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The Tacoma times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, September 22, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085187/1913-09-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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pES NEWSIES WILL HAVE A TREAT THIS WEEK—MANAGE* TkMMONS HAS INVITED THEM TO PANTAGES FRIDAY NIGHT
For Tacoma and vicinity: Fair tonight, Tuesday fair. Light frost tonight For Wfcahington^Fair tonight, cooler east portion; Tuesday fair; wanner east portion; light frost tonight.
1 T'B easy to guess why the
I Times la growing wheu you
know U»al it prints more ex
clusive news features than
any other newspaper in Ta
coma. If you miss the Tillies
I one single day you mtes the
best little treat you ever en-
Joyed for a penny.
——i—SM——^—^— —— I
THIS DAY - IN ? TACOMA '26
YEARS - AGO: :- •--:■■-■.-■'-•:>
"". ■;>■: The Mary - Hulkes, Captain
... „- arrived ■•£ In port i.^ this
I - morning f bringing a cargo ,of
. ostrich; feathers ; and drunken
' "',* Bailors. *,y>i*;-ir^jujfi ■ -■•;■-' ■';
• - A:i Tom Louder, who was arrest
■ \ed J for speaking lon ' the \ street
corners about the "Misuse "of
; Labor," -, was ■-„ given ■'■; a : good
" chance ■'' to ' acquire | more data
on his subject .yesterday >by
Judge Bench. .-,- ■.'■} : *I^
A ' young ■ lady " came ■In the
; "•fixer j pharmacy yesterday and
asked for ■a* bottle :of 1 carbolic
BJJ acid. - After procuring It, she
am drank the entire contents in the
■ | store, but . was f not hurt much.
— Mixer has a fine brandy for his
c own ', use I that > he \ hides :. under
' . | a misleading label and the clerk
• unwittingly sold Borne of It.
The young lady. is now; sober
-.'■-; ing up. :■>'-■••,;., >;.-/<--V-_ i '>..;"■■"•.-.■;■"■
y_ ■'-■_,' The editor of :our' scurrilous
I rival >"■ was I horeswhipped ' again
this morning. That's about all
.' he is good for. >■;.< •;«'■;_•
IN :A 1 TAOOMA STORE pictures
. : of Perry's battle on Lake: Erie
• -'-. are { selling .under j these Si cap
'- tlons:*,-.Cu..'•'•' !P-:, V-,".■.'-",' .; r<'V.' .-•
W "Don't - give up the ship for
ten cents." ■.^'i- <■"'-.■"■'■'.",■.:'.'. ; : ;:
;' . "We ■, have met . the enemy
and they : are ' ours ' for ■ fifteen
.'■."■^ cents." ;;/.'■;,»'. \}fc\ ■:'.■' :.■■'■-<:- : -v.
'.EAVES.. FROM OUR COOK
BOOK: -■- ■,^-;.:X.;^.-.,';V<-: «
7i :"> Frying Potatoes. ;C •-'".■
-,"", First place a saucepan (which
.- j 1b I never used j for sauce) over
» -". a quick fire. When 'it £ gets
warm throw in a fistful of lard
and let it melt properly. You
," know when this is, for It will
spit in your face and burn you
a dozen times or so. You can't
make a mistake. Skin 'a " dozen
...■_•' large, blue-eyed Murphies and
• •-. - give 'em 51 a•■ cold S bath. \f*After
:>- properly ; chilling them ";* throw
gK 'em >j in I the - grease ■ and I that'll
. warm i them • up, all right. ; Let
I 1 'em sizzle ' along; and - start ■an
i animated conversation -1 with
H your next door ;, neighbor and
I 1 forget ; all * about J the y potatoes
I until you smell S them I burning.
