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The Tomahawk. (White Earth, Becker County, Minn.) 1903-192?, September 24, 1903, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064695/1903-09-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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The Tomahawk.
WHITE EARTH, MINN
All the News of the Past Seven
Days Condensed,
HOME AND FOREIGN ITEMS
News of the Industrial Field, Personal
and Political Items, Happenings
at Home and Abroad.
XHE NEWS FROM ALL THE WOULD
DOMESTIC.
The exchanges at the leading clear
ing houses in the United States during
the seven days ended on the 12th aggre
gated $1,420,420,672. The decrease com
pared with the corresponding week of
last year was 41.9.
Mrs. Clara Costello, of Chicago, de
tpondent over her husband's insanity,
taturated her clothing with kerosene
and turned herself to death.
Justices Caverly and Prindlville de
clared in Chicago that wife-heaters
should be whipped at the post.
All but 14 buildings in the village of
Eustis, Me., were destroyed by fire.
'It is proposed to elevate the American
legation at Constantinople to an em
bassy, in order to avoid delays in treat
ing with the sultan of Turkey.
Forty-five New Jersey corporations,
with a total capitalization of over |80,-
D00.000, are reported to have passed1
into
the hands of receivers during the last
year.
A carload of powder exploded near
Beaumont, Kan., killing three men.
Conspiracy and bribery are the charges
In the indictments returned in the post
office investigation at Washington
against George W. Beavers, August W.
Machen, James W. Erwin, Isaac S. Mc
Giehan, George H. Huntington and Eu
gene D. Sheble.
New York athletes captured the na
tional championship of American Ama
eur Athletic union at the Milwaukee
peet.
The schooner Fielding rescued seven
tnen and one woman from the bottom of
an overturned ship near Port au Prince,
flfine of their companions were drowned.
Rear Admiral Casey has been retired
on account of age, after nearly 47 years
active service.
Two severe earthquake shocks were
telt in Portland, Ore.
Major Delmar, king of geldings, broke
his own record at Syracuse, N. Y., trot
Ung a mile in 2:00%.
There were 172 business failures In
the United States during the seven
days ended on the 12th, against 205 the
same week in 1902.
Secretary Shaw is having prepared a
"blacklist" of national banks that are
reducing their circulation.
A ten-inch wire gun in a trial at Sandy
Hook fired shots at a velocity of 2,500
feet a second, practically the world's
record.
(Weekly reviews of trade say there Is
Increasing activity In nearly all lines of
business.
The "Star-Spangled Banner," which
commemorates the siege of Baltimore
by the British September 13, 1814, has
been selected as the national anthem
by the navy.
Wind, rain and snow caused great
damage over a wide area of the north
west, the loss to crops being serious.
A corporal and a seaman were killed
and several other persons were severe
ly injured by the explosion of a barrel
of alcohol on the cruiser Olympia at
Norfolk, Va.
President Roosevelt has abandoned
the plan to summon congress in extra
ordinary session in October, and the
present plan fixes November 9 as the
date.
Forty-five countries will be repre
sented at the St. Louis exposition, ac
cording to John Barrett, commissioner
general.
Counterfeiting of United States coin
was carried on in the Pennsylvania
pentitentiary at Philadelphia by five
convicts under the officials' noses.
Senator Carmack, of Tennessee, will
Introduce in congress next session a
bill for the repeal of the fifteenth
amendment.
A hurricane swept over Florida, caus
ing loss of life and great damage to
property.
The percentages of the baseball clubs
In the National league for the week end
ed on the 13th were: Pittsburg, 675
New York, 606 Chicago, 587 Cincin
nati, 537 Brooklyn, 504 Boston, 416
Philadelphia, 336 St. Louis, 331.
The percentages of the basball clubs
In the American league for the week
ended on the 13th were: Boston, 659
Cleveland. 563 Philadelphia, 537 New
York, 517 Detroit, 496 St Louis, 480
Chicago, 447 Washington, 301.
