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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, February 15, 1913, Image 1

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ICITY COMMISSIONER READY FOR FIGHT WiITH STONE-WEBSTER TRACTION MONOPOLY
jfc, -'' fT\_ •?*??? Now comes that g«y and happy
"• \ I JkXol^s^^ When most Tucoina folks
> ! I f,; v ~ I "^ " kuylnj? seeds for spuds and
\'mj- ' fIL Mm KIWIIS, 1"•
tM I ' nsL. I iftfi). And beans and artichokes.
MADERO REFUSES TO RESIGN
PRESIDENT PREFERS
DEATH TO SURRENDER
I OF OFFICIAL POSITION
(My United rress Kensed Wire.)
MKXIOO CITY, Feb. 15. — President Francisco I. Mudero of
M«-\ir<> Ihis allii iiiinn flatly refused it second request by tlie
senate that lie resign.
The -senators and Francisco <le la Itarra tlipn left the na
tional |ial»cc nnd went Immediately to the clintulier of <l<-|i;iti>■■-,
where they l« san the preparation of a manifesto to the effect
that unli-s- Mudero resigns immediately American Intervention is
certain. The manifesto will plead witli the people to join in v
concerted movement to oust Madero from the presidency.
vr.KA t 111/., Mm., IVIi. IS.—A report reeplved hero ihix nfter
nunu HiiyM the Nrimli- til Mexico City today formally demanded the ren-
Itt'uatloii of I'renldrnt FranclNco J. Mariero.
<ll;VII II CITY, •■■»-«>. 13.—A committee of >rn»lar« left I 111- rliaill
ber of tfi-|uill*-N i lilm nlhr n v»llli the avowed Intention of iiMkliiK
]*reHideut FninclNCO I. Mndero to rrnlsn lilm office* The Ncnntors were
a< .M.ii.l to the national iinlnce by Franclaco tie la ilurrn.
MHXICO C'li'Y, Feb. 13.— tlnni liter to property In Mexico City
from rebel nnd feilrrnl Mliella llilm nil. moon \\n» placed at $U0,U00,000.
All iiiiliiMtrlnl enteriirlnea are completely ileniornltzei! and the enforced
IdleueMM will Hwell Ilie rout of the eueaEineutu here by liuudredn of
i hi'HMii ml-, of flollara.
>IEXICO CITY, Feb. —"I will die rather than reslKn."
This defiant reply was sent by President Francisco 1. Madero
of Mexico today to his udvisers ami leaders in the Mevican senate,
who spent most of last night trying to induce him to quit office and
permit the election of a new president. • .
I-ust niKht's tl^litlny.. which started at 10 o'clock, continued
until 4 o'clock today. Madero's forces des|»erately attacked the
rebel stronghold, but the I>la/. gunners mowed them down.
After (In- customary hour for
breakfast, the fighting was resum
ed lnii' today. The federal troops
repeatedly charged Diaz' rebel
stronghold, the arsenal, but were
repulsed with heavy losses, as
rapidly as they advanced.
The Madero force is fighting
with its back to the wall, appar
ently believing the stability of the
government depends on the out
come of today's battle. It Is
known that many of the federals
are tired of fighting and but for
the firmness of General Huerta
■would desert.
The rel>els renewed their can
nonading of the national palace
today and shelled Madero's priv
ate residence. The hitter was
badly damaged.
Congress will meet this after
noon to receive Madero'a resigna
tion but there is no reason to be
lieve It will be forthcoming so
Jng as General Huerta ran keep
the troops at the palace loyal.
Many of the men are wavering
and would join the Diaz revolt if
they thought they could reach the
m-. ii.!l in safety.
t ' <?>
♦ NOISELESS. «.
<> . 4
* (Rj- United Press Leased Wire.) <$>
<S> CARSON CITY, Nev., Feb. 15.—Three specially con- <J>
• structed rifles fitted with Maxim silencers and fired automa- <?•
<J> tically, have taKen the place of the executioner's firing squad <?>
♦ at the state penitentiary here today.' . " <$>
<?> The guns are In a steel cage and are worked l>y a spring <j>
3> arrangement. The on!y sign they give that they have done <?>
«> their work is when their victim crumples with three bullets <s>
Q> through his heart. ' ' <j>
>>«>«><J<<J><t>'J><S.<S>«>««<S>«>«.<t><J><s><s><»<»«.«.<J.<s,«>(s,|
MORE RELEASED
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
LEAVENWORTH, Kan., Feb.
