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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, February 13, 1913, Image 1

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FORGET your worries and
laugh. The world will
laugh with you and you'll find
plenty of company, too, when
you read the joke column on
the editorial page of the Times
WRECK AMERICAN BUILDING
RAILROAD OFFICIAL
{ INDORSES MUNICIPAL
= LINE TO TIDEFLATS
A. M. INGEHSOLL, VICR PRKSIDKNT OF MILWAUKKK ROAD,
■ SUGGESTS A LINE TO MILWAUKEE LINK IN A SPECIAL
TO CITY COMMISSIONERS TODAY—"WONDERFUL DE
VELOPMENT OF TIDEFLATS WOULD RESULT," HE DK
CLARES.
The Milwaukee railway is for the municipal street railway over
the 11.-H-.
» A. M. Ingersoll, vice president of the road, called at the city
hall today to advise with the commission on the project. His sug
gestion was that the city start on a simple basis, building the line
lit present on the surface of the present 11th street across the
'Poynllup liver and up to the tracks of the Milwaukee.
This would take care of all the people there now at both the
Milwaukee shops and tho docks. -
Fimil Solution.
"The final solution," said Mr.
Ingersoll, "will be the construc
tion of a steel viaduct over the
flats from the 11th street bridge
to Sitcum avenue. There 1b go-
Ing to be wonderful development
on the tideflats and it will be
covered with railway tracks on
the surface. The street for
street cars and teams must be
placed above the railways."
-» Tho council agreed with the
railway vice president. Although
no action was taken it is likely
that the first unit of the munici
pal railway will stop this side of
the Milwaukee tracks. This, will
be about 700 feet this side of
Sitcum avenue.
Later when the steel viaduct
goes over the flats the city will
- elevate the tracks.
Frank Ross was at the city
hall also today to boost he mu
nicipal railway project and to
lay his ideas before the commis
sioners. He did not get in, how
• ever, until after the council ad
journed.
SEATTLE TIMES BUILDING
DAMAGED BY FIRE
BKATTLK, Feb. 13.—Fire that
started from an unknown source
. ni 4 o'clock tlii- morning uutinl
the upper stories of the Times
building. Second avenue and
Union street, and did great dam
«P' to the ii|i|m-i- siorii-s of the
Denny building adjoining. The
property loss will run into big
figures, probably luilf a million,
but there was no loss of life, the
Denny building being empty at
the time nnd all persons In the
Times building escaping.
At 6 o'clock the fire in the
Times building hud not been en
tirely smothered by the twelve
companies of firemen who had
been working since the first call,
but it was well enough under
control to assure no further dam
age.
The lose of tlie Times includes
18 linotype machines and other
composing room property and
damage by water to the office
furniture and the presses. It
was not thought at this hour that
PREACHER FREE
■ (By United Press Leased Wire.)
REDWOOD CITY, Cal., Feb. 13
■—Rev. Frank Horn, former pas
tor of the First Baptist church at
Richmond, Cal., whose trials since
Eva Mac Metz, his alleged wire,
accused him of bigamy have been
many and varied, walked out or
the Jail here today, a free man.
» ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦.♦ <J> <8> <S> 4> <J> * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦«♦«♦««»«>«*«<»«**«
. ♦ ' ■' " ' ■' ; : ■'-■■-.-■■.- ■ <»,
" ♦ ■ YOU MXrSN'T DRINK. , <j>
0 - ■• .- : ' ""'.■: : : :: „; -■ ■ •
<$> Because the civil service board passes and puts ' on the <$>
<?• eligible list for city dock watchmen .men who drink, the city <®>
<?> council this morning took the position out of the civil service. <»
<?■ Mayor Seymour will now see If he can find a sober man out-
<S> side. . . s. , , ,-- „ <$>
« "The last two were got under civil service were drink- <g> ,
<^.erß and this is ; too Important' a place to stand anything like <s>
f> that," said the mayor. , <s> ,: - ■ ■ - • <j>
■*>:..: •■■■■■>,■ :-^r.^^.^^---C. ""-:r:,■"■■-. ■ -•■ .: d . hy &*•;
THE TEAR CURE
TheTacoma Times
MELLINGERS
WIN SUIT
That the undertaking estab
lishment of the C. C. Mellinger
company at 510 Taeoma avenue
cannot now be considered a nuis
ance nor a menace to property
owners in the immediate vicinity
is the decision handed down tiy
Superior Judge Kasterday this
morning in the case of Ada Sui
ter against the company. The
plaintiff aleged that property va!
