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The Colfax gazette. (Colfax, Wash.) 1893-1932, December 21, 1900, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085460/1900-12-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE AX GAZETTE.
PWENTY-FOURTB YEAR.
GREAT
IMPUTATION SALE
The amputation of the hand often saves the arm;
A loss now on goods is better for us than to carry
this season's stock into next season.
Now is your opportunity to save—our time to
lose; but it sometimes pays to lose.
No Matter The Sacrifice
We are out to Lower Records
And we are doing it.
WATCH THIS SALE-IT IS COINC TO BE A LIVELY ONE
We are going to make a Clean Sweep. See posters for prices.
Sale commences Nov. 17. ends Dec. )50.
When You Want Supplies
Why Go to Outside Cities?
YOU CAN BUY HERE AS CHEAP, AND VERY OFTEN CHEAPER.
The city merchant baa very few facilities for buying and selling which the
country merchant does not also possess. In fact, the advantages on the,whole are
on the side of the country dealer. His rent is much less. His general expenses are
much le*s. Why then does ho much trade go to outside cities, which of right
Bbotild be distributed throughout the neighborhood in which your lot is cant?
Because the country denier lets it go there.
Whatever the state of affairs may be in other Paloose Country stores, we will
not sell you cotton for wool, nor jute for tlux. We buy for cash; we sell for cash;
We buy in large quantities; this means another big saving. We ask no one.to
trade with us simply because we are in business in this neighborhood. We do
not aHk your patronage as a right; we ask you to come here because
It Pays You to Buy in Colfax.
The meaner sorts of merchandise we have no time to bother with; neither
have you if wejud^ethe trading public aright. Clean, honest, reliable stuff, at
lowest prices, is What intelligent buyers are looking for. We keep none other.
Respectfully,
CHAS. PLATT.
BAEROLL & MOHNEY
HEAVY AND SHELF
HARDWARE y # W
FOR OUT <>' DOOES ¥
and indoors, upstairs and downstairs, \ . \ j., I
kitchen, dining room hihl chamber we have . - \
as complete a collection of crockery, china- . y'-^-X-- * ,/ J
ware and glamware as eati be foaad in this :;t/; " *;7^? -^r
section of the country. Nothing antiquated. "J-. V ~ :^ ':~^J.,r^
everything up-to-date, including the price,
which is always as low as is consistent with v (" " ' jgr
meritoriooa articles. k'~t»vt..~ " ' *?s^H,G-r
Christmas Presents Cheap
But Not Cheap Christinas lMvsonts.
The Colfax Drug Stoic
(Next Door to the l»ost Office)
Daring the month of December intend to Slaughter tli<» Prices
on all Holiday Goods. Especial attention is called to the line of
tine Pocket Books, which will be Hold regardless of cost. Call and see
our stock of Beautiful Picture*
Telephone, Main 1. C. F. STUAKT, Propr.
'jilt (^ an^a Glaus
"^^^^^^^^^ ""^ '''8 Headquarters at
Tm<: 1 i:i: Hive
33SK?^!^5!3S5fc Where he has All Kinds of Nice
XAI^IS GOODS
At Prices on the Bottom.
Don't Forget the Place. Main Street, Colfax, Washington.
Modern Warehouse Elevator 00. ISIKEI
MANUFACTURES THE
MODERN WAREHOUSE ELEVATOR
And is agent for h number of sutu.Jar.l gasoline engines, from one to twenty horse power Can
put in a one horse power pump tna! will pump 600 gallons of water an hour "The oo«t or ru'nnine
the engine is from 15 to 20 cents per full day Why buy a windmill? Manufactory and Office, i
Main Street, Opposite School House. COLFAX, WASHINGTON
f\ f\ T\ I COE V MERCANTILE CO.
\J\J XJ • UOCKFORD, WASH.,
Can fill all orders for Wood on short notice.
Best Grade $2.75, Buckskin $2.25 per cord, by carload
KlllNf*ril)P f°r your Ma^aziues and Newspapers through The
OUUcWjIIIjc! Gazette and nave money.
COLFAX, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, DECEMBEB 21, 1900.
NEWS OP THE STATES
—__ I
(ittlliored From Hills, Valleys
and Plains of the Union.
, Boiled Down As It Comes From
the Wires for Information of
Husy Headers.
