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The Colfax gazette. (Colfax, Wash.) 1893-1932, January 19, 1900, Image 4

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085460/1900-01-19/ed-1/seq-4/

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COLFAX GAZETTE
IVAN CHASE, PUBLISHER.
Established, 1877. Entered at the po»toffice at
Colfax as second class matter.
BDBBCRIPTION RATES.
Six Months, postage paid One Dollar
OtM Year, pontage paid Two Dollars
Twenty-five per cent discount for
advance payment.
COUNTY OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER
Spokane weeklies are poking fun at
the Review over its diversified farming
efforts. At least, this is better than
shouting 16 to 1.
If this weather continues fall wheat
must be heavily pastured throughout
the I'alouse, else the green fields will be
come tangled forests that would puzzle
a Filipino to slip through.
Tagals have begun to murder Ameri
can prisoners and mutilate their bodies.
Sympathizers with the Tagals in this
country have strange ideas of the proper
sort of material to start a new republic.
The democratic Baltimore Hun wan-s
itH party that the Uoebpl operations in
Kentucky will return as a plague. It de
nounce* as revolutionary the tffort to
unseat a governor who unquestionably
received a plurality of votes.
Governor Rogers save: "Fusion may
not be accomplished as it was in 1890
and 1898, but the same result will be
reached." To which the Tacoma Ledger
retorts: "Governor Rogers is pound on
this proposition, and his frankness in
making the admission is commendable.
The same result will be reached as in
189*, whether fusion is accomplished or
not, only a little more so."
Governor Rogers' reasons for belief in
fusion are something like the incident of
a woodebuck being offered as a prize foi
the best reason given for the political
faith of the competitors, says the Ta
coma Ledger. Two of them gave the
stereotyped replies, but the third was no
doubt upon the same grounds as Gov.
Rogers believes in fusion—that he was a
democrat because he wanted the wood
chiu-k.
One of the most reliable measures of
the business progress of the country is
found in the consumption of postage
stamps. For the month of September,
1899, 54.1,376,000 stamps were printed
for use of the people. This great total
is, however, not so surprising as is the
increase within the past two years. For
September, 1898, the output whs 260,
--085,000, and in the same month of
1897 but 5241,685,000.
John L. Henderson, a life long demo
crat of Hood River, Ore., resigned big
position as a member of the Wasco
county democratic central committee a
few lays ago. In his letter to the chair
man he said he haH a son in the army in
the Philippines, and he is not satisfied to
rote one way, while the son in the mili
tary service of his government shoots
the other way. The democratic party
is in a bad hole when its good old friends
make op their minds that aa loyal and
patriotic citizens they can stay by it no
longer. That is what they are doing.
The Yakima Republic thinks Mr. Hender
son is but one of a large number oj
them.
The great nations have been having
bad luck in their ware against "inferior
races'' recently. Italy got badly beaten
by the Abyssinians two or three years
ago, England has met several reverses in
its fight with the Boers in the past few
weeks, and now France has been badly
beaten in a battle with the Chinese. The
United States has fared better than any
of the other countries in its conflict with
inferior peoples. It has beaten the Fili
pinoß in every fight it has had with them,
and has scattered them to such an ex
tent that the warfare in the islands is
now of the guerrilla order entirely. Uncle
Bam is a lucky individual, but he Drakes
a good deal of his luck himself.
Volunteer vs. British Regular.
Probably the British military experts
aren't spending all their time just now
in remembering the patronizing things
they have had to say about the Ameri
can volunteer soldier ascompared to the
British regular. But if they could give
a few moments to heart-searching and
retrospect, they might read a lesson in
the folly of pride in some statistics re
cently served up by the Army and Navy
Journal. It seems that thus far in the
campaign, the Hritieh regular, of whose
steadiness and bulldogishness we have
heard so much, has become discouraged,
retired from the field or allowed himself
to be captured after suffering losses in
killed and wounded of only 5 or 7 per
cent. Rut the despised American volun
teer, in fifty battles of the civil war, suf
fered an avtrage loss of 16 per cent on
the Federal and la per cent on the Con
federate side before he gave up hope of
rictory. At Bull Run, where the north
ern fiasco caused so ma:h amusement in
England, the toss was 120 per cent. These
are average figures am] show how much
pnniehment American soldiers are
usually willing to take before getting
discouraged. Compared with certain
notable engagements the British percent
age of resistance in this war is ridiculous.
