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The Colville examiner. (Colville, Wash.) 1907-1948, January 11, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085318/1913-01-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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A Weekly Journal of
Democracy
Issue Number 272
.
The kind that will be satisfactory to you. That is what you
want. We use in repairing watches genuine factory made
material and take the utmost pains in repairing and adjusting.
If your watch is off its rate bring it in and let us tell you what
is wrong with it, as the longer you put it off the more it is
liable to cost you to have it repaired right.
t/ewelei 9® Optician
Lasswell Building
The long winter evenings are almost upon
us. Electricity in the home is almost a
necessity and is certainly a great comfort
in many ways. Have your house wired
and enjoy all the pleasures of a well light
ed home.
Stevens County Power & Light Co.
Electric Lights Baths Sample Room
Steam Heat Free Bus
Hotel Colville
The Largest and Best Equipped Hotel in Stevens County
WILL DINGLE, Proprietor
First-class dining room in connection, under supervision of Mrs. Dingle.
Frank Ko&ka
Merchant Tailor
Colville, Washington
COLVILLE ABSTRACT CO.
Abstracts of title to Stevens county
lands, mines and water rights
Title Guaranty & Investment Co.
REAL ESTATE
Rickey Block Colville, Washington
If you are dissatisfied with your holdings in
this community and want to sell or exchange
for other property, call on G. B. Ide of the
Ideßeal Estate Agency
Colville, Washington
as we are in touch with 3000 real estate
dealers throughout the United States, Canada
and the Inland Empire. If you have a bargain
we want it. If you want a bargain we have it
Youth's Companion,l year,regular price $2.00
Colville Examiner, 1 year, regular price $LSO
$3.50
For a very short time the Examiner will send
both papers to any address for
$2.50
Cbe Colville examiner
Colville, Stevens County, Washington, Saturday, January 11, 1913
Cleaning and Repairing
Neatly Done
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CITY AND COUNTY
The annual meeting of the
Stevens County Federation of
Commercial Clubs will be held at
Colville on Tuesday afternoon,
January 21st, at which time the
officers' reports will be submitted
and new officers elected for the
ensuing year.
The federation has accomplish
ed much during the past year,
and owing to the recent prelimin
ary organization of a central sell
ing agency with headquarters at
Spokane which promises to solve
the problem of our fruit growers
in the future, strong support
should be given the federation so
that Stevens county will be right
in line to receive her share of the
benefits to be derived by such
co-operation.
Every man in the county who
is at all interested in the develop
ment of our agricultural interests
should attend this meeting. Make
it a point to be there.
Suggestions for President Wil
son's cabinet will be received by
this office up to 8 g. m. next
month, at which time all sugges
tions will be destroyed in order
to allow the new president to suit
himself. We also offer this plan
to the daily papers which make
various announcements from time
to time as to their guesses on the
new cabinet.
Again the Index announces that
"there is no court house ring."
It may be that at this time the
statement in its strict wording is
true, inasmuch as the ring seems
to be almost disassociated from
the court house, owing to a re
cent vote throughout the county.
But don't forget that a ring may
still exist in hope—even though
not in office for the time.
The new liquor map of this
state compiled by the local option
league shows all of Stevens coun
ty dry with the exception of two
points, and all of Pend Oreiile
county dry with the exception of
three points. This startling item
of news ought to be sent to the
wholesale liquor dealers of the
northwest—for their information.
They do not seem to know it.
Judge—"Do you know the na
ture of an oath?"
The man about to subscribe to
an oath—"Sure I do; I've worked
around lawyers' offices quite a
while."
Some of the citizens seem to
have taken exception to Mayor
Spedden's concession to the wets
in the appointment of Deputy
Sheriff W. W. Bryant as city
marshal. It is hardly likely that
Mayor Spedden would appoint
any man to office whom he did
not feel certain would enforce
the laws of this city, and if the
small factional disturbances of
the past can be smoothed by the
appointment of any man to office,
it will prove a wise policy. What
this city wants in a marshal is a
man who will do the work prop
erly, and if he can apprehend
some of the local light-fingered
chicken lifters, he will have made
a reputation which will be ap
proved.
