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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, February 14, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1913-02-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE LABOR JOURNAL
Mention the Journal to the
merchant who solicits your patron
age through these columns.
VOL. XXIII.
Clearance Prices
on Men's, Young Men's and Boys'
Suits, Overcoats,
Hats, Shoes, Shirts
and Furnishings
CONTINUES SATURDAY
It may be your last, chance—So don't miss coming
The Brodeck Co.
WE GIVE S. & H. GREEN STAMPS
Remnants of
Dress Goods
and Suitings
And all are new arrivials. Two large tables full, representing some
3,000 yards of fresh new remnants in lengths from 1 1-2 to 4 yards.
In this great lot will be found almost every known fabric on the
market, suitable for dresses, skirts, coats, etc. All the season's best
weaves and colorings will be found here and at only about_half their
former prices.
NEW PERCALES
New yard-wide percales, light
and dark patterns, in figures,
stripes, dots, checks and plain
colors The regular 12 l-2c
quality. Special, yard 10c
W. H. CLEAVER JtrirJSS
BOTH PHONES 217 HEWITT AND ROCKEFELLER
Successor to Dolson & Cleaver
Few People
who try to "be their own banker" make a permanent financial success.
This bank insures the safety of the funds of depositors and makes
It possible for them to conserve their financial resources.
CALL FOR THE
HAFERKORN SEAL
SOUDAN SECOND
Union Made by
Haferkorn Cigar Co.
Riley-Cooley Shoe Co.
FULL LINI OF UNION MADE SHOES
lot* Phone* 766
1701-3 Hewitt Avenue
New Ginghams for Spring. All
plain colors and fancy stripes,
checks, plaids, etc. Excellent
quality, worth 12 l-2c. Spe
cial, yard 10c
BANK OF COMMERCE
5c Cigars
THE
NEW GINGHAMS
1712 Hewitt
THE LABOR JOURNAL
THE OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE EVERETT TRADES COUNCIL
Devoted to the Interest
ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
WE cannot pay the honor Cat
To Freedom's captain; tongues are lame
Wben they attempt lo link due i raise
Unto the msrtyred Lincoln's name
We halt Impotent, psisied. dumb
Our swelling hearts alone can sense
The weakness of our spoken words
Tbe emptiness of eloquence
FIGHTING FOR
HUMAN LIFE
LINEMEN ASK LEGISLATION
THAT WILL STOP SLAUGHT
ER OF THEIR MEMBERS
WHO WORK IN MAZE OF
HIGH TENSION WIRES.
OLYMPIA, Wash., Feb. 13.— (Spe
cial.) —The linemen, members of the
International Brotherhood of Electri
cal Workers, in this state, are at
Olympia asking the legislature to en
act into law senate bill 180, an act
"relating to the placing, erection, use
and maintenance of electric poles,
wires, cables, apparatus and fixtures
and providing the punishment for the
violation thereof." G. L. Brooks and
W. R. Thomas, of the Seattle union,
are here giving their support to the
bill, and opposed to them are a host
of representatives from all the power
ful electrical concerns in the North
west. The Stone-Webster company,
who control electric power in the
Sound country, the Washington Water
Power company and the Inland Elec
tric company, of Spokane, the Port
land, North Yakima and Walla Walla
concerns, the Oregon-Washington R.
& N. Co., the Great Northern and the
Northern Pacific railroads all have
had their engineers and other repre
sentatives on the ground. A hot fight
is on, although the power companies
have consented to conferences with
the representatives of the linemen's
union and their friends, and have con
ceded maay of the points of protec
tion that the union demands in Ita
bill.
The proposed law requires, among
many other provisions for safety in
handling the deadly electric current,
that there shall be maintained on all
poles and cross-arms, a sufficient
clearance between wires to provide a
reasonable degree of safety for the
workmen. By reason of the fact that
the men are now compelled to work
in a maze of these deadly wires that
are so closely spaced as to make their
work extremely dangerous, there has
been a veritable slaughter of the men
who follow this trade.