ues were depreciated by the com
pany and it was a nuisance. Jutlge
Easterday said that if the acf.on
had been brought before the erec
tion of the building in 1909, It
may have been a different mat
ter; but that the people on ad
jacent property knew what sort
of an establishment was going up,
and they should have protested
before the structure was built.
the presses In the basement were
damaged except by water.
The Times will be issued this
afternoon from the Post-Intelll
gencer plant.
According to the assistant man
aging editor of the Times the loss
to that establishment will reach
at least $300,000, which will
probably bring the total loss to
half a million.
MASKED MEN
HOLD UP
WOMAN
Three masked men held up
Mrs. T. It. Mitchell of Greendale
this morning at 10 o'clock, rob
bed her of her groceries and com
pelled the woman to give them a
ride and then disappeared when
the Taeoma Eastern railroad was
reached.
The robbery occurred about
a mile from Greendale. Mrs.
Mitchell was returning home
when the men jumped up from
behind a tree and demanded that
she hold her hands up. No vio
lence was used.
When Mrs. Mitchell reached
her home, she immediately no
tified the officials.
VOL.X. NO. 47.
30c A MONTH.
OVERRULE
EX -JUDGE
HANFORD
LKONAKD OLSSON WINS HIS
APPEAL CASK TO UDODHH
CITIZKNSHIP TO THIS OOUX
TRYREFUSAL BY JI'IKJK
IIAXFOIID ONK OF THK HKA
SOXS FOR LMPEA4.TTMENT
PROCEEDINGS LAST FALL.
The United States circuit
court of appeals, sitting in San
Francisco, to<lay reversed the de
cision of -'Judge Cornelius Han
ford, revoking the citizenship pa
pers of Ix-onard Olnkoii of this
city, and i-emanded the <»>r to
the United States district court
of Western Washington for a
new trlul. "
Judge Hanford disfranchised
Olsson because tie professed ad
herence to the principles of so
cialism. This action caused a
wide protest and precipitated the
congressional impeachment In-:
quiry which terminated when j
Hanford resigned his office <as
United States district judge.
The decision states that there
are "other reasons" but does not
specify them.
CITY HOLDS
HEARING
TODAY
The council held a hearing
this morning on the construction
of the transmission line to the
.\is(|iially pom plant.
The ins|H'ctors were called in
with the foreman on the job.
William Callahan, who was in
spector on practically the whole
job, was the star witness. He
admitted the joh had been slight
ed on tarriug poles, crossarnis and
in putting in smaller holts than
called for. He also declared he
had objected to the manner of
construction at Cranberry lake.
He said he kicked in the early
stages of the work because crib
bing was not put In to. supitort
the poles and reported to Gronen,
then,, commissioner. He declared
later he told Andy Gunderson,
the contractor, that Gronen said
no wires should go on the poles
in that way and Gunderson said:
"Well, Gronen won't be commis
sioner when the wires go on."
Callahan Insisted that he be
lieved Gunderson was interested
in the job all the time even after
he went to work for the city
when appointed by Lawson. He
said both Keith and Barnum,
the engineers, had trouble with
Gunderson, who wanted to do
things different than they asked.
Lawson came to the rescue by
saying that everything Gunder
son had done he had ordered him
to do.
Nothing definite came of the
hearing. ■ \
LAWSON WANTS
10 MEN ON JOB
Commissioner Lawson wants 10
men up along the Green river
gravity line at an expense or
$860 a month and he wants them
taken out of the civil service.