At Balaklava their own famous Light
Brigade lost nearly 87 per cent; at Metz
the Aardeschutzen lost -46 per cent; at
Mars la Tour the Sixteenth Westphalian
Infantry lost 49 per cent, while Long
street at GaiLes Mill and Hancock at
FredericksbHrg lost 50 per cent. Evi
dently the strictures on the bravery of
volunteer soldiers were embarrassingly
premature. However, when the boasted
British regular gets used to fighting
foemen worthy ot his eteel, who employ
his own leisurely tactics and display the
same pertinacity, instead of coming on
in one bloody rush and then chasing off
to the hills of India or the sands of Sa
hara, it is probable that his percentage
of loss will come somewhat nearer the
historical average. Unless military
history belies itself, his failure thus far
to stand punishment is not so much his
own fault as that of his leaders.
OUTLANDER9' GRIEVANCES.
Statement of Complaints Against
South African Republic.
Oregonian: An article in the New
York Tribune sets forth at length the
grievances alleged by the outlanders in
the South African Republic. A summary
is given below. But, as The Oregonian
has often said, these grievances are not
the heart of the matter. Great Britain
is acting upon the claim that her suz
erainty, which she asserts was guaran
teed by treaty, is denied, hence she is
moving to compel the submission of in
surgents or rebels to her authority.
Here, however, are the grievances al
leged by the outlanders:
First —In 1894 Paul Kruger was in London.
He then expressly and publicly invited En
glishmen and Americans to settle in the
Transvaal and conduct mining there.
Second —Kruger sold one of his own farms to
Englishmen for §500,000, paid in gold. His
friends and neighbors sold other farms at
even greater prices, receiving from foreign
settlers many millions of dollars.
Third—These foreign settlers produce every
dollars' worth of wealth which can be ex
ported from the Transvaal. Every dollar of
the wealth now possessed by Mr. Kruger, his
sons-in-law, his officials and indeed any part
of the Transvaal population has been produced
by these settlers.
Fourth—The taxes levied annually in the
Transvaal have exceeded $20,000,000. Nine
tenths of this amount have been collected
from foreign settlers whom Mr. Kruger in
vited into the country.
Fifth—No appreciable part of these taxes
is expended for the benefit of the foreign set
tlers. These taxes if divided among all the
Boers would amount to §2000 to each family
annually.
Sixth—One-half of these taxes has been
spent in making preparations for war, and the
other half devoted to the payment of enor
mous salaries to and jobs for Mr. Kruger, his
sons-in-law, friends and political supporters,
who roll in wealth from these public funds.
Seventh—The government is hopelessly cor
rupt.
Eighth—The foreign settlers exclusively
built the city of Johnannesburg, a fine town,
formerly with 50,000 inhabitants, but they
were denied any right to govern the city and
denied any municipal government whatever.
Not $5 could be expended in repairing a ruad
or bridge without express authority from Pre
toria. The death rate in Johannesburg- was
three or four times as great as in New York,
on account of lack of proper government.
Ninth—Foreigners were denied the right to
bear arms.
Tenth—All newspaper's were at Kruger"s
mercy.
Eleventh—All meetings of more than seven
persons in the open air were absolutely pro
hibited, while all other meetings could be dis
solved at once by any policeman.
Twelfth—No foreigner was allowed to pre
sent a petition for redress of a grievance.
