OCR Interpretation


Pullman herald. (Pullman, W.T. [Wash.]) 1888-1989, November 03, 1888, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085488/1888-11-03/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

- -■.£"—^a.-i to.
VOT '" 1 • nsjocx, 'M 4
-5r — — 11. C. WILLIAMSON,
"\ r - Fatliioaablo
-^SSrber.&Hgir-Cuttep
Special Attention t* ot)*sn to Cutting
and Trimm •»■/ ' < dl*** anil
Children' a Hair.
HOT & COLD BATHS |
PULLJIAH, WASH. TEH.
Line & Transfer,
11. LANNING, i - PEOPEIETOB
PULUIAN, WASH. TEE.
Freight and Furniture
BAGGAGE, ETC.,
Carefully bandied and lianlfd fly Competent
Tramstere. Orders mny be left at the FABISS
liltOS.' store, and will bo promptly aded to.
I
STAYER & WALKER
Dealers in
I H i 111
•3TUDEBAKEK FARM AND SPRING
WAGONS,
LITTLE GIANT GANG rLO\Y>V
). 1. CASE WALKING AND SULKY
PLOWS,
KEI . . bISG BAEEOW,
bHB STANDARD SPEING TOOTH
BAfiEOW,
( DARK'S CUTAWAY HARROW,
ACME PULYEREZING
BUPERIOR STEEL LAND-KOLLEHS
BARLEY CUISIIERS,
■v... HOTTER SEEDERS & DEILLS, -
IIOOSIEB PRESS DRILLS,
BUCKEYE FEED MILL & POWER,
DIAMOND FEED MILLS,
Dedrick Hay Presses
808 SLEIGHS,
ROSS FEED CUTTERS, FOE HAND
f« ' t)r Power,
Kcme Brick and Tile Machines, Swell-
JJody C::Uore and Sleighs,
V. I. qASE THiagSHiNG MACHINE
CO.'i> KN(iIKES i .SAV.'-TVIILLS,
Chandler & Taylor's No. 1 Engines and
Saw-Mills, Ac, &c.
PULLMAN, " - ir^isir. rru.
DID
—^mojr
KNOW
THAT
The Washington Import^ Co.
was located only half a mile East of
1' D IXMAN, W. T. This is so,
and tin re yon can buy
ptPQBTED
English Shire
AM)
Cleveland Bay
STALLION 3. ALSO, GENUINE
Hanibleienian
AND
-—^ Tlioroiiglibred
I fljfi K; gN UJOXS. j^4.ND-CHI.NA FIGS
- i '
horse-shoeh;. ! m
— •-,:>
Z3T All my work is guarau
GRAND ST., - . - _'
ilf paid in :«i?*noe. \*~ . JJBS.O© per Year.
if not paid iirudTOice.'-r..... 2.50 per Year.
Six Months 0n1y..... .'....*... .', 1..23 a Iv'ee
, „.,.' ADVERTISING RATES
Are liberal, 'in* made known on application ia
person or by mail. Legal Notice at the l>-i?il
rates. Giro oa » trial.
Entered at the Post Office for Transmission in
the Hails at Second-Class Bates.
••now:"
In other word?, Good morning!
And with the compliments of the sea
sou we present you with the first issue
of Pullman's Sr.<t paper, The Hhi;a;.i>.
In regard to the "long-felt want *' —
well, you know how it is, how it has
been for some time jxist. We aro here
to fill that vacuum to the best of our
ability, and to rustle like all ret-out for
Pullman and the county, its citizens, its
(armers,its general interests. Incident
ally we shall also rustle Bomewhat for
ourselves. Wo are not here for our
health, but for uu.siness with a big B.
We. don't invest much stock in the
stereotyped aow-newspnper "promises,"
and "resolves," and "pledges," as to
what their future coarse is to be. Deeds
are worth more to the pound than words,
especially in the Palouse country. How
ever, we will remark that the Herald
intends to be, first of all, a local paper,
devoted mainly to homo and county af
fairs, with an observant eye upon terri
torial doings of interest, meanwhile. To
litieally, it will bo of '.!-■' Republican col
or, fast-dyed and warranted to wear, but
not bo deeply "sot" as to be bigoted.
How does this strike you? Two dollars
worth?
