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The Camden chronicle. (Camden, Tenn.) 1890-current, July 18, 1890, Image 2

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THE CHRONICLE,
A DKMOCIUTIO XEWSlUrF.K.
1 ' l I . I , I H 1 1 1 : 1 WKI'.KIA IIV
Tit A vis nnoriiEiis,
CAMDEN, TENN.
THE CONVENTION.
Sl'llSC'lMITlON KATES.
mm- dollar hm- year In advance; II ft y cents for
St months; tclltv-lie cents for til let- months.
Tiik t 'ii iion 14'i.k will lie Issued on Friday of
( iirli week. tfiiliscrlptlnnH, payalile III advance,
imm In' si-iit by post-olllce order nt our risk.
I'osliiyc st a int it are nut desinilile, Iml when It Is
I'll, ml necessary to remit llirin one-cent stimiiH
m preferred.
Au'cnts wand il to solicit Miibscilpt Ioiih. Write
lol iei ins. etc.
Vi' shall spare no riidi'i.vor to furnish valuable
iiiid'iid nuttier to our patrons; and hope to se
rine a eorrcHpoiiiteiit at every post-olllce in lien
tciiiCiMintv to furnish us with county news.
" We assume no responsibility lor the ex
pressions contained in coniniiiiilcatlons appear
ini; in the minimis of this paper.
DEMOCRATIC TICKET.
1 lie following are the )"liloer:iti -ii'inilliel'S, se
lected hy primary cleetli i Mar. I: s, t -i , for tin1
county olllcs ot I'.entiin Cn-.'iity. and th should
receive the support of all true' liemocrats at tin
poilson the 7th day of A'v'.st, Ittt):
For Conii'v Jiidu'':
Ii. C. SCRUGGS.
For Coiintv Clerk:
AV. A. STEELE, Jit.
For Circuit Clerk:
A. II. BROOKS.
For Tnir.Ve:
AV. J. BARNES.
For Sheriff:
E. O. FLOWERS.
For registrar:
J. T. BO WLES.
THE LARGEST EVER ASSEM
BLED IN THE STATE.
Hon. James D. Richardson Perm a
nent Chairman.
Four Candidates in the Race with a
Strong Following.
A Platform Without A Flaw.
to the great mass of the people; for its I this convention; ami it was further re
FRIDAY, JULY 18, 1800.
The Platfcrm.
The platform unanimously adop
ted by the Democratic convention
fit Nashville Inst Tuesday, is broad
enough for ever lover of free gov
ernment to stand upon. It endors
ee the principles of our free gov
ernment as handed down to us by
our forefathers. L endorses the ad
ministrations of GitovEK Cleve
land and Robert Taylor, favors
free schools, and opposes the school
I rast. It declares in favor of econ
oiny in running the government,
find the collection of taxes suffi
ient only to meet the expenses of
government, economically adminis
tered. It favors good public roads,
It. favors protection to agriculture
n nd labor. It condemns the Repub
lican party for its legislation in the
interest of monopolies and against
labor. It condemns the Republi
can party for its high tariff policy,
its proposed interference m elec
tions, and for its sectionalism ant
unjust partisanship.
We publish in full the platform
ta adopted by the convention, am
recommend it to the careful con
'deration of our reader.
"With rule3 especially formula
ted to prevent Democratic interfer
ence, it has taken the Republican
Congress seven months to make
one law. The expense to tax-payers
for seven rnontln nnticral leg
islation is simply enormous. Add
this to the millions of dollars that
one law takes out of the public
treasury, and we can form some
conception of what a Republican
Congress costs the American peo
ple for measures that are in the in
terest of monopolies and money
barons. It is hardly possible, in
this enlightened age, the American
voter will continue in flower a
party that has proven itself so en
tirely unworthy the great trust
placed in it.
Tin: recent Republican nomina
1ion for Congressman in Quay's old
district in Pennsylvania, was a sur
prise to Quay and his friends, and a
strong straw that points to the down
fall of Quayism. The opposition
to Quay in that district was strong
enough to defeat the Quay candi
date and nominate the opposition,
The Taylou men areencouaged.
"When his name was presented to
the convention, the prolonged ap
plause with which it was .greeted
opened the eyes cf the other can
didates. The cheering for Taylor came
from nil over the cnpitol building,
end echoed through every corridor.
The largest and most distin
guished body of representative
Tennesseans ever assembled in the
State is in convention at the cap
ilol in Nashville. It is the State
Democratic gubernatorial conven
tion, but will also select a candi
date for supreme judge to fill the
vacancy occasioned by the death
of Judge Folkes, and is made up
of the intelligence and chivalry
from all over the State.