15. — E. H. Houlihan and William
Shupe of Chicago and Paul Mor
rin of St. Louis, three of the 33.
union men convicted at Indian
apolis of unlawfully transporting
dynamite, were released from trie
government prison here this art
ernoon.
♦ ♦■S*<t><S><i>«>'Sl>«.<s><t.
<8> WHAT DO I CARE? <?•
«> —: 0
<$> (United Press Leased Wire.) <3>
<8> NEW YORK, Feb. 15. <$>
The stock market opened <?>
<£. fairly strong today. . <!>
*>«>«''S'«>3>'s>s>cß><l>«.<s>.g><ssj>,j.
INVEST
NOW
. For Present Income and
",■;:':; Future Increment '^ .'
Buy Tacoma Property
We have . many pieces of well
located . property • that - will
make money for the wise In
vestor. ; .« " ' -"
; Calvin Philips & Co. v
U 211 California . Building
\v: .':>"• Money toM.oan;.;"::;U'C
- ' .■:--•-..-.■' ' ." -
TheTacoma Times
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TACOMA
30c A MONTH 9' TACOMA, WASHINGTON, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 191*. HOME EDITION
DEMAND MRS.
SCOTT GIVE
FORTUNE
(Hy United Press leased Wire.)
LONDON, Feb. 16. —"Kirst pay
the deficit in the cost of the Scott
South polar exposition if you wish
to aid the families of the vic
tims."
This was the message given to
the British nation here today by
Lord Curzon, president of the
Geographical society. In an open
letter to the public Lord Curzon
says there is a deficit of $150,
--000.
"Captain Scott, the letter
continues, "pledged his own
private fortune us well a,s
Mrs. Scott against the debt.
The widow will l>e responsi
ble for the deficit unless the
money is paid in some other
way."
MEN RELEASED
Lack of evidence against John
and Alec Horst has canned the
prosecuting attorney's office to
discharge them from custody.
They have been confined in the
county jail on suspicion of com
plicity In the shooting of Fred
Horst a few weeks ago. Jolin
Horst was to have appeared tie
fore Judge Easterday Monday to
apply for a writ of habeas corpus.
DR. UNDER ARREST
BOISE, Ida., Feb. 15. —Dr. C.
C. Smith is today under arrest
charged with manslaughter fol
lowing the death of Miss Clara
Fox, a school teacher, who, ac
cording to the verdict of a cor
oner's jury, died of starvation
after a forty days' fast.
WILSON KIDKS IN DAY COACH
(By I nil. <| Press Ix-used Wire.)
PRINCETON, N. .T., Feb. 15. —
President-elect Woodrow Wilson
rode here today in a day coacn
from New York, occupying a seat
beside a laborer. He inquired
regarding the latest news from
Mexico City but refused to com
ment on the siauation. Wilson
dozed most of the trip.
~NK\V CABINET
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
TOKIO, Feb. IB.—The ap
pointment of Marquis Chlnda to
be minister of foreign affairs and
Viscount Takahashl to be minis
ter of finance was announced
here today by Premier Yamomo
to, who Is forming a new Japan
ese cabinet
Lina Comes
Back, Lots
Of Jewels
J,IXA CAVALIKRI.
(Hy I iiK.-.I Press Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, Feb. 15. —Llna
Cavalierl, operatic beauty and
former wife of "Sheriff Bob"
Chanler, arrived in America to
day after an absence of three
yrars. The singer was resplend
ent in jewels. She was by her
own admission weighed down by
$100,000 worth and she added
nonchalantly that her collection
now totals $2,200,000. She wore
a jeweled necklace, rings on
every . finger save the "pinkies"
and the left thumb, diamond stud
ded jewels, and from a muff she
drew a mother of pearl vanity
case encrusted with more baubles.
GOVERNOR
TROUNCES
REPORTER
(United Press LlMtl Wire.)
