OCR Interpretation


The Northwest worker. (Everett, Wash.) 1915-1917, August 05, 1915, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085770/1915-08-05/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

At '* i F
Pnijft Two
Place Your Money I I
WHERE 1
It will bo safe, and where it will bring you sure |B
returns. fl
You may need it later on. ■
Four per cent, on Saving Deposits. ■
Citizens Bank <& Trust Company I
Cor. Wetmore and Hewitt H
Paints, Glass, Window, Doors
Roofing and Building Paper
You can buy from us at wholesale prices. Give us a trial.
H. A. ENGELBRECHT CO.
2007 Hewitt Avenue. Everett, Wash.
iI \ '■' .'» ■■■ ■ 'A^7'. ■ '-AA '. , ■
_-*,-».*_-»-_'%-_.-*-*'_>--.*-.-_.--.---_,*.-_.-_-►,--.*- -a -a ~a ~»
FRESH CHURNED BUTTER, FRESH RANCH EGGS AND
. FULL CREAM CHEESE ALWAYS ON HAND.
Watch for our Wednesday and Saturday specials.
MEADOWMOORE DAIRY STORE, 1918 Hewitt Avenue
AMERICAN DYE WORKS
a, BOBIKSOIf * ton S' -'+ ' ' CLEANERS AlfTt
LXADIHG CLEAKBBS AND
Mil Wetmor. H_-i-K-> DTK-IS
;.. ' y ':;"'.,;?v T:7 '»;. a ,\'I '■ 7- w '. :■/.-'"_".■ 'f"J : .'-. ■'*.->.
I C. M. STEELE I
♦ Grocery and Confectionery f
x Stock always fresh. Least pos- $
? *ZAA7 elble prices |>
f PACIFIC AND GRAND • |
i a»eeeee»eeeeeeeeeeeeee»»»
3 ', For high grade Watches see <,
•I A.J.MOHN ii
<>A?'Av^':'-A '' 'J'[
;;• 1416 HEWITT AYE. ..J |
1>.....;'.;-.''-V-- t i iltttltt !
,-,..--.-.. ■ ....... ■ .9,
'./■: D. KAMERMAN p:
Everett's Reliable Jeweler
1616 Hewitt Avenue
Ind. 227 X Sun. 500
;' ' '■ ' " ..I
EVERYTHING IN COMMUNITY
SILVER
*___! ------- _^-^-M-_
AUSTIN'S, 2004 Hewitt Aye.
6% MONEY 6% MONEY
Loans may be obtained for any pur
pose on acceptable Real Estate se
curity; liberal privileges; correspond
ence solicited. ; Ji
A. C. AGENCY COMPANY'
76S Gas, Electric Bldg. Denver, Colo.
»-•■ .-.......--.....■.
W The ir>
;>..;, Commercial Press
Printers
Manufacturers of
RUBBER STAMPS
2931 Lombard Everett
Chris Culmback
.' _ i . i _...
FOR
TOBACCO
CIGARS
CANDIES
1405 Hewitt Aye.
PHONES 237
_, ■ ■i. ■ ■■.»■■■ — .......am......
In a negro district a member was
on trial, charged with stealing chick
ens. The evidence went to show that j
the defendant had been found with
his foot in a steel trap at the door of
a hennery, while an empty sack lay
near by. The decision of the judge
was to this effect:
"De cot finds dat de 'feudaat hadn't
no criminal 'tentions. Dah hain't no'
law to p'vent a gemnian from puttin' j
his foot in a steel trap ef he wants j
ter do it." I
Loren Thomas Frank Vallier
PARIS LAUNDRY
. We gauarantee all our work
and prices are right
2818 Grand Avenue
•::>: Phonea 1167
_^_^_^_^_^_^_^_^_^_^_^_^_^H______^B
KITTLESON GROCERY CO.
Good Things to Eat
Phones: Ind. 47, Sun. 1540.
1701 Wetmore Aye.
■ <■■■■■■«■■■» «_■_>■_ m
J. 0. SOVDE j
GROCERIES, DRY GOODS AND t
NOTIONS ;.,;■; -j
3419 Everett Aye., Cor. Summit I
Phones: S. S. 1818, Ind. 470 f: v I
■ ■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■.,,«,, nift,
■y±>-~j-\V;,'.l.-'-A: **.<■>: AA '
EDW. EGKLUND I
Dealer in Fancy and Staple X
GROCERIES I
Pkomtm 128 i
2707 Wetmore §
—♦—♦—♦—♦————♦#
THUESON GROCERY ' CO.