Thirteenth—No foreigner was allowed to
settle in the Transvaal. Full naturalization
could be obtained in two years. After for
eigners had Bettled there, he repealed all
naturalization laws absolutaly. Then, under
pressure, the term was made 14 years, but
during all said 14 years the foreign settler
was without a country, being compelled to re
nounce all allegiance to his mother country in
advance. At the same time he was compelled
to serve in the Boer army on 12 houra notice,
and then he had to serve without pay, cloth
ing or even food, which he ir.ust provide for
himself. At the end of 14 years he could not
vote until his humble petition was approved
by two-thirds of his Boer neighbors, by the
military chief of the district and Kruger him
self.
Fourteenth— All children must be taught
the Dutch language exclusively.
Fifteenth—The whole Transvaal govern
ment was corrupt and rotten from top to
bottom. No business could be done with
them without bribing Kruger's sons-in-law
and hangers-on.
1 am now prepared to do all kinds of
land business, homestead entries and
proofs, contests, etc. Have had 13 years
experience in land cases. W. A. Inman,
U. S. Commissioner, Colfax, Wash.
Money to loan on city property at 7
per cent, repayable in easy monthly in
stallments. J. A. Pkukixs & Co o
H, W. Goff writes reliable Insurance.
The Bee Hive for bargains*
The engineer misunderstood the signals
and there was a frightful railroad collis
ion, with terrible loss of life. The whole
country was appalled by that accident.
There is doubtless a far greater loss of
life occurring every day, in various sec
tions of the country, for which the only
excuse is,—"the doctor didn't under
stand the symptoms." These cases are
not the subjects of special inquest or the
country would be aghast at the sacrifice
of life to ignorance.
It has been the experience of Df. R. V.
Pierce and his staff of assistant physi
cians, that ninety-eight out of every
hundred persons submitting to their
treatment can be cured. People given
up by the local physicians, weak, ema
ciated, with stubborn coughs and bleed
ing lungs have been absolutely cured by
the use of Dr. Pierces Golden Medical
Discovery.
Sick people are invited to consult Dr.
Pierce by letter free. All letters are
held as strictly private and treated as sa
credly confidential. Answers are mailed
in plain envelopes without any printing
on them.
" Last spring I was taken with severe pains in
my chest, and was so weak I could hardly walk
about the house," says Mrs. G. E. Kerr, of Fort
Dodge, Webster C 0.," lowa. "I tried several
physicians and they told me I had consumption.
I heard of Dr. Pierces Golden Medical Discos
cry and I thought I would try some of it. Before
I hnd taken the first bottle I was very much bet
ter; I took five bottles of it and have'not yet had
any return of the trouble "
COLFAX GAZETTE, COLFAX, WASHINGTON, JANUARY 19, 1900.
WAR IN CHINA.
French and Chinese Throw Shot at
Each Other.
Tacoma, Jan. 14.—The steamer Elm
Branch brings news from Shanghai that
French warships have taken possession
of Kwong Chau Wan bay, where a
boundary dispute has been pending for
several months.
The French commenced operations by
seizing two Chinese gunboats, destroy
ing their guns and ammunition and tak
ing the officers aboard the French ship
as prisoners. The warships then shelled
20 Chinese villages, compelling the Chi
nese troops to move back.
A four hours' battle took place at Veg
Luoo, in which the French lost four kill
ed and 28 wounded. The Chinese loss
was heavier. After the Chinese left the
French forces were divided into four ex
peditions which pillaged and burned
many villages on their march back to
the seashore. Several mandarins sur
rendered to prevent the burning of their
towns. They are held as hostages to
prevent retaliation by the natives.
Olympian: The population of Thurs
ton county will be increased to thu extent
of 500 within the next six weekß, and
this increase will occur all at one time.
Thoniaa Bordeaux, superintendent of the
Maeon county logging company, is now
arranging for the immigration to this
county of 500 men from Wisconsin, the
men to be employed in the camps of the
company in the Black Hills.
There is more Catarrh in this section of tha
country than all other diseases put together,
and until the last few years was supposed to
be incurable. For a great many years doctors
pronounced it a local disease, and prescribed
local remedies, and by constantly failing to
cure with local treatment, pronounced it incur
able. Science has proven catarrh to be a con
stitutional disease, and therefore requires con
stitutional treatment. Hall's Catarrh Cure,
manufactured by P. J. Cheney & Co., Toledo,
Ohio, is the only constitutional cure on the
market. It is taken internally in doses from
10 drops to a teaspoonful. It acts directly on
the blood and mucous surfaces of the system.