The postal recipts at the 50 largest
post offices in the United States for Aug
ust were (4,728,205, a net increase of
$406,842 over August, 1902.
Robbers took about $10,000 in cash
from the Minnehaha.county bank at Val
ley Springs, S. D.
The cruiser Maryland was launched at
Newport News, Va.
John Whybra, a lumberman 45 years
old, committed suicide by throwing him
self into the whirlpool rapids at Niagara
Malls.
A report that the members of the crew
c. of the battleship Kearsarge are on the
p' verge of mutiny is officially denied.
Fire destroyed the barns at the insti
jtntlon for feeble-minded at Lincoln, 111.,
^iend 40 horses were cremated.
Much of Eau Claire county, Wis., was
^onder water and farmers are heavy
lo6ers.
Charles Joseph Bonaparte, of Balti
more, has accepted the invitation of Sec
retary Hitchcock to undertake the in
vestigation of Indian Territory affairs.
The American Association of General
Passenger and Ticket Agents has begun
a movement to put a check on baggage
smashers.
Bitter feeling among union men at In
dianapolis against D. M. Parry, president
of the Manufacturers' asociation, result
ed in the fatal stabbing of one employe.
A hurricane which swept across the
southern part of Florida killed 18 per
sons and did great damage to property.
On the second anniversary of the
death of William McKinley Toledo un
veiled the first statue in Ohio of the
late president. At Canton flowers were
placed on his tomb.
Secretary Shaw has designated 50 na
tional banks in various parts of the
country as depositories of public funds
and has ordered $4,000,000 deposited
with them.
Burglars opened the safe of Frank
Bailey, engineer on the Caro division of
the Michigan Central road, and secured
$3,800 in currency.
A passenger train struck a carriage
containing Frank Milner and Miss Kate
Bilby near Terre Taute, Ind., killing
both.
Clarence Egnor, of Buffalo, N. Y., was
put to death in the electric chair at
Auburn for the murder of Archibald
Benedict, a keeper in Auburn prison.
The situation in the northern half
of the corn belt wa,s critical and if gen
eral heavy frost reaches the district
in the next ten days it will cause a loss
of $200,000,000 to farmers.
An Invasion of the feud section of
Kentucky by the Salvation army has
been inaugurated by a small band on
foot.
The congregation of the Belden Avenue
Baptist church in Chicago celebrated
the raising of the church debt with a
banquet and a jubilee service.
The crops in many western states are
reported ruined by rain, frost and snow,
and the losses already are figured in the
millions.
Frances V. Benque, who sent threat
ening letters to Secretary Hay, has been
sent to an insane asylum in New York.
At Noblesville, Ind., William Howe
shot and killed the divorced wife of his
son and then killed himself. Jealousy
was the cause.
At Centerville, Miss., William Wil
liams, a negro, was lynched on the main
street for shooting James Germany.
The national irrigation congress met
at Ogden, Utah, to discuss plans for re
deeming millions of acres of western
arid lands.
Excessive moisture retards the ma
turity of crops in the Mississippi and
Missouri valleys and lake region.
At San Antonio, Tex., Schulz's Palm
garden, for more than 25 years a noted
resort for tourists, was burned, the loss
being $250,000.
The annual report of the commission
er of patents shows a total of 29,293
patents and 2,194 trade-marks issued
during the year.
Benjamin J. Ogden, mayor and lead
ing lawyer of Keyport, N. J., has dis
appeared, leaving debts of $100,000.
Fire in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., de
stroyed nine business houses, entailing
a loss of $500,000.
Rear Admiral O'Neill, chief of ord
nance, will ask for $18,000,000 for ord
nance in the navy for the next fiscal
year.
Fort Yates, N. D., has been abandoned
as a military post and the troops have
been transferred to Fort Lincoln N. D.
Frost holds off and the corn crop of
the west gets a respite. Two weeks of
warm weather are yet required.
