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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, February 25, 1916, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1916-02-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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Page Two
WONDER MERCANTILE CO-
Men's Furnishings and Shoes
Union Made Suits Made to Order
S. UES & SON, Prop.
Cor. Hoyt and Hewitt Avenue
Let A. P. Do It
WATCH AND JEWELRY
REPAIRING
Umbrella Repairing
A. P. Miller -:- 1916 Hewitt
All Kinds of
jewelry and Sporting Goods snd All
Kinds of Repairing st
Nick Grad's
3005 Hewitt Aye.
JOHN F. JERREAD
UNDERTAKER AND EMBALM ER
2939 Broadway Both Phones 230
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
GET YOTJB NEXT SUIT MADE AT
R. HULTMAN
1 he Tailor
2908 Wetmore Avenue
Good meeting halls for rent in i
Labor Temple at reasonable prices, j
'Kitchen privileges. Inquire at Ls-;
»bor Temple, 2814 Lombard. Fones:
Ind. 115. Sunset 148. 1
' 1
JOIN THE WOMAN 'S
CARD 4% LABEL LEAGUE
Meets every Friday night In the
Labor Temple
1916 World
ALMANAC ENCYCLOPED
30 Cents, postpaid 35 Cents
HILL'S BOOK STORE
American
Dye Works
LEADING CLEANERB
Both Phones
Suits Pressed 50e
2821 Wetmore Aye.
ROBBINS TRANSFER CO.
FONES 371
We Move Anything—Day and Night
Both Phones 631
Brick Storage Warehouse
MODEL STABLES
E, .1. Dwyer, Mgr.
LONG DISTANCE HAULING
A SPECIALTY
Heavy Trucking, Transfer,
Cor. Grand and California
Everett. Wash.
OPTICIANS
If yon rtJne your eyes and optical
service go to the Everett Optical Co.
They grind their own lenses and you
can gel your glasses the same day
your eyes are fitted. Prices moderate
and all work guaranteed Everett
Optical Co., Baker at Sandstein, 2812
Colby Aye , Everett, Wash.
STAB SHOE STORE
E. E. WEBER. Proprietor
MM Hewitt Avsnue
Service
Notes and News of Shingleweavers
(Headquarters International Shingle
weavers' Vnion of America, Seattle)
To the Officers and Members of Lo
cal I'nions— Greeting:
You will no doubt be pleased to
learn that the jurisdiction of Local
No. 61 of Raymond. Wash., is now
practically 100 per cent, organized
and as a happy result of this condi
tion the crews employed in the five
larire shingle mills operated by the
case Shingle Co. in that vicinity have
been granted the restoration of the
union scale of wages without friction.
1 Surely, this is an object lesson to ev
ery shingleweaver throughout the
land.
A mass meeting of the shingleweav'
ers of Everett was held under the
auspices of Local No. 2 last Sunday
afternoon. The crowded hall was
permeated with an enthusiastic re
organization spirit. That Local No.
2 will soon regain its former enviable
standing in the ranks of organized
labor is unquestionable. The local
is now holding regular meetings, in
the Labor Temple, every Tuesday
night.
Local No. 3 of Snohomish, Wash.,
also is nearly 100 per cent, organized.
It is the plan of that local to con
solidate with the several others in
'the near vicinity of Snohomish, with
a view to further extending their
campaign for a 100 per cent, organi
zation in that section.
A movement is on foot to amalga
mate the various locals of the Grays
Harbor county. Wash., with headquar
ters, for the present, in Aberdeen.
At their last meeting Local No. 10
elected an organiser, who assumed
his duties yesterday. The expense of
maintaining the organizer will be
borne by the enlarged local.
Wednesday evening of last week
the andersigned attended a meetmg
of the shingleweavers of Kapowsin,
Wash , and aided in the reorganiza
tion rf Ixjcal No 04, of that pace.
The crew of the Young & .Trhnsoi
mill, located there, intended to strike
last Thursday for the restoration ol
the union scale of wages, but were
prevailed upon to deler action .nti:
the convention can be held and ' nited
action secured. The members of Lo
cal No. 64 are now wide-awake and
AN ACUTE PROBLEM
Suffering Among Garment Workers
In spite of the great advances made
in late years in the women's garment
industry in the elimination of exces
sive overtime, the shortening of the
'regular hours of labor, and the rais
in i; of rates of wages, the problem
of irregularity of employment at the
present time seems to be quite as
acute as ever. Shorter hours, better
treatment, and better weekly pay
have not besn accompanied by a
ii ngthening of the working season.
