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The Lynden tribune. (Lynden, Wash.) 1908-current, January 16, 1913, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085445/1913-01-16/ed-1/seq-3/

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SM ALLPIELD'3
ELECTRIC OPERA HOUSE
If the Electric Has it,
It's worth seeing!
SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS
TONIGHT
Chas. E. Royal Company
9 : PEOPLE : 9
25 cents, any seat.
Special Two Reel Feature
Saturday and Sunday, Jan'y 25-26
"Rube Marquard Wins"
It is the best base ball picture ever made. It will
feature the record-breaking pitcher of the
New York Giants. Great base ball.
January 30 and 31, and Feb'y Ist.
LaMott Comedy Company
Bran New Show
15 and 25 cts. : Any seat
If It's Good, you. see it
j& at trie Electric
Nation Should
Take Care of
Disabled
By WILLIAM J. GAYNOR.
Mayor of New York
City
be a very small tax, after all, on the great body of goods produced in
this country. . . , . ,
It is now a thing right before the
With them, in such things they are the LAST Df THE WORLD-
And vet we are a vain people and have the vanity to think we lead the
world. Those who travel in Europe know better than that.
Over there Prussia has had such laws since 1547, and most coun
tries have bad them for generations. And I dare say when our courts,
through the infinity of their wisdom, will stop declaring such laws un
constitutional, as they call it in this country and vo.d-as soon as
they quit that we will have such a law not only in the national gov
e nmeVbutin EVERY STATE g THIS UNION.
Pike's Peak Not the Highest
What is the highest mountain in
Colorado? 'Pikes Peak." nineteen
persons out of twenty will answer
nd Incorrectly. The twentieth
may know that the two highes
mountains In the state "re Mount
Massive and Mount Elbert both in
1 ake county, in the beadville dis
trict The altitude of each of these
mountains according to the nited
States Geological Survey, is t«.«0-
--feet above Bea level.
f The height of Pikes Peak Is l*r
h M feet. Moreover there are f.fty
slxTy other peaks in Co orado
Hpnroximately as
leet. The lowest point in t olor.iuo
L. V N D E N
IN THE FULFILLMENT OF
GOD'S TIME ALL THE
PEOPLE NOW DEPEND-
I ENT ON CHARITY WILL
BE TAKEN CARE OF BY THE
GOVERNMENT. I KNOW OF NO
REASON WHATEVER WHY THE
MEN AT WORK WHO ARE IN
JURED BY MACHINERY OR THOSE
WHO BECOME SICK AND INCA
PABLE SHOULD BE TURNED OUT
AND NOT TAKEN CARE OF. MY
OWN NOTION IS THAT THE NA
TION IS BOUND IN MORALS AND
GOOD CONSCIENCE TO TAKE
CARE OF THEM.
Some think it is a vast scheme.
Why, it is not vast at all. It would
be just as easy to do it that way as
to do it in the poorhouse and in
the other way. The tax on the
production of the world would do
that very thing—PAY EVERY
BODY WHO LOSES A FIN
GER OR AX ARM OR A LEG,
THOSE WHO GET SICK,
THOSE WHO GET TOO OLD
TO WORK ANY LONGER.
The tax that -would, take care of
these people without any lawsuits
or contentions or trouble would
is 3,350 feet above the sea level
Of all the states Colorado has th<
highest average altitude, estimatec
by the Geographic Survey at G,80(
feet.
Although not the highest mount
am. Pikes Peak is probably th<
best-known peak in the t'nitec
States There was at one time i
Weather Bureau stationed on iti
summit, and it now hag a substant
ial railway station at the termina
of the highest railway line ii
North America. It can also b<
reached by an excellent wagon roai
and trail which connect the summi
with Colorado Springs.
Mount Rainier topß them nil—ii
Colorado —by about fifty feet.
THE LYNDEN TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. JANTARY 16. 1913.
IRRIGATE UNDER GROUND.
: Systsm of Distributing Watsr to Plant
Root* Successful In Tsxas.
I One of the most remarkable out- j
growths of the era of reclamation in
; the weßt Is a test that has been made
near Midland. Tex., of a system of
! subirrigation whereby water is fed to
' the roots of plants well under the
'■ ground Instead of having It percolate
. down to them from the surface. The
success of such a system would add
millions of dollars to the yearly profits
,of farms throughout the west because
; of the saving of water in places where
j It Is scarce and the better results to be j
had in the growth of plants.