Tuesday, December 11
The telegraphers uu the Northern Pa
ciflc sent a committee to General Maun
ger Kendrick to present several matters
of importance to the operators. They
'-Hny there is do irritation and that they
have been well treated.
Myron T. ilerrick, president of thr
| Society for savings at Cleveland, Ohio,
in being prominently mentioned as a
Rdcceeeor to Secretary of the Treasury
I Gage in case of the latter's retirement
I from the cabinet.
i The estimate of appropriation bills
! for the government next year is as fol
lows: Agriculture, $4,000,050; army,
$1 13,019,044; diplomatic and consular,
11.897,638; District of Columbia, "$9,- I
080,703; fortifications, $12,401,193;
Indians, |9,250,751; legislative, etc,
*-•;•>,:{(.i!t,;-,o<); military academy, $ 1,045,
--rSO; uavy, f87,172,430; pensions $145,- |
245,230; postoffiee, $121,207,349; river !
and harbor, |25,130,000; suudry civil, |
$63,378,113; permanent annual appro- !
pnationp, $124,358,220.
Cornelius Alvord, the defaulting teller ;
of the Kirsf National Bank of New York, j
who Btolt $690,000, was indicted by the !
grand jury on 52 counts.
Official vote of North Dakota: Mc-
Kiriley, 35,891; 8ryan,20,519; Woolley,
731; Debs, 518; Barker, 10.
Recruits are arriving at San Francisco
from various enlistment points at the
rate ol 250 a week.
The senate ccntirmed the president's
nominations of Brigadier General Lloyd
Wheaton and Brigadier General A. R.
Chaffee to be major generals.
December wheat at Chicago, 70> 4 /.
Portland, cash, 54; Taeoraa, 54.
Wednesday, December 12.
In the wreck of a Great Northern pas
senger train near Brockton, Montana,
three women passengers and a child
were killed.
The Northern Pacific announces that
a reduction of fares from 4 cents to 3
cents a mile will be made in Montana,
making the rate at the lower figure over
the entire system.
With imposing ceremonies the national
capital today ■• the centennial
ann! survey made anting o f tne Beat
ton. v'"u'"">^,a n ; i p
John H. McCullough paid $47,500 for
a meanberairip in the New York Stock
exchange. . •
Santa Fe railroad officials say they
have plenty of new men to take the
places of striking operators.
Thursday, December 13.
The report given out a few days ago
by the Associated l'ress that the trans
port Hancock had arrived at San Fran
cisco with 1500 bodies of soldiers and
sailors was an error. The ship only
brought 11 bodies and ten of them died
on the way over.
A lone robber held up a train in the
outskirts of New Orleans. The con
ductor whs shot and severely wounded
by the robber, who stole several regis
ters d mail pouches and express packages.
The jury in the trial of Jessie Morri
son, who killed her rival, Mrs. Olin Cas
tle, with a razor at Eldorado, Kansas,
disagreed mid was discharged. Niue
were for acquittal and three for man
slaughter in the fourth degree.
Wheat has grown ho rank in Kansas
that farmers are offering free pasturage
to Btock to eat it down.
Friday, December 14.
Wind blew 60 miles an hour at San
Francisco and along the coast, accom
panied by thunder and lightning, bail
and rain Much damage was caused in
many sections of the city.
Commencing January 1 the Calumet
& Hecla Mining company of Michigan,
will increase the wages of its 4000 em
ployes 2 1-2 per cent. Last March the
company raised the men's wages 10 per
cent.
The Predonia state normal school at
Dunkirk, N. V , burned and six young
women perished.
Paddy Ryan, pugilist, died at Albany,
Gen. M. J. Bulger of Birmingham, Ala.,
the oldest confederate officer, died.
Saturday, December 15.
For selling bogus diplomas Dr. James
Armstrong, president of the Metropoli
tan medical college, was given a year in
jail and $500 fine.
Five men disguised as tramps asked
the town marshal at Brighton, 111., to
sleep in the calaboose. When he accom
panied them to the jail the marshal was
seized and locked up. Then they at
tempted to blow up a bank, but were
unsuccessful, but robbed a store of $100.
W. B. Coppinger died at Springfield,
111., from injuries received in a football
game.
Four people are dead and several
others in a dangerous condition from
mysterious poisoning at Marietta, Ohio.
They were taken ill after dinner.
Sunday. December 16.
Eastern Utah has an alarming small
! pox epidemic.