Agent Dr. Fahrney Medlelnae
Grocerlee, Flour, Feed, Fruit and
Vegetablee
120t Hewitt Avenue
Phonee: Ind. 14X, Suneet ISM
«-■-»■■■■_,. ii..,.,.,.,.
___--- ■_■■-.. ■ i i ......
MOON & REEP I
, Successors to |
REEP GROCERY .. _. {
1912 Hewitt Aye. j
Phones: Sunset 197,. Ind. 487 )
_
-,--,--... ■- - ......<
.......... | , ._,,,,. ■_!.,,
HIGH SCHOOL GROCERY
Both Phones 1166—26 th A Colby
HIGH GRADE GROCERIES
Our Motto, Quality and Service
■■■■■- ..... .- ■ ■ 111, i
CHARLES L. LINDBLAD < >
Staple and Fancy Groceries, '»
Fruits, Flour, Hay and Feed !'
Sun. 1064, Ind. 466_C X
LOWELL WASH, f
WESTBERG GROCERY . I
Staple and Fancy Groceries I
Phones 42 2933 Broadway I
We Give Green Trading Stamps I
EVERETT, WASH. 1
WOLD BROS. & WEST- I
LUND X
Nineteenth and Broadway I
Dealers In Fancy and I
Staple Groceries, Dry Goods, |9
Drugs, Grain. Feed ft Flour. I
Sun. 367 Ind. 816 EH
ORGANIZATION NEWS
ARLINGTON COMRADES
MAKE GREAT SUCCESS OF
FIRST SHIPLEY LECTURE
"EVOLUTION OF MAN" SUBJECT
FOR FRIDAY, AUG. 13th
After nibbling for two fain on
Shipley's "Nebula to Man" Illustrated
total*-, the Reds of Arlington, urged
by the comrades of Sllvnua, —who ha
heard them —started tho course last
Friday evening at th- Scenic theatre.
About 1115 persons were present, an
seemed to enjoy to tho rail both th
wonderful iteroopttoon views and the
story told of sun, planets, moons,
| comets, meteors, unci the universe of
i blazing suns nnd glowing nebulae that
wander through space so far beyond
our solar system.
"The Autobiography of the Earth"
will bo given on the evening of Aug.
C, followed by "The Evolution of Man"
on Aug. 13. The latter two lecture
Illustrated with about 200 stcrcoptlcon
views of ideal geological landscapes,
animate of millions of years ago, and
man before and during the Glacial
Epoch, will show how life arose on
tho earth, and how man himself Is
but the final term of a series of evo
lutionary processes which began with
the lowest germ of life In the ancient
ocean, which once covered all the
earth.
What would amount to approxim
ately twenty miles deep of the earth
strata havo been searched by scien
tists, thanks to the terriblo catacly
sms that have forced to the surface
strata that were laid down millions
of yean ago.
Imbedded In these ancient roc
are the fossil remains of thousands
'of extinct animals, revealing the slow
evolution of life from the lowest crus
taceans and mollusks to our savage,
and In many cases ape-like prehis
toric ancestors. It Is a wonderful
story, and no thinking man or woman
can afford to let this splendid oppor
tunity go by, when so much valuable
: knowledge can be obtained with so
little cost of time or effort.
It was the great Sir John F. W.
Herschel who said: "Geology, In the
magnitude and sublimity of the ob
jects which it treats, ranks next to
astronomy in the scale of the sci
ences." And John Ruskln well de
clared that "Geology does better in
re-clothing dry bones and revealing
lost creations than in tracing veins
I of lead or beds of Iron."
HAVING GOOD MEETINGS
Reports to hand indicate that Carl
Ulonska is having fairly good meet
ings. The reports also Indicate that
the meetings would be much better If
more comrades got In and boosted.
Comrade Ulonska should be heard by
every Henry Dubb In your locality. If
you cannot get them there by persua
sion, chloroform them. It would
never do to let them miss the lecture.