A study of the extent and causes of
irregularity of employment, and of
the attempts to regularize employ-
men! in published by the U. S. Bu
reau of Labor Statistics or the De
partment of Labor as its Bulletin 1S».
The Bureau's study is based upon
data secured Iron employers' pay
rolls showing the actual amount of
i ages paid from week to week for t.
period ol 52 consecutive weeks. The
study covered four out of the five so
called centers of manufacture of wom
en's ready-to-wear garments, the cit
ies of New York. Chicago. Cleveland
! and Boston, the field thus covered
; embracing approximately 76 per cent.
Of the industry of the country. In
these four cities, pay-roll data were
secured from more than 500 estab
lishments representing approximately
150,000 workers and 17 groups of
manufacturers.
| A DEPLORABLE CONDITION
Unemployment, on account of its
11 chronic recurrence, has particularly
i serious consequences in the women's
garment industries. In one of the In
dustries where B special study was
i I made it was found that one-tenth of
the employees had work for less than
10 weeks and less than one-fifth of
thOM actually employ ed In the course
jof a year had work for as much as
!40 weeks. In the cloak, suit, and
-kirt industry, the report shows pay
rolls in the dullest week amounting
to less than one-half those of the av
erage week and only a little more
than !Ml«H]UarteT those of the busiest
week. In the dress and waist indus
- try pay rolls in the dullest week were
! found to be only a little over one
' half those in the average, week and
only a little over one-third of those
in the busiest trees', With slight
: modifications, similar fluctuations of
t employment were found in the other
| branches of the women's garment in
dustries.
In spite of this extreme Irregular
ity. the matter of repolarization of
employment has so far received but
scant attention from manufacturers
or their organizations Many Individ
ual employers when first interviewed
aggressive. They may he depended
upon to champion the cause of or
ganized labor at all times.
A reorganization meeting of l.oca'
No. 24 of Olympia, Wash., w'.l ho
held March ?.
It is reporc'i that the shingle weav
ers Of Anacortes are indicating a de
sire to reorganize. With that end Ir.
view, President Brown will get in
touch with ihe shingleweavers A that
place, in order to push the work as
rapidly as possible.
Secretary Williams of Local No. 23,
Kureka. Calif., stated in a letter just
received that the Eureka Trades and
Labor Council voted unanimously to
give their moral and financial sup
port to the reorganization of the
shingleweavers of Humbnlt county.
Calif.
Fearing the reorganization of the
shingleweavers, it is likely that some
of the employers will attempt to
thwart our efforts by "voluntarily"
Granting their crews slight wage in
creases. It is hoped that no shingle
weaver will be so shortsighted as to
"fall for their game." Only through
a militant organization can you ever
get a square deal from the greedy em
ployers!
Organizer Andy Raynor resumed
his field duties today arid will devote
his immediate time along the Sumas,
Wash., branch of the Northern Pacific
Railway.
Local unions should keep this of
fice fully informed as to the progress
of the work of reorganization, and
also state if assistance from head
quarters can be of benefit. President
Brown and the writer are both avail
able to fill dates or lend other assist
ance in the work. Also, President E.
|P. Marsh of the Washington State
Federation of Labor is devoting all
of the time he can spare from his
regular duties to promoting our move
; ment. Having but few men in the
' field it is important that these be as
signed to places where the most good
i! can be accomplished, and in this ef
' fort the local unions can greatly aid
• by keeping in close touch with in
\ ; ternational headquarters.
I Fraternally yours,
. | WM. H. REIT).
International Secretary-Treasurer
KILLING FEWER PEOPLE
According to a report of the Bu
reau of the Census, sent out. January
1, 1916, the encouraging news is giv
en us that the number of automobiles
is increasing faster .than the death
rate for which they are responsible.
At the close of 1909 there were ap
proximately 200,000 registered auto
mobiles in the country, with 632
deaths from them that year. For
1914 the registration was approxi
mately 1,750,000 automobiles, with
2623 deaths charged to them. In oth
er words, during a five-year period,
1909-1914, the increase in automobiles
was 775 per cent., while the fatalities
increased for the same period 315
per cent. The conclusion reached by
the census department is, "that the
automobile today is being driven with
more care and more regard for pub
lic safety than it was a few years
ago." This is encouraging to us who
are still alive, but contains little con
solation for those who have already
been the unfortunate victims of crim
inal indifference and carelessness.