Systems of Irrigation generally are
i based ou a flow of water In surface
! ditches fed from surface canals. It has
| been found, however, that great waste
! attends this plan both from seepage
' and evaporation. In localities where
i water is scarce these factors are of the
utmost Importance.
I Agricultural experts for years have
[ been engaged in an effort to perfect a
j system of subirrigation. The great dif
! Acuity to be met, however, lay In the
! plugging of the water outlets when
pipes were laid underground. It is
| necessary that these outlets shall at all
1 times be free If the water Is to be dis
! tributed properly. It is believed that
! this problem has been solved under the
' system in operation near Midland.
The experiment has been carried on
[by wealthy farmers of Kansas, who
\ bought much property In that vicinity.
Their plans were greeted humorously,
! but they went ahead installing their
system. They laid concrete pipes two
feet under the surface on a large tract
; At short intervals in these are inserted
\ plugs having openings the size of a pln-
I hole. Over these holes are laid caps
: which fit over the pipe in such fashion
i that only a little room is left for the
egress of the water and no room for the
< entrance of dirt or roots. It has been \
' found that the water from these holes 1
• spreads to a distance of more than ;
! sixty feet Good crops have been grown
i on the land, and farmers who formerly
scoffed at the idea are now figuring on
installing similar devices.—New York
Times.
CLEAN DAIRY UTENSILS.
To Ktop Product* Puro They Should
Bo Sterilized Every Day.
If the dairyman is to keep his dairy
utensils absolutely clean he must ster
ilize them daily. This is Just as neces
sary in the small dairy as in the large
one. The dairyman who milks only a
few cows cannot afford an expensive
equipment In his dairy room. Many
who do a profitable but modest busi
ness believe that a sterilizer Is an ex
pensive luxury. Such is not the case.
A homemade sterilizer may be made
at a cost of not more than $7 or $8.
Go to your local tinner or hardware
merchant, show him the accompanying
cut and tell him to make you a boa:
three and a half feet square of gal
vanized iron, twenty-eight gauge, a lit
tle heavier If he hasn't this. It should
not be of lighter weight. All joints
6hould be riveted and soldered closely.
This will make a steam tight box.
with the exception of the cracks about
the door, and will hold enottarb steinn
pressure for all practical purposes in
sterilizing.
The door should be not quite three
feet square and should be cut to lap
HOMEMADE STERILIZER.
[From Country Gentleman.]
about an Inch over all four sides of the
opening. Ordinary heavy doub'e strap
hinges may be used, fastened with
either bolts or rivets. A bolt and staple
fastener holds the door shut The
steam may be piped Into the top and
one side as shown in the illustration.
A few holes punched in the bottom will
drain off the condensed steam. It
should be turned on slowly ut first and
then gradually be worked up to full
force with thirty or forty pounds of
steam in the boiler. A thorough ster
ilization will be accomplished In from
ten to fifteen minutes. The writer has
used a sterilizer similar to this, which
cost 17.50. and found it to be thorough
ly efficient—Country Gentleman. »
The man who allows weeds to
go to seed indiscriminately on
his farm, be he renter or land
owner, is a nuisance to himself,
to bis neighbors and to his coun
try.
For Tree Wound*.
In California the following mixture
was used on trees three years ago and
Is still in good condition: One part of
crude petroleum to three parts of rosin;
warm in separate dishes, mix and ap
ply warm to cuts made by pruning or
by cultivator injury. While this mix
ture is not better than grafting wax. it
is much cheaper and Is worthy of trial
These Pesky Weed Seeds.
If weeds are allowed to lie In the
garden over the winter the seeds will
be ready for business In the spring,
long before it is time to plant vege
tables.
TRIBUNE FOR JOB PRINTING.
SOME OF THE
SPECIAL BARGAINS
we offered you last week are still at your mercy.
The various lines are not as complete as they
were, but it will well pay you to come in and
look them over. They are all splendid bargains.
Broken lots of 50 cts. fleece lined garments, 43 cts.
Elastic ribbed goods, a good run of sizes, were $1.00: the garment, 78 cts.