SAI.KM, Ore., Feb. 15.—
Declaring Mint because he
took the job of governor of
Oregon he "did not take i
nny obligation to no longer
ii-iiuiiii linniaii," Governor
Oswald West today dilated '
on his fight with Frank L.
l'erkins, a rc|K>rter, hi the
state house, which Is the
big to])lc of conversation in
Oregon today. • '
In speaking of his encounter
with Perkins, Gov. West today '
said:
"The Evening Telegram of I
Portland has been printing from i
time to time lying articles in i
which I have been branded in- i
directly as a crook, and I know i
Mr. Perkins to be responsible for |
most of this stuff.
"While I have no control over i
the columns of the Evening Tele- .
gram, thank God I still have the ,
right to choose my own company. j
I promised myself if Perkins ever .
spoke to me I would knock him .
down. He did, and I did.
FRISCO WILL GET
LIBERTY BELL
(By United Press l.i-ast-d Wire.) I
SAN FRANCISCO, . Feb. 15.— I
Housed in a building made from !
timbers from old Independence i
hall, Philadelphia, the Liberty ]
Bell will be displayed at the i
Panama Pacific exposition «in
1915. . ■ , •
This was the news contained in '
a letter, received by President
Moore of. the exposition today
from Mayor Blankenburg of ]
Philadelphia. ,
BATH TRUST GETS 1
i HEAVY FIND \
(By United ' Press Leased Wire.) <
DETROIT, Feb. 15.—Fines ag- <
gregating $50,000 were imposed '
hefe today on the members of <
the "bathtub trust'/,-•who were <
convicted of criminal restraint of <
trade .in ' the United '- States dis- <
trict court here. Judge Sessions <
imposed the fines. •"•• >:-•; <
NOW WHAT
OF THOSE
14 KIDS?
Why not spare one per cent out
of your pay envelope for the
Woolsey Home?
Surely that will not put a rrlmp
Into your income and If a thou
sand Tncoma |..-,,|.1i would <t»
that today, the Woolsey Houie
would be in safe harbor. '.
The" response to the stories or
Mrs. Woolsey need, printed in
Ihe Times has been generous, Just
as the Times knew it would lie.
But there is pressing need for
more money at the Woolsey
Home. No great sum Is asited —
Just a tithe from any of you read
ers will be mighty welcome and
It will help put the home on a
sustaining basis.
Just think— a dime will keep
one of these fourteen little wairs
a day; 70 cents will keep one a
week —and just figure up how
much good you can do for those
kids, whom nobody else cares for
but Mrs. Woolsey, if you can spare
a dollar or two.
Here are some of those who
have sent money and help to Mrs.
Woolsey in response to the Times'
suggestion:
» ; : m
r 1
T. Thompson $ 1.25 i
Mis. Jl. A. Ferguson.... 2.00
Mrs. Uorrluy 1.00
Mrs. liusli 100
.1. 1.. Ware 2.70
C, F. ratterson 1.50
/..Quinces- 150
Edwin ilurke 1.00
.lohn Beeman 100
I .1. B. l'ettkrew 50
I Smiett'H Hardware 2.00
James Hoyd, l'uyallup.. 8.00
A. E. Btlvari 1.00
Mi-b. W. W. T>e\Vitt 1.00
■ Mrs. M. A. Carman 1 00
I Noi.-l>an. Ila|>tist church 10.00
W. F. Willaon, l'uyallup 6.00
Four Indies brought pro
vlßlons and offered to
do mendlntr I.GO
From others who did not
wish their names pub
lished 24.55
Mrs. Chester Tliorne.... 10.00
Fern Hill Lumber Co.,
1 loa<l wood ,
Foster Lumber Co 7.00
N. C, llendrlcksen 1.00
Joseph Hnnsen 00
M. J. lllckey 1.00
EKKerF Flsli Co 1.00
Mrs. C. TV Christiansen.. 1.00
Mrs. C. H. Sedgwlck.. . . 1.00
H. J. Hubner 50
J. B. (SallllitiKh 2.00
Mrs. r. S. Albright 1.00
Henry Green 1.00
Mrs. Kimnn 1). M. Kemp,
Miss Caroline M. Menzel,
Miss Kmmu M. Levering 16.00
A. J. Holmes 2.00
Mrs. IJ. s. Huff, BUctron 1.00
J. IC. Honnell 5.00
Mrs. rt. K. Atkinson,
I Simmer 1.00
I Mrs. J. IS. Atchlson,
Katonville 5.00
Total $118.20
•—- . — •
TACOMA NOW
HAS 96,405
E. Dana Durand, U. S. director
of census, writes Health Officer
Janes in this city that the govern
ment estimates conservatively
that Tacoma had 90,405 .popula
tion January 1, 1913. At this
rate the city will be allowed t>y
Uncle Sam 101,081 by the end of
this year.