It is a most important conven
in an epoch of the history of the
country that tries men's souls. It
is a convention similar to those
held and to be held in every State
of this grand republic by the Dem
ocratic party to put out for the im
portant offices the very best men
of the party for the purpose of
wresting the Government, State
and National, from the grasp of the
corrupt and corrupting Republi
can party, that the grand and good
government our forefathers fought,
bled, and died for as an inheritance
to their posterity may be preserved
and perpetuated.
The candidate the convention
nominates for Governor and su
preme judge, the people of all par
ties who desire good government
can cheerfully support, and espo
cially every Democrat can support
with Ids vote and confiding trust
FIRST DAY.
When the convention was called
to order at 12 o'clock Tuesday by
Thomas L. Williams, Chairman of
the State Executive Committee
there were about two thousan
delegates present. The galleries
were full, the floor of the house
was full, and the aisles were packed
N. W. Baptist, of Tipton County
was elected temporary chairman
and the usual committees were ap
pointed.
The eomrrdt'ee on permanen
organization recommended Hon
T T X 1 1
-James v. lucnaruson as perina
nent chairman and Eth B. Wade
secret ary. The report was adopted,
T)it committee on resolutions
presented the following platform
which was adopted without a dis-
attenipt to pans a Federal election law, or
force bill, designed to engender a coiillict
U-t ween the nices of the South, and to
strengthen entrenched monopoly; for its
utter disregard of the will of the people
in unseating duly and legally elected
Democratic representatives; and its
HhainelessnesH in denying the right of
Statehood to territories fully qualified for
admission by the number of their citiiens,
because they ate iKmiocratic, while they
admit into the Union other territories, as
States, wiili a much smaller population,
for the reason only that a mn jority of their
voters are Republicans; and in contrast
with all this and the weak, vacillating,
selfish, strife-producing, and labor dissat
isfying administration of Benjamin Har
rison, we present with pride the adminis
tration of Grovpr Cleveland, marked, as
il was, by high moral courage, exemption
from nepotism, jobbing, and speculation.
We denounce the McKinley tariff bill,
recently parsed by the Republicans of the
lower house of Uongreos without full de
bute and due consideration, in which
taxeR are heavily laid on the necessaries
and but lightly on the luxuries used by
therich.and which prevents importations,
curtails exportatk-us, and at the same
time, increases taxes, thereby oppressing
the farmers and laborers of the country.
We demand a currency of gold and
silver anl also of paper, convertible into
oin at the option of the holder, and v;p
lemand the free coinage of silver on the
basis originully fixed by law, and that it
and the gold dollar shall be equally a
unit of value.
solved that the basis of representation in
this convention be one vote for each 100
votes cant for Cleveland in ls.SS, and one
foreveiy fraction over "0 votes, ami the
following is fixed us the number of votes
each county is entitled to tin k r this ap-
poruonnieiit :
:ield sacred for homesteads for American
citizens, and we condemn the policy of
the Republican party in its extravagant
lonations of many millions of acres to
corporations.
We denounce the importation of pan
per labor which comes ju competition
I
Counties. v I
.5 i
Anderson 7 i
Itcdford ?)
Itcnton ii
Hledsoo 5
ltliiinit 10 !
ltradley hi
Campbell.... 0
Cannon Vi
Carroll i
Carter R !
Cheatham . .. 11
Chester 12
Claiborne 10
Clav 7
Cocke 8
Coffee 18
Crockett IS
Cumberland. 4
Davidson.... 87
Decatur 9
DeKalb 15
1 lksi in 15
Dver 20
Kay''tte -3H
Fentress '.
Franklin 24
;ibson :w
(iiles 32
(IruiUKer !t
tireene IKS '
('rinidv
Hamilton ....
Hamilton.... 40
' iticock G
H:ir liiimn... 1!)
M.-v iiit la
J i. a kins n;
II 'iv wood.... '20
Henderson .. 15
Jfeorv 21
J ic.-fnan .... 15
Mijv.rtmi 7
Jl'tmphreys . 14
l.ic''.:-on 1(1
Jicnes 3
Jefferson S
Johnson 2
Knox.
U'.k? 5
Comities.
I.andcrdulc.
Lawrence.. .
U'wls
Lincoln
bunion
Macon
Madison
Marlon
Marshall....
Maurv
Mc.Mlan ....
McNairy....
Meigs
Monroe
Montgomery.
Moore
Morgan
Obion
Overton
Perrv
l'lckkt
Polk
Putnam
Kiiea
ldoane
Itotiertson...
KuUierford .
Scott
Sequatchie ..
Sevier
Shelby
Smith
Stewart
Sullivan
Stunner.....