Commissioner Freeland and tne
mayor kicked on the latter prop
osition this morning and the or
dinance was held up. Lawson
said they were just common la
borers but he had the salaries
fixed at $90 for a keeper at tne
intake and reservoir and aSI tne
rest w«re $85 a month. He asKs
for six patrolmen to patrol the
pipe line, which is burled under
ground most of the: way.
CHARLESTON, W. Va., Feb.
—Charged with bribing Dele
gate John M. Smith of Tyler coun
ty. Col. William Seymour - Ec
wards, candidate for United Stales
senator, wag arrested j here today
on a warrant issued " by Justice
Marion Gllchriat. - >
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
TACOMA, WASHINGTON, THU RSDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1913.
"TREAT WOMEN SLAYERS
AS YOU WOULD A MAN"
SAYS JUDGE TO JURY
Mrs. Clarice Nelson Rootli, indicted for manslaughter, who soys
she "had to kill her husband." ,
DECLARES "CHIVALRY" TOWARD WOMEN SLAYERS IS A
DISGRACE AND URGES CONVICTION 'OF SOUTHERN
REAUTY WHO SHOT HER HUSBAND.
LAKE PROVIDKNCK, La., Feb. —When Mrs. Clarice Nel
son Booth is placed on trial here for blowing off her husband's
head with a shotgun, it will be "Southern chivalry" on trial, more
than the accused woman.
Judge F. 1. Ransdell had to give the grand jury some mighty
straight-froiii-the-shoulder talk before they would indict the pretty
young woman for killing her husband, Dr. James Fleet Booth, Jan
uary -.t. * , ,-■ ■; .
"I know," he said, "that men down here look with different
eyes on 11 woman than on a man.'. That is the trouble and disgrace
of American ways. -;V '•
"Every public officer must enforce the law, whether it is a
woman who is guilty, or a man. - *}' ■'
"In our tolerance of woman's
crimes we are cultivating a dis
respect for law. The worst
crimes in the history of the world
were committed by women."
Evidently the judge wanted an
indictment for murder in the first
degree, but he didn't get it. After
11 hours of wrangling the jury
charged Mrs. Booth with man
slaughter.
The prosecutor in this case is
intensely human, a Southern man
who prides himself on his chival
ry and tender feeling for unfor
tunate women. Most of the men
down here are like that.
Nobody here, excepting, per
haps. Judge K.iii-il< 11, thinks any
trial jury will convict Mrs. Booth,
Most people have already forgiv
en her for killing Dr. Booth.
While Judge Kansdell was tell
ing the grand jury that Mrs.
Itooth's deed "is one of the most
horrible and gravest transgres
sions of the law ever committed
in Louisiana," people outside the
court room were telling how this
vnmi- Dr. Booth abused, mistreat- ,
id and deceived his first wife, and
then took advantage of pretty lit
tle Clarice Nelson and forced her
to marry him for her reputation's,
sake within two weeks after the
iii -1 Mrs. Booth died of a broken
heart.
Dr. Booth was one of the most
famous surgeons in the South.
In his big sanitarium he perform
ed wonderful operations, and his
patients made him a rich man.
CHICAGO HAS A BIG FIRE
(lt> i'nit.-it l-i.ss Leased Wire.)
CHICAGO, Feb. 13.—Fire de
stroyed the plant of the Burns
wick-Balke-Collender bowling al-'
ley and bar fixture company here
But ,with all that his reputation,
his scandalous affairs with wom
en, his brutal treatment of his
first —and of his second, too,
for Ire soon tired of her —closed
th,e doors of respectable people
against him.
Mrs. Kooth says, "I couldn't
help it. 1 had to kill him."
That will be her defense—
she had, to kill her husband.
FIRST RUN FILM AD IS !
CAUSE OF DAMAGE SUIT
l'robahly one of the most pe
culiar and novel damage suits
ever brought in I'ierce county is
the suit filed this morning
against Israel Davis and Jane
Doe Davis by O. .1. Tollefson. The
defendants own and operate the
Shell theater, 1324 Pacific.