Durand ; says the government
figures are conservative and he is
willing to concede Tacoma is
growing. The figures were arriv
ed'at. by taking one-tenth of the
growth between 1900 and 1910
for each year since that time.
SKIN GRAFTED
(By I nii.il Press Leased' Wire.)
BANDON, Ore., Feb. 15.^-After
having seventy inches of skin
grafted on his body, and seventy
inches more necessary to save his
life, Rol Anderson, sole survivor
of the railroad wreck near here in
November, has a fair chance of
recovery.
BIG BODYGUARD I*l v
FOR WILSON
PRINCETON, N. J., Feb. 16.-r
Fresident-elect WlUon's body
guard was doubled ' today and
hereafter four secret service men
will attend him day and'nigh.t.
He went to Philadelphia today to
see a dentist. .; ,■'"'•,.' ';,-,;
€>«•**•«> «V«* «> <£ <*■ ■».* ♦ ♦
<J> (United Press Teased Wire.) «
<$> SEATTLE, Feb. 15— Fall- *>
<3> ing asleep In the - office of ■$>
<S> the : Novelty garage, ; Chris <<?.•
* Hand, 19, is dead here today <s>
<*> because the connection* be- <$>
■i> tween the gas heater and Jet <5>
♦** were faulty. .•. -: '■-.-- '■* . ■ ■"♦
* ♦*♦♦♦**<«>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
IT'S NAME IS NOW TACOMA HIGH BRIDGE
<$> <£> <J> ® ® <P €><S><S> &<s><s> <$><e>^ <«<B><J> «> 4> »>
PRETTY GIRL CHRISTENS THE STRUCTURE
j
«■<?><s► «><s>» 3><s><§> <^<$><^ <S><e>«> *'S><S> «>♦<?> ♦$><$>
PARADE AND BIG CROWD ARE FEATURES
MISS BNOLA MINTVItK, I'lil.lJ'V I'OUKU T.ICU.MA I.IUL \iHU TODAY CHRISTKNKD
THK TACOMA HIOH BRIDGB.
NKUKST PICTURE OF TACOMA HK.II UUDOI SHOWING SITKNDII) l!i:i> \l> PAVKMKXT
AND KII>K-rATHS.
"I christen thee Tacoma High
Itridge," cried pretty Miss l</ii<ila
Mclntyie this afternoon us a l>iii
glistening bottle of champagne
smashed against the gaunt glrdem
of Taconui's new llth street
bridge.
And thousands of men and
women, and children of course,
cheered lustily—and the celebra
tion was over.
Tacoma High Bridge is tlie
highest lift bridge In the world
and with its christening and "of
ficial opening" today the great
tideflats district is opened to Ta
coma. with adequate means of ac
cess. ....
The tideflats, once regarded T>y
early residents in this city as
worthless, now becomes the most
valuable section of the city out
side the chief business district
for It is there that the great lum-
CLUB OUT
FOR THAT
. CAR LINE
i Members of the Hillside Im
provement club at a t>!g meeting
last night warmly, endorsed the
project for a municipal car line
over the llth street bridge, as
suggested in the Times, and a
committee was ■ appointed to get
together with the other Improve
ment clubs and push the scheme
along. "'.'";. •
;. The club also went on record
as being opposed to renewing the
license of a C street saloon and
appointed a committee to confer
with the other clubs for an Inves
tigation of the "vice problem,"
It-being asserted last night that
the authorities are not keeping
the lid on in Tacoma. .. ' ." ■
These officers were elected for
the year: G. A. Webber, presi
dent; C. H. Dow, vice president;
Dr. R. V. Hoyt, secretary; W. L,.