Louis Arrata wounded Marshal Bar- |
i rett and Constable Pritchard when they
went to arrest bim at Santa Monica, i
i Cal. He also wounded Frank Angel and I
his own daughter and then killed him- j
self.
The big tannery of Zsehistshe & Sons
at Sheboygan, Wis., burned; loss, £180,
--; 000.
Two negroes, Jim Henderson and Bud j
Rowlands, were lynched at Rockport, '
Ind. They waylaid, murdered and j
robbed Hollie Simons, v white barber.
Official returns show Michigan to have
given McKinley 104,584 plurality.
Monday, December 17.
Steamship Alpha, a British vessel, was
I wrecked on a reef in Bay nee sound in a
tierce pale. Her captain, owner and
neveri of the crew perished.
; Andrew Dahlberg wan assassinated at
hie home near Hiltsboro, Oregon. He
; was shot through a window by an un
known person.
; At Topeka, Kansas, James Hoffner a
; Kussmn, was arrested for killing bis six
months old baby. Hoffner went to his
! home in a state of intoxication and at
tacked his wife while she was holding the
baby in her arms. He fell over OD the
child two or three times and killed it.
A third negro was lynched at Boone
ville. Ind , for the murder of Holly
Simons, a barber.
Great Britain Also Collects.
! Constantinople, Dec. I(s—Owing to
the success of the United States in press
ing claims for compensation in connec
tion with the Armenian disorders, (Jreat
Britain is now urging the Ottoman gov
ernment to pay similar claims put for
j ward by her subjects. It is expected
that energetic means will be taken to
j obtain a settlement.
I BRITISH WERE VICTORS
; Early Reports Were That the Dutch
Were the Best Men.
With Oom Paul Thousands of Miles
Away in Safety, Defeat
is Certain.
London, Dec. IT—The report of an
other severe battle resulting in British
victory, is current here. According to
the story the fighting began at day
break and lasted for several hours. The
Boers, who numbered from 1500 to
2000 men, were surrounded at the
Orange river and totally defeated, with
very heavy losses in killed and wounded.
A number of Boers, it is added, were
captured.
Whipped Dewet
Maseru, Dec. 17—It appears that
Dewet'a force was twice repulsed before
breaking through the British lines in tht
neighborhood of Thaba N'Chu. In the
third attack Dewet led in person. With
a few determined men he charged and
broke the British lines, the rest of the
command following. He was forced,
however, to leave in the bands of the
British als pounder and lf> wagons
with ammunition and stores. Com
mandant Haasbrook, with a commando
and two guns, tried to get through
•-■pringkant's Nek, but was driven back,
losing 40 men.
WHIPPING THE BRITISH.
Boers Laying It All Over the Eng-
lish in Africa.
London, Dec. 14.—Lord Kitchener re
ports that after severe lighting at Xooft
Gedacht General Clement's forces were
compelled to retire by Commandant De-
Urey with a force of 2500 men. Five
British omterp were k;!.Va. The other
easualtiea were not reported.
The battle still continues a few miles
from Krugersdorp. General Clements
has asked for reinforcements and
mourned men under General French
have already gone. There have beeu
many casualties on botti aides. It is es
timated that the Boers number 2.s<)<).
Still Capt tiring English.
Aliwalnorth, Dec. 15—A party of Bra
bantu horse, consisting of raw recruits,
engaged a superior force of Boers De
cember 13 near Zastron,- Orange River
Colony, losing four killed, 1 wounded
and 120 taken prisoners.
ÜBIQUITOUS \YM. J.
Intends to Work His Lovers to a
Finish.
Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 15.—William J.
Bryan gave out the following interview
today:
"I have for several years had in con
templation the establishment of a week
ly newspaper and this seems an oppor
tune time for undertaking it. Intending
to devote my life to the study and dis
cussion of public questions, I have
taken this method because it will best
accomplish the purposes which I have in
view. Through a paper, I will be able
to keep in touch with social, economic
and political problems. The paper wili
at the same time, if successful, provide
an income sufficient for my pecuniar;
needs, and this kind of work will allow
me more time with my family than I
have been able to enjoy for several years
past.
"I expect to lecture occasionally,
especially in college towns, where f can
speck to students, but my principal
work will be done with the pen, or per
haps I should say, with the pencil.
"The paper will be called the Com
moner, and will defend the principles set
forth in the Kansas City platform. I
shall be publisher and editor, and Lin
coin will be the place of publication."
