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The Colville examiner. (Colville, Wash.) 1907-1948, October 05, 1912, Image 2

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treasurer's ot'lice is Bliss Phillips,
undoubtedly honest, well liked,
and evidently competent. But
Pbillipa would never have had the
job if his understanding with
George Seal had not previously
been thorough. Seal's bank and his
newspaper have both gained con
siderably by having Phillips a
strong i'riend in the treasurer's
office, and Phillips is of course a
candidate for reelection, supported
by Seal, his bank, his newspaper,
and his business associates.
L. E. Jowojfa, in the auditor's
office, was elected through the
grace of the Seal-index machine.
He has made quite a good auditor,
and personalty there is no lauit to
lind with Jesseph—but tliu system
is wrong. County warrants lind
cenain places with alarming reg
ularity, and tne auditor's vast
amount oi priutiiig all goes to
Seal's newspaper without being
let by bid, or without much con
sideration as to prices charged.
Those linancially interested in hav
ing Jesse ph a.s uuuitor have gained
what they sought. Jiut the peo
ple oi the county sanctioned it by
their votes, so there can hardly be
am complaint on the part oi' the
people.
There are other officers to be
elected this year. The candidates
on the republican side are ring
men with but one exception, so i'ar
as we can learn. Sonic of them
are progressives—some are stand
patters. It makes no particular
difference to the ring what a man
believes-so long- as he "comes
through" in the ring procedure.
The ring's official newspaper organ
has not even taken sides on the
progressive or stand-pat question,
showing that there is something
stronger at stake. That stake is
county patronage —warrants, la^i
titles, tax foreclosures, printing,
bank deposits, etc.
Some one profits from having a
certain set of wen in office, but
where the average taxpayer prolits
is a problem which some one
should solve tor public inl'or-
niatioii.
The attempted local option elec
tion in Spokane was headed oil' by
the Spokane county superior
court last week, the petition be
ing declared iu\alid in that the
provisions of the law had been
violated by the local option people.
The matter cau not be brought up
again there for two years.
The republican national republi
can committee has refuted to ac
cept the resignation of (Jummil
teenian A very of California, a
progressive, but "'expelled" him
from the party "lor being a trait
or." Six other national connnit
teemeu Cavoriug Koosevelt were
replaced by Tail men. The (i. U.
I. has decide 1 that a Roosevelt
supporter has u<, claim on a gen
uine republicii.
To the Lincoln school of Spo
kane belongs ihe distinction of
having the largist enrollment of
children, and the greatest number
of teachers of any grammar
school iv the stbte.
Twenty-one yean ago, when
there were but four rooms in the
building, Mrs. Mary A. Monroe
was made the ] rincipal.
Over twenty thousand children
have come uiidtr her supervision
in this time. The building has
been added to Mid rebuilt, pupils
have grown up and married and
sent their children to the school
under the guidance of Airs. Mon
roe, who has remained a model of
good order, go»»<j work, and good
spirit.
Mrs. Monroe brings out the
best effort of bcih teacher and pu
pil. In athletics the school is al
ways enthusiastic. Twice in the
last three year* ihe baseball cham
pionship of the ctiy has been won
by Lincoln teams.
For the first time, Mrs. Monroe
has plans to sever her connection
with the school, wt.ich she has
built up.
She received the nomination
for state superintendent of pub
lic instruction, and is waging a
A LIST OF THE NOMINEES
■TATS TICKET. IISMMIMiIIIf DEMOCRATIC SOCIALIST. PBOCnUOSStTBi
QOVBRNOR M. E. HAY W. W. BLACK ANNA A. MAIiBX ROBERT T. HODGK
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR L. P. HAKT LESTER P. EDGE A. H. BARTH GOVNOH TEATS
CONQREBB, AT LABOB HARRY ROSENHAUPT B. O. COWMOH M.E.GILES J. A. FALCONER
.1. b. frost ii. M. White a. w. wagBNKKBCHU. w. bryan
CONGRESS, THIRD DIST W. L. LuFOLLETTE ROBCOH DRUMHELLEIR. B. MARTIN P. M. GOODWIN
SECRETARY OF STATE I. M. HOWELL QBORQB E. RYAN FRANS BOSTROM W. H. FORD
STATE TREASURER KDWAIID MEATH LOUIS UILBERT MINNIE E. PARKS A. E. MOBERY
AUDITOR C. 11. CLAUSEN GEO K. STEPHENSON
ATTORNEY GENERAL \V. V. TANNER W. C. JONHS BRUCE ROGERS B. J. MILLS
LAND COMMISSIONER CLARK V. SAVIDGE ALBERT SCHOOLEY H. G. CUPPLES W. 11. KAUFMAN
SUrERINTENUEN'I JOBBPHINB I'RESTON MARY A.MONROE FRANCES S^ L.VKSTKH C. E. BEACH
INSURANCE COMMIMIOM H. <». FISHBACK JEBBB P. MURPHY J. w. COLLINS
COUNTY TICKET.
