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New Ulm weekly review. (New Ulm, Minn.) 1878-1892, August 22, 1883, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064939/1883-08-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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OL.UME VI. N O 43.
flBLIbHBD KVERY WEDNESDAY BY
JOS. EOBLETER.
Office ovei City Drug Stora.
TEKMS:
One Dollar and a half per year in
a Iv.mce.
It itca of Advertising.
FUitNlSHKDUPON APPLICATION.
Iveitisements in double column, double the
jingle column rates
Business inls of Ave lines, one year f5,00, each
Addition illine7' cts
Ml tr insientidveitisementstobe paid for in
advance
Adveitisetnents tnseited in theloc il noticed
IImux, ten ct i line for the fiist ir.seition ind
cents i lino lore ich subsequent nisei lion but no
notice nisei ted lor less tli in 50 cts
mouncements of lnuiriiges and deaths insert,,
ed free, but obituuy notues, except in speciit
cusses, will be ch nged at advbrtisif rates.
lie-jal notices will becb irged 73 cts per folio for
the first insertion, and 2" ct pel folio for eaob
subso(|uent inseition All legal notices must be
upoit the responsibility of the attorney oidejins
tlism published, no iftldavitof publication will
be it\e until the publication fees lie tid.
hi connection with the papor, we hive a splon
did lasoitment of jobbing iterial, and we are
piep nod to execute all kinds ot pi luting in a style
tinsuri isstd and at moderate rites
J. R. FOSTER,
ID E 2tf I S
NEW ULM, MINN
A full set of teeth foi ten riull.us.
(i.ts .tdmmifiteied by Di. IJpny, svntl
teeth exti acted without p.un.
Office ovei Kifliiiif & Kellei's
SLM
J^K. A MAUDE!!,
PEVIDENT DENTIST,
Office, (.oner Mum unit Yumi J* SU
E\ lL\ MIN.Nk-MJU
A K. C. UERRT,
PHYSICIAN & 8UKGEON.
OrrKI AT I UK ('ITT DHUO &TOUK
O W UV, MINNESOTA
DR^B. CARL,
Physician and Surgeon.
MWIMI! ___-_
NEW ULM, MINN.
.1. RAY
Notary Public, Conveyancer,
and agent foi St. Paul
FIRE & MARINE INSURANCE CO
S, i'l I. Hiown Co.. Minn.
JOS. A.ECI^STEIN,
Attorney and Counselor
Titles examined and poifected.
Particular attention given to collec-
B^Othce over BiownCo. Bank
NEW ULM." MINN.
JOHN LINBTPTHANDA LL CAHAGBtRG
Lind & Randall,
ATTORNEYS A LAW
COLLECTORS-
PRACTICE I N ALLTlIECOURTts
JVEW TTLM, MINX-
Miss T. Westphal,
Keeps on hand a larsjd and well
assorted stock of millinery, fancy
woods and zephyr wool, opposite
the Union Hotel, between second
and Third North streets.
NEW ULM MINN
A HO
DRESS MAKING
:*Irs. Anton Olding,
xnxr DOOU TO
^OMMKU'S STORK, NEW U-SiM
II i-on himl pool-lock ol Millneiv UoocN Pin
X^IIIIL' In put ol Hit- Bonnets, Vcl\et, Si'k-.
liil.'n.H* re.tlier ill) in II in VIOWII.II
Al a oinsforstimpiiigmoiiogrim St tinp
HI if of illkind ill mlioitlei Woik unl !'I-IHOII
abl mtHmnukiiiR tii to ouler
MERCHANTS' HOTEL,
CHAS. BRUST, PROP R.
Cor. Minn. & First South Streets
New Vim, Minn.
FIRS
f*
CLASS accommodations Location con
vnniont to biHiiuras amirtcnot.Snmplc rooms
heat ii the city
Catllogui
FREE I
"'"l,fB"
tv*^i^m^
UJLBS
MILLIONS
OPTHEM
For FLORISTS and
AMATEURS.
Dutch Bulba, Japan
Bulbs, French Bulbs,
American Bulbs. Also
Plants for Greenhouses
and Window Gardens,
HIRAMSIBLEY&CO.
Bochester,N.Y.*ObJcago,Ill.
lySSi^i^ijijjBi^jiii imjjrji^n
M,NN
ihceand residence on Get man St.
"isrxwr^wSECcoME,
PHYSICIAN 3CRGE0N.
Sleepy Kye 1
WM. WAKEFTELb,
rilYSICIAN and SU JIG EON
Wilt answer calls in city 01 countiy
all horns of the day and night
OFFICIO wit.i Di 0-
Benv
Ktesling, Kfeller&Co
ove
i
^Stoie
j6HN~WHITE,
uduute of Onlui 10 tei in i olli ge, To. onto,
Veterinary Surgeon.
Tieats all Diseases of Domestic
Animals
OtTice At Cuvs. RossKOPF-s hveiy ham
BROWN CO. BANK.
ii cinniiouKN
PrcRulPiii
II ROSS,
Calucr.
COP, Minn, and Cfintre Strs.
NEWULJI, MINN.
Collection" find all business pertaining to lmnkinj:
promptly att nd( to.
Individua Responsibility
$500,000
Frank Burg,
Manufactmer of and Dealer in
CIGARS
TOBACCOS, &
PIPES
Minnesota street, next door to C.
Somnier's Store.
NEW ULM MINN
CENTRE STREET
Sample Roona
BUliardH*UT
IN BASEMENT OF
DSZieslixigf's ^Blocls:
The best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigais constantly kept on hand.
Louis Felkel, Prop'r.
Meat Market.