German Vessel Foundered
Madrid, Dec. IG—The German train
ing frigate Gneiseuau has foundered off
Malaga, northeast of Gibraltar. The
Gneisenau foundered at the entrance to
the port of Malaga, where she was about
to take refuge from the terrible storm
prevailing. A large number of the
cadets can be seeu from the shore cling
ing to the rigging. They are shouting
and signalling for help, fhe captain
and many of the cadets have been
drowned. It is believed tfcat forty, who
left in one of the ship's boats and have
not been seen since, are lost. The total
loss is now thouehr*to be no less than
100. Some dispatches say 140. Forty
of those saved are badly hurt.
Free of Charge.
Any adult suffering from a cold settled
i on the breast, bronchitis, throat or lung
| troubles of any nature, who will call at
j Colfax Drug Store, will be presented
\ with a sample bottle of Boschee's Ger
man Syrup, free of charge. Only one
bottle given to one person, and none to
children without order from parents.
No throat or lung remedy ever had
such a sale as Boscbee's German Syrup
'in all parts of the civilized world.
! Twenty years ago millions of bottles
| were given away, and your druggist will
i tell you its success was marvelous. It
jis really the only Throat and Lung
Remedy generally endorsed by physi
cians. One 75 cent bottle will cure'or
prove its value. Sold by dealers in all
i civilized countries.
I Get Green's Prize Almanac.
WORK OF CONGRESS
Important Hills am! Measures
Under Discussion.
State oi Washington Will Not Bel
Allowed a Third Repre
sentative.
| Washington. Dec. Ls.—The boose to
day passed tin- war revenue redaction
bill. The opposition sought to recom
mit the bill with instructions to report
hack a measure reducing the revenue ai
I least 170,000,000, and including a pio
vision for an income tax, ho drawn as t.>
escape an adverse decision of the sn
premeeoort. The motion failed, 131 to
155. Thereupon the hill was passed
without the concurrence of tin- minorit v
who refrained from voting.
The amendment placed in the hill yes
terday to tax express receipts was'de
reated on an aye and nay vote in the
bouse, VJ7> to 139.
The pension appropriation hill, carry
ing 115.145,230, w«s passed in exactly
thirteen minutes.
•Jobs lor Soldiers,
Washington, Dec. 17.—This was the
individual suspension day in the bouse.
The speaker of the bouse first recognized
Mr. Bromwell of Ohio, who moved to
suspend the ruleH and pan* the hill re
ported by the civil service commission
to give preference to honorably dis
charged soldiers in the executive depart
ments. It provides that honorably dis
charged soldiers of the civil war and
after thorn honorably discharged soldiers
of the Spanish war and the war in the
Philippines he riven preference both in
appointment to office and retention
therein, ami that loss of limbs or other
physical impairment, which does not in
capacitate, shall not disqualify them.
After an interesting debate thin I ill was
defeated .".") to I<>7.
No New Washington Member
Washington, Dec. 17.—The boose
committee on census by, a vote of 7 to 6
agreed to report the Hopkins r. appor
tionment bill, leaving the total mem
bership of the bouse at 357, as at pres
ent, and rearranging a number of state
delegation**.
To Suppress Train Bobbery.
Washington, Dec. 17.—Representative
May of New York, in the house, and
Senator Hoar of Massachusetts, in the
senate, today introduced bills "for the
suppression of train robbery in the
territories of the United State's and else
where." It provides the death penalty
for those guilty of a "holdup" in case
the death of anj person on the train re
sults. In case no one is killed the penalty
is made hard labor from 20 to 40 years.
That Nicaragiian Treaty.
Washington, Deir. 1? — JMt betore ad
journing, the senate gave its consent to
the fixing of a definite time to vote upon
the Hay-Pauncefote treaty. Mooney
(Dem. Miss.) »nd Mason (Rep. 111.) bad
occupied the time of executive session in
making speeches upon the treaty, aud
when Mason, who was the hint speaker,
concluded, Lodge (Rep. Mass) renewed
his request to t;ike a vote u(\t 'llmr*
day. No voice wn~ raised in opposition,
and the agreement was recorded.
RETURN THE VOLUNTEERS
The Soldier Boys Are Coming Home
Before .July.