Then take them off. If this ie
done properly the spuds will be
< fried hard as nails and will be
. v 'as delicirug .- as - a chunk $i of
' armorpUce. . 1';:'.,..-. .'":.-■,;'-;'• -•:
THE LATEST now '» the cobweb
%£ gown.- How .nice it :is :. to; be [ a
#jgj spider. 'SJ When *• said vi' cobweb
comes '. to Tacoma the | mayor .is
: ','--* going to ■ declare." a ; legal ; holi
day. :■ ~^i.r-V-;r.■---,'."■■■."-:<*. -vc?;/..',"'
WITH SUCH personages as , Har-
Ws& ry Thaw, Hans jj Schmidt v and
r.: <; Huerta 1, under j surveillance,, the
continued existence of th^fcMn
.'.Jist'is ;asßured.^r--:;7^>>-;:A^Mr;>'>
} UKARST'S war with M/*o in
behalf of ; his ranch aFj/hvaeri
\l can | lives =is * lang£pglng. ::
fo* COLOR. W|l-l-k
/MAKE ME «-ookIj»
srt£ COLORED TO THE ROQT7
OfhlßH/UK.
PENNANT COUPON NO. 46
Any three mupoaa eH>p*4 from The Tlair. eaueAatlTely ■««
h»rrA, «he« presented at Th« Tlbm office, The "Wat A«l" Coraer,
mutt, mid Commerce, with IB ee>l», wIU «.«Hle you «• m b*..tlful
t 80-eeot 1 »»»••»! ; Heren«e» ; pennants .by wall . will east •Be aMMImal
» to cover postage. BrU« or mall «o The Tacoma Times, Math t ■»«!
Rhymes for the Times
*^p*<fc-rA hundred t more , rhymers ] praising. Times Want Ads came to
the Want Ad Corner today. The I contest ! closes next ■ Wednesday
and the winner, will be announced Thursday. " Her* are some of
the best that came In today:
I lost my money the other night,
*• Which placed mo 3lnt an awful as Say«; Pat : to; MJk«,*|fii^ra,Siil
SP»' pilst: 7P&s*m§®&zjs* ■■"' <* <)^4S*i, Oi've > lost >me JofcSJ^^SiSia«fl
'Twas all th« money , that I ;had; nfea Says i Mike Ito frat, "Befforry,
I regained it by a Time* Want Ju»t Jeok In the Time* Want Ad
A<Jt CA. HITNBTKR. *"* "'" **" °M by tO™Or^"
IK South J street. "•' t,l> ;> H. H. CRANDAUL
"The Want Ad Corner"
The Tacoma Times
0~, A I THE ONLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER IN TAOOMA I „„„„ I
MONTHJ. VOL. X. NO. 235. TACOMa, WASHINGTON. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,1913. | EDITION [
TRACE MORE CRIME TO MURDERER
HOW TO FOOL THE NEW
YORK GIANT BATTERS
■:■•: ♦♦♦ ■■:;■♦» ♦:j ♦♦♦ #,♦ ♦♦ - -■.■■■!♦♦♦ :-q ♦♦♦ "ri:-; 4. <t> ♦ :":^ => .♦'♦°- ,S- ■'♦ ♦ ♦^i
Some World's Series Tips to the Athletics' Pitchers by the Greatest Pitcher
>:■■:■ -j;-y: :-,'^;iir the Giants Have X Faced This Season. *%v-^ i^P^~£ir%
BY GR.OVER G. AIiBXASiDBR.
The Glanta are dangerous hit
ters and daring base runners, as
the Athletics will discover before
the world's series Is far along.
With the prospect of a pen
nant for Philadelphia, I studied
the Giant batters moM closely
than usual, perhaps, as the team
was the one we had to beat to
win.
Meyers Is a natural slugger—
hard to fool. He hits anything
yet at times he misses all sorts
of pitching. He likes a high ball,
close in, but is as good on a low
one when he is meeting them. 1
don't believe any pitcher knows
his weakness. Against Meyers I
put everything I have on the
ball.
Doyle is a slugger, too, but
hasn't been hitting much this
year. He likes them low, but is
deadly on high ones when his eye
Is on the ball. I have been moot
successful by making him reach
for them.
Snodgrass is a streak hitter.
Weeks at a time he can't hit a
thing, and all of a sudden he be
gins, and, no matter what you
serve him, he laces it safe. If he
has a batting streak during the
series it wouldn't surprise ms to
see him lead both clubs.
Sliafer is one of the best bat
ters on the team and one of the
most scientific hitters in the
game. Being a left-hander, he
usually hits to right field, but he
does place his hits.
Burns is a good hitter. He
likes curves. Low calls are his
long suit. He isn't so likely to
hit the high ones, close in. He is
the best waiter on the team. He
won't go after anything that isn't
right over. -When the ball is over
both he and Shafer will swing,
and they usually land.