POWERS OF "STRAW" BOSSES
NEW YORK— Secy. Shillady, sec
retary of the mayor's committee on
unemployment, states that it has been
the practice of certain firms to allow
under bosses to hire and discharge
employes at their pleasure. In one
instance it was found that 3000 work
ers had been engaged and dismissed
within twelve months from a firm
which employs 1000 persons. "This
sort of thing is against a firm's best
interests, as well as a danger to the
community," said Secretary Shillady.
IRON MOLDERS STAND FIRM
PITTSBURG, Pa. — Striking iron
molders are standing firm in their de
ma ml for an K-hour day. This move
ment started last November and is
the first K-hOUr fight for these work
ers in the large centers of industry.
About 40i) iron molders have been
granted the shorter work day while
900 are still on strike.
Patronize YOUR Advertisers
were apparently unaware of the ex
treme irregularity of their pay rolls,
and stated that for the most part their
business showed very little irregular
tty In the course of a year, and that
generally speaking employment In
the garment trades is as regular as
it could possibly be under the exist
ing circumstances
The I-abor Bureau'sflgures tell a
different story.
THE LABOR JOURNAL
The Chicago Federation
Offers Program of
Preparedness
(Continued from Page 1.)
summer vacation. This training
should he nstruction In the laws of
health, woodcraft and nature study,
cooking, camping, first aid in case
of accident i,r drowning, and all that
goes to mak" boys and girls capable
and independent. Working in groups
would develop this power to co-oper
ate which Is so essential in peace
as well as war. To put guns in the
hands of children for this work would
be vicious; to imitate guns with sticks
would be silly. The schools should
do all possible to develop keen, ready
minds and healthy bodies. The co
operative instinct which would result
in willing obedience for the best in
terests of all. proceeding from knowl
edge of what is best is the ideal which
should inspire this training.
8. Organized labor should strive to
obtain the fullest possible recogni
tion by the government for organiza
tion of working people instituted for
the purposes of improving wages and
working conditions.
Representation for Labor
We recommend that organized la
bor be alive and awake to see that
in any system of citizen soldiery the
greatest possible freedom and democ
racy shall prevail; that enlisted men
shall be given education in civic af
fairs, physical training and the fullest
opportunty for promotion from the
ranks; representation for labor upon
whatever committees or commissions
may be chosi n to decide upon or con
trol plans for military defense should
be demanded.
9. Any military system should be
democratically officered and con-
trolled by beads directly responsible
to the citizens of the land.
10. We should oppose any increase
in the standing army.
The danger to the American work
ing man from foreign countries is not
so much the danger of an attack by
their governments. The real danger
to the workers comes from the hordes
of helpless, underfed foreign immi
grants which are brought into this
country every year by the great man
ufacturing interests which want
cheap labor. Any plan for the in
crease of the army and navy would
make this danger more acute. If the
| American workers are drawn into the
army and navy and the industrial
plans which would be necessary to its
support, a demand for more labor
power would make an excuse for
i bringing in low paid workers who
| would undermine the standard of liv
j ing and make every real problem of
labor more acute.
Shorter Day Problem of Labor
The preblems of labor are the short
ening of the work hour, the increase
of wages, the betterment of condi
tions, stronger organization and con
stant development of greater power
in the political field. An increased
army and navy would not solve a
single difficulty that labor has to face.
Preparedness is needed in the
United States, but it must be a pre
paredness which is based upon physi
cal fitness, Patriotism is needed, but
it must be a patriotism which is based
upon love of country, and only a coun
try which guarantees liberty and op
portunity will be loved.
We feel that the labor movement
of Chicago, situated as we are in the
very center ot America, and feeling
the life of both the East and the
West, should help to hold the bal
ance, to strike the average to counter
act the hysteria and speak for the
international spirit of labor which we
hope will revive when the guns of
Europe have been stilled and we are
able to start to build upon the ruins
of a better civilization. Respectfully
submitted,
F. 11. R.
CHICAGO FEDERATION OF LABOR
LEARN FROM THE MONKEY
Do they allow two or three mon
keys to form a corporation and ob
tain control of all the paths that lead
through the woods?
Do they permit some smart nimi
key, with superior business ability, to
claim all the springs of water in the
forest as his own, because, of some
alleged bargain made by their ances
tors 500 years ago?
Do they allow a smart gang of mon
key lawyers to so tangle up their con
ceptions of ownership that a few will
obtain possession of everything?
Do they appoint a few monkeys to
govern them and then allow those ap
pointed monkeys to rob the tribe and
mismanage their affairs?
Do they build up a monkey city and
then hand over the land, and the
paths, and the trees, and the springs,
and the fruits to a few monkeys who
sat on a log and chattered while the
work was going on?
Patronise YOUR advertisers!