Everybody get In and boost for the
lectures in his burg. Get away from
the habit of letting "George do it."
Tell everybody. Write It on every
piece of available paper. Chalk It on
the sidewalks, BOOST, and then
BOOST again.
WOMEN VOTE RIGHT IN
NORWAY
Since Norway has given every adult
woman and man the right to vote leg
islation is said to have taken a re
markably Socialistic turn. The wom
en particularly are demanding social
legislation for the improvement of
the lives of the masses, rather than
pandering to the classes, as has been
the custom of pimple-headed politi
cians everywhere.
A PRACTICAL
SUGGESTION
TO LOCALS AND INDIVIDUAL SOCIALISTS:
I have read every Socialist book and pamphlet that has
ever been printed in the English language. lam familiar with
every paper and magazine now being printed in the name of
Socialism and I want to say with deep conviction that I con
sider THE NORTHWEST WORKER far and away the best of
them all. Particularly correct is its position on the Great War
which is the all-absorbing subject for some time to come. The
comrades making it are not eternally begging for help or ped
dling stock,they are devoting their energies to producing a
really good paper, and they are succeeding most brilliantly in
that at least!

If you really and truly care to do Socialist work,—work
that will not turn to ashes on your own lips in some form of
slavery to the state, a reformed and strengthened Capitalism,
—then you can do no better thing than circulate with all your
powers The Northwest Worker, and stick to it. I'm doing it.
Let's concentrate upon it and make our first concern to see
that it is sustained and its usefulness extended. In bundles is
the best way to handle it.
Yours for World Socialism,
BRUCE ROGERS.
THE NORTHWEST WORKER
NEWS FROM OLYMPIA
HERMAN'S MEETINGS IN
OLYMPIA ARE TRIUMPHS
Olympla oomradai are rejoicing over
the success of both of comrade Her
man's net tinea, Wo want the other
local! to work hard to advertlso hit
meetings and get the crowds out. He
is worth It.
Wo held one meeting ill Priest Point
park nt 2:30 p. in., another one nt So
cialist hall nt 8 p. in., both were well
attended, the outdoor meeting having
over 200 nnd tho hall meeting wn
nearly that many. A great many of
the audience from the park followed
the speaker to the hall riveting; so
wo expect to feel results in our mem
bership from such a demonstration
of Interest and understanding. Our
expectations are not groundless as
wo received two applications at th
close Of tint Inst meeting and have
more substantial promises.
No speaker has ever made the
Bclenco of Socialism more clear or
hold his audience better.
EDITH A. TISH, Sec.
SILVANA-ARLINGTON PICNIC
Tho fifth annual Socialist picnic,
held nt beautiful Island Grove la
Sunday week was a success In every
way. From far and near five hundred
men, women and children gathered to
Join in the day's festivities, bringing
well laden baskets, the contents of
which were spread at noon and a free
lunch served to all. At 2 o'clock com
ratio Kate Sadler mounted tho plat
form and by her eloquent logic an
force of delivery held her audience
'• for an hour and a half as she spoke
of the development of modern produc
i tion and Industry and the relation of
I tho working class to the same. It
was regretted that the Silvana band
could not be present, owing to cir
| cumstances, however, comrade Nels
Bruseth favored the assembly with
several fine selections on the saxo
phone, accompanied on the piano by '•
Agnes Thorsen. Swings and teeters I
were highly enjoyed by the little ones.
In athletic stunts the following were j
winners: High jump, Marius Holdahl; '
irunninq, Andrew Holdahl and Phy
Hartson; 12-lb s weight throwing, Ben j
Anderson, of Lakewood, 44 ft. The |
collection taken was sufficient to de-1
fray all expenses of the picnic Come j
again, neighbors and friends, and
make this an, animal day of pleasure.
TO EVERETT READERS
We are given to understand that a
solicitor employed by the Commercial
Importing Co., ,of Wetmore avenue,
selling CORONA BLEND COFFEE, is
inducing our readers to buy that cof
fee under false pretenses. We want
our readers to understand that this
firm is not an advertiser In your pa
per and that an order for goods given
to this firm Is a detriment to the well
being of this paper and those that
support It. Be sure that you buy
your goods from only those that ad
vertise. H. M. Clausen, of 2831 Rocke
feller, and The Imperial Tea Co., of
1407 Hewitt avenue, both of whom
roast and sell their own coffee, are
advertisers, besides the numerous
grocers.