They offer one hundred dollars for any case it
fails to cure. Send for circulars and testimon
ials. Address,
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O.
Sold by druggists, 75c.
Hall's Family Pills are the best.
Call on H. W. Goff for Insurance.
WE WILL SEND TO YOU
OR YOUR FRIENDS
IN THE EAST,
FREE, POSTPAID,
a c-opy of our handsome il-
lustrated new pamphlet. It
gives actual experiences of
\ inelanders in their own
words, with photographic
illustrations of their homes,
orchards and gardens. It
tells all about the pros-
perity, climate and health-
fulness of Lewiston Valley
as compared with the con-
ditions east of the Rocky
Mountains. Send us the
address of your friends and
we will send them thepam-
phi ut.
LEWISTON WATER & TOWER COMPANY
Clarkston, Washington, or
Lewiston, Idaho.
THE OLD STAND-BY IS
MIDDLE'S
LIVERY
STABLE.
Finest Turnouts in the city.
Teams and saddle horses by the hour,
day or week. Stock boarded at reason
able rates.
H. M. LIDDLE.
Northern
Pacific Ry.
PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS
TOURIST SLEEPING CARS
ELEGANT DINING CARS
TO
ST. PAUL GRAND FORKS
MINNEAPOLIS CROOKSTON
DULUTH WINNIPEG
FARGO HELENA BUTTE
THBODGH TICKETS TO
WASHINGTON PHILADELPHIA
CHICAGO NEW YORK.... BOSTON
AND ALL POINTS
EAST AND SOUTH.
Through tickets to Japan and China, via
Tacoma and Northern Pacific Steamship Co.
For further information, time cards, mape
and tickets, call on or write
GEO. H. LENNOX, AGENT, COLFAX,
-OB——
A. D. Charlton, Assistant General Passenger
Agent, No. 255 Morrison street, corner Third,
Portland, Orecon.
Notice to Creditors.
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, ad
ministrator of the estate of Sampson Stephens,
deceased, to the creditors of, and to all persons
having claims against said estate, to exhibit
them, with the necessary vouchers, within one
year from the date of the first publication of
this notice, to-wit: Within one year from the
22d day of December. 1899, to the said adminis
trator, at his place of business in the city of Col
fas, Whitman County, Washington.
HOWARD BRAMWELL,
Administrator of the estate of Sampnon
Stephens, deceased.
ON HIS° ANKLE.
iftfif SIX Yfifirc Of litfilKP Obstinate sores and ulcers which
aiigi oia icaia vi nucule refuse to heal under ordinary treat .
PmtnntlV RlirPfi ment soon become chronic and deep
dUlltmil&, riU!ll|Jliy UUIGU S e atG( l, and are a sure sign that the
Dy C C C entire circulation is in a depraved condition. They
DJ Oi Oi Oi aro a severe drain upon the system, and are con
stantly sapping away the vitality. In every c'aso the poison must
be eliminated from the blood, and no amount of external treatment
can have any effect.
There is no uncertainty about the merits of S. S. S. ; every claim
made for it is backed up strongly by convincing
testimony of those who have been cured by it jfa
and know of its virtues by experience. i
Mr. L. J. Clark, of Orange Courthouse,Va., writes: f#^4M
" For six years I had an obstinate, running ulcer on my g»:;***ip, **^ H)
ankle, which at times caused me intense suffering. I was W|'"_. £,^ f*
60 disabled for a long while that I waß wholly unfit for is2|;v. JgL SK 'm
business. One of the best doctors treated me constantly WJKri;
but did me no good. I then tried various blood remedies,
without the least benefit, 9. S. S. was so highly recom- W^gfr^*W£
mended tliat I concluded to try it, and the effect was Jl|K\kV? //Spfc
wonderful. It seemed to get right at the seat of the nHßk^^yjffi/I'
disease and force the poison out, and I was soon com-
pletely cured." Swift's Specific—
8. 8. S. FOR THE BLOOD
—drives out every trace of impurity in the blood, and in this way
cures permanently the most obstinate, deep-seated sore or ulcer, ft
is the only blooa remedy guaranteed purely vegetable, and con
tains not a particle of potasn, mercury, or other mineral. S. S. S.