REPRESENTATIVE S. ft MATSON J. C. HUTCHINSON JAMES CHASE
REPRESENTATIVE ELIZABETH M. STAYT W. I). SMITH JOHN WILSON
SHERIFF WILLIAM MILLER W. L WOODARD DAN McMILLAN
CLERK W. J. SHELTON L. C. RICHARDSON T. A. HUNT
AUDITOR WILLIAM MORTON -\. H. SANSBURN ELMER OWSLEY
TRBABURBR BLISS PHILLIPS JOHN McDANIEL W. U SAX
ATTORNEY H. W. STULL .JOHN B. SLATER
ASSESSOR .(AMES AI,GIE -\. B. DODSON It. S. WILTSE
SCHOOL BUPBRINTBKD MARTHA A. BOARDMANLILA KULZER DOROTHIOA ELMER
10NG1NBBR B. B. HUBBARD R. ft THOMAS
COROMBB I£- M- WEST W. MIQHBLL CHARLES ADAM
COMMISSIONER BBOOND W. W. PALMER P. H. GRAHAM A. C. CONNELLY
COMMISSIONER THIRD E. H. LONG M. C. STOLP J. M. SMITH NON-PARTISAN.
Colvllle. OOLS Sii|irrl.»r Court Judge
JUSTICE OF PEACE A. L KNAPP JAMBS PETTY W.H.JACKSON
COMMITTEEMAN CHAHLBS ADAMB B. S. BEGGS D. LAURY F. LEO GRINSTEAD
vigorous eamjuigo which bids
fair to carry l>er name to every
voter in the state.
Although ;i candidate on the
democratic ticket, a non-parti
san dub of women was organized
to assisi her in the campaign. A
progressive president ami a re
publican chairman of the exeecu
tive committee prove that party
lines have been discarded, and it
is Mrs. Monroe the efflcieni ex
ecutive and educator who is the
candidate rathe* 1 than a democrat.
.Many unsolicited letters have been
Miit her fiy citizens of all political
faiths endorsing her candidacy
and offering their support.
lii her plati'nm, she lays she
favors a practical course for the
rural schools, suited to the needs
ill country life, extensive courses
in agriculture; domestic science
for the housewife, and a closer re
lation between the farm and the
school.
lii cities she fbVOTO an extension
In Ilii' manual training and domes
tic science departments, school
ami iiome ' ganieris" and a close
connection between the school and
the occupations of life. She also
favors training that produces
good citizenshm and self sustain
ing citizens.
Perhapa the twenty-one years of
training in on school brings to
mind a severe and unpleasant
vision of some cartoonist's "school
ma'am," if so, the picture must be
reviled. Mrs. Monroe is a kindly,
happy woman quick to see the
humorous side, and quicker still
in her sympathies.
Should the people of Washing
lon decide to make her superin
tendent of public instruction, the
Lincoln school will suffer a loss
greater than when I lie building
was destroyed by lire, nine years
ago.
Uovernor M. E. Hay, who again
wants to be governor, spent $13,-
LU0.99 for his primary campaign,
according to h!> sworn .statement.
Looks as though he wants the
job pretty badly. And it also
looks as though some other man
of ordinary iiKcius, no matter how
honest or capable, would have
trouble in bea.'j/g a mau who can
loss up $13,000 for the simple
nomination. Monty seems to talk
in this state—and the voters
stand for it.
