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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, February 07, 1913, Image 1

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THE LABOR JOURNAL
Mention the Journal to the
merchant who solicits your patron-
through these columns.
Vol. XXII.
OFFICERS, DELEGATES AND VISITORS TO THE ELEVENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SHINGLE WEAVERS' UNION OF AMERICA, PORTLAND, ORE- JANUARY 16TH, 17TH AND 18T H, 1913.—Courtesy Shingle v.
Getting Your Clothing at
BRODECK'S
Slaughter Prices
Clothes and Furnishings
Every man, Young man and Roy should attend during these
last few days of the Clearance.
The Brodeck Co.
WE GIVE S. & H. GREEN STAMPS
GUARANTEED HOSE
4 pairs (I nn
FOR #I.UU
Read This Guarantee:
OUR GUARANTEE
If for any reason these stockings prove unsatisfactory, we ask
you to return them and get new ones. We leave it to your
sense of fairness
Those hose come in black, white or tan and are made express
ly for tins store. Are of a superior quality silk lisle with an
extra fine finish. Are seamless and have a wide, stop run
jarter top. <D» 1 f\f\
Come -1 pairs in a boX for, box •4*f» J-
W. H. CLEAVER
BOTH PHONES 217 HEWITT AND ROCKEFELLER
Successor to Dolson & Cleaver
PERSONAL SERVICE
The officers of this bank often have opportunities to perform
personal service for its depositors.
Frequently proposed investments are laid before them, and de
positors are often given information and advice which saves them
from serious loss.
The business enterprises of our customers have conservative
co-operation.
Your personal interests will he well served when you connect
yourself as a depositor with —
Riley-Cooley Shoe Co.
FULL LINE OF UNION MADE SHOES
Both Phones 766
NORTHERN TRANSFER CO.
Office aad Storage Warehouse Across from Great Northern Freight Depot
Sunset 191, Ind. aga
During the Great
On the best
of the country
1701-3 Hewitt Avenue
BANK OF COMMERCE
THE LABOR JOURNAL
WOMEN FORM
STATE BODY
Eighteen delegates from Union La
bel Leagues to the twelfth conven
tion of the Washington State Feder
ation of Labor met at the White
House parlor, Olympia, January 22,
1913, to form the above named or
ganization. There were present also
members of local leagues.
Mrs. Ora Williams, of Seattle, was
chosen temporary chairman and Miss
Leola May Blinn temporary secretary.
The Union Card and Label League
constitution printed by the State Fed
eration of Labor was read, and a mo
tion was adopted to call the organi
zation the Woman's Union Card and
Label League.
A motion was adopted to adopt the
Label League constitution as read.
A motion was adopted to meet in
annual convention in the same city
as chosen for the State Federation of
Labor convention.
A motion was adopted to designate
this meeting as the first annual con
vention and the meeting in 1914 as
the second annual convention.
A motion prevailed to allow as
many delegates as local Woman's
Union Card and Label Leagues may
send.
A motion prevailed that only ac
credited delegates be allowed to vote
in annual convention, other league
members present to have voice, but
no vote.
The following officers were elect
ed:
President, Mrs. Ora Williams, Seat
tle; Vice President, Mrs. Nellie B.
Taylor, Tacoma; Secretary, Miss Le
ola May Blinn, Seattle; Treasurer.
Mrs. Julia Alliman, Everett; guard,
Mrs. R. B. Ellis, Aberdeen.
A motion was adopted to provide
that the officers be authorized to ap
point such committees as may be nec
essary during the year.
A motion prevailed that creden
tials as an organizer be issued to the
president, signed by president and
secretary and the seal attached, her
expenses to be borne as may he pro
vided outside of the league.
The secretary, Miss Blinn, offered
to donate a suitable seal to the organi
zation, and the offer was accepted
by rising vote of thanks.
A motion prevailed that Mrs. L.
Gee, fraternal delegate from the Ore
gon Federation of Labor to the con
vention of the Washington State Fed
eration of Labor, be made an honor
ary member.