Washington, Dec. 14.—The opinion in
expressed at the war department that
there is no prospect of a general re en
listment on the part ol the volunteers in
the Philippines. The records of the de
partment all tend to show rhat only a
small percentage of the state troops are
likely to serve beyond the present term
of enlistment. Officers serving with the
volunteer regiment* in the Philippines
have been sounded on that point, and
have reported a general disinclination
on the part of the volunteers to prolong
their enlisted service. It is realized thai
a similar state of affairs existed among
the state volunteers recruited during
the Spanish war. There were about 10,
--000 of these volunteers in the Philip
pines when the volunteer regiments were
mustered out at the close of the Spanish
war, and oi that number only 7450 n-
enlisted for service in the Philippines in
the present volunteer army, notwith
standing the liberal inducements offered
by the government to that end, includ
ing travel pay at once to the amount of
$100 to each man who enlisted.
The plans of the war department for
bringing home the volunteer troops are
shown in the following cable from Ad
jutant General Corbin to General Mac-
Arthur:
Send Them Home.
"Send volunteers convalescent to tJtf
capacity ol the next transport return
ing, and a volunteer regiment by trans
port following. Ah you report 69,000
dow, the secretary of war directH thai
you start home the volunteer regiments
until the force is reduced to 60,000, the
number fixed before beginning reinforce
ment by regular*. Will send you regu
iur regiments to further relieve the
volunteers."
They Are Coming.
General Mac Arthur wan equal "to the
occasion, and immediately answered
under date of December 13 from Manila:
"With reference to your telegram of
the 11th, the Thirty seventh infantry
regiment, D. 8. V. infantry, nails on
transport .Sheridan January'l, aud the
Eleventh regiment, U. 8. V. cavalry, on
January 15. The movement will'con
tinue as directed until completed. The
Thirty-sixth regiment, D. S. V. infantry,
ie in the field; cannot leave at present.
Authority in requested to retain regular
officers in the volunteer Hervice whose
regular organizations are here. Also
voluuteer officers vow assigned to
special duty who so desire, with a view
to muster out June 30. An important
question of policy in involved, as the de
parture of volunteers almost renders it
impossible to furnish officers for special
duty, the necessities for which are in
creasing. Transport Shermaa leaves
December 15 with about 500 volunteer
convalescents, and the transport War
ren, Dtcember 2:2, with the same num
ber. Any remaining will go on trans-
I port Sheridan, January 1."
PRICE V\\ E i EN
CLEVELAND ON DEMOCRACY.
Cireat Need In a lUtiirn To lC»ic».f
Principle*,
Ulaata Oa Dee. 17-TV AUaaU
Journal this afternoon print* an inter
vi.vv w.th former President Cleveland
• ■dunned l,v r rtaff correspondent mi Mr"
< leveland'n home.
"In mj opinion," n-iid Mr. <|„v , .|( l , ll |
the great need ..f the democratic purtv
ih it return to Brm principles. Tbedeni
ocratic party baa not been Fatally di
organized, tun it badly Deed* refaahili.
tation on purelj democratic line
''Whai m th«- matter with tin- "pan* •
It I'hh, in m.v h,,,„!,!, judgment, simph
wandered off niter Grange rod* \
large man of democratic roten u«
thif before tl,». last election. Tbej re
mained quiet, bni wben the time came
(<> rote tbej »nl\ 'Thia in not de
mocracy, -in.l refimed to support it
"Ac 1 tee it," H, t i,| \| r . Cleveland', "it
jib the duty of «1,.t ratn ererywbereto
aid in the rehabilitation i.l ti>.- party
Lhere an' mma si^nn of an iuMHtenry
upon the DeceMity ol a return to demo
cratic doctrines in tin- Booth, hut they
an> not so general mm I would hk.- to
■cc."
I'Whai ol the future?" was a*ked.
with a Hineere return to i(M old time
doctnne«,' be replied, "old timeTictorifi
of the democratic party will certainly I.c
won.
RESULT OF A STRIKE.
Game of Blaff Between Operator*
ami Paymasters.
Topeka, Kan., Dec. 12.-Tb« s,,, lt u
be railroad hag repudiated it» relations
witb_the L -ier ol Railway Teleftrapbera.