Murray is dangerous. Give him
a fast one, rather high, and he
will murder it. He's not so good
on low balls, but likes curves.
Merkle and Fletcher are both
high-ball hitters. Let Mergle
have one around the shoulders
and he will drive it out of the
lot. He Is weak on low balls, but
I have seen him lift low ones to
the fence.
Fletcher doesn't like low balls,
nor is he keen for curves. He
can whale curves, but doesn't hit
them so well as the fast ones.
McLean, like Meyers, is a slug
ger. He doesn't like to reach for
them nor does he care to stoop
for a low one, but he can hit 'em
low when necessary. He dearly
loves a high ball.
On the bases the Giants are
wonders. Every man, save
Meyers and McLean, can sprint.
They take more chances than any
team In the league. They worry
pitchers with their long leads, yet
they generally beat a snap throw
back to the base.
If a pitcher tried to keep the
Giants anchored to the bases he'd
spend his time watching them.
Sometimes the pitchers do catch
them, but the chances are over
whelming In the Giants' favor.
For every man caught, four are
not, and that means each ad
vances a base.
The Giants have base-running
to * science this year, and it is
(he big reason for their success.
They are faster and better than
in 1911.
When a pitcher is worried his
effectiveness is cnt down. The
worried pitcher cannot give his
entire attention to fooling the
hatter, and this gives the team at
bat a big advantage.
GROVER A LEXANDER.
CAPTURED IN OPEN
BOAT, BOY PIRATE
MAKES CONFESSION
Captured in an open rowboat,
to which he had attached a stolen
portable gasoline motor, John A.
Prey, age 16, hunted for the past
week as a desperate burglar and
pirate, confessed his entire list of
robberies to Capt. John Fitzger
ald at police headquarters today
and assisted in sorting out the
boatload of 'loot. More than half
of the loot, including cameras,
clothing and machinery, was
handed back to the owners today.
The lad was caught by City De
tective Frank Geary Saturday
evening near Point No Point, four
miles from the mouth of Hoods
canal. His motor had refused to
work and he was rowing hurried
BRAND NEW STORE OPENS TODAY
♦ ♦♦ >*♦ ♦♦♦ ♦♦♦ ♦♦♦ ♦♦♦
CHRISTENING DRAWS CROWDS
HOnOAN :.' PARKER DEPART-
Sf MENT £& STORE THROWN
m OPEN TO -i. THE PUBMC —
<;: HUNDREDS *OF SHOPPERS
% CROWD STORE DURING THE
DAY.
The Horgan-Parker company
opened { the i doors of | the fifth ; big
department store! for ! Tacoraa 8a
0 street today.
*y Occupying > the - big New ?# York
block and the new building erect
ed adjoining I for the new bust
new ] home tho company present*
one 'of l the moat commodious and
airy bwUteea houses in tho North
west. & S.<^S2~;-KVxX&£iei
The Commerce street room* ere
utilised ; for storage and f packing;
the =C > street floor tor silks, gen
eral' dryj goods and the regulation
ly to shore, Intending to pitch
camp. The boy was made pris
oner and his boatload of loot was
towed to Tacoma, arriving here
at 6 o'clock Sunday morning.
According to the boy's confes
sions, after leaving Tacoma he
robbed the store of J. M. Smith at
Steilacoom and the Stei!acq,om
postofflce. Going to Seattle, he
looted several launches and then
proceeded north, int< ding to
make camp in Hoods canal and
remain hidden until the search
for him was abandoned. He de
clared that Warren Bachelor, the*
other youth held at police head
quarters as an accomplice, had
had nothing to <do with the crimes.
departments of the" big ■tore.
The second floor; la for'suits,]
millinery ■ and ■ link - goods; >V th«
third ! floor" for i muslin .wear, coj£
sets and < hoys' goods; fourth floor
orj the business offices, carpets,
rugs and ' draperies and fifth floor)
for a big waiting room for ladMp,
with ? hair dressing: and manicur
ing,>art^needlework «nd kindred
wares.