Kirby, treaerer. ' ■
.-Upgardson-What, were , your
sensations' when you came out of
that severe attack of heart fail
ure the other• day? i ..,-.- ..,-; :,-.
Atom — Gloomy. Awfully
gloomy.; I realied that ■ I'd • have
to give up smoking.— Trt- 1
bune.
ber yards, mills and factories are
located, the rich Bource of Ta
conia's industrial prosperity.
Today's celeliratlmi licgnn a Ill
de lifter 1 o'clock, when neariy
(\v<> hinidud work horses owned
l>y the concerns doing business on
lie tideflats iniii'cheil iimiss tiie
bridge ami back sikiilii as n sort
of concrete expression of licit' ap
lii'oval of tlie whole affair.
This work liorse parade was
viewed by a goodly crowd but l>y
2 o'clock there as a dense Jam
around the bridge when the civic
procession swung into view on a
street.
A band of music playing a live
ly nlr liciKlcii the column and
here was OoVOTBOT Lister, Mayor
Seymour and the city officials,
and many elttaraa tn automobiles
trailing along behind.
True "winter-spring," Puget
♦>**<e><S><B><S>«><s><!><J><}><S><§>'»'»
<?> «>
<s> cui'in Ill'sV. <j>
<?> Chauffeur Cupid, who has «>
4 been lagging of late, sudden- <ply
♦ly threw on the high gear 4>
♦ today and showed a burst of ♦
• speed that dazzled the aud!- <j>
<?> tor's office. Licenses were <J>
♦ issued to Frank Del and <$>
•■*• Martha Gleisner, both of Ta- <$■
<*> coma; Robert Harrison and <*>
'•> Lucy Rabanns, both of Ta- <$>
♦ coma; A. Edwards and L, H. <?>
•$> Babcock, both S of. Tacoma, <?>
♦ and Eugene R. Simpson and <$>
<S> Antoinette Chasander, also •
<$■ of Seattle. ■ " .. : • <{>
<$< <j> <•> -»■ <$><•> .j, <t» <»> <j> 3.3, .«> <§> <$, <j,
BOYS OFF
FOR GORE
Jackson Kernegy, aged 12, and
Hurt Davis, age' 14, have lert
home, taking with them a blanx
et, a revolver and ; a cabre. ' The
Intended whereabouts of the boys
ig not known. Jackson Uveg wlin
his parents at'l22s South Stee:e
and Burt lives with' his mother
and step-father > at* 931 Souin
Grant. - The police have sent out
a description of the boya to all
the !* dip&i .menu in the - North
west. L'
I"
~"~I ' Sjjjrf* Hel'ne '■ K*t*l«»B bnsy bow, '■-' ■ ?
Kiul.i *-^>£ A H >rln StJln comes to b«t;
L^Jyyr.^li llut baseball Isn't drawing her—
She wants s new spring hat. . .
I ; '••»
Sound weather graced tn»> after
noon's festivities and there was
enthusiasm plus.
There were ehort Rpeeches
made by Governor Lister, Mayor
Seymour and T. H, Martin, ttie
secretary of the Commercial ilun
and Chamber of Commerce.
The Internntlonul Contract
coiiipiiny, the tii-in which built t:ie
>tre»t bridge. «ns represented t>y
its president, C. K. Flower.
After the spepch-makhnf, pret
ty .Miss Mrlnt,vi-i» was hel|x-<] to r.
prominent place on the hridfic and
christened the structure with It*
name, a fitting mul not too "hi-fH
luiin" name, which was -•-!•-« t«-<I
by Henry Itmlcn.
(<ieoi'KP Scofleld, president or
the Commercial cluh mid Cham
ber of Commerce, was chairman
of the affair and he ivns mighty
busy seeing that everything went
off smoothly—as It surely did.
THIS HOUSE
WAS LEFT
OUT
Following the discovery thai
a house on 32nd and Pacific ave
nue has not been assessed for five
years, County Assessor Cook to
day declared that a proper map
ping system would soon t>e in
stalled to guard against any repe
tition of the error In the future.
The property Is valued at |4,
--000.
Assessor Coo'it has *«en ap
pointing field deputies to go over
the ground to cover peri ial and
Improvement taxes. Sev ty men
will be used in they rork ot
straightening out matte/.*, accord
ing to the official. .'-.'.