Upton
Trousdale . .
Unicoi
Union
Van liuren..
Warren
WashinUm
Wayne
Weakley. ...
White.
Williamson.
Wilson
IS
11
:i
M
r
12
2.1
a?
14
15
7
15
10
4
P:
8
4
7
14
1
H
22
1
ti
4
5
11!
21
1:1
24
10
24
Total il,05
THE CANDIDATES.
The following gentlemen were
pia !ed before the convention for
the nomination for Governor (it
with and lowers the waj'ea of American having been agreed to dispose of
workingmen. the GovernsluD first). The nom
nn respect to Mate anairs tno Do
inocracy of the State, believing that the
prot-pei ily of a free State depends upon
the intelligence and virtue of its people,
have inaugurated and maintained a sys
tem of free schools for the benefit of all
the children of the tate, and we pledge
ourselves to continued offort. to increase
and extend the facilities of this benefi
cient system.
"We declare in favor of strict economy
in the management of all State affairs
and that no more taxes shall be collected
from the people than are absolutely nec
essary to meet the wants of the State gov
ernment so administered, and that all
persons, corporations, and property sub
ject to taxation under the Constitution
should bear their just and equal propor
tion of the same.
In the past the Democratic party has
enacted such lien laws as have secured
the rights of the laborer and mechanic,
and we pledge ourselves to such other
additional legislation as may be appro
priate and necessary to secure their full
protection in the future.
Good public roads we regard as a ne
cessity to the rapid and steady develop
ment of our State, and we favor such leu
islation as will tend to their establish
ment.
We. w elcome labor and capital to our
Creameries.
mating speeches were limited to
five minute ts:
John E. Richardson nominated
John P. Buchanan, of Ptutherfor
County.
General W. H. Jackson nomin
ated Jere Baxter, of Davidson
County.
W. P. Robertson nominated John
M. Taylor, of Henderson County.
George B. Peters nominated
Josiah Patterson, of Shelby County-
Balloting was next in order.
BALLOTINO.
The two-third rule was adopted,
making it necessary for one man
to receive 1,070 of the total vote of
1,005 to get the nomination.
First ballot Buchanan, 795 1-5;
Baxter, 297g; Taylor, 177; Patter
son, 2707-20.
8EC0ND DAY.
Nine ballots were taken the sec
ond day. Seven were taken with
but little change. Buchanan lost
votes from the first, while Patter
senting vote:
THE PLATF011M.
Whereas, The Democratic jmty has
heretofore contrilnued so much to ihe ex
tension and lii.iiciial growth of the coun
tiv, and has. always favored the int'tests
of the laboiing and producing cla.ses,
therefore the Democracy cf Tennessee.,
in conventii n assembled, reaffirm its
a Iherence to 'he fundamental principles
of free gover. uncut a. enunciated by the
fathers and practiced by the party, for
long years approved bj the people, and
recently deciaied by the national Dem
ocratic platfoiiu hi LSSS, tin i pledges itself
to the adminislri.iioii - f public tilfairs in
strict accordance therewith We indorse
the adminigrrati -a of Graver Cleveland
as President of ine United State, and
the present adin'iiistrntion of Governor
K. L. Taylur in recpii;! to our State gov
ernment. We declare that tl .. agrieuln.r..! inter
ests are the mainstay and supp.r.i nf our
dual system of ivernmeTit, State and
Federal, and we arraign and condemn
the Republican parjy fur its legislative
'discrimination against this class, which
has greatly reduced the price ol farm lands'
i'.vA products; for its corrupt grant of
large t-.ubsidics to special corporations;
for its revolutionary methods to perpetu
ate its potter; for it3 reckless squander
ing ol public money for party purposes;
for its corrupting and debauching of the
American franchise; for its efforts to fo
ment sectional strife and thus disturb the
business tranquility of the country; for
i t- efforts to luster combinations, uniaw
.ul trusts, and monopolies, so oppressive
State which comes to identify themselves Hon aud Baxter made slight gains,
Tavlor held his own. The ninth
ballot stood: Buchanan, 729; Bax.
ter 307 J; Patterson, 37o; Taylor,
1981
The, latest dispatch from Nash
ville, 9:15 last night, gives Baxter,
344 ; Buchanan, 700 ; Taylor, 1S2 ;
Patterson, 389.
with our industries, development, anil
social progress.
We favor a modification of our penal
system so that there may be a proper
classification of convicts to the end that
minors and those committing small of'
fenses may be kept separate from hard
ened criminals, and so that convict labor
in iy not come in conflict with or autago'
nize the honest labor of the country
We believe that government is the best
among a free, self-reliant people, which
governs least consistent with social order,
and which, believing in the people, leaves
them to work out their own destiny.