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE
State of Washington. County of Sno
homish, ss.
Sheriff's Office
By virtue of an Order of Sale issued
out of the Honorable Superior Court
of Snohomish County, on the 23rd
day of February, 1916. by the Clerk
thereof, in the case of E. E. Stuart.
Plaintiff, versus Vina Upper and N.
L. Upper, her husband: and Schwa
bacher Bros. Company, a corporation,
Defendants, No. 15463, and to me as
Sheriff, directed and delivered.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. That
I will proceed to sell at public auc
tion to the highest bidder for cash,
within the hours prescribed by law
for Sheriff's sales, to-wit: at 10:00
o'clock a.m. on the 25th day of March.
A.D. 1916, before the Court House
door of said Snohomish County, in
the State of Washington, all of the
right, title and interest of the said
Defendants above named in and to
the following described property, sit
uated in Snohomish County, State of
Washington, to-wit: Lot Twelve (12),
in Block Six Hundred Seventy-nine
(679) of the Plat of Everett, levied
on as the property of said Defendants
above named to satisfy a judgment
amounting to Five Hundred Seventy
nine no/100 dollars and costs of suit,
in favor of Plaintiff.
Dated this 23rd day of February,
1916.
DONALD McRAE. Sheriff.
By J. L. Allen. Deputy.
H. W. HOLMES,
Everett, Wash.,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
The State of Washington. County of
Snohomish, ss.
In Justice's Court, Everett Precinct,
Snohomish County, Washington,
Noah Shakespeare, Justice.
To H. H. Brown: —
In the name of the State of Wash
ington, you are notfied that the Haley-
Sheraton Company, a corporation, has
filed a complaint against you in said
Court which will come on to be heard
in my office, in Justice Court Room
in the Court House in Everett, in Sno
homish County, State of Washington,
on the 25th day of March. A.D. 1916.
at the hour of nine o'clock a.m.. and
unless you appear and then and there
answer, the same will be taken as
confessed, and the demand of the
Plaintiff granted. The object and de
mand of said action is to recover
$24.00 and interest thereon due Plain
till from you on open account, the
Plaintiff having garnished moneys and
funds due you from S. D. Clark as
trustee in bankruptcy of the Conti
nental Computing Cash Register Co.
Complaint filed February Bth, 1916.
NOAH SHAKESPEARE,
Justice of the Peace.
Plaintiff's Attorney,
G. W. LOUTTIT,
Over First. Nat. Bank,
Everett, Wash.
God, give us men! The time demandsj
Strong minds, great hearts, true faith,
and willing nands;
Men whom the lust of office does
not kill;
Men whom the spoils of office cannot
buy;
Men who possess opinions and a
will; t
Men who have honor; men who will
not lie;
Men who can stand before a dema-
gogue
And damn his treacherous flatteries
without winking;
Tall men,
the fog
In public duty and in private think-
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE OF
REAL ESTATE
State of Washington, County of Sno
homish, ss.
Sheriff's Sale
By virtue of an Order of Sale is
sued out of the Honorable Superior
Court of Snohomish County, on the
20th day of January, 1916, by the
Clerk thereof, in the case of Holland-
Washington Mortgage Company, a
corporation, Plaintiff, versus E. J.
Kennedy, Mamie A. Kennedy, his
wife; Bessie Sedgwick, Edwin W.
Moore; Ralpr C. Bell, Trustee; First
National Bank of Everett, a corpora
tion; S. K. Painter, Lena R. Painter,
his wife; and Citizens Bank & Trust
Co., a corporation. Defendants; No.
BIG SUGAR SPECIAL
20 LBS. SUGAR $l,qo
WHEN PURCHASED WITH AT LEAST $5 WORTH OF OTHER GOODS; STAMPS ELIMINATED
ABE MARTIN must have had the STEVENS "MORE FOR IT IS RirHT"
BILL in mind when he said: ' "Wl
"When th' manufacturers o' some article git If we let them pass the Stevens bill WF wn i
t'gether an' decide t' raise th* price of it, they have to pay a .
give out a 'prediction' that we'll have V pay more T ° PAY A WH OLE LOT MORE FOR IT.
fer Petition, here for signatures to oppose the bill.
Begin At Home To Reduce Your Living Cotfts
By making out a list of the things needed and TAKE ADVANTAGE of this BIG spfc-iai
a Great Saving to You. «t-sw»i»lM It means
FARM PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION *
4 Phones—*9B, 1248 ; S.S. 998, 997 » ...
The Store thet Keeps the "Crimp" In "High Coet of Living In Everett ' Man, » er
YOUR FRIENDS
Can buy anything you can give them—except your
photograph.