♦ ♦ «>♦♦♦♦■«>♦<*.♦*♦<*.♦♦
«S> «
•fr . HOORAY FOR HIM! <$>
3> <e>
3> A fine bouncing 11-pound ■»■
<». baby ■■;- boy. came - today ;to " <t>
♦ brighten, the home Sof i< Mr.
<«> and : Mrs. ; Oscar fi Johnson/ «>
4> 1108 South 10th street. ■ • >
<S> And listen: . \ '.J : ''*' »'*"♦
>t-. He as born with a' tooth. ;<j>
♦.••■v.r: -•:.:»::--.';,_::;•-■♦
*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
MILLS
SAYS
WAR
"I want to say 1 am for Unlit
| from tliis timo on," said Commlg- i
loner -Mills tliis inoruliiKi h.nn- '
merlng tin- table.
"The WcllHlW people
liOVO thrown down the gauntlet. I
When I lie)' pro|>osed as » matter I
of cold blooded luis'iii-sh to com* I
pel this city to |>:ij them $23,000
» >ear simply to connect up with
iin to help out in case of m l>re*k
iliiwn in our power linen, when j
they would probnhly never hnvo j
to do it and it would <>>-i them
iidlliinK. they nave notice to ns i
tlmt it wus war. 1 want to sajr '
that never a^ain will 1 vote to ',
Hi»e Stone-W'elMer any privileges I
whatever in this city."
The rest of the council re
echoed the sentiment.
The question of Commissioner
Nick Lawßon's budget was up and
out of it grew the matter of new
business and reduction of rates.
The budget was practically fixed
and after paying all bills at the
present figures the light depart
ment will have $1,004 left.
Then th,' council began talking
of getting new bualnws. The
council came very near turning
jLhe whole' matter of new business
over . to Mayor Seymour for i\
month to see what he could do.
It was llnally concluded that the
whole council should get bu«y ou :'
the matter when trie rates * an*
adopted and this city will be raked]
with a flnetooth comb for new?
power customers.
The possibility of getting Rus«
ton and other big users wag con*
sidered.
"We can absolutely condemn
the whole transmission line of tne
Stone-Webster people tinder tliesr
franchise," said Kreeland. And
the temper of the council was
Mich that they felt like starting
right out to do It.
\Vl' iie council adjourned IL«*'
til wlih (he understanding that
Hoss of Seattle and local electri
cal experts will be consulted on
the matter of making rates for
household consumption or cur
rent.
The mayor wanted hair a cent
rate. Freeland wanted a rate
based on a connected load sched
ule. i
When it is finally settled a rate
will he made that will abolish
thp wood piles in Tacoma and thra
will become a city where house- ~ :
hold duties will be run by light*
ning. '
HILLMAN
FREE MAN
MONDAY
Monday, February 17, will see
Clarence I). Hillman, the million- £
aire Seattle realty dealer, wal* 9
out of McNeil's prison a free man.
Warden O. P. Halligan received
the order for hts unconditional re- I
lease some time ago. lie was sent •
to McNeil's island to serve a term
of 2 1-2 years, entering the penJ
tentiary April 19, 1912. His pris- *;
on record is said to have been M
without a flaw, and his term was
thus shortened.
GIRL STABBED 13
TIMES; WILL LIVE
(Ily United Pi.-s- leaned Wire.> ,:
SILVERTON, Ore., Feb. 15. — %
Jennie Rose, a young Italian girl, fp*
was the victim of a murderous !;>
assault early today when an, un
identlfied man forced bis way into
her home had stabbed her 13
times before she 1 could I escape >
to the street. She will live. j,,; --^
DIES AT MU^fe^i
SIOUX CITY, la., F«*. I^%».
With the last notes of his svm-^
phony swelling< through the First
Baptist church, 'J.- K. Hurd,
clarinetist, dropped from his chair- f
dead; a victim of heart disease. tyi&fi
• ——■ ——i;"" i""' • ---■—^ -.-.
J': For Tacoma ' and vi- J m
cinity: Rain tonight m
and Sunday. &^f& W
I For Washington 1
Rain west tonight |>
" and Sunday; rain east W
; tonight or Sunday. m
• I

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