* The store this morning was vis
ited 1 by f, hundreds f of I people,^ In
cluding r many of the old i friends
of / Mr. j Morgan, who J came |in| to
wish V him ' Bticess. He >as I gather
ed | around ■ him s many iof ate! old. I
employes and others prominent in
local establishments tor clerk* and
department heads and the new en- j
terprise starts out with fluttering I
prospect*. '
CONFESSES
TO BRUTAL
MURDER
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 22.— >
Confessing to a murder that al- j
most rivals the sensational slay- ,
ing of Anna Aumuller by the j
pseuido-prieHt, Hans Schmidt, Ja
roD U nlfholin is today in the city
jail here under double guard for
the alleged murder of Anna Cath
arine Schumacher, hi Holy Sepul
chre cemetery, Rochester, N. V.,
on AugUMt 0.
Tho body of the murdered girl
was later found buried in two
feet of dirt showing marks of a
severe struggle and indicating
that she had been strangled to
death. All clues to the identity
of the slayer were lost by the
Rochester police.
Wolfsohn'B confession followed
his arrest yesterday for grand
larceny. He was placed In a cell
when he began pacing back and
forth in an excited manner. Final
ly he asked for pencil and paper
and sent a note to the district at
torney containing the fuels of the
murder.
Wolfsohn said be had passed
the cemetery daily and had no
ticed a girl placing flowers on a
grave.
"I flirted with her and she
smiled back at me," Wolfaohn
confessed, according to the de
tective*. "The next day I saw
and spoke to her. We agreed to
seek each other there the next
day!* She kept her appointment.
I tf/ed to kiss her but she re
sented this and tried to run
away. I grabbed her and began
choking her. She screamed, but
no one heard her and then f
strangled her.
"I then attacked her and after
that dragged the body to the
woods in the cemetery. I found
a grave-digger's spade and dug a
bole large enough to place the
body In it. No one knows how
I suffered for doing this. I could
keep It secret no longer."
WESTERN WASH.
FAIR OPENS UP
TOMORROW
WEDNESDAY WILL BE ." FIRST
kf PUBLIC *> EXHIBITION—COM-
M PXETION OF J TWO -,; BIG
ROADS St WILL i BE " ? CELE
-3^BRATED^'^;'^,B":;-v-":. --.f- "■ -
•<e»'.J J.:"*^^".«;**^ •"'•* - \<) ->•'■'-■...•'.■»,•• .-:-^
'";: The Western Washington > fair
opens Tuesday.
?& The first f day 1 will Ibe for ar
ranging and entering the exhibits.
Those who ■ have : the big ,; potato
and I the plump i red < apple lor the
other fine products *of £k Mother
Earth * or £ some 'f/ other JJ mother
should ' get i them \ln I tomorrow. -.
a The F fair for 3 the public 5 will
really |l open ??* Wednesday. This
will ;be Good * Roads I day. The
governor will speak and the com
pletion iof two big country roads
wilt be oelebrated.^^^iS'i?
»■ The Better Babies show will be
Friday 1 and % Saturday. »■ Already
over 70 little "folks, each one of
whom \ has a doting [ mamma who
thinks her infant the prize of the
universe, . have been entered.
THOUSANDS PAY
fl IESPECTS
DEAD MAYOR
tfEW YORK, Sept. 22.—De^
■pit*• the cold end ■-:.driving ' rain
20,(§06 people followed the
fcWte bearing the * late £ Mayor
finrw>T to Old Trinity church 'this
mooting. Bareheaded in i\ the
r«M it la estimated.soo.ooo; saw
the funeral march •from, the: slde^
wit i^OTOs|^a»«P4»We^.of ithe
ftt&fta i oar, which! was 1 drawn by
1« black homes with eight police
men * and f a eight ij firemen leading,
were i honorary I paH-be&rers, men
known throughout; the ; nation.
At 11:46 o'clock the engine Of
every boat of the municipal ferry
system : •topped for » fit* , minutes.
hjou^j ?Jsw%ff*Cwemoria|
,*l^Jto«f*f^|Sl^firougtid.ttt:
!ih«l wbm | h«« -, Kour; tb«.; beUt «t
WejrylN«w^«rMS#*rare.li'S'toJiea'
•oUwnly. ,The »toeS «xrbang« did
mot \ «p«*-i uftttt^ aowt^s^wg|aH|
Why Does Man Kill The
Thing He Loves The Most
WINNIE LEE ANSWERS

ABOVE, THE EYES OF H.WS SCHMIDT, THE UNFROCKED
PR IK NT WHO HAS KILLED "THK WOMAN HE LOVED" AM), HK
LOW, THE EYES OF REV. CLARENCE Rl( HARDHON, WHO KILL
ED "THE WOMAN HE LOVED"—A COMPARISON.