In a nutshell, then: You remember
the proverb, "As thy days thy strength
shall be." In the case of the HkRATiT)
we will paraphrase it thus for a motto:
••As iis support, bo tho paper shall be."
That's fair, all around. We are mightily
encouraged with the present business,
and shall be ready at any time to make
our paper larger and give more reading
space if it continues, -tho business, we
mean. So, a strong pull, a long pull,
and let US all pull together for Pullman.
[That pr.n is rather atrocious, and we'll
stop right here. |
THE NEWSPAPER.
There are some tilings from which or) crops or Eastern Washington is
the freshness no^rj^fefa^va^^^urof^'nieu' from the official report of Lieut,
which .tfe J=«snScrnever dies. Day by Frank Green, of the U.S. signal corps,
day we may stand beside a telegraph in response to a Senate resolution con
operator, for instance, but the mystery corning the wheat lands of the territory,
of his performance never becomes clear, The report is dated July 27. 1833:
and the —*"- surprise is always mS^s^^/s^ss^
fresh and keen. Just so the newspaper fa fcQ be fa a y ., rillly of ( „ions.
is a constantly recurring miracle whoso tllo most prominent of which are theier- I
wonder never wears away. Whether ly
ing carefully folded in the office or invit
ingly open upon the table; whether
wrapping cheese and codfish, or thrown
discarded into the street to scare horses
and I)'' trampled on, it is always invest
ed with ;i strange kind of owe.
The newspaper! Look at it. It seems
empty and vacant, pc haps. "Nothing
in the paper," yon say; yet -•-'
I you will find it an open <i I
many people wi:
known. Cl
another sor
, ■ io£ a death. Look
uts closely- -its news items,
llany, its list of accidents, of
imea see how sndden wealth
has .surprised some, and sudden poverty
saddened others: take into your mind
tho i>; i j>< >rt or the consequence of all
;h se things, and you will find that you
hold in your hand "the ends of myriad
invisible, electric conductors, along
which tremble the joys, sorrows, wrongs,
triumphs, hopes and despairs of as ma
ny men and women," all as sensitive) to
pleasure or pain as yourself. Hero yon
nave the lore of the scholar and the wis
dom of the sage. Here the divine
preaches, the poet sings, and the parti
san lies. Here the statesman proclaims
his principles and the auctioneer offers
his wares. Here is the result of tho an
tiquarian's research, and through the
very next column throbs a tale of pres
ent love, passion and romance. Here,
iocteed, the Old and the New aro brought
into contrast, and
"Tradition, snowy-bearded, lean 3
On Romance, ever young."
This is but a feeble portrayal of what
a newspaper is: let us se« Low it is
made. Come with us to the office. We
will pr.ss that pile of paper. Yet, stop;
! pick up a sheet of it. We cannot wait
to explain the curious process of its man
ufacture, yet that clean white sheet is
the purified product of rags and filth.
The fiber which forms its texture may
have been stripped from Egyptian mum
mies; it may have come from the city
streets, or from great garrets in country
homes; it may have wrapped the luxu
rious form of beauty, or been the scanty
covering of want. But, whether from
the robos of a queen or the rags of a
harlot, it gives no cluo now to its for
mer condition. Like a eanctiSed soul,
1 it is ready fur a now life.
We pass into the editorial room. Xta
occupant is bus- : There are. papers]
itroru far and near; v'ltfos?*? from -sfideiy i
i6-"iitereii. c^fa»por.d<-j:ts: ;teioj{i;u«a—•
. lligence inVeveryt':foiai;vv 1* from :
■£fhb~inas9 id to b^-^^ted what ig_ofj
iteeu'i^ Cl ,rnd^"i^tf| ''The work of
-- investigated
PULLMAN, W. T. ing high ren
j .-^patsound? "C'Jick!
ypn^ltrf^ fe that? Wh- y
<; H,^' " <«ft Progress mar^-a to.
i*"") 1 I '" r ,..v■; :■*.• ' fj; "cast-." Look at that
j 'A^Sfi' 'r 1'01>os? s 'ca?^ filled with
l/P-c'B of rijotX^ W hat are they? Tliey
.a* the w ■ aerh t i Jt ,v >;r , „
TYPES.