Seven or eight years ago the line
men began a fight for an ordinance in
Seattle providing for these same safe
ty regulations within the corporate
limits of that city. For five years
their ordinance was juggled back and
forth through various committees of
the city council and from one city de
partment to another. Finally, two
years ago when the initiative and ref
erendum provisions of the city charter
became operative, two members of the
union started out with an initiative pe
tition and within one week they had
enough signers to submit their ordi
nance At the city election which fol
lowed In March, two years ago, the
ordinance was adopted by an over
whelming vote, thereby demonstrating
that the initiative and referendum is a
pretty handy thing ho have about
when such legislation In the interest
of the people la needed
The willingness of the big electric
power concerns of the Northwest to
confer with the men over this meas
ure, Is attributed to the fact that they
EVERETT, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1913.
By ARTHUR J. BURDICK.
[Copyright, 19U, by American Press Association |
HE stood with calm, unflinching faltb
When reeled the edifice of state.
When chaos threatened and tbe skies
Were blackened by the clouds of hate.
And, ruled by love ol God and man.
With naught of malice in his heart.
He stayed the ruthless hands that sought
To rend the Nation's soul apart
MILITIA IS j
LOSING GROUND
ATTEMPT TO GRAB OFF FAT
SALARY FOR ADJUTANT
GENERAL IS DEFEATED IN
SENATE AFTER SARCASTIC
DEBATE ON BILL.
OLYMPIA, Wash., Feb. 13.- (Spe-I
cial.) —It looks like the day of the Na
tional guard was passing in this state.
At least the state soldiery is not now
as powerful In its political influence
as It was at one time. A bill to in
crease the emoluments of the adjutant
general so that he would be drawing
the equivalent of about $4,000 per year
was unceremoniously defeated In the
senate one day last week. The word
ing of the bill which read the state
militia shall consist of "4,000 officers
and men" struck Senator Hutchinson,!
of Spokane, as not being quite as|
clearly stated as it might be. The
senator said that inasmuch as the
state militia was purely a social in
stitution that enabled a certain type
of men to disport themselves In flashy
uniforms and gold braid, it ought to be
put on a footing of the highest effici
ency, and that he would therefore
move that the clause be changed to
read "consist of 4,000 officers and
four men." It is plainly evident that
the National guard of the state of
Washington has lost standing with
both the legislators and the people
and it will not be long until they will
quit voting away good money to main
tain the "tin soldiery" of labor-hating
cotillion steppers. More and more the
people will use their money for con
structive purposes, and cut out their
support of the mock militarism of the
barbaric past
BACK HOME AGAIN
George Downing of the painters' un
ion returned to Everett this week
after a six months sojourn in King
George's realm across the border.
After working several weeks in New
Westminister George went over to
Vancouver island and spent the re
mainder of the time working at his
trade. While there were no unions
where he worked he reports that near
ly every building tradesman carried a
card in some organization in the
States, Eastern Canada or Great Brit
ain. Everett still looks good to Bro.
Downing and ho will remain here if
work picks up
fear the linemen will initiate a much j
more drastic measure and go to the,
people with it, should the legislature
fall to pass the present proposed law
The advocates of the hill point to
the fact that the adoption of the Se
attle ordinance has resulted in a great
saving of life and accidents, although
not all the Hues have yet been brought
under its requirements, three years
having been allowed for the comple
tion of the work of reapacing the
' wires. References to the report of the
I Industrial Insurance commission
shows Seattle to have had a lower
percentage of accidents than any of
' the cities that are working under the
' old system.
of Organized Labor
SUPREMEi.V great, we ot this time
His 'Blue cannot estimate
lis oi,l> by the distant view
that »c can judge the truly great.
And not till In it.mil.
Are balanced the •ccooatl ot earth
Will mankind knoii and comprehend
The measure of our Lincoln's wor.h
ACT PASSES
OREGON HOUSE
ADDRESS OF JOHN H. WAL
LACE OF THE WASHINGTON
COMMISSION IMPORTANT
FACTOR IN BIG VOTE RE
CORDED FOR MEASURE.