A dispatch from Dawson says the
Klondike's output of gold will be $10,-
000,000 this year.
A twentieth century crusade against
their ancient enemy, the Turk, is being
planned by knights templars in Chi
cago.
PERSONAL AND POLITICAIi.
Anna C. Hines died in Shelbyville,
Ind., aged 103 years and six months.
The republicans of the eighth district
of Texas have nominated Dr. Max Ur
wilz, of Houston, for congress.
James E. Furlong, of Providence, has
been nominated by the socialists for
governor of Rhode Island.
C. Sam Nichols, aged 60 years, who
had founded numerous papers in Kan
sas, Missouri, Colorado and Wyoming
since the close of the civil war, died in
Salt Lake City.
James Kerr Kelly, aged 84 years, for
merly United States senator from Ore
gon, died at his residence in Washing
ton.
FOREIGN.
The government of Colombia is
aroused to the danger of the secession
of Panama, owing to delay, in the canal
treaty, and takes steps to check the
movement.
The powers are still exerting pressure
both at Constantinople and Sofia to pre
vent a Turko-Bulgarian war.
France has ordered a squadron to pre-,
pare to sail for Turkish waters.
Later reports show that a storm
which swept the British isles caused
great devastation among the shipping,
and that the loss of life was over 50.
Tolstoi celebrated his seventy-fifth
birthday with his family at Tula, Rus
sia, in good health.
Advices from Sofia report another
wholesale massacre by Turks, 60,000 per
sons, the entire Christian population of
the Akrida and Leren districts, being
slain.
The presence of war ships in Turkish
waters has resulted in the porte show
ing eagerness to grant the United
Staes' demands, not only for the pro
tection of Americans, but for the set
tlement of old questions.
An epidemic of yellow fever prevail*
In Linares, Mexico, one-fourth of the
population, 3,000 persons, having died.
The British cabinet divided on Mr.
Chamberlain's fiscal proposals and a
partial reorganization was declared pos
Rihla.
&Ski!.4^"...
Bulgaria has appealed to the powers to
prevent the devastation of the country
by Turkey, plainly stating that unless
the atrocities are stopped the nation will
be forced to adopt stern defensive meas
ures.
Great Britain and Japan have decided
to protest to China against acceding to
Russia's demands in Manchuria.
Bulgaria has called three divisions of
reserves to duty to protect the frontier,
and there were reports that the mobil
ization of her whole army was near. The
Turks destroyed monasteries and mur
dered all the monks.
Two Porto Rican laborers were sen
tenced at San Juan to terms in prison
for insult to the United States flag.
Samuel A. McAllister, United States
consul at Barbados, West Indies', died
at his post. He was appointed from
Delaware in 1897.
Premier Balfour has issued a pamph
let in' which he says Great Britain must
modify her free trade policy in order to
compete with other countries.
Oral argument was begun before the
Alaskan boundary commission in Lon
don. __.
THE NEWS BOILED DOWN.
The Philippine commission decided
that insular supplies imported from the
United States must pay duty.
Real estate assessments in the towns
comprising Chicago will this year yield
$500,000 more revenue than in 1902.
Colonial Secretary Chamberlain
probably will modify his views as to
taxation to harmonize with those of
Balfour.
With the object of aiding in procuring
low rates to the world's fair, St. Louis
manufacturers have declared war on
railway ticket speculators.
Gen. Baldwin, of the department of
the Colorado, in his annual report urges
the reestablishment of the army can
teen conducted under proper restric
tions.
President Roosevelt has decided to
recommend the transfer of the govern
ment printing office to the jurisdiction
of the department of commerce and
labor.
Stokers on the Old Dominion line
steamer Princess Anne mutinied during
the gale off the New Jersey coast and
were forced to work at the pistol's point
by the officers.
Carefully compiled figures from cor
respondence of Charles M. Schwab and
others interested in the steel business
show that steel rails are being made at
a cost of one-half the present selling
price.