I have always supported the for
ward march of the human race to
ward the light, and I have sometimes
resisted a progress which was with
out pity.Les Miserables.
We are all collective beings, let us
place ourselves as we may; for how
little have we, and are we, that we
can strictly call our own property?—
Goethe.
SOCIALIST PARTY I
DIRECTORY.
Cards will be inserted In this col
umn for the sum of fifty cents a
month.
NATIONAL EXECUTIVE SECRE
TARY.— Walter Lanferslek, 803
West Madison St., Chicago, 111.
STATE SECRETARY OF WASHING-!
TON.—I,. E. Katterfield, Box 491,
Everett, Wash. Office 314 Com
merce Bldg., Everett.
SNOHOMISH COUNTY SECRE
TARY.CarI Ulonska, Room 3, The
Forum, 1612 California Street, Ev
erett, Wash.
LOCAL EVERETT No. 1 meets every
Friday evening at 8 In The Forum,
ICI2 California St., Everett. Frank
Cort, fin.-sec; Hanna Crosby, rec.
sec; F. O. Crosby, organizer.
LOCAL EDMONDS meets every Sun
day evening at 8, In Engels' hall,
Edmonds. C. E. Brlggs, Edmonds,
recording sec; B. H. Davis, Ed
monds, financial sec.
LOCAL MONROE meets on the Ist
and 3rd Fridays In the month at 8
p. m. In the St. James hotel. R. W.
Thompson, Monroe, sec; W. S. Kel
ler, Monroe, organizer.
I ftfAl r* cr. A d \#ai I i-w ._*_ I
-ocal CEDAR VALLEY meets Oil
the 2nd and 4th Saturdays in the
month at 8 p. m. In the Cedar Val
ley church. Richard Pape, R. F. D.
Edmonds, sec; J. M. H*-»ver, R. F.
D. Edmonds, organizer.
LOCAL LAKEWOOD meets every
Thursday in the month at 8:30 p.m.,
In Lakewood hall. Chas. Roth, R.
1 Arlington, fin.-sec; John Over
void, R. 1 Arlington, organizer.
LOCAL RICHMOND meets every 2nd
and 4th Sunday in the month at 3 p.
m. in the homes of members. F. D.
Hoffer, R. 1 Edmonds, fin.-sec; Bon
ner Bartlett, Edmonds, rec. sec.
LOCAL GOLD BAR meets every 3rd
Sunday In the month at 2 p. m. in
the homes of members. Rufus
Wren, Gold Bar, organizer; Gustus
Fleeder, fin. sec.
LOCAL BILVANA meets every 2nd
and 4th Sunday in the month at 2
p. m. in the Silvana Trading Union
hall. Arvld N. Berg, Silvana, fin.
and rec. sec; Ole Larson, Silvana,
Organizer.
LOCAL BRYANT meets every 2nd
and 4th Sunday In the month at 2
p. m. in the homes of members.
Mike Kronholm, Bryant, fin.-sec;
Ben Montgomery, Pilchuck, . or
ganizer.
LOCAL HOME ACRES" meets first
Sunday afternoon of each month at
comrade Chas. Solie's residence. W.
J. Fortson, rec. sec; Chas. Solie,
fin. sec; Chas. Jurgus, organizer.
LOCAL MARXIAN, Seattle, meets ev
ery Thursday at 8 p. m., at 1433
Lakeside Aye. Lalla Rogers, 1433
Lakeside Aye., fin.-sec.
LOCAL ARLINGTON meets every
Monday evening at 8 p. m. in the
Labor Temple. Homer Caswell, rec.
sec. Wilford Dougherty, Fin. sec.
FROM A READER
Vancouver, Aug. Ist, 1915.
To the Northwest Worker:
Dear Comrades: I have been a
worker for Socialism 18 years and my
ideas have changed a great many
times as to certain phases of Social
ism, and as I am not a graduate of
any high school or have any ability
as an orator, I seldom argue any
thing at a Local or write anything
for publication, but I read a great deal
and the stand the Northwest Worker
takes on subjects and discussions al
ways rings with true Socialism and
should be taken by every true Social
ist In Washington. There are thou
sands of dues paying members today
in the Socialist party who do not und
erstand true Socialism or are traitors
to the party according to their appli
cation card they sign when asking for
membership to the party.