The members present, whose names
are hereto attached, were, by motion,
requested to attach their signatures
to the minutes of the first meeting
and be known as charter members of
the league.
A motion prevailed that gentlemen
be not eligible as delegates to the
State League from local leagues.
A motion prevailed that no salaries
be paid to officers. |
The meeting then adjourned to meet
in the convention city chosen for 1914.
Charter Members.
Officers.
President, Mrs. Ora Williams. 2110 j
East Pine street, Seattle.
Vice President, Mrs. Nellie B. Tay
lor, 1512 North Anderson, Tacoma. ,
Secretary, Miss Leola May Blinn,
583 1-2 New York Block, Seattle.
Treasurer, Mrs. Julia Alliman, 2512 (
Rucker avenue, Everett.
Guard, Mrs. B. B. Ellis, 520 Bur-;
lelgh avenue, Aberdeen.
Members.
Mrs. Ida V. Zelgler. 3826 Hoyt ave
nue, Everett; Mrs. E. A. Francois,
4218 Rucker avenue, Everett; Mrs.
Georgia Sylverser. 19 Etruria street,
Seattle; Miss Mary McDougall. 2717
Pacific avenue, Everett; Mrs. Ella
Allen. 2117 Oakes avenue, Everett;
Mrs. L. L. Alexander, 409 South Michi
gan street, Aberdeen; Mrs. William
Johnaton, 401 Second street, Hoqul
am; Miss Helen Taylor, 1612 North
Anderson street, Tacoma; Mrs Fred
Overman. 3223 Bucker avenue. Ever
ett; Mrs. E. la, Judson, 116 West Fifth
street, Aberdeen.
Honorary Member.
Mrs. L. Gee, 601 East Washington
street, Portland, Ore.
1712 Hewitt
THE OFFICIAL PAPEK OF THE EVERETT TRADES COUNCIL
Devoted to the Interest
EVERETT, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7. 1913.
TRACING THE GROWTH OF
THE SHINGLE WEAVERS UNION
The Shingle Weavers' Union is the
pioneer organization in the timber in
dustry.
It. is an organization of trained
fighters, drilled In 25 years of strug
gling.
Statements to this effect have been
made in previous articles of this ser
ies. In this they will be proved. It
will be shown here that years before
the spirit of organization began mov
ing among the other timber workers,
shingle weavers began getting to
gether to fight the encroachment of
the growing power of capital.
The First Attempt.
When other organized workers in
1886 began agitating for a general
eight-hour day, the shingle weavers
along the east shore of Lake Michi
gan caught the spirit. In Muskegon,
Mich., the first shingle weavers' local
was organized. Shortly after another
union was formed at Manistee, an
other big lumber center further north
on the lake.
The workday In shingle mills In
those days was 12 1-2 hours. Girl?
and boys were working together, By
>rganization female labor was abol
ished and a 10-hour day established
■ hrough a strike,
The organization lasted but a few
years. It was crude. Manufacturers
were not organized and the training
developed during the decade just
passed, through the opposition of the
lacking In this early period of organi
sation.
Shingle manufacturing had already
begun moving west, thus making an
other factor in breaking up this first
attempt at organization among thi
shingle weavers.
The West Caost Union.
About 1890 the shingle weavers or.
the Sound began getting together.
The West Coast Shingle Weavers'
Union was formed with locals In Bal
lard, Tacoma, Snohomish, Arlington.
Chehalis and Sedrb-Woolley. Pros
perity reigned in the shingle industry.
Packers were receiving 10 cents a
thousand, one cent more than the
union scale today.
In 1893 the manufacturers in Bal
lard had learned a lesson from their
employes. They organized and an
nounced a reduction In wages. A
strike followed. Three months later
the disastrous panic of '93 struck.
This was the death of the West Coast
Shingle Weavers' Union.
Following this second attempt at
getting together among the shingle
weavers, wages went lower than ever
before in the history of the shingle
industry. In Centralia packers were
working for as little as three cents a
thousand. Knot sawyers wages went
down to below a dollar a day.