A blue book* issued by the British
board of trade shows that the commerce
of England has been seriously reduced
by tariff regulations of other nations.
The report is exhaustive and has an
important bearing on Chamberlain's
proposals.
PEON HOLDERS FREE.
President Roosevelt Pardon* Two
from Federal PrisonHold*
Law Is Vindicated.
Washington, Sept. 18.The president
has granted full and unconditional par
dons to George D. and Barancas F. Cosby,
convicted at Montgomery, Ala., of vio
lation of the peonage law. These men
were indicted for holding Pike Swanson
in a condition of peonage, pleaded guilty
on June 30, 1903, and on the same day
were sentenced to imprisonment for a
year and a day in the United States peni
tentiary at Atlanta, Ga. They have been
imprisoned ever'since, and Wednesday
were released on telegraphic instruc
tions from the department of justice.
The president granted the pardons upon
the recommendation of Judge Jones, who
sentenced the prisoners.
Steamer and Freight Depot Bnrned,
Elizabeth City, N. C, Sept. 18.Fire
Wednesday night completely destroyed
the steamer Alma and the freight depot
of the Norfolk & Southern railroad, en
tailing a loss estimated at $100,000. A
deckhand is reported missing. An im
mense quantity of freight was destroyed
and several people were hurt through the
explosion of some oil and two kegs of
powder.
Three More Indictment*.
Washington, Sept. 18.The federal
grand jury Thursday returned three in
dictments in the postal cases, involving
two people, one of them being a joint in
dictment. The names of the indicted
persons were not made public.
THE MARKETS.
Grain, Provision?!, Etc.
Chicago, Sept. 17.
FLOURTn Rood demand and firm.
Quotable: Spring patents, special-brands.
H80P*.M fcard patents, $t.30@4.-iC
straights, $S.* winter patents, $S.T5@
3.90 straight, 9S.E&&3.70 seconds, JS.CyJf3.20.
WHEATWeak and lower. December,
Sl4Si%e May. S3fr83H
CORNLower. September. 5!%52*.ic
December, May. M*&S2c.
OATS-Weak. May, 39%40*fec.
RYEQuiet and easy. No. 2 in store,
tie samples, 5$65s%c September delivery,
BARLEYVery Arm in good demand.
Screenings. 43@50c feed barley, 46g61c
low-grade malting, 5&63c good to choice,
54@vSc fancy, 60@62c.
BUTTERFeeling firm. Creameries, IS
20c dairies, lS^l^c.
EGGSPeeling firm. Fresh eggs, at
mark, new cases Included, 18lS4c.
LIVE POItLTKTFeeling easier. Tur
keys. MJKJc spring chickens, lO^li^c
ducks, Ufc@12c.
POTATOESMarket excited and high
er. Northwestern white stock, good to
choice, per bu., 7072c Mk-higan white,
good to choice, 7C72c.
New York, Sept. 17.
FLOURDull and unsettled.
WHEATDeclined sharply. September,
87?ic December, S7 11-16*7 15-lGc May,
S3 l-T6$S8%c.
RYEFirm. State and Jersey. 57g6S*4c
No. 2 western. H' f. c. b. afloat.
CORNLower. December. C7%S*?Ac.
OATSNominal. Track white, 42@&
ifj. YSW
r^ c*ir ^^'r^,f^^f^^Y^W^^s^:l'7Ke'
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O
01T HE CUBIT
Colonial Secretary Decides to Re
sign as Result of Disagreement
Over Fiscal Question.
SAYS PREMIER BALFOUR'S VIEWS
ARE NOT SUFFICIENTLY ADVANCED
Announcement of Reclamation May
Be Delayed Until October 1De-
clared That Only King: In His Prl
-vate Capacity Can Avert ItCol
league* Urged to Apnea!.