In his 'cpmplaint Tollefson at- .
leges that the theater advertised
both within and without to this
■affect:
"We will pay $1,000 to
anyone who can prove our
■ pictures are not tho first
run in Tncomn."
The plaintiff declares that on
November 12, 1912, the defend
ants displayed an Kssanay pic
ture called, "The Love Test," and
which he alleges was shown at
the Bijou, 11th and C streets, six
weeks before. He says he proved
this to the defendant and de
manded the sum <>( $1,000, which
today, forced the guests in several
Hearby hotels Into the streets in
their night clothes. No accidents
«fr« reported. The loss was
|38».ft00.
A Famous American Doctor Says That Crying la
Good for the Health of the Sick People.
HOME EDITION
SEEK TO
DISBAR
MURRAY
YOUNG ATTOUNKY SKUVKO
WITH IHKIIAHMKNT PAPKM
AS HE FINISHKS ARGUMENT
BEFORE JlltV IN COURT TO
DAY — CHARGES PILKD HY
I*l HI NG ATTORNEY
LORENZO DOW.
3. Matthew Murray, young Ta
coma attorney accused of sulxirn
ing perjury, today faces disbar
ment. Charges against him werr
filed this morning by Prosecuting
Attorney Ixtren/.o Dow, mid papers
served upon Murray this morning
immediately after his argumen;
to the Jury in a case in which he
appeared for the defendant.
The charges against Murray
mnke a voluminous document,
nnd are In seven specifications.
The charges against him in hrief
are that he is alleged to have
(diiimltted larceny and subornn
(ion of perjury, that he is guilty
of unprofessional conduct, and
that he has violated the oath
willed he took as an attorney-at
law.
In the first two specifications
the complaint refers to the subor
nation of perjury in the GoocJen
case and the alleged larceny of
$150 from E. E. Harding:, a client,
on December 1 H 1911.
It Is further alleged that on
September 12, 1912. that Jie |
passed a worthless check for $23
on E. B. Driscoll. Three other
times during September Murray ,
Is alleged to have cashed worth
less checks for small amounts. ,
"I have not looked over the ,
charges against me," said Murray
at noon today, "though I presume
that they are part of the con
spiracy against me. But they
are going to have to fight to get I
me."
Murray has been under $250
bonds since his release from tlio '
county jail last week owing to a '
serious illness. He has been llv- '
ing at. home and has been under '
the constant care of a physician.
< $<s>'3, <> ,j >< £,j,,s,,3 > ,
t> T. R. & P. Has Special Cars -*> !
t> You can stay at the Fire- • ,
v man's ball tomorrow night ■• L
♦ until 2a. m. The T. R. &<l
-•- P. has consented to run cars <»>
♦ ul> to that hour. Mere are •$>
;' the cars and the places to <*> ',
♦ catch them: Sixth avenue <? '
♦> and South X street cars ♦
♦ leave from 11th and X, -?>
♦ South Tacoma, Fern Hill and <?
•- Bismarck cars from llth <*>
■>•> and Pacific, and Point De- •
'■ fiance cars from 11th and C •
♦ streets, <j>
♦ *'"?<§>'S><S><B><i>^<S><}>.S>..«><3><s><3>
was denied him, he declares.
He has started an action to
get this sum of money and the
costs of the suit.
* ENTERPRISING *
REAL ESTATE
* CHICAGO, Feb. 12.—Finding
CHICAGO. Feb. 12.—Finding
upon his arrival in Oakland, Cal.,
that he would have to move the
city hall and several skyscrapers
to work a "farm" for which he
had traded a general store in
Converse, Intl., Arnold H. Sltiman
is here today seeking the arrest
of W. H. Stoart, Chicago realty
dealer, who effected the ex
change.
Sluman says he was told his
ICO acre plat In the Western city
was " all ready for sowing." He
found a bumper crop of business
blocks had sprouted on his
"farm." . .