Many "raw deals" have been
worked upon the Stevens county
voters by the courthouse ring in
years past, and they are now but a
matter of history. But the first
one of the year of our lord, "The
King," in 1912, which has dearly
come to the light of day was con
summated last week, and it de
serves at least passing mention
from any county paper which
claims to give any of the news.
Some months ago the prosecut
ing attorney, a republican office
bolder, began a series of prosecu
tions in Springdale against a cer
tain class of people who were at
the time termed the "anti-Van-
Dissel" people The "antis" were
haled into the superior court to
answer to various alleged cri.nes
The Colville Examiner, Saturday, October 5, 1912
iii connection with tiie Sprisgaale
light \\liich was over the question
as to who weii; the legally elected
I oi'liciijis of thai prosperous town.
The "antis" claimed that Van-
Dissel and his crowd were trying
to run the town to their own
fashion, even alter they had been
beaten in the town election, and
were extremely wroth that the
county attorney should step "n to
help the loser.
But the prosecuting attorney
(republican) kept on, and ivied
several of the "antis." He
caused them considerable anoy
anee, considerable expense, and
had the county pay the costs of the
prosecutions.
But the "antis" won out in
every particular, both iv Stceus
county and in Spokane county
courts.
The claim at the time was that
the prosecuting attorney ha.l an
agreement with VanDissel tii'ii in
return for .political support lie
•StentaprOßecute VuiiJJissei'tj en
emies. This claim was printed, in
the Examiner at the time, Uut
wai scouted by the newspapers of
the county which belong to the
eourthouM "ring."
But now comes VauDis s d,
through his newspaper, the
Springdale itcforiuer, and an
nounces that he is for the entire
county republican ticket, rega.'d
less of the fact that some of the
ticket are "progressives" .jrl
some of them 'stand-patters." He
goes a step farther and HEART
ILY KECOM.UENDS that "both
progresives and republicans make
tiie cross mark at the iiead of tin
republican ticket, and then go
across and vote for the individuals
on the progressive ticket." This
means that VunDissel advo ites
the election oi all the county
ticket.
When the reader compares thik
stand with the claim made several
months ago that a "deal" wan n
lie can judge loi himself what has
ueen going on in this fair conaty
<>i oui's. And (.specially since thU
is tne Urst time in years whica the
Reformer has taken any certain
stand on the county tickets.
Those who know VanDiss;:!
and those who know the Kefo.jiier
management—and those who
know the desire of the prosec.iung
attorney to be reeiected, can yive
a hazy guess as to how politics arL'
worked by the courthouse .ing.
The prosecuting attorney ..iav
only have been used by Adam*
and Seal to gain a certain end. The
Examiner doesn't claim to know.
But the result of the Springdale
prosecutions was to place Van-
Dissel and the Spriugdale Reform
er in the queer position of sup
porting a county ticket in its en
tirety, althougl that ticket is
made up of two different factions
of the republican party.
It looks funny to a blind van.
Rnt then the "ring" probably has
to do a few funny things this voar
to keep in its lucrative position.
Enrl Casey, the well known mer
chant of Inchelium, was doing
business in Colville this week.
The BoUle Business.
According to a careful investi
gation it has been ascertained
that there are eight energetic boys
from ten to twelve years of age in
Colville that ere engaged in the
but tie business. In an interview
with a number of those rustlers
they were asked ''Ilow many
buttles do you get in a day/"
One small boy answered, "I make
fifty cents ne.irly every day and
sometimes moi'o." "Where do
you get these bottles?" "All over
town but mostly from the hotels
and blocks."
"Do you find a ready market
for your bottles?" "Yes, there
are three places in town that will
buy all the bottles we bring, and
pay fifteen ci.nts a dozen for
them."
The young bottle merchant went
to say that some of the boys
i more money than he did, for
reason that they liad nothing
c to do, while he could only
spend but one h< ur each day, as he
had work to do at home. "How
was the bottle business during the
week of Yep-Kanum," the boys
were asked. The answer was,
"just about the same as any other
time."
if the volume of business in this
line is anywhe.u near as stated by
the boys who make it a specialty,
there are approximately 180 bot
tles and rlasks PICKED UP
DAILY by the boys in Colville,
or 120 a week, or 5400 a month,
or o'f>,7oo a year. If one-half this
amount of bottles were for
whiskey, at $1 a quart, it would
represent an ti.nual wrhiskey in
vestment alone of about $25,000 a
year, while the remaining half,
beer bottles ut twenty-iive cents
a bottle would represent about
$8,000 more.