Plush wool, in nearly all sizes, $1.00 quality, now 78 cts.
Fancy striped wool, all sizes, $1.50 quality, now $1.05.
Two grades celebrated Eagle brand goods, full line, were $1.50 and $2.00
now Sl lO and $1.60
Men's Sanitary Australian wool, fleece coated, all sizes, were $2, now $1.55
Combination Suits, $1.09 and $1.88.
Blue Flannel Shirts, in sizes from 15 to 17y 2 . $3.50 grade, now $2.65
Blue Flannel Shirts, in sizes 15 to W/ 2 , $2.00 grade, now $1.45.
Grey Flannel Shirts, $4.00 grade, now $2.95.
We are closing out some broken numbers of "Star"
Brand Shoes, at the following bargains:
Ladies' $2.75 to $3.50 Shoes, at $1.19.
Ladies' tan high top Shoes, were $5, now $3.69
Men's $2.50 to $4.00 Shoes, $1.39
Men's $4.00 to $5.00 Shoes, $2.49
IF YOU WANT ONE OF OUR SWEATERS, YOU MUST ACT QUICK
Lynden Co-Operative Co.
The store of Honest values
The Poor Wall Street Spec's.
The Wall street speculators are
putting up a poor mouth over the
business tliey managed to scrape to
■ fether in IWI2. During ihe twelve
months they sold only a trifle of
twelve billions of dollars worth of
stocks and two-thirds of a billion
dollars' worth of bonds. Their cum
missions on this piddling business
amounted to only a little more than
thirty millions, hardly enough to
1 keep their families in gasoline,
champagne and diamonds Still
I when they reflect that they handled
|in a single year a volume of busi
ness as great as one-tenth of the
entire wealth of the t'nited States
of every kind, they may feel better
satisfied with the record.
TRIBUNE FOR JOB PRINTING.
Make Wash Day
A Pleasure! 2K5,5e23
Let the A. B. C. Power Washer do the work.
This Power Washer and Wringer will revolutionize your wash day by banish
ing from it all the drudgery to which you have been accustomed. It washes
and wrings by power quicker, easier, more thoroughly and econom
ically than any other washer. It cleans fabrics more carefully and with far
less wear and tear than by hand. It saves its cost several times a year. It's
time you looked into it. DO IT TO-DAY.
This washer has a movable power wringer which slides along with wash stand
and wring from either wash or rinse tub. Belt drive saves clothes and machine
ry. No cogs, chains or sprockets to get caught in or get out of or
der. Runs by gasoline engine or electric motor. Universally used. Guaranteed
Price, $35.00. ON EASY PAYMENTS.
Bauman Implement Co. INC.
WE STAND BEHIND EVERYTHING WE SELL!
The Largest Supply House for Agricultural Implements in Whatcom County.
AGENTS for JACKSON AUTOMOBILES. 3rd and FRONT, ST, LYNDEN.
A Great Wheat Yield.
Last year was one of the great
wheat yields in the United States
Nevertheless we are among the low
est among civilized nations in wheat
production per acre. Belgium pro
duced 25 quintals per hectare of
land, Germany 22.0, Great Britian
19.7; whereas the United State*
yielded but 10.8 Russia, Algeria
Spain and India are among the few
Countries that grow less wheat per
acre than we do. In these count riet
of high yield more labor goes in
to an acre, of course, and perhaps
even more into a bushel. It has
been shown in the United States
that a very little more labor intel
ligently applied will increase the
yield more than correspondingly.
More labor on the wheat fields
would mean more profit.
SAVE TIME, HEALTH AND MONEY
Notice to Creditors.
No. 237:'.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OP
THE STATE OF WASHINGTON
IN AND FOR THE COUNTY
OF WHATCOM.
In the Matter of the Estate of
MARTIN STEWART. Deceased.
Notice is hereby given to all per
sons having claims against the a
bove estate to present the same
with the neessary vouchers, as pro
vided by law, within one year after
the sth day of December, 1912, to
the undersigned, administrator of
the said estate, or at the law office
of Neterer fc Pemberton, his at
torneys, in the Clover Block, Bell
ingham, Washington, or said claims
will bo barred
JAMES STEWART, Administrator

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