The paper is being "made The |
types, one by one, have been p?8 ted up
by nimble fingers and placed ii W-oper
position. The errors have been correct-1
ed; every punctuation {mint is in ita
place. The scattered '-columns" ere
massed together; the "form," or page,
is securely " locked up" and sent to the
press-room, whither we will follow. Ah!
hero is where the wonderful transforma
tion is wrought; here matter becomes
the exponent of mind. The pages are
properly placed upon the, press; the- ma
chine moves rapidly forward, its arms
reaching for their strong embrace.
"Stop tie press!"' There is an error
of statement to be corrected, or an ob
jectionable, article to bo removed. The
types are taken out and borne, away—
corpses of a dead thought.
Look, now, upon that mass of typo on
tho press —quiet, dark, inert as tho earth
you trend. But, yet again, —the
white sheet has fallen upon their up
turned faces, the touch of the press bap
tizing them; the life that was in them
ha i passed upon paper, and the new cre
ation is pregnant with thought—a thing
with a soul, for it can move the souls of
men. That sheet so blank before, is
now a living power. A change has
passed over it, as marvelous as if, in an
instant, tho unwritten face of a boy
should put on the furrows of age, the
lines of care, tho impress of manhood's
experience.
Here, now. we have it—the newspaper!
Wonderful product of brain and toil!
One wotlld think it should be dearly
bought and highly prized; and yet it in
the cheapest thing in tlio world. Five
cents will buy it. One or two dollars
will bring it to your homo every week
in the year. And still, strange to say.
(iiciC are men "too poor to take a news
paper." They can pay ten cents for a
glass of beer, or fifteen cents for a bev
erage of unknown composition called a
"cocktail"; theycampay fifty cents fora
circus ticket, or a dollar for tho theatre,
yet they are "too poor" to buy a news
paper, which is a ticket of admission to
t he great World's theatre, whoso dramas
are written by God himself, whose scene
shifter is Time, and whose curtain is
rung down by Death.
Olli WHEAT LANDS.
The following extract regarding the
wonderfolly successful wheat (and otli-
tility of the soil, tin- very general pre
sence of a great depth of clay and hard
pan subsoil which acts as a vast reservoir
of moisture, the general mildness of the
winters as compared with other wheat
growing regions l^pg further inland to
the east, a incJe:";Xe mint of rainfall
during the t,""-' 11 season followed by
a nearly totally dry Opening and har
vest season, the prevalent westerly *?'•■■.
with their moistu" fi OHi - \ ' scifi< ■ ■..:: j
- tho scarcity of -jr/ ; : '-,=Uag •■v'uvW
frwn tho east, and | ;-: -'X-^? '" Vli-'.,
slight extent U^M'ii^'-'-i ofußj*s&)Sc!«
■ i ■.r ■ „iu'Ji giving longer daya in the
growing season and consequently more
hours of sunlight in which the plant
grows than in more southern latitudes.
Of the foregoing, the very great fer
tility of the soil must be held as of tho
first importance, for without this soil,
rich in tho material necssary for the
growth of the plant and the filling of the
kernel, the favorable climatic conditions
would bo fruitless. To the fertile soil,
treated under a favorable climate, must be
assigned the first place, and in its depth,
which is shown by reports to be an av
erage of 3 feet and more, is given prom
ise of almost inexhaustibility. This 3 feet
of soil being very friable, admits with
great facility the percolation of the
greater part of the rainfall and water
from melting snows. The rains are sel
dom heavy, and. except under the in
fluence of Chinook winds, the snows melt
gradually, so that only a small part of
the whole amount of precipitation passes
over the surface. ■ All of the prominent
streams, in fact all of the streams, have
their sources in the mountains and are
fed by melting snows. The streams be
come very low and some totally disap
pear is the winter months and assume
their largest proportions in the months
of June, July and August, when the
heavy snows in tho mountain.] melt."
Till: LEGISLATURE.
Colfax Gazette: "For representatives
the republicans have this year placed in
nomination two good men. A. T. Farias
is senior member of the. hardware firm of
Fariss Bros., of Pullman, a successful
business man, and one who ■will bring
his business acumen to the duties of a leg
islator. He con.es from a portion of the
county that has right to representation
at the capital, and we believe will serve
the county with credit to all.
J. S. Fenn, of Rosalia, is well known to
the people of Whitman county. He has
had the benefit of experience in the leg
islative halls, and -will return to them
, with the benefit of experience, and wide
; knowledge of the wants of his constitu
ents.