ROPfTPQ' QTTTnTO 218-219 Realty Bldg.
IyWVJJL<IyO Ol Ul/lU Over First National Bank
15337, and to me as Sheriff, directed
and delivered
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That
I will proceed to sell at public auc
tion to the highest bidder for cash,
within the hours prescribed by law
for Sheriff's sales, to-wit: at ten
o'clock a.m. on the 4th day of March,
A.D. 1916, before the Court House
door of said Snohomish County, in
the State of Washington, all of the
right, title and interest of the said
Defendants above named in and to
the following described property, sit
uated in Snohomish County, State of
Washington, tfonwjt: Dots One (1),
Two (2), Three (3), Four (4), and
Five (5), Block Three (3), Rucker's
Park Addition to the City of Everett,
being a part of Ix>t Two (2), Section
Thirty (30), Township Twenty-nine
,(29), North of Range Five (5) East,
W. M. Also, the vacated portion of
Thirty-fourth Street which attaches
to said Lot One (1) above mentioned
»by reason of said vacation of a por
tion of Thirty-fourth Street, levied on
as the property of said Defendants
above named to satisfy a judgment
amounting to Forty-six Hundred Eigh
ty-five and 22/100 Dollars and costs
of suit, in favor of Plaintiff.
Dated this Ist day of February, 1916.
DONALD McRAE. Sheriff.
By J. L. Allen, Deputy.
ROBT.. F. BOOTH,
Seattle, Wash.,
Attorney for Plaintiff. 5t
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND
FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY.
Carl Engstrand, and Carl Engstrand
as Executor of the Estate of Tekla
Maria Alhsen, Plaintiff, vs. Gus S
Torngren, Defendant.
Summons
who live above
The State of Washington to the said
Gus S. Torngren, Defendant:
Yon are hereby summoned to ap
pear within sixty days after the datp
of the first publication of this sum
mons, to-wit: within sixty days after
the 4th day of February, 1918, and
defend the above-entitled action in
the above-entitled Court, and answer
jthe complaint of the Plaintiff, and
i serve a copy of your answer upon the
undersigned attorney for the Plain
tiff at his office below stated; and in
case of your failure so to do, judg
ment will be rendered against you
according to the demand of the com
plaint, which has been filed with the
| Clerk of said Court.
The object of this action is to de
clare forfeited a certain real estate
contract executed by Tekla
Maria Alhsen as seller to the Defen
dant Gus S. Torngren as purchaser,
"IT GIVES ME TWICE
AS MUCH PLEASURE"
she tells her friends when they admire her All-Gas Kitchen.
"The old coal stove that was here when we moved in kept me
simply chained to my kitchen. Just when I was about worn out
I did a little real thinking. Then I called up the Gas Company
and told them to take the stove away—and put in a gas range
and water heater. The very next day they were installed and
I've been free from drudgery ever since."
The
All Gas Kitchen
will do as much for you. A cabinet gas range will save you
half the time in cooking. A gas water-heater will furnish plenty
of hot water quickly and at little expense.
The cost of an All-Gas Kitchen is moderate; investigate today.
Everett Gas Company
Friday, February 25, 1916.
BUY YOUR GROCERIES
At The
COW BUTTER STORE
Cor. Hoyt and Hewitt
Ind. 165Z Sunset 137
THE MAIZE
EVERETT'S POPULAR CAFE
1705 Hewitt Aye.
We have a repair shop in connec
tion with store and have an expert re
pair man in charge of same. We
make a specialty of repairing motor
cycles, bicycles, typewriters, cash
registers, guns and revolvers. We'
also do lock, safe and key work. Tele
phone and we will call for your work
and return same when repaired at
Arthur A. Baily's Sporting Goods and.
Hardware Store. Both Phones 76.
MILLINERY
New location
MacBEAN'S MILLINERY
1812 Hewitt
KITTLESON GROCERY CO.
Good Things to Eat
Phones: Ind. 47, Sun. 1540
1701 Wetmore Aye.
for the following described land situ
ate in Snohomish County, State of
Washington, to-wit: the South Half
oi the Northeast Quarter of the South-'
east Quarter of Section Four, and Ix>t
Seven of Section Three, all in Town-,
ship Thirty, North of Range Six, East
W. M., and to quiet the title to said'
land in the Plaintiff herein.
ANDREW JOHNSON,
Attorney for Plaintiff.
Postoffice and office address: 2-3
Fobes nidg., Everett, Wash.

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