•We will have nothing furth.-r to do
with an organisation which limh proved
itself as incompetent, It broke its coo
tract to give ijn thirty days' notice and
gave us but thirty seconds," said (i.-n
--eml Manager Mudge tonight. "Thai in
Dot saying that recognition will be de
nied the 0. I: T. permanently or under
competent management. I urn not com
petent to speak for the future; that inn
matter for the railroad people to de
termine. Mr. Ripley, in an interview
save be favors the assistance ol railroad
organizations. I urn in favor of the
brotherhoods. Thej are the authorized
bodies with whom a great volum* of
mutual business can l»e transacted,wbere
otherwise there would he no head or
authority to transact business with. I
cannot say but thai with the same able
and careful management the <>. R. T.
would he on the same footing with the
15 «»f '•• I- . B. of I. k and o berorgan
izations.
'T..v breaking their contract they
buve forfeited recognition.
'Ah to the Colorado ilintrictH, ire have
H|)fci;tl fiL'i-iiiH out )tlun« tbe line from
Denver to Colorado Springs to pnreoi
any more annoyances. *'
('. <; Sbotwell, enperintendenl <>f tde
grapb, Bays be Ihih a Ht»ick of applies
tionafrom operators who are anxious
..) work, <it,;l that be limh toMtbem tlmt.
bo more are needed.
CAPTURED \ FEW BEBELS.
How the Rattle Goes on the Inland
Inland of Laxoß
Manila, Dee. 17. -Thirty rebek wen
captured this morninJf near San Pedro
Maeiiti, four miles from Manila, by L'".
men (it ;iu Twentieth United States in
fantry and 'JO members of the native
Manila police. The force landed from
small boats and surrounded tbe suburb.
Seventy pernonw were captured, but
only :!() were identified,
Manila, Dec. 17 — Advicesjnai received
from [loilo, Panay inland, say that the
inßurgents Saturday burned a part of
the village of Cabatuan
Assistant Surgeon Frederick Wash
burn, Jr., of the Twenty-sixth infantry,
with 28 men, held the principal build
ings. A strong wind waH blowing at
the time. The Americans sustained no
casualties.
Later advices from [loilo announce
that detachments ol tbe Twenty-sixth
infantry surprised the headquarters ol
Amman Salae thin morning, capturing
considerable quantities of HtoreH and
Home papers. Several natrves were
killed. Ttie Americans, who have no
lohhch. were utill in purHiiit of the fWinj?
insurgents when the dispatch left lloilo.
KoL> Then Kyery Night,
Bope, Ind., Dec. 18.—The Hafe in the
Citizens' bank here was blown op bj
robbers and looted of ith eontenta at
2:30 o'clock this morning. There were
five explosions in opening tbe naif. The
telephone «irl saw the flashes and called
up a number of citiz.-riH. Postmaster
Sbaugh, one of the hrnr to arrive on the
scene, «iw a man on guard in front of
the bank, who ran inside the bank door
just in time to avoid a load of shot from
Sbaugh'e gan. The robben Bed with
their booty and made their escape. It
iH not positively known tbe exact
amount of money secured, but there whh
at least flß,ooo taken. Three or four
men were connected with the robbery.
Snultbed Giivcrnur Pintfree.
Lansing, Mien., I>ec. I(S.—(Jovernor
Pinuree's banquet, which wiiH announced
in honor of the mem ben of tin- ntnte
legislature, justiceH of the nupreme court,
and railroad ofhcialn of the state, was
LjiviTi in the hall of the houHe of Fepre
aentatives. None of the justice* of the
supreme court nor the railroad officials
invited were present, while only three
state senators and 4<"> representatives
attended. Not a state official-elect ac
cepted the governor's, invitation to be
present.
A -New Year's Guide.
There in one book every one nhould
make an effort to tret, lor the new year.
It contain* simple and valuable hints
concerning health, many arnjsing anec
dotes, ami much general infortuation.
We refer to HostPtter'a Almanac, pub
lished by The Ho»tetter Co , I'ittwburgh,
Ptt. It will prove valuable to any house
hold Sixty employee are kept at work
on thin valuable book. The insue for
1901 will be over eight millions, printed
in the English, (Jerman, French, Welab,
Norwegian, Swedish, Holland. Bohetni
au and Spanish languagen. It containn
proof of the efficacy of Hontetter'n
Stomach Hitters, the gredt n-tnedy pre
jiared by the publinherrt, and it* worthy
of careful preservation. The almanac
may be obtained free of cost, of any
diuggiHt or general dealer in the coun-
try.

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