Woman Writer Discusses Remarkable Case of
Unfrocked Priest, Hans Schmidt, and Anna
Aumuller, and Declares That It Proves Sex-
Antagonism Is as Much of a Fact as Sex At
traction and That "Love" Is Too Often Used
as a Cloak for Brutality.
BY WINNIE LKB.
DO "all men kill the thing they love?"
OR do men only use "love" as an excuse for th% great and
little wrongs they inflict on women?
"I killed her because I loved her so," said the unfrocked priest
who confessed to the murder of pretty Anna Aumuller In New York
this week.
And there are few women who have not, once In a lifetime, ac
cepted "because I love you so" as explanation ENOUGH for some
phase of man's brutality.
As a reason for his pardon, MAN finds it all sufficient, but
WOMAN, even while she grasps it for the sake of peace, never
quite understands it.
This is the plainest of proofs that men and women are actuat
ed by motives so different that sex-ANTAGONISM IS as much a
FACT ac sex-ATTRACTION.
As soon as woman makes a demand upon man, even though
it be a righteous demand, she irritates him. Attraction changes
instantly to repulsion, and man "kills the thing he love*,
with "a bitter look" ... or a "flattering word"
or "with a sword."
It is the present fashion to go sslp about sex, and always SEX
ATTRACTION is understood, as If man's motives were controlled
only by the POSITIVE and never by the NEGATIVE form of love.
And yet every day comes some new tale of aex-ANTAGONISM
as a ruling force with man.
• • • •
When Eve passed beneath the flaming sword out from the
Garden of Eden, she had already discovered how natural man con
ducts himself when he is incensed.
And she ought to have warned her descendants.
But she did not; and woman still wonders how man dares to
make his GREAT LOVE for her his ONE EXCUSE for all fcis
WEAKNESS, all his CRlMES—even forgery, bankruptcy; murjer.
Love, it seems, is the only thing in the world about wfflch
man can DELIBERATELY DECEIVE HIMSELF.
HE EXPERIMENTS with science, QUESTIONS theology, DIS
CARDS a worn-out political theory, ADOPTS a new and reasonable
philosophy, WITH GENUINE INTELLIGENCE.
But LOVE he finds by chance and accepts without thought.
And one day he finds that the WEB of love has become a NET
HE IS NO LONGER FREE!
Just as Hans Schmidt found that his love for Anna Aumuller
had entailed responsibilities which demanded open recognition.
• • • •
Now when fat« balances man's honor, his traditions or his con
ventions against a woman, be cries oat that he loves her—RVKN
while he DESTROYS HKR—or her happiness—to PRESERVE
THEM.
But he deceives himself.
His REAL cry Is for LIBERTY ,and so be breaks the bond—
the bond which irks him.
He asserts himself once more—thus regains be the mastery.
• • • • *
"Feminism," or the present world-wide unrest of woman, pro
claims though that man Is NOT deceiving HER as generally as HI
USED to do. ....
Woman is demanding THE TRUTH about IX)VE and the
LOVER. : r ' *. T
She it not afraid of a play like "Damaged Goods." Nor
ashamed to ask for eugenic marriage lawc
And she is robbing man of sentiment 'as his favorite refuge for
all of bis sins.
And when that time comes, murders like that of Hans Schmidt I
will be rarer, for the Anna Aumullers will not accept love at a
value assayed only by its owner—they will gauge it themselves.