London, Sept. 18.It is learned that
Colonial Secretary Chamberlain has de
cided to resign from the cabinet, on the
HON. JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN,
ground that Premier Balfour's attitude
on the fiscal question is not sufficiently
advanced to enable Mr. Chamberlain to
remain a member pf the government
without the sacrifice of hi-s own views.
"f'j "iyi"
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RUSSIAN MONASTERY, JERUSALEM.
Recent dispatches from Con stantinople reported it sacked by Mohamme-
dans and all the monks therein murdered.
The resignation is quite likely to be an
nounced within a day or two, but may
be postponed until Mr. Balfour has an
opportunity to make his promised public
announcement on October 1.
King: May Avert Resignation.
There is just a last chance that the
king, in his private capacity, may avert
what is now. declared to be inevitable.
Mr. Chamberlain's resignation is almost
certain to cause an appeal to the coun
try, Mr. Balfour being thus left without
the support of either the protectionists
or the free traders. Chancellor of the
Exchequer Ritchie and his followers are
as openly opposed to any measure of
retaliatory tariffs as Mr. Chamberlain is
convinced that the unity of the empire
depends on preferential duties in favor of
the colonies. With the exception of a
few liberal organs, who viewed Mr. Bal
four's pamphlet as a repudiation of Mr.
Chamberlain's policy, there has scarcely
been a seriously considered suggestion
that Mr. Chamberlain would retire from
office. But the generally accepted hope
that he would retain his portfolio is
shattered, and the news, when it becomes
generally known, will come like a thun
derclap not only to the supporters of
the government, but to all other polit
ical sections. By Mr. Chamberlain's de
fection practically all the existing party
lines will be swept away, and their re
construction must largely depend on Mr.
Chamberlain's future attitude. That he
will be content to retire from public life
can scarcely be considered. It la be
lieved he will not ally himself with
either side, but will rally to the banner
of his preferential programme all the
support he can gather from every quar
ter.. Mr. Chamberlain can rely on the al
most solid Irish vote when he confines
himself to fiscal ideas.
It is announced definitely that Mr.
Chamberlain urged his colleagues to ap
peal to the country on the preferential
trade issue. He admitted they would be
defeated, but maintained that six months
of weak, liberal government would put
the party back in power with an im
proved standing.
Estate of Lord Salisbury.
London, Sept. 18.The probating of
Lord Salisbury's will Thursday showed
that he left B estate valued at $1,551,680.
SNOWFALL IN NORTH DAKOTA
Adds Greatly to Seriousness of Crop
Situation.
Wire* Doivn In Several Place*Re
ports from Var-lona States Tell 1
Damage by Frost*.
St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 18.A special
from Jamestown, N. D., says: A heavy
fall of snow over James River valley
Wednesday adds greatly to the serious
ness of the crop situation. It is esti
mated that the-fall was three Inches
deep. Opinions differ as to the damage
to the corn crops, but authorities agree
that It will amount to a large sum.
Wires on the Northern Pacific railroad
are down in several places.
Milwaukee, Sept. 18.The weather
bureau in Milwaukee reports a light to
heavy frost throughout Wisconsin
Wednesday night, with a probability
that it was Killing in many localities.
The northern and central portions suf
fered the most, the southern section re
porting light frost.
Lin6oln, Neb., Sept. 18.Heavy clouds
prevented frost Wednesday night in the
eastern half of Nebraska. In the ex
treme western and northwestern parts
of the state frost fell Wednesday night,
adding to the. heavy damage that was
done the night before. An estimate of
the damage done to crops in this state
has not been completed, but it is feared
that it will reach a large figure.
Des Moines, la., Sept. 18.Again the
clouds saved the corn crop of central
Iowa. Frost failed to make its appear
ance in the central valleys of the state,
although predicted by the government.
Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 18.The clouds
have saved most of Kansas from a kill
ing frost so far, except in the northwest
ern corner of the state, where a light
frost fell Wednesday "night. Low tem
peratures still prevail throughout Kan-
sas and western Missouri, and it is feared
corn is somewhat damaged in the dis
tricts where frost has fallen.