The Third Attempt.
For eight years the fighting spirit
of the shingle weavers seemed to be
broken. But it was not killed. In
1901 locals sprang up In different
towns around the Sound. Within a
few months unions had been forne d
in practically every shingle center
from Sedro-Woolley to Kelso in the
southern portion of the slate of Wash'
ington.
About the same time a new organi
zation had been formed at the mouth
of Menominee river In 'he cities of
Menominee. Mich., and Marinette,
Wis.
All of these locals were affiliated
directly with the America* Federa
tion of Labor. The pti sent Shingle
Weavers' Union is the result of this
third attempt at organization.
The organization started under aus
picious circumstances. Kvery local
hut one, was formed in (he face of a
strike. The shingle weavers proved
their fighting capacity An under
standing was had. according to which
no local was permitted to organize un
till the members had secured union
conditions and wages. In but one
place, Elma. did the manufacturers
agree to the conditions without a
strike. But In every other community
the strikes were won and locals were
organized.
These unions, affiliated with the A
F. of I*, were loosely associated to
gether, through what was termed a
"Grand Council." •
The International Is Formed.
The growth of these local unions
of Organized Labor
was steady from this time on. In
January, 1913, delegates from the vari
ous locals met in Everett and formed
what is now known as the Interna
tional Shingle Weavers' Union. The
organization was perfected without
the aid of even an A. F. of L. organ
izer. Wm. Blackmail, State Labor
Commissioner, and president of the
newly organized Washington State
Federation of Labor, addressed the
convention at its opening and left for
other duties.
Some of those present at this his
torical convention were: J. G. Brown,
representing Elma, now president of
the international; A. J. Larsen, Sedro-
Woollcy, at present fifth vice presi
dent of the international; Donald lie-
Rae, Marysville, later secretary-treas
urer and now, sheriff of Snohomish
county: Wm. Hubble, Ballard, elected
president at the convention; Frank
Carpenter and Willard Hyde, Belling
ham; Rolla Beebe, Si dro-Woolley;
Guy Stratton, Edmonds; W. H. Clock,
Everett; (leorge Campbell, Castle
Rock; Al. Case, Olympia; Jack Coats,
Elma; Wm. Ingram, Aberdeen;
' harks Cole, Hartford, president of
the convention; Fred Vauderhoof, Ar
lington, and Thos. Burns, Marinette.
Wis.
The Big Strike
From the time of forming the in
ternational until 1906 the new union
grew constantly in strength. The
weavers went from victory to victory
until they had come to believe that
they "couldn't be licked." But they
failed to recognize the growing power
.;f the organized manufacturers.
As in 1593, the trouble began in
Ballard in 1906. A strike was de
clared April 1. On July 17 a general
strike of all shingle mills in the state
was called. It was the most complete
tie-up of the shingle industry in all
its history.
But the manufacturers were too
strong for the fighting weavers. In
August a special convention was
called in Tacoma. The strike was de
clared off. The men went back to
work wherever they could get uiiion
conditions. Ballard was utterly dis
organized. Scabs occupied the jobs
formerly held by union men. In Bel-
Hngham and on Grays Harbor the
strike also left its disastrous effect.
But the weavers were not "licked."
They had come to realize that they
would have to organize more yet.
They felt the need of still more train
ing.
Still on Top
Tho yell following the big strike in
Bkll&rd, the union secured a general
advance in wages amounting to ap
proximately 50 cents per day in tin
diffen nt branches. Then came the
1907 panic, and a crash in thhagh
prices. Wages in nearly all lines
went down, but the union weavers
for the most part held their scab
with the advance of the previous
year. They went through this
struggle united and despite the poor
est of market conditions for three
years just past, are now on top.