cures Contagious Blood Poison, Scrofula, Cancer. Catarrh, Eczema,
Rheumatism, Sores, Ulcers, Boils, or any other blood trouble. Insist
upon S. S. S.; nothing can take its place.
"Valuable books mailed firoe by Swift Speriiic Company, Atlanta, Ga.
Dr. John Benson,
HOMOEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN. Spec
ialties: Chronic diseases and diseases of
women and children. Calls to any part of
the county promptly answered. Office n
Colfax Hardware building.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
Cal. M. Boswell,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Can be
found at office over Barroll's hardware store,
or at residence on Mill Street, when not
professionally absent. Telephones—Office
492, residence 49.5.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
R. C. Coifey, M. D.
SPECIALTY: DISEASES OF WOMEN.
Office hours, Ito 5:30 p. m. Residence, Dr.
Crayne house. Office, Pioneer Block.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
Wilson Johnston, M. I>.
Diseases of the
EYE, EAR, NOSE, THROAT and CHEST
Office hours, 9t012 a. m., 2tosp. m. Office,
Rooms t> and 7, Pioneer Building.
Dr. A. E. Stuht,
DEUTCHE AKZT,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. Office,
Rooms 7 and 8, Colfax Hdw. Co. Bldg.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
G. A. Chapman, D. I>. S.
DENTIST. Graduate Ohio College Dental
Surgery. Office over Colfas Hardware Co's
Btore.
OOLFAX, WASHINGTON.
Dr. E. H. Bently,
DENTIST. Best teeth, $10 per set. Pain
less extraction, 50 cents.
GARFIELD, WASHINGTON.
J. C. Kerry,
DENTIST. Over Colfax Hardware Com
pany's store.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
Have your Spectacles fitted by
J. W. Sever, Optician
Graduate of the Chicago Opthalmic College. All
errors of refraction fully corrected by properly
ground glasses. Eyes tested free. At Severs
Jewelry Store. Main Street, Colfax.
Washington Market
I. B. HARRIS, Propr.
Fresh and Cured Meats,
Fish and Game in season.
There is no doubt about the quality of the
meats sold from the blocks of this market —
it ia the BEST.
The highest market price paid for cattle
and hides.
South Main Street, Oolfax.
O. R & N.
TIME SCHEDULES.
Depart For Arr. From
From Colfax.
Portland, Pendleton,
San Francisco, Den
ver, Omaha, St. Louis,
11:10 a.m. and East via Oregon 3:50 a.m.
7:15 p.m. Short Line. 3:sr>p.m.
Spokane, St. Pai , l>u
:i:ssp. m. luth, Chicago nud East 11.10 a.m.
3:50 a.m. via Great Northern 7:45 p.m.
11:30 a.m. Pullman and Moscow 10:4 r)a.m.
8:15 p.m. 3:40 p.m.
8:00 p.m. Columbia River 4:00 p.m.
Ex. Sun. Steamers. Ex. Sun.
Saturday To Astoria and Way
-10:00 p.m. Landings
Willamette River.
6:00 a.m. Oregon City.Newberg, 4:30 p.m.
Ex. Sun. Salem & Way Land's Ex. Sun
Willamette and Yam
-7:00 a.m. hill Rivers 3:30 p.m.
Tue, Thur. Oregon City, Dayton, Mon, wed.
and Sat. and Way Landings and Fri.
6:00 a.m. Willamette River. 4:30 p.m.
Tue, Thur. Portland to Corvallis Mon. Wed.
and Sat. and Way Landings and Fri.
Lv. Riparia. Lv. Lewiston
Daily Snake River. Daily
1:20 p.m. Riparia to Lewiston 8:30 a m.