St. Joseph, Mo., Sept. 18.The mer
cury werit to 42 degrees above zero in
this locality Wednesday night and there
was a light frost in the lowlands. Farm
ers and gardeners say the damage was
very slight. Corn was not injured at all,
but tomatoes and late vegetables were
nipped.
NATURAL GAS EXPLODES.
Several Persons Terribly Bnrned,
Tvro Fatally, as a Result, at
Marlon, lad.
Marion, Ind., Sept. 18.The residence
at 1606 McClure street, occupied by the
Lucabel and Crabtree families was par
tially destroyed at one o'clock Thurs
day morning by an explosion of natural
gas. Mrs. Hattie Lucabel was terribly
burned about the body and inhaled
flames. She is fatally injured. Ora
-Crabtree, aged six, was also fatally
burned. His twin sister was badly
burned. Mrs. William Crabtree, the
mother of the children, was terribly
burned in an effort to save the children.
Well-Known Minstrel Dead.
New York, Sept. 18.Edwin French,
widely known as a minstrel, is dead at
Saranac Lake, N. Y., from a complica
tion of diseases. He had been suffer
ing for more than a year. French began
his stage career in the early days of min
strel shows, and for years was promi
nently identified with leading troupes.
Entire Family Poisoned.
La Crosse, Wis., Sept 18.The entire
family of seven of William Grover, re*
siding near Galesville, were poisoned by
eating canned minced ham. One child is
dead and the rest of the family are In
a serious condition.
Takes Change for Worse.
Denver, Col., Sept. 18.^-United States
Senator Scott, of West Virginia, who has
been ill at the Brown for the last few
days, has taken an alarming change for
the worse, and is now in a most serious
condition.
f- ypy,-, .*j^ ffl^"yf'' f^^^f^^ $W?
FBARED A SEPARATION.
Fa* Dear Xlttlo Lamb "Was Afralal
Her Father Mlffnt Bo Pat
witb the Goats.
Her father had read her the parable of th#
sheep and the goats at the day of judgment.
She made no comment, but that night s,
sound of weeping came from her room. Her
mother went as consoler, relate* Brooklyn
Life.
"Why are you crying, dear**
"About the goats! Oh, I'm so afraid I'm
goat!"
"Why, no, dearie, you are a sweet lifctle
lamb, and if you should die to-itight you.
would go straight to Heaven" With tbi*
andlikeassurance*ahewaB finally pacmed.
The next night the same performance was.
repeated, and again her mother inquired the
""It's the goata! I'm afraid about tha
goats!"
"Didn't I tell you, dear, that you were a.
little lamb?" mf
"Oh," she sobbed, "I'm not crying about,
myself, but I'm 'fraid you may be a goat!
A Boy's Victory.
Crossroads,Tenn., Sept. 14.Orbra YOUBB..
the ten-year-old son of Lester Young, of this
place, is a bright boy, and one who is very
well liked by all who know him.
For some years Orbra has suffered a great
deal with a form of Kidney Trouble which
was very annoying, and which made him mis
erable all the time. He had to get up three
or four times every night, almost all bis
life.
His father heard of a remedy called Dodd a
Kidney Pills, and bought some for the lit
tle fellow with the result that he is now com
pletely cured of the old trouble. He says:
"Dodd's Kidney Pills soon gave me great
relief, and now I can sleep all night without
having to get up. We will always praise
Dodd's Kidney Pills."
There are many children suffering from.
Kidney and Urinary troubles. These dis
ordersehould be promptly corrected. Dbdd a
Kidney Pills is a safe and sure remedy for
all such derangements.
Master Orbra Young conquered his trou
bles and maI a well boy of-himself by using
Dodd's Kidney Pills, and any one may dfr
the same by the same means.
Parents should see to it that their children
are given a fair chance in life, and there i
nothing that can undermine the health or
a growing child as much as Kidney and Uri
nary derangements.