In Ilallard the basis of a strong or
ganization has been formed since last
summer. In tiellingham is now a
prosperous local and union conditions
prevail in every mill. On Grays liar
bor the Shingle Weavers' union was
never in better fighting trim and is
steadily growing in strength with
every mill paying the scale. In Ana
cortes much the same conditions pre
vail. Iv and around Portland, Ore.,
where not a mill last summer was
paying the union scale now every one
of them is working under union scale
of wages.
Iv the East In Michigan and Wis
consin the union weavers have had
no serious trouble in maintaining
their end. President James Jondro.
of that district, reported a prosper
ous condition in every shingle center
at the Portland convention.
The New Union
The early attempt at organization,
coupled with the past decade of al
most continuous fighting against big
odds, have developed sterling quali
ties in the ranks of the shingle weav
ers. In the Kverett convention in
1903 none of the delegates felt cap
able of drafting a resolution. At the
Portland convention closed a few
FAST TEAM FOR EVERETT.
"Go down, you boob, go down!"
Less than two months and exclaims
tion of like character will be bean!
out at Robbing Park, as the ball
teams clash for the season of 1913.1
Already the fanning has commenced
on street corners, in billiard parlors
and thirst emporiums. The sporting 1
editors are getting out their dope
books, ball players are overhauling
last year's uniforms, and the baseball
public, which includes 90 per cent of I
tlie citizens of Everett, are on the
gui vive (whatever that is) of antici
pation. Manager Davis promises ai
team for Everett that will be every
bit as fast as the Smokestackers of
last year. We will all agree that that
will be going some. Local players,
according to Mr. Davis, will be given
a tryout and if they make good, will
be given places on the team. That
ought to relieve the minds of those
disconsolate ones who don't like the
idea of an imported bunch of ball
tossers. According to reports. "Iron
Man" McGinnlty'S Tacoma Tigers will
undergo their spring training on the
Everett grounds, so we will see some
real ball playing right off the real.
The coming of the Tigers to Everett
will give the local bunch a good work
out and a chance to show their class.
Its a cinch that pitcher Singleton
and first sacker Giddings, will be giv
en places if they want them. Mr.
Davis knows their rating as ball play
ers and their home in the hearts of
the fans. But it is not a cinch that
the afore mentioned athletes will be
seen in Everett uniforms, as each
man is said to be flirting with out
side offers. The fans will rest easier
when they decide to affix their names
to Everett contracts. The season
wouldn't start right with these two
portside artists absent from the line
up.
Anyhow, it isn't long now till the
Umps yell "play ball." That's the
main thing.
PHOTOGRAPHER IN NEW
QUARTERS.
The busiest man in town this week
is B. J. Brush, the photographer, who
has moved his studio from the top
floor of the Commerce building to
rooms 218-19 Reality building, just
over the First National Bank. Mi-
Brush has taken the studio recently
vacated by Rigby & Rigby. The new
quarters are commodious and tastily
arranged and Mr. Brush will continue
the same high class work which has
made him one of the leading photo
graphers of the city.
HE SAVED OTHERS, HIMSELF
HE COULD NOT SAVE.
It was with sorrow that we learned
the other day of the sudden death of
11. C, Feist, a former member of the
Everett Electricians' Union. Fred
was working as a lineman in Califor
nia at. the time of his death and. with
a comrade was caught by a crossed
wire. Fred threw his comrades tree
from the wire, but was unable to
save himself, and died. He was one
of the warmest, truest hearted hoys
we ever knew and the news was a
shock to his large circle of Everett
friends.
'a , , ks ago. a body of men represi
the ihlngle weavers that challenged
any gathering In intelligence, aggies
sivencss and progressiveness. Far
from being subdued in their many
hard struggles, they displayed a won j
derful spirit of courage. With a reali
zation that the past fights were but;
skirmishes in the battles of labor and
that still greater preparations must,
be made for greater conquests.
Tho International Union of Shingle
Weavers. Sawmill Workers and
Woodsmen, launched at Portland, is
an appropriate monument to the past
ten years of the history of the Inter
national Shingle Weavers' union. The
task of organizing the vast numbers
in the timber industry is not a task
for timid men. But timidity 1b un
known in the Union Shingle Weavers'
vocabularly.