OLYMPIA, Wash., Feb. 13.—(Spe
cial. I—Commissioner1 —Commissioner John Wallace, of
the Washington Industrial Insurance
commission was highly elated over
the receipt of a telegram from Salem,
Ore., last Thursday Baying, "Work
men's Compensation bill passed
house, fifty-five votes to two. We owe
a good share of this vote to your won
derful address. We all share in send
ing you good wishes." The friends of
industrial insurance in Oregon have
been working like beavers for the en
actment of the law, and a few weeks
ago they had Mr. Wallace come to
Oregon and deliver an address upon
the workings of this law in the state
of Washington before a Joint session
of the house and the senate. The
fight is now on in the Oregon senate,
and the casualty companies are re
sorting to every conceivable sort of
underhanded work and misrepresenta
tion to beat the bill there. They have
flooded the capital with the Patterson
pamphlet, which is a veritable tissue
of misrepresentation. The Oregon
friends of the act sent to Olympia for
the official figures with which to re
tot* the statements of this document,
and the commission, with the consent
of Governor Lister, granted permis
| sion to the auditor of the commission
Ito go to Salem and present the actual
figures to the members of the senate.
One day last week the desks of the
members of the Washington legisla
ture were supplied with copies of the
Patterson pamphlets, and judging
from the comments generally given
out by the members after perusing its
pages, Mr. Patterson's efforts have
strengthened rather than weakened
the cause of industrial insurance on
the Washington plan. Mr. Patterson
made very broad claims that the act
had proven a miserable blunder, and
acting upon that bold misstatement of
fact, proceeded to indulge In a long
tirade of intemperate abuse of Its
whole purpose. The document of
\ eouree is being published and circulat
ed at the expense of those who profit
through the graft of casualty insur
ance, an Interest that has suffered
! greatly because of the state industrial
insurance act.
ST. VALENTINE BALL.
Cirand ball on February 14th. St
Valentine's night. In Masonic hall un
der auspices of Ladies I.*bel League.
Wagner's orchestra. $1 admission.
Perfect order and pleasant e\entng
guaranteed to all attending
The particular conditions with I
which your doctor prescribes are suc
cessfully coped with when we fill
your prescriptions Dwight Darling.
Apothecaries.
" • ' ->jz,V — *
COPYRIGHT, nil, SV AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION
worship heroes only when they're dead.
In life we stone or censure or neglect.
We know them not till over them is shed
The tinsel halo of a world's respect.
And thus it was with Lincoln. He was decked
Id such a, homely semblance that -the race
Of human jackdaws at his great name pecked
And shrilled derision at his .grief worn face.
It needed a new age to find his rightful place.
pnpJHE modern Pharisees, the slaves of form.
LJLJ The Mammon worshipers, the self deemed wise.
***** Saw not his mighty heart with man-love warm.
Nor the great soul behind his patient eyes.
These never know a prophet tiil he dies—
Not even then unless the world's acclcim
Distends bis figure to gigantic size
And so creates a fashion of his fame.
Then the lip servers come with tributes to his name.
QET this. too. is a blessing—that the good
In him so soon has overcome dispraise;
That he is known and loved and understood
Who was misrepresented all his days.
It teaches us that Truth ha 9 power to raise
Her standard far aloft for all to see
And that so fair she is the whole world's gaze
Returns to her throughout tbe years to be.
Thus all the Truth at last all men shall render free
HOUR qualities did Lincoln body forth.
The first was this same truth, in him so strong
He sought it as the needle seeks the north:
It would not let him advocate the wrong.
The second was his faith. Thrcugh all the long.
Dark years he felt at last would come the light.
Beneath the sorrow in bis heart a song
Sang ever ot the triumph ol the right
He heM to God. the source of every great soul's might.
mIS third strength was simplicity He sought
The heart of every question, stripped it free
Of all confusions, then in clearest thought
And plainest speech he made all men to see
His last great force was love In mercy he
Outstripped all men this stern old world has seen
Since one who taught and wept in Galilee.
Between these two no love like theirs has been.
And this it is which keeps their memories so green.
THE LAEOR JOURNAL
Is the official organ of the Trades
Council, and is read by the labor
ing men and women of Everett
NO. I.

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