An Ice Cream Idyl.
Gentle reader, didst thou ever order one
plate of ice cream with two spoons? Honest,
now, inthe dearold dayswhenyou were young
and there was only one girl in all the world,
and she had around face like the full moon.
and as full of freckles as the skin, of a brook
trout? Did you, now? Come, own up! It
was down in the little ice cream shop, the
only one in the village, and you were dread-
fully angry when the lady who waited on.
you smiled, as you thought. You would
have been glad to get along with one spoon
and take turno in licking, but you were too-
bashful for that. Still, you used to share
licks when you thought the smiling lady
was not looking, and love went with them,
and the ice cream was twice as sweet and
flavor some. What! You never did! You,
really never did? Well, then, son. you have
never known what Heaven on earth is. Your
education has been neglected.N. Y. Newa.
fl.00 Biff 500-Pound Steel Range Oiler.
If you can use the best big 500-pound steel
range made in the world, and. are willing to
have it placed in your own home on three
months' free trial, just cut this- notice out
and send to Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago,
and you will receive free by return mm a
big picture of the steel range and many,
other cooking and heating stoves, you will
also receive the most wonderful $1.00 eteel.
range offer, an offer that places the best
steel range or heating, stove in the home of"
any family, an offer that no family in-the
land,nomatter what their circumtancemay
be, or how small their income, need be with
out the best cooking or heating etoye made.
Sounded That Way.
We know that Richard Wagner waspoet,
philosopher and musician. A man of such
varied genius must also have had humor.
Jugend records one witticism of the great
composer.
"Your son conducts with his baton in mi
left
hand,"esaida
friend to
T, Wagner.bear Yes, sadly answered, "I can it.'
Youth's Companion.
Radlsson on the Chippewa.
A new town in Sawyer county, Wis., on
the Omaha Road. Located on both tbs
Chippewa and Couderay rivers, in center
of a most fertile and promising hardwood
district. Good muscallonge, bass and piko
fishing in both rivers. Exceptional oppor
tunities for landseekers. If looking for a
new location don't fail to see this new
country. For map and full particulars
write to Postmaster, Radisson. Sawyer Co.,
Wis., or to T. W. Teasdale, General Passen
ger Acent. C. St. P. M. & O. R'y. St. Paul.
Very- Mean of Her.
EdnaMr. Case just ^complimented me..
He said I reminded him 0? a swan.
MayReally. He told me once that swana.
always died after they sang and he knew
many people who ought to do the same thing.
Chelsea Gazette.
Mrs.Patty"Do you really think Dr.Duck
man is a skilled physician?" Mrs. ttiblin
(the patient)"J don't know so much about.
that. But he has such a quieting way with,
him. When I said I hoped I shouldn't be
buried alive, he said he'd look out for that.
Wasn't that thoughtful of him."Boston.
Transcript.
No matter how much tome men hate billf
collectors they are invited to call again.
Chicago Daily News.
I am sure Piso's Cure for Consumption
saved my life three years ago.Mrs. Thos.
Robbins, Norwich. N. Y., Feb. 17,1900.
Before accepting the inevitable we should?
be certain of its identity.Puck.
To Cnre a Cold In One Day
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All
druggistsrefundmoney if itfails tocure. 25c
They who turn their backs on the falaa
face the true.Ram's Horn.
Dyeing is as easy as washing when Put
nam Fadeless Dyes are used.
The raw recruit is apt to be roasted by
she drill sergeant.Puck.
While there it love there's hope.Kam'*
Horn.
SAWYER'S
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Slickers
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veatfctr. KscdtfsrBasn*
east ciocfctoar tan own
nuBoas the it$t for
yesx*. Instates
Look for tme
mark. If not at
dealerawnte
n.K.SAWTra
sox, s*i arn.
hatCu^KMc*.
w- FfSO"S-CURE FOR
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