Ocean steamships sail from Portland for
San Francisco every five days.
W. H. HI7RLBURT,
General Passenger Agent, Port'and, oregon.
W. H. WINFBEK. B. L. M'CROSKKT
Winiree & McCroskcy,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Offices over the
Firßt National Bank. Telephone No. 24.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
8. J. CHADWICK. W. J. BRYANT.
Chadwick & Bryant,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Office* in Waite
block.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
M. O. Reed,
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Will practice in
State or Federal courts of Washington,
Idaho or Oregon.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
Will. A. Initial),
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Will do all kinds
of legal business Office with H. W. Goff,
Ellia block.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
H. W. Can Held,
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Office in Frater
nity Block, Rooms 9 and 10.
OOLFAX, WASHINGTON.
J. N. Pickrell,
ATTORNEY AT LAW Office In Frater
nity block, Rooms 4 and 5.
COLFAX. WASHINGTON.
James G. Combs,
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Office-Room 11,
Fraternity block.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON.
C. M. Kincaid,
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Office-Room No.
7, Pioneer block.
OOLFAX. WASHINGTON.
ALLEN BROS.
Dealers in
General Merchandise
DUSTY, WASH.
Highest market price paid for country pro
duce of all kinds.
Thousands of gardr•n^^fck
pradepend on Feny'aSeedfl
every year nnd never suffer
MM <lisai>i>ointnient. Cheap sutoui- TO^
tnt. s bring lohs, not paying crops.
tm It paya to pay a little more fo; Mi
» Fekiiy'sSeeds. Five cents per paper H
gK everywhere, :i:id ulwuya wortli it I
»■ Always t lip Best. 1900 Sewl Annual free. E
■ 0. M. FERRY & CO., DETROIT, MICH. M
visit DR. JORDAN'S great
MUSEUM OF ANATOMY
rj 1051 MARKET ST., 811FRUCISCO, CIL.
Of The Larrat Anatomical Museum In the
_jß__ w°rld. Weaknesses $r any contracted
jjg3H> disease poiitlvelr cared by the oldest
JJS? fm\ -teni.ist on th« Coajt EsL36yclri.
JSwl DR. JORDAN-DISEASES OF MEN
Ffflkl SYPHILIS thoro-jghlr eradicated
I %Mg B r°'" b>'stcm wit^out the uss cfMercorj.
Bff I Trosaes fitted by an Eipert. KadL
ml tIA cMI ctlr" fo* Haptnre. A quick and
I(I \\% radical cure for Piles. Flnura and
Jl Fto.alß. by Dr. Jordan's special pain
■• -€• less method*.
Consultation free and strictlyprirate. Treatment per
sonally or by letter. A Poritiw Cur* in every case
undertaken. Write for Book. Pnil.OSOl'iiv of
MARRIAGE. MAILED FREE. (A valuable book
for men.) Call or writs
DR. JORDAN & CO., 1051 Market SL, S. F.
J^MAd^ 50 YEARS'
INEXPERIENCE
|F^ Trade Marks
'fMB^ Designs
rrvTfi Copyrights Ac.
Anyone sending a sketch and deßcription may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention Is probably patentable. Communica
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patents taken through Munn 4 Co. recelvo
special notice, without charge, in the
Scientific Jftierican.
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 a
year; four months. $1. Sold by all newsdealers.
MUNN SCO. 3818"-*' New York
Branch Office, 625 F St., Washington, D. C.
There is no scarcity of
Lumber now at
Codd's
Sawmill.
The yard b stacked high, the Htock of
logs jh larger than ever before, unri lum
ber in coming from the Haw at the rate
of 40,000 feet a day, iiiHiiring the prompt
tilling of all orders.
A complete stock of
Sash, Doors, Blinds,
Moulding, Window (ilass,
and building material of all kinds kept
constantly on hand. Kiln Dried Lambeff
a specialty. Estimates promptly fur
nished and money Raved for you in
building operations*.
WILLIAM COM).
Hiram Mitchell
Auctioneer.