We denounce all trusts which are'or
may be formed to increase the price of
school books used bv the children of the
State in obtaining an education
The Democratic party heartily sympa
thizes with the Iri.-h people and ail oth
ers in their struggles to obtain the bless
ings of home-rule in their governmental
affairs, this being a cardinal tenet of
Democratic faith and the sheet-anchor of
constitutional liberty.
On the past record of our party, our be
lief for the present and hope for the fut
ure, as herein declared, we go before the
country in the present canvass, and in
vite the co-operation of all people who
favor honest government, equ?.l rights,
and human liberty.
The following resolution was pre
sented by the committee on cre
dentials and basis of representa
tion, and adopted by the conven
tion: Resolved, That where the names of
any person or persons have been added
to the list of delegates by any person
after the adjournment of the county con
vention, they are not entitled to seats in
From Areadne.
Kegular correspondence.
Humor has it that we are to be
startled by a wedding in our midst
soon.
Owing to the continued drouth,
crops will be about one-third of an
average yield in this neighborhood,
Jefferson Lowry is indisposed
this w eek, but we hope it is nolh.
ing serious, and that he will soon
regain his good health.
July 12, 1890.
From Eva.
l!ei;ular correspondence.
Ivev. A. Gossett, of Birdsoug, was
in our village yesterday on busi
netis. -
Sirs. L. Bryant, of Huntingdon,
is visiting at Eva and vicinity this
week.
II. C. Patrick has been some
what indisposed the past week, but
is convalescing.
The millet crop is this section
will be almost an entire failure on
account of the drouth.
July 15, 1890.
Now that our county has at last
opened its eyes to the progress and
improvements made by our sister
counties, it is to be hoped that we
will take hold and improve the ad
vantages which we enjoy develop
he elements of prosperity which
exist all over aud throughout the
county.
Among the many enterprises
which is susceptible of being made
highly profitable to all parties en
gaged therein, as well as contribu
ting to the general prosperity, is
the establishment and operation of
creameries and dailies for supply
ing the creamery with milk. It is
earnestly desired tliat not a pound
of cheese or western butter will
find its way into Benton County.
Our markets ought to be supplied
with the home product. The money
that is sent East and AVest for but
ter and cheese, or any farm pro
duct, ought to go into the- pockets
or be added to the bank account of
our own farmers. And it will, if
we make an effort in that direction.
The creamery industry is li-ving
rapidly developed in Texas, Ar
kansas, Kentucky, and Alabama
all around us, and has ceased to
exist as an experiment, but is an
important factor in swelling the
farmers' bank account and giving
employment to fanners' sons.
Dr. J. M. Moses received a letter
last Monday from C D. Jones,
agent for Davis & Rankin, cheese
factors, of Chicago, now engaged in
erecting a creamery at Stuttgart,
Ark., wanting to know what the
prospect was for a creamery at this
place, and stating in the letter that
when he could learn of a town that
within a radius of 8 or 10 miles
around it there could be found 200
cows and upwards to sustain the
business, he would visit the place
and explain the matter fully to the
business men and the farmers. He
usually forms a stock company, or
any way the people have a disposi
tion to invest When the required
amount of stock has been sub
scribed, then he will purchase a
ocation, erect the building, put in
lie machinery, etc., and nothing is
to le paid by the stock-holders wn
til the factory is completed and in
running order, and accepted by the
stock-holders, who are the owners.
He also will furnish an experienced
butter and cheese man to manage
the business for the company.
The business will pay from 10 to
25 per cent, on the money invested,
circulating from $4,000 to $5,000
per month, among the farmers for
their milk, and creating a largely
increased trade among the business
men of the county.
"We will say to our business men,
farmer friends, and citizens, that if
they would take hold of the matter,
take stock in such an enterprise1,
and take an interest in it, we do
not hesitate to say that improperly
managed and conducted on princi
ples of business, when once start
ed, the indirect benefit of such an
industry in Benton County will
more than pay our business friends
for their investment
AVe might be exporting thou
sands of pounds of cheese and but
ter every year, if we would utilize
the splendid clover lands which wet
have for raising clover to fed to
dairy cows. There are thousands
of acres of magnificent land in this
county, that could be utilized in
this way, and we will be glad to
note when the matter is being dis
cussed by our farmers, and we will
present any facts and figures in the
columns of The Chronicle bear
ing upon the subject, that will, as
sist them in any way. J
"We are of the opinion that this
is the best enterprise we can take
hold of now to help one another out
of the ruts, pay our debts, improve
our condition financially, and also
improve our farms as .veil as im
prove the condition of our county.

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