But the boys complain that they
are not able to get all the bottles
that are used because at many
homes the bottles are destroyed,
and at others the bottles are re
turned to the v holesaler in the
original barrels.
Inasmuch as the boys can real
ize fifteen cent-: a dozen for bot
tles, and the lottles can be used
over and over again, the boys re
quest that all i>. titles be saved for
them, and that all those who buy
their liquors in jugs save the jugs
from now on.
KLUPLE'S CARPENTER SHOP.
D. 11. Kimple, carpenter and
contractor, who has been operat
ing in Colville for the past rive
years, is the first mechanic to
equip and install modern machin
ery for a first-class wood-workers
shop, in this city.
Mr. Kimple': new shop has a
floor space of ]; 00 square feet, in
addition to a large ware-room
where is kept i large stock of
shop lumber, flooring, ceiling, lath,
shingles, moul lings and Carey
patent roofing. He has recently
installed a fiVß.bom-power, three
phase electric motor. Among the
machines now in use is a seven
foot jointer, rip and cut-off saws
and dado, a Mams combination
saw and beading machine, a Nail
£ Brown san-iing and polishing
machine, turniiig latin-, jig saws
tor braekei an.'; bctoll working,
a morticing machine, and emery
wheels. A pluuer and band saw
will lie added \ ithin a tew weeks
which will the:, necessitate more
power. Mr. Kimple has at pres
ent about twenty mechanics in
his employ on contracts in and
around Colvillo.
Saved by His Wife.
Advertisement.
She's a wise woman who knows
just what t<> do when her hus
band's life is in danger, but Mm.
K. .). Flint, Braintree, Vt., is of
that kind. "She insisted on my
using Dr. King's New Discovery,"
writes Mr. P. "for a dreadful
cough, when I was so weak my
friends thought 1 luid only a short
time to live, and it completely
cured me." A quick cure for
coughs and colds, it's the most
safe ami reliable medicine for
many throat and lung troubles
grip, bronchitis, croup, whooping
cough, quinsy, tonsilitis, hemor
rhages. A trial will convince you.
.")() cents and $1.0(1. Guaranteed
by Frank B. Gtoetter.
High School Course.
The folowing is a list of the
high school entertainments for the
coining season. This series of
high class entertainments has
been secured at a cost of $500. The
sale of seats, howevei, lms alri-ncly
almost reached that amount.
Byron C. l'intt, lecture, "When
We Dead Awake." Friday. Octo
ber 11.
Gray Concert Company, vo.-al
ist. pianist, violinist, and re.uler
November 12.
High school drama, Dec. 10,
Strollers male quartet. Feb. 8.
Rat to. impersonator, March 30
A Log on the Track
ot tne lastest express means ser
ious trouble rhead if not re
moved, so does loss of appetite,
it means loss of vitality, loss of
strength and nerve weakness. If
appetite fails, take Electric .Bit
ters quickly to overcome the cause
by toning up the stomach and cur
ing tiic indigestion. Alichaei lless
heimer of Lincoln, Nebraska, had
been sick over three years, but
six bottles of Electric Hitters put
iiiiii rignt on his x'eet again. They
have helped thousands. They give
pure blood, strong nerves, good
digestion. Only CO cents at Frank
ii. Uoetter's.
ill interviewing the various
DUfiiaeH nien of Coivilie it is evi
dent that Yep-Kanum was a grand
success from their point ol' view,
iiarmans say Iney did an excellent
business every day. "John" ol
the Leader sa^s Uieir business was
tar better then lie expected. The
management oil the Farmers' Store
states that their dry goods, cloth
jng and snoe department did an
excellent business during lep
kanuni week. J. D. Casey & Sun
say their business in ail depai <,
ments was much increased, ilun^u,
iiros. say their business was good..
i' 1. B, (jioetter says both he and his
clerks were kept busy for three
days. Dr. lverr says the (Joivuie
Drug Company did a nice busi
ness, and on account of YepKainuu
did some effectual advertising tor
the "Kexal .Store." B. G. fiich
says his business was more than
doubled. Ueorge Stenger stated
that he and his clerks had all they
could handle. Kice of the Variety
Store says Yep-Kauum is a good
thing, and that he did more than
double the business he expected.