"The republican candidate for council
man this year is a man whose abilty and
character no one can truthfully assail.
Thomas J. Smith has been a fanner
of Whitman county for many years, and
is to-day one of our most prosperous and
; energetic citizens. What he has gath
i ered of wealth has been won by the put
suits of agrienltneei' and stock raising.
■Mr Smith has already served the people
'd -YiTiitmaa couuty," and served them
well, v-^hoscsltf know him have the full
, -i 1-!—T^-e^^iiis abilities, and be'f 11
' this organization tfce noSls'm
by every man wu«, *
its. =;X 2sSf-
■ '— » -^ 1
Bank====«ilrnan ?
;K - \ rULLMAX, Will. TEE.
J. A. Perkins, President. 11. J. Webb, 'Wfc-rres. W. Y. Wixdur, Cashier.
■' * \
1 Incorporated under the Banking Ijiv,* Washington Territory.)
|Trajis<#fs i\ Regular B&ilchjg Business.
INTEKEST ALLOWED ON TIMftEPOSITS.
Loans, on Farm Proper| Negotiated
AT LOW RATES. \
Draw on New York, San Francisco, Portlarl Colfax, Moscow,
and all the principal points in h rope.
BOARD OF DIRECT OL :
Wat Ladd, Portland. A. L. Mills, Colfas. \ J. A. Fekkin-s, Colfax
H. J. Webb, Pullman. W. Y. Wixi*, Pullman.
,1
|lftKlllllli;liKSiF. *
\ ' ; '^£vJ ■ - _~^f
«&5 ■
| Every Style and Price. Guaranteed Ust 2!
5 cqiiaiied for Operation, Economy, \XI
X Durability and Workmanship. x
X Impwwements and CoQTcnicncea found in no others. 1 V
f ALV/AYS RELIABLE i POPULAR EVERYWHERE i %
X SOU) EXCLUSIVELY 3¥ . X
I FAKIS^ - 13 it, o ® M |
§ PULLMAN, - - WASHINGTON TEE. jj
"■-* We also keep on hand the largest stock of
Shelf and Heavy Hardware,
Iron, Steel & Tinware
and thn most extensive assortment of i
| lanips and "7r.:fflifiiififs" f 1) ils. Croc r <e;%&<?.;
'to be found in the whole Palouse country. ' Don't forget it.
REPAIRING AMD JOB WORK
promptly attended to by experienced workmen.
Z£T It pays to trade with tho FAEISS BROS., for you are then sure of reliable
goods, low prices, and a square deal all around. Call and see.
P. BBEMEB, THE GROCER
Has a full stock of GROCERIES & PROVISIONS, Hats,
Cara CLOTHING, Gents 1 Furnishing Goods, Confection
ery Cigars and Tobaccos, CROCKERY and GLASSWARE
all at prices lower than ever before known in this country.
Main Street^- — - - Pullman, W. 7.
31. N. l^liillip^ ; f
DEALER IS j
KITCHEN, DINING-ROOM & PARLOR
. mJ '
j..— « - /
Furniture
»...,■.:.■ *
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION AND PRICE.
Organs & Sewing- Machines,
MIRRORS, OIL PAINTINGS, PICTURES fo FRAMES,
WILLOW-WARE OF ALL K:'*>S.
Undertakers' Goods fx Variety.
I I
*W IH intending purchasers will find it de.J cdl-v their interest to examine
the complete slock now on hand. I propose sell c *ateb than any other firm
in this burises-f in the Palousc country. >"
L
McConnell, \
Chambers, V.; \
& Company,/
/
4
X
—Tim—— • m
'A ■ : \ v'
Leading Merchants
«. ■'
OF THE P.\DS>USE COUNTRY, CABBX
:" -1— OF -ft
mI ■ :
\
.^IN Vy.V^IIIX^roN , T!} apliT . THEIRIGOODB AT
LOWEST IVRICES! I
I
r ■ I
jTHE-JP" f! MAHKEI PRICES L I
h all POINTS ON the 8. 41-. „>„,. B.iN^L f f
' v\ ! I
Wo invite all th Ladies, and especially those of COLF.«.X, MO.SC- V *'* "'''* I ' ■
6m» towns, to call and examine our elegani assortment.. ' t
Cloahs, SsLtSr^Q^^ifP^Wl
pa
/Dress Goods, Era >t'M
1

xml | txt