Word from Olympia states that
Governor Hay has at last given
up hope of a contest, owing to
the unfavorable court decisions
in King and Pierce counties which
Drevented the ballots being open
ed. It was a hard blow to Hay,
with all his money, to see another
man—and a democrat at that
elected by the people of this
state. Money may buy a nomi
nation, but it does not always
secure an election.
A New York paper says that
women are beginning to smoke
cigars. We'll bet if they smoke
the same kind of cigars they gen
erally buy, they won't smoke
very many.
Jens Jensen of Metaline Falls,
progressive, was elected to fill
the vacancy in the lower house of
the state legislature, made vacant
by the death of S. J. Appleman.
Jensen's plurality over Alva S.
Sherlock, democrat, of Newport
will be about 200. Lee R. Bilder
back ran as a socialist.
Jensen's election leaves a nomi
nal republican majority of two if
the democrats and progressives
effect a coalition. The standing
of the parties in the lower house
now is: Republican, 49; progres
sives. 29; democrats, 18. It has
been asserted that many legislat
tors elected on the republican
ticket will vote with the progres
sives. In the senate the repub
licans have 27, the democrats 9
and the progressives 6.
The republican party had no
candidate, owing to the fact that
the bullmoosers stole the repub
lican nominating convention. The
lone Record, a republican paper,
has the following to say regard
ing the manner in which Jensen
was secured:
"The betrayal of the Pend
Oreiile republican party at New
port Monday was shameful. At
the last election the electors chose
a full complement of committee
men, in the name of the repub
lican party. Jens Jensen was
chosen state committeeman. The
death of Representative Apple
man, elected as a republican by
republican votes, under the re
publican banner, made a special
election necessary. The election
was set for January 8. The time
was short. The only way of
making a nomination was through
a convention of committemen rep
resenting the party. This con
vention was held in Newport
Monday.
"The republican party held its
ct>nvention in the court room.
The bull moosers held, at the
same time, a convention in the
jury room, at the rear of the
court room. Republican Com
mitteeman Jens Jensen appears
with his pockets full of proxies
and resignations, stalks through
the courtroom and into the
bull moose jury room. Ed Appel,
republican county chairman, lays
down and resigns, crawls over
the railing and hikes to the bull
moose jury room. Mr. Jensen
is nominated the bull moose can
didate and boasts he has killed
the Pend Oreiile republican party.
The next morning the bull moose
Spokesman-Review comes out in
jeering headlines: 'The Bull
Moosers Capture the Pend Oreille
Republican Party!' 'Jens Jen
sen Leads the Pend Oreille Coun
ty Republicans Into the Bull
Moose Camp!'
"That is a nice message to go
out to the tried and true repub
licans of this county and state, to
be flashed through the wires all
over the world, isn't it? And
shall we lay down now? Submit
to being stabbed in the back?
Shall the proud old banner be
trailed in the dust? Become the
mock and jeer of its assassins?
NO! . That is not the stuff of
which true republicans are made.
Laying down played no part in
bringing us the great victories of
our party. It is fight. We've
got to fight. It is the purpose of
the bull moose party to obliterate
the republican party, to wipe it
off the face of the earth if it can.
It boasts that it has done so. It
is fighting for this election to
strengthen itself two and four
years hence. As republicans we
have been jockeyed out of a can
didate."
The report of the state superin
tendent of public instruction
shows that Stevens county stands
sth in the state in number of
school districts, yet 12th in cost
of conducting the superinten
dent's office. In this county
there are 121 districts, with
school houses and grounds valued
at $249,308, and equipment worth
$43,616. Out of 5,865 school
children, 5,110 are in school, with
an average daily attendance of
3,578. Average months of school
in the county 7.6, teachers 198,
average salary paid male teachers
$85.83, female $68.89. During
the last six years, under County
Superintendents Daisy Hard and
A. D. Foster, the public school
system of this county has been
brought up to a high standard,
comparing most favorably with
the record of any county in the
state.