Will pay prompt attention to advertioinK
and posting bills for all salt-n put in my hands,
rree corrals at Col fax for stock brought to mo
to sell. Parties at a distance will find it to
their advantage to communicate with me be
fore fixing dates or making final arrangements
for sales. OalJ on or address me at Colfax,
and your sale will receive prompt and careful
attention.
EAST gggb WR
THE SURVEYOR'S CHAIN
MADE IT THE SHORTEST
TRANSCONTINENTAL ROUTE.
It is the most modern in equipment.
It is the heaviest-railed line.
It has a rock-ballast roadbed.
It crosses no sand deserts.
It is noted for the courteny of its employe*
It was built without land g.ant or mivern
ment aid.
It is the only line serving meals on the a-la
carte plan.
THROUGH THE GRANDEST
SCENERY IN AMERICA
BY DAYLIGHT.
_ Attractive Tours during Season of Naviga
tion on Great Lakes via Duluth, in connection
with Magnificent Passenger Steamers North
west and Northland.
For maps, tickets and complete information
call on or address O. R. &; N. agent, Coif ax, or
F. I. WHITNEY, G. P. & T. A ,
St. Paul. Minn.
Spokane Fstl's and Northern,
Nelson & Vort Kheppard
and Hi <l Mountain
...Railways...
The Only All-Rail Kmite without change of
cars between Spokane, Roeeland and Nelson.
DAILY TRAINS.
Leave. Arrive.
8:50 a. m SPOKANE 6 00 p m
11:25 ». m. ROSSLAND 3:50 p. m*.
'■•:10 a. m NELSON s:f>o p. m
Close connections at Nelson with steamers
for Kaslo and all Kootenai lake points.
Passengers for Kettle river and Boundary
creek connoct at Marcus with btatre daily
H. A. JACKSON. G. P. & T. A.
Spokane, Washington
GAZETTK CLUB LIST.
Payable in advance. Colfax Gazette and—
American Economist, New York $'2 55
American Gardening-, New York " 2 30
Argonaut, San Francisco .... 455
Bulletin, Sunday, San Francisco..... 2 30
Call, Weekly, San Francisco. ..... '" 2.25
Cosmopolitan Magazine, New York 2 35
Century Magazine, New York... 5 05
Chronicle, Weekly, San Francisco 2*65
Enquirer, Weekly, Cincinnati 2 05
Examiner, Weekly. San Francisco "' '2 65
Ja.m and Fireside, Springfield, 0... . 1 75
Globa-Democrat.Twice-a- Week.St. Louis 2 30
Harper's Magazine, New York. 4*15
Harper's Weekly " 4*75
Harper's Bazar ' 4'yg
Inter Ocean, Weekly. Ch'cago. '. I*9o
Leslie's Illustrated Weekly, New York ' 355
Lippincott's Magazine, Philadelphia 355
Ledger, Weekly, Tacoma " 2 30
Munsey'a Magazine, New York!! 2 40
McClure's Magazine. New York
Northwest Horticulturist, Tacoma I*Bs
National Tribune, Washington V 45
Northwest Magazine, St. Paul 2 55
Oregonian. Weekly. Portland 2 55
Orange Judd Farmer, Chicago ' 2 30
Public Opinion, New York. 3*55
Post Intelligencer, Weekly, Seat'tie '.'.'.". 230
Keview of Reviews Magazine, New York 355
bcribner s Magazine, New York 4*05
St. Nicholas Magazine, New York.. 4*05
Scientific American, New York 4 (\r
Tribune, Weekly, New York 220
Tribone, Semi-Weekly .[[[[ 2 85
The Forum, New York " //«
Toledo Blade, Toledo 0....'..'!"... j go
The Housekeeper, Minneapolis i'or
Traveler, Weekly, boston {95
The C^ueen of Fashion, New York. 185
Womankind, Springfield, O I'fiK
World, Thrice-aWeek, New York! '. 2 30
Youth's Companion, Boston (new subs) 280
If the periodical desired is not in *bove list
apply to The Gazette for rates.
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