<3> YEP! •■■■ <J>
■•> NEW YORK, Feb. 13.— <S> i
9 The stock market opened lr- <5>
♦ regular today. <s> c
<*>€><S><S>4><&<&<s><}><S><3><s>v?><&<fe^ |
LETTERS of life interest,
articles that concern
every woman of the household.
These are the features the
Times has to offer on its wo
man's page every day.
FURIOUS BATTLE STILL
RAGING ON STREETS OF
THE MEXICAN CAPITAL
NO HOIK OF PBAOI —AMKRICAXS IX II.WGKIt—PB.STII..KXCK
ra/UUB —KNTIIIK KOIUK OF IXITK1) RATH AKMY TO
MOVK SOI TiI—TAFT IX CONSTANT COMMINICATI O M
Wim CEMTEII OF TROVULK — DBATH OF \mi i:i< \\
WOMAN coxfikmi:i>.
(By Vnitcd Press leased Wire.)
MBXICO CITY, Feb. 111.—The library of the American .lull
was wrecked hero Ht noon tudaj by shrapnel which was nred dl
rertly into the huildin.'.-. llnllets |wiforated mores of pictures on
the walls, im iudui;; |ioi'lruits of Washington, l.iiii>>lii, ,Mi Kinliy
and Tuft.
No one wm killed.
MMXICO CITY, Feb. 12.—At I) o'clock (he artillerj duel be
tween the hiii/. and Mailim forces continued, with Madero's heavy
guns inl'lii linu heavy damage on the arseiinl.
.Many shells from Kia/.' machine nun- nnd etinnon flew far ont
of the fighting /.one, killing uml wounding many non-combatant*.
r.oth sides nre ignoring ull rules of civilized warfare.
WASIIIXCJTOX, Feb. ft,—Alarming report** from Ambassador
Wilson of conditions today at Mexico City caused President 'lull. Ht
Secretary Knox's leanest, to t;i\- Wilson permission 1., draw funds
to any amount for the cure of American and foreign refugees.
These dispatches also told of vain IMNII of Wilson and the
(Jeruian ninbassa<lor for cessation of hostilities and confirmed the
killing of Mrs. W. 11. Holmes and .Mis. Percy Griffiths, l».,tJi
Americans.
He also declared (hat the censorship of the Mexican govern
ment over all dispatches is increasing.
MIIXICO CITY, Feb. IS, —The battle between the Madero and
Mia/, force's for control of Mexico City whs resumed at 8:10 a. m.
today. Except for the lad that the belligerents had drawn some
what closer, the |K>sitiou of the two forces were practically the
same as yesterday.
Madero's forces assumed the aggressive today, and supplied
with additional ammunition, pressed heavier guns into service.
IMa/. replied with cannon and machine guns.
HiU'sting shells are still falling in territory outside the fight
ing /one, thereby jeopardizing the lives and property of American,
Kngttah, (Jernian and other foreign residents.
Three Americuns, including two women, are known to have
been killed and a score of others injured. The loss to both tlia
federal and rebel forces already is believed to exceed 1,000, and
today's battle is almost certain to swell the death list by a thousand
limit',
Frantic ap|wals by American Ambassador Henry !..-• n»- WilHon and
the (ierman and Spanish aniltassadors have gone unheeded by both
Madero and Ilia*. Mmlero has expressed a willingness to move tlio
seat of government if conditions do not improve within a day or
two, but this is as far as lie will go. Diaz flatly refused to listen
to any sort of a peace proposal unless it involves complete surren
der by Madero.
Madero now claims that he has 7.000 loyal soldiers. Yester
day he claimed he could muster lo.oisir t»< «.| »—. General Km/ la
known to have ilimiii soldiers at his command, but in not believed
yet to have shown his full strength. He declared today that U,300
/.i|«iiivln- ale newiii^c the capital to join his revolt.
I'racticHlly no effort has been made to move the dead and
wounded and the capital's blood-bespattered streets are literally
choked with torn Hud dismembered bodies. Many of the wounded
have died from a lack of medical attention, and the ■ itj is threat
ened with pestilence as a result of the presence everywhere in the
business district of decomposing bodies.