"That Xobby Shop" was head
quarters for pennants and belts,
and did a big business. Tom Asp
end, the veteran barber, says that
he and his men were going some
every minute, and on the last day
of Yep-Kanum ran out of lather.
The four hotel men say they were
packed from the basement to the
skylights. The six restaurants
were worked to their utmost ca
pacity. According to statements
by all these business men no one
was charged a penny more during
Yep-Kanum than at any other
time. And it is needless to say
thai all the members of the govern
ing board of the chamber of com
tneree and all their committees
were on the jot every minute.
Among the uquartriennM who
took part In the cowgirls parade
lust Wednesday were Mrs. Allen
Mcl high. Miss Myrl Moore, Miss
Beulah Ntayt, Miss Marie Cyr.
.Miss Saluda Kildow and the little
.Misses Mary Jackson and Edith
Cattle. After the parade the
girls joined in a wild stampede
with the local bronco busters and
Indian bucearus on Main street.
The girls showed to the sheering
crowds that they were not timid
but knew how to ride and rein
with spurs and quirt the '.vild
cay uses with as much ease as their
companion! in chaps. Mrs. Allen
McHugh was awarded the prue as
being the best as well as the Jiiost
daring rider.
At B special meeting of the Ste
vens County Motor Club held a
few weeks ago it was agreed that
all automobile owners in the city
would decorate their cars and join
in the parades-during the celebra
tion of Yep-Kanum. At this meet
ing it was estiiaated that the club
would use 50U yards of bunting.
Bui according to statements made
liv a number of auto men the 30
machines wen: draped with near
ly 2000 yards of bunting, in ad
dition to hundred! of Hags.
streamers, pennants and flowers.
The motor club seemed to haw the
Yrp-Kaniim spirit and spent at
least $300 in decorating their ma
chines for these parades.
Few people realize that t •<•
great success of Yep-Kanuin \\a.-.
largely to the credit of President
Louis (x. Seller of the chamber oil
commeroe, who devoted most of
his time for several weeks to th
preparations, Secretary Campbell
did an immense amount of the rou
line work, and the entire govern
ing hoard got in and "drilled" f■>
make the occasion a good >.u\
Everybody helped, too, and the
merchants did themselves proud in
decorating their stores. The rag
ctable and fruit exhibits were sent
to Spokane, ami won several ':M.i
and a few seconds, ci edited to SV
vens county.
The fonr-rc'l entertainment at
the Colville cheater on Sunday
night was witnessed by a large
audience. The cataract of Alf
karelo, Swede.i, was a most mag
nificent water scene. The Light
that Failed, w.t-s a pathetic story.
Sheep Shearing in New Mexico,
was intercstii.f,' and realistic.
The bible gtur.v from Genesis,
Abraham offering Isaac, was
plainly portraxd upon the can
vas, and was a sermon in itself.
J. C, Harrigan attended the
quarterly meeting in Spokane
Wednesday of the Inland Empire
Press Associate n, of which organ
ization he is a member of the exec
utive committee.
Registration books close on the
night of October 15. Those who
want to vote November 5 must reg
ister by the loth or they will lose
t heir vote.
W. M. Free and Miss Edna
Byers were united in marriage by
Rev. L. B. Ila-.iis at the Congre
gational parsouhge at 10 o'clock,
Sunday morn-.ng, Carl Buchanan,
Harry Miller aud Mrs. Free, moth
er of the groom, were present at
tlic ceremony. Mr. Free has a
ranch near distal Falls. The
bride arrived from her former
home in Andc.v-on, Indiana, on
Thursday. The wedded couple
left for their country home on
the Pond Oreflta on Monday.
Saves Leg of Boy.
Advertisement.
"It seemed that my 14-year-old
boy would have to lose his leg, on
account of an ugly ulcer, caused
by a had bruise," wrote D. P.
Howard, Aqiione, N. C. "All
remedial arid doctor's treatment
failed till we tried Bucklon's Ami
CB Salve, and cured hime with one
box." Cures burns, boils, skin
eruptions, piles. 25 cents at Prank
B. Goetter's.

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