And if the past history of this
small band of fighters is any criterion
a new force will soon appear in the
West stronger than the millions of a
Weyerhaeuser -- the united timber
workers under the banner of the In
ternational Union of Shingle Weavers,
' Sawmill Workers and Woodsmen.
TEE LABOR journal
Is the official organ of the Trades
Council, and is read by the labor
ing men and women of Everett
READ THIS
AND THEN ACT
To the union men and women of
Everett and all other friends of go\
eminent by the people:
It is imperative that you write or
wire to your state senators in the Ii g
islature at Olympia your demands tor
the enactment of the following bills
which are required to carry into I !'
--feet and operation the recently ad
, opted amendment to the state con
stitution, referendum and recall:
Senate bill No. 45, providing for the
amendment of the state constitution
by the initiative.
House bill No. 89, or senate bill No.
2:15, establishing the forms of peti
| Hons for the referendum and the ini
tiative.
Senate bill No. 136, establishing
the forms of petitions for r. call of of
ficers.
Senate bill No. S5, providing [or
I pamphlets of publicity of candidates
for all offices.
Senate bill No. 49, providing for a
| complete system of registration so
that initiative and referendum meas
ures and all other publicity man, r
may be furnished to all voters bj th
secretary of state.
Upon the success of these bills, de
pends the fate of all other measur
in the interests of the people now be
fore the legislature. Should the others
be lost, we will have an appeal to the
people if the initiative, referendum
and recall measures are secured, but
if these are lost, ALL IS LOST. Lei
such a flood of letters and teh grams
pour in upon the legislators at 01;
pia that they may understand hovi
ious and insistent is th« demand of
the people for this legislation.
All of these measures above enum-
crated have been carefully drawn In
the interests of the people, and each
one is necessary to the genera! scheme
of carrying out a governnn nt of. b>
aud for the people. Their adoption al
this time will make it much easier to
advance the interest of other meas
ures now pending.
OTHER BILLS BEARING ON THE
INITIATIVE AND REFERENDUM
WILL DOUBTLESS BE INTRO
DUCED. SOME OF THEM MAY BE
GOOD, SOME VICIOUS. TO BE
SURE THAT YOU MAKE NO MIS
TAKE. DEMAND THAT THE BILLS
ENUMERATED ABOVE ONLY BE
PASSED.
WRITE OR WIRE YOUR REPRE
SENTATIVE AT OLYMPIA AT 0N( E
BOTH IN THE NAME OF YOUR
UNION AND AS AX INDIVIDUAL
CITIZEN OK THIS STATE WHO BE
LIEVES ix THE INITIATIVE AND
REFERENDUM AND WANTS THE
PROPER MACHINERY WITH
WHICH TO CARRY OUT THE LAW.
ST. VALENTINE BALL.
Grand ball on February 14th, St.
Valentine's night, in Masonic, hail un
der auspices of Ladies Label League.
Wagner's orchestra. $1 admission
Perfect order and pleasant evening
guaranteed to all attending .
J. H. WALTERS AGAIN IN THE
CITY.
J. H. Walters, late general organi
zer for the Brotherhood of Railway
t'armen, was in the city this week
and paid a fraternal call at the Jour
nal office. Mr. Walters is now field
inspector for the American Railway
Employees Alliance, an organization
of railway employees formed to en
force safety appliance laws now ou
the statutes books in reference to rail
road transportation and to score Ml
laws enacted in states where such
legislation does not exist. Mr Wal
ters reports that plenty of the states
have statutes enough, but the trouble
lies in lack of enforcement. His bead
quarters an now in Chicago, and he
works from there to the coast, cover
ing the various transcontinental lines.
ST. VALENTINE BALL.
Grand ball on February 14th, St.
Valentine's night, in Masonic hall un
der auspices of Ladies Label League.
Wagner's orchestra. $1 admission.
Perfect order and pleasant evening
guaranteed to all attending .
NO. 52

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