Mexico City's magnificent public buildings today present m
dismal front. Mattered and torn by bursting shell, nicked, dented
and damaged by hailstorms of bullets, the loss to public building*
alone will run into millions.
The loss of life has been fearful, but the exact figures will
never be known. Conservative estimates cannot be made until
cither Madero or l>ia/. emerges from the conflict victorious and the
work of removing the bodies from the streets starts.
WASHIXfiTOX, 11. C, Feb. 12.—A crisis in the Metiran situa
tion is expected tonight. Secretary Knox and Secretary Htliuson
prepared for an all night vigil to receive official dispatches. I'uless
the battle in Mexico City is decided tonight with either Dia/. or
Madero victor, the administration probably will act tomorrow. .If
the official reports indicate further disregard for the safety of
Americans and other foreigners, it is believed President Taft will
lay the matter of intervention before congress tomorrow.
The four transput s are provisioned for 3O days' service and
can accommodate three thousand troops with their mounts and
pack animals. They can reach \ era Cruz in five days.
The war department has revoked the leaven of absearcn of all
officers and the absentees arc rejoining their command* mv quickly
as possible.
(Hv United Press 1,-Msed Wire.)
WAKHIXUTOX, I). C, Feb. IS.—lnstead of only two transports
preparing for quick trips to Mexico from Newport News, V«., all
four ti;ui-|i'.ifs there are being fitted up. They are the Sunnier.
Meade, Kilpatrlck and McClellan.
VKKA CIU'Z, Feb. IS.—Seven American and German payroll
guards for the International railway were killed at Ynnegas by no
Mexican relM-ls, according to dispatches received here this afternoon.
DARROW OPENS
HIS ARGUMENT
LOS ANOELES, Feb. 13. —
Clarence S. Darrow, accusPd or
bribing Juror Robert F. Bain, in
the McNnninra trial, delivered the
opening argument to the Jury In
his own behalf today. Darrow
denied every charge of the prose
cution and his opening address
resemble,l a closing argument and
a final appeal to the Jury, rather
than a pre-evldence peroration.
4^««>**<»«><fr*4>4> * <» ♦ ««• ♦ ♦<$>♦♦ 4> 4> <t> ♦'♦ ♦ ♦ ♦!•'.♦»§
♦ ♦
>S> FAMOUS AUTHOB DEAD. «
<8> . ■ "■' ;(■;: ■■-:•->'■■ —:-.." ij. ,■■;-.--■ ■;■ ■".;:-■. w^'^q^
♦'■\;' • ' ; (Hy Vnlted Pp«i «■ Ix-ns«><l ' Wire.) . , ■ :>^ ♦^if
♦ ,"•-■•...;■' SHELRYVILLE, Ind., iFe l,.—Charles Major, author iof t '*li"'i;
<«> "Dorothy Vernon of Haddon H all,",^'« When i Knighthood * Was >isjji
♦ in Flower," other romances, died at his home here today ♦ P
.<*>.of'cancer of i the." liver. ■jX'f7Z'^::^-S ''.<■,.■■ ■ - '<■;;': H ■ ~ <$v.'
<?' . :■■•' Major was 56 ' years of ,'age and was'a prominent iattori^«>?l
■«> . ney ;of this place. ;i Somo of *hls i other books wer« "A Poreat ♦
sft Hearth* and "Yolande, ; Maid for Burgundy." Ho :, wa» •a * f r«-"t*^
■ quent contributor to magaitr.es. " ■ '.A'CJ''YV"i*.:'- ■■■'• s%V:->''**'fl
<?> ■'.■'■■^^^■;;,"!:i'.'• • • - , ,'•-_,-„- , t "' " -"'
FILES SUIT
OF APPEAL
Mary Louisa Vance hag filed
notice of appeai against the in
dustrial insurance commission of
the state, ag personified toy C. A.
Pratt, John H. Wallace and Ham
ilton Higday, who recently ruled
she should receive no damages for
the death of her husband, killed
at Alder, October 9, I9IJ.

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