The referendum started by Local
Marx and printed in the Northwest
Worker of July 29, should be second
ed by every Local In Washington and
should be freely discussed by locals.
The members of the Locals should be
careful in selecting men for office and
see that they do not advocate some
side issue such as prohibition or reli
gion, but stick to the class struggle.
One great trouble with the working
j men in the Socialist party, as in all
other parties, is they will pick out a
man who is glib with his tongue
whether he has any sound sense or
not. The Socialist party stands for
the laboring man and if the members
of the Socialist party have not sense
enough to vote for a laboring man to
represent them instead of for a
lawyer, or a preacher, or some one
who makes a living off the laboring
man, we will have the same condi
tions under a Socialist administra
tion that we would have under any
other administration. For that class
of men usually work In the Interest
of that class of men.
Your comrade,
B. F. PEYTON, i
R. F. D. 4, Vancouver, Wash.
TRADE ON ROCKEFELLER AYE. AND SAVE MONEY
New Fall Goods WSB.
We have placed in stock the famous SUNLIGHT GERMANTOWN
YARNS, acknowledged the finest and softest on the market
12^c Germantown Yarns, 10c. 35c Knitting Yarns, 30c.
A LITTLE BUNCH OF MONEY-SAVERS
15c 36-inch White Outing $1.50 White P. K. Skirts $1.25
i./_ ■£"• _-;;,_- -- 10c 18c Galatea 15c
$_- 27' "Ch White Outing «**« Dress Gingham..... 10c
,/ la"n i TVr:7 9c 8c Apron Gingham... 6c
100 Colored Outing Flannel 8c 19c Tom Sawyer Cloth 15c
.»iA _f___ B 1 Calicopß - 5c 18c Dixie, Cloth 12/ 2 c
n^ v Per, Caleß;„ 36lnch 10c 20r White Oil Cloth ____17c
Ml fVrcales 36-inch ——- 8c 20c Colored Oil Cloth 15.
10c Bleached Muslin 7 c 8c Shelf Oil Cloth ___.5c
ir' rl . ,Un, ached Muslin. $1.50 Large Bed Spreads..sl.l9
25c 9SSI«fS_" T-»- 10c 200 *W Bed Spreads..sl.49
ir>c tA _ r. Marqulsette..._l9c 35c Large Turkish Towels..23c
.Be n«?_ ?**"* "9c 65c Large Turkish Towels-.49c
ll- r\ ,rLf, Wns_," 10c 19c Huck Towels __.___..__lsc
35c Dress Voiles, 36inch____19c 12c Huck Towels — _9c
49c Wool Challies 35c 75c Play Suits ______ ____68_
96c(House Dresses ___ 50c 69c Play Suits ______.il
J .25 House .presses 95c 59c Play Suits """49c
ra^p^-sr-a | b^a__i___3g
POLS ON & SMITH
THE STORE ABOUND THE CORNER ON ROCKEFELLER
THE EASTLAND DISASTER
Editor Northwest Worker:
Regardless of the'lmmediate contri
buting causes of the Eastland horror,
we, if we stop to think, know these
things to be the primary and original
causes of this and all like disasters,
where human life is snuffed out in
wholesale quantities, with the utmost
disregard possible and without the
least warning.
The Eastland, being a common car
rier, and a social necessity, yet priv
ately owned, was produced first as a
profit making machine, and secondly
as a social necessity, which brings up
the question of "Value" that Is neces
sary to define in order to more thor
oughly understand the situation.
First, under our present form of
capitalistic society, we have two kinds
of value. Social value as expressed
in the quality of a social necessity
and capitalistic value, by which is de
termined the amount of profits this
same social necessity can produce.
The Eastland has been, , ever since
its construction, very hard to manage
and keep in a seaworthy condition, as
she was of light draft and top heavy
and with a large crowd 'such';' as ex
cursion boats always have, she could
hardly be kept upright. Our present
capitalistic laws, being based on priv
ate property in social necessity, which
causes the interests of the individual
owner to be opposed to that of so
ciety's as a whole we can expect noth
ing else than that the owner, in ord
er to perpetuate himself in his posi
tion, today disregards the interests
and safety of society in his mad race
for more profits and further that he
is protected by law, and then some
of us are foolish enough to imagine
that we can bring the perpetrators of
such horrors as these to justice.