HINT AT PRINTING GRAFT
INTHE SACRED CHAMBERS
OF U. S. SUPREME COURT
ffm By qIIiKON GARDNER.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 82.—
With obvious j reinctMßc* ; the sen
ate today Is mo*!** to titftUptt
the United State* supreme tewt'i
printing graft. It li : » delicate
tbii^ to*chargei*«rt»*fe«p«!ta
ble body with the ktad of practlc*
which v was i'^J Imputed i&io» 1
Barnes of New York; jret. tW» ap^,
{team.to:be what baa bapttemtd.
vJ'r«aplattonf"itntmd«cß4^iß^:
: a*iutod IChamWsrlalß jot i Oregon
; a*k»|tor;|t*Si4-Te(iUgatlbnswhlcß""
will % discios* i whyX; the S •upreme
■-, y. ■■**SS(i*»« lit»Jifs»dl«^^^^S3sSM»art "•■'ißgHßiS'JsSßf
). ,"'T'H going to be th*. question, •'. .
I«pi i «oim ih to *. wta i tiw 'mam
I "Who's g»iag to win the
world's MXiew" from now on.
Fully conscious of the p«b>
llr'H desire to know all about
Jk the big team* the Times
J starts today the first of ay' .
series of articles on the
- world's greatest player*. <-^3
ssfSjsssas'SiSa?
JS^jy «2jJ&» wm^^-t^jEg;
SCHMIDT WAS
RINGLEADER
IN WRONG
NEW YORK, Sept. 22.—United
States secret service men today
are tracing the counterfeit oper
ation* alleged to have been con.
ducted by HauH H< huiidt and hU
friend, "Dr. Muret," the dentist
who is bring held in the Tomb*
on a technical charge. A number
of bogus «1O and *2O bills re
cently were passed in nearby Cbat»
nectlcut towns and the secret ser>
vice men are trying to trace them
to Nrlimiilt and Muret.
Muret today declared that it
was Schmidt, the priest, who sug
gested the counterfeiting scheme,
Schmidt laid particular stress tip
on the fact of how easy It would
be for him In his clerical garb
to "shove the queer."
In case he were caught in the
act of pasing bogus money he
oould explain that the money had
been in the collection box and
so avoid any suspicion that he
was Implicated In Its manufacture.
From those who lived in the
neighborhood of Muret'B flat,
which, It is said, Schmidt vtoited
almost nightly, today came itorlea.
of wild escapades In which wom
en and girls nearly always fig
ured.
DR. MOORE
AT ODITIOO
PACKED CHURCH HEARS Ml*.
IBIEH - IiROTUftE ON
" ?"WHAT WRONG WITH TWO
&WOBX,D.»^^»^^^
Rev. W. A. Moore SwaAay era*.
Ing preached to a packed chmcb
on ! the "What's Wrong With til*
World' congress and in bis ktm*4
ly way showed up the ■■inning—
of the croakers of the HhII jfi
school who ay* trying to j huHtsls)
the congress and prevent ajpf agfe*
tation over i the ' evils > thasr'afflict
the people, by J shouting from ths>
housetops "There b Nothing
Wrong .With: the I .£*MaigrM
ft "Nothing i|S wrong jS with to* j
world?" echoed Dr. Moom,S^%
"And thousands :of | little I chil- j
dren from 6 to 16 in the sweat
shops and ' factories of the land T" *
"Nothing wrong with to*
world T"
"And while we are holding tola :
service tonight 800.000 of the fair
young women of this land an Mil
ing themselves in sham*."
And so the pastor nut the ga
mut fof S the evils that J affMct tk«
nation g and | society And he de
clared there is ' a lot S wrong with
the ; world if and slt*lsl up sto tho 1
world 'I to I get I busy J and; nab* 1%
right.
STEEL TRAINS'
CRASH; 3 DIE
-.'I NEW YORK. Sept It.-*Two T
all steel electric train* on tit*
Long * Island ril railroad K> collided. ;
early today in College PC Thrs*.
trainmen were killed and twenty,
passengers were injured.
,si£^--!_-Hv4s&— '■-■'--,■ - -^;- S, nfiJiV
!^r?______, Tg^v^?_y^_KK-__"iaS-*^^^ffr^3p^^^^BJ|^^B^^jß^^^^M^^^M
_L?w-,^___L'»* l —' ■^»^fcA^L£s
[' UAVUII "*,. • Vis___p * WV BV^WHmSqHH
.^MAA^a^ktekJnHS __9^__________
Jjj^Wtmmm^mßS^lMtM T|jflJlKHl^B__H]MßßMl
MBBHnn|injnn|9Hn^&HH

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