A few of the republican papers
that were not quite shivered to
shreds in the recent democratic
quake, have recovered sufficiently
to sit up in bed and talk "hard
times." They even go back to
20 years ago and talk about the
evils of those days which were
perpetrated by Harrison and
placed on Cleveland.
A glance backward will be
worth while at this time.
Every panic since the Civil war
originated and developed under
republican rule.
The republican campaign text
book of 1904 devoted much space
to the many business disasters
occuring from July, 1893, to No
vember, 1894, intending the pub
lic to attribute them to the inaug
uration of President Cleveland in
March, 1893. But the republic
ans fail to refer to the fact that
the republican tariff law was in
force during more than twelve of
the sixteen months of greatest
business disasters. This fact
must be remembered—the Mc-
Kinley tariff bill became a law
Oct. 6, 1890, and the first indica
tions of the 1893 panic were seen
Nov. 11,1890, scarcely more than
thirty days after the McKinley
law was passed, and the panic
reached its worst stage in 1893
and early in 1894, during which
time the McKinley law was in
full force.
It may be recalled, too, that
the panic of 1873 under republic
an rule and in a period of twelve
years of high tariff taxation, was
most disastrous. It continued
five years, 3,000,000 workingmen
were thrown out of employment
and bankruptcy ran riot.
In 1890 the McKinley high tariff
bill was passed, and there were
10,673 failures, followed by 12,394
in 1891. The tariff was raised to
nearly 50 per cent, but wages
stood still or declined while the
cost of necessaries advanced.
The most serious labor troubles
in the history of the United
States have occured under repub
lican high tariffs.
The republicans tried to scare
the voter away from Wilson be
fore the election and now they're
telling ghost stories to scare the
people, hoping that something
might happen to justify their
pre-election predictions. But it
won't.
Architectural and engineering
plans for the Panama-Pacific Ex
position have been completed and
made public. The architecture
is very impressive. The Admin
istration Building is well towards
completion and ground is being
broken today for the largest ex
hibition palace. All buildings
will be completed in June, 1914,
seven months before the opening
so that the landscape features
can be developed without inter
ference. The states and foreign
nations are selecting their sites.
The location of the grounds will
permit delivery of exhibits,
whether by sea or by land, on the
exposition grounds without trans
shipment The exposition will
be treated as a bonded warehouse.
Power and compressed air will
be supplied at cost to the exposi
tion.
All parties who desire to bring In
wood on Hubscrlptlon should bring It In
now. Four-loot wood is especially do
slrable.
An Exponent for
Stevens County
$1.50 Per Year
D. H. KIMPLE
Architect
Plans and specifications for all classes
of buildings, furnished in short order,
together with the approximate cost of
the building. You can save money on
any kind of building by securing plane
and estimates first.
Colville, Washington
Henry C. Rukgaber
Horseshoeing, Black
smithing, Wagon Re
pairing.
The best lighted shop in the country.
Big equipment, and satisfactory
work assured.
lL c FRANK B. GOETTER
F. D. Tower
Racket Store
All of the little things
that are handy
Home-Made
Candy
Fir^l door north of Casey
HOTEL
TOURAINE
Solicits your patronage while in
Spokane.
EUROPEAN PLAN
RatM r>o cents and up. Reasonable rates
by week or month. 4 Mock from post
office, near new Monroe Street bridge.
Full view down Riverside Avenue from
Lobby.
Wrn Snow, Prop. R. H. Snow, Mgr.
Spokane, Washington.
Stevens County
Drug Store
Homeopathic Drugs
Help the Chronic and
Cure the Sick
C. DeKEYZEß,coiviiie
FORD
The Universal Car
It is the light-weight champion
of the world. In a fair and open
fight the sturdy Ford has won
its title, and holds it because it
has more strength for its weight
and can deliver more power for
its size than any car in the
world's arena.
Every third car in the country
is a Ford.
Prices for 1913: Runabouts,
$625; Touring cars, $700; Delivery
cars, $725. Fully equipped, F.
O. B. Colville. For particulars,
see
Willett Bros.
Colville
i AMUSEMENTS j
Colville Theater
H. D. Williams, Manager
Every night 7 to 10:30
Continuous Motion Picture
Admission 10c

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