If we wish to continue the present
form of society we must expect this
and like human slaughters with ever
increasing magnitude, as they go hand
in hand with profits, and with an ever
increasing disregard for human life.
Lastly, that the only permanent
remedy for these evils is the direct
opposite form of society, or the Social
Ownership of the social necessities,
coupled with the democratic manage
ment of the same.
Under this form, and this alone, can
we expect to have the proper regard
for human life, as then it will behove
each person, in order to protect him
self to have constantly in mind the
safeguarding of every other member
of society. ':* y£
Human life and energy being the
greatest essential to social welfare,
yet w e know at present it is held the
cheapest.
Yours for Greater Social Justice.
HARRY FETTERHOFF
HUMAN NATURE
! You can't alter human nature. Our
ancestors used to be cannibals, but the
people are no more.
You can't alter human nature. Our
ancestors formerly lived in caves and'
ate uncooked meat, but now we do
neither.
You can't change human nature. Our
ancestors burned witches and tortured
people of other beliefs than theirs;
but we never do anything like that!
You can't change human nature.
Our forefathers imprisoned men and
women for being in debt; but where
is there such punishment today?
You can't change human nature.
Our ancestors kept chattel slaves and
argued that it was right and scrip
tural, but there are no chattel slaves
today.
Human nature may he trained and
civilized, so that it will end the rob
bery of the masters, make all people
free and give all opportunity. And
that will mean Socialism: '
Thursday, August ->, 111...
Weiser's Grill
I A Good Place To Eat
I W. J. WEISER, Prop.
m .' ' •'•- :-'V"7-.-»...«<.«.. . . ..',.■■•■.,
UNION OYSTER AND
.CHOP HOUSE
CARL ERICKSON, Prop. >
We Cater to the Working Men
1717^_ Hewitt Avenue
♦♦♦»e»»»»eeeeeeeeeeeee»ss<
I HOTEL LOMBARD ■'
I . . 1922 Hewitt Aye. j
I Rooma 50c, 75c, $1 ,l
X Phone Ind. 498 X !
• Socialist literature always on i
X the table j
144444444A444444AAA4J _-_>. _-._-■ _i
'^ • .... - '--:'■ ■.-!
T JOHN F. JERREAD ]
Undertaker and Embalmer !
',)■ ' Phone Main 230 A i
:: z EVERETT, WASH. |
, _;
y *'.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦♦## SSSS#i
;; , THE EVERETT BATHS i
; J .^C, First Class : r.'- '•? J
X BARBER SHOP ',
| 2821/_ Wetmore J
♦♦♦♦ c c c ♦ c c ♦ c c » see c c c c <>'♦♦♦<
♦■■■i■ ■ ■ i ■ .<
CITY DRUG STORE j
1910 Hewitt Aye. j
Free delivery to any pert ot \
the city. Ask for Green Trading '
, Stamps. %:.<■■&.¥s ;■>;s;.■; : \.
*"""" i ■•■ - 1,, i, ~j
| See !
| M. H. CLAUSEN j
f For Freeh Roasted Coffee and j
x Delicious Tea
I Phone 581 2813 Rockefeller j
I GOLDFINCH BROTHERS
•I Wall Papers, Paints, Glass
■f 2812 Rucker Avenue
f. Both Phones 285
" - ■ ■■ _
CARL REICHELT, Prop.
COMMERCE BARBER SHOP
Commerce Bldg., Everett, Wash,
Two Good Bathe
— ■ i i ■ ■ ■ i. . .. . ...
....... ........ A\
J _, Northern Transfer Co. ~~~_
I No hauling too large or email i
J Storage In connection *
* Office phone Ind. 292, Ban. 191 *
' Residence lad. 41T J
J 800S McDOUGALL AYE. J
I Thompson's I
§ Hewitt Aye., Near Maple St. §
§ Something for Everybody X
»»»e»»»»»*ee4MMMMM4eee|
Dr. Ross Earlywine, Dentist, 206
American Bank Bldg. Both Phones
125.

xml | txt