CHAS. STDEBE, Prop'r.
A largp supply of fresh meats, sau
sage, hams, lard, etc., constantly on
handt All orders from the country
promptly attended to.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES.
Minn- Str New Ulm. Minn.
M. EPPLE,
Dealer in
Live Stock,
Hides, Lard, Wool*
Cattle bought and sold in large or
small numbers. Contiacts solicited
Meat Market,
ZIEHER&BREY, Propis.
MINNESOTA ST. NEW ULM,MINN
THKe
mulct signed would lcspcotfiilly liilotin
th public that thiy Imve estnuliahcil a nit it
inurketone door north of the Union House, We
will spare no pains or mains to keep our ulu.t
fiippln il with only the be^t licsl. ts, 8tuint
and everything else usually found in li'frtclas*
i meat mat ket, indoui price swill ilwa^ a compile
nvorably witli those of out competitor II so dc
xired, aitieleh pineliascd of us v-ill be sent to the
durchti"! '8 house witliont extra charge Thelugli
et in ki pi ice will i'w i i be paid for fat cuttle
hult^iLti
\NTONZIEHE
ANTON BllKY
C. F. HELD,
Undeitakej and Dealei in
All KINDS OF FURNITURE
Pioprietoi and Manufactiuet of
THE FARMERS FRIEND
Fannins: Mill'
The best tanning mill in the maiket
Stoie and Factoi yon Oentie Sti eet near
the C:ty Mill
NEW ULM, MINN.
NEW MACHINE SHOP.
Centre Street, Opposite Mueller &
Seherer's Lunilior Yaifl,
NEW ULM, MLVN
Ylieo. KobbttVfl), ^l'op'i'-
I am now j)iepaieu to execute all
oideis with dispatch, llepaiung of
Thioslieis md Ileapeis a specialty.
My Machineiy is all new and of tne
most impiovedpattern. AH woik u.u-
lanted .is lepiesented. All those in
want of anything in my line aio coit'i
ally invited fo fTtve me a call.
riLO. KOBAR^OII.
H. WERRING,
nr\L: it iv
Dry Soods, Notions, Boots & Shoes
(i nor ft I F, a,
MutlnMiieMV. Fdruiin!: lm]i!onien(s
(i ihht) frtttP, \fni,i
H. Rudolphi,
A VI FACTUM It Ol' A, I)i\LBIt I
Boots and Shoes!
Minn. &3d N. stis. New Ulm, Minn.
Alaige assoitmenj of men's and
hoys7
hoots Ami *hes and ladles' and
cluldtenq1
siioes constantly kppt on
Hand, cmtoni woik anil iepauinj
piomptly attendo'' to
M. JUENEMANN
MAvirAcnritn O A ND BEWHI
HARNESSES,
COLLARS,
SADDLES,
WHIPS,
SADLERY,
AN KETS
Uphohteiy, and all custom woik
peitainlng to my business promptly at.
tended to. Minnesota street, next door
to Sclmobrich's saloon. Ne 'Jim.
ia#MBaaMbtaaai|Mai'i
\htttym i mmmmmmstmmm
R. PFEFFERLE,
Dealer in
Canned, Dried and Green Fruits,
FLOUR AND FEED
STONE.WOODE N AND WILLOW WAI E
Minn. St. Ne lilm Minnesota.
nF.lLEtt
Furnishing Goods,
GROCERIES,
CROCKERY & GLASSWARE
BOOTS AND SHOES,
H. Laudenschla^er,
Dealei in
STOVES,
HA TID WARE, TINWA HE A N
AL Braisgquitenit,diseasetsbthageiwoulsswoccuAe
FRESH AND CANNED
FRUITS
And eveiything else belonging to a
fust cl.iss
NOVELTY STORE,
NEW UJLM, MINN
C. BALTRUSCH.
DJ'ALLn IN
Drj Goods,
Hats and Gaps,
Men's and Boys' Clothing,
Ladies Jackets and Dolmans
LADIES' AND GENTS'
And the veiy latest patterns in
Dress Goods & Trimmings
My pin chases have been made th
lectandfoi ca&lu and I am theieby
enabled to m( the lowest puces.
Call and examine niy stock and coin
paie puces befote pmchasing i.lse
wheie.
BALTRUSCH.
CASH PURCHASES
and CHEAP SALES
JOHN NEUMAN
Dealer in
ID:R,Y GOODS
Hats, dips, Notions,
Groceries, Provisions,
Crochery anil Glassware,
Green, Dried and Canned
Fruits, etc, etc.
I will ilwnys take urn produce in exchanged
foi goods, and paj tin highest mi ket pnceloi ill
kinds of ipci igs
In connect on llh my toio I li i\e a hist elT-e
hiiloon furnished with i splendid billi table and
mycustomeis will always find good liquois and
tigius, ind evciy toienoou-i splendid lunch.
All goods ptirclitisccl of me will be d*.li\citd to
my put ofthe city ftee of cost.
Minncot tSttiit, New Ulm, Minn
LIGIITNING RODS.
The Celebrated White. Howe,
New American & Singer
SEWING MACHINES.
Cor Minn & Is S Sts New Ulm,-MINN
Eagle Mill Co,
Hanufactureis of
ROLLER FLOUR
BY TH E
Gradual Reduction Roller
System.
NEW ULM, MINN
GEO BENTZ & CO
Impnrtcti intl Whole-al l)eiiKrin
WINES &
LIQUORS
3 W 3d St, S PAUL, Minn.
PHOTOGRAPHS!
The nntleisigned would lesj ecifully
inform the public that tl ey have
opened :i
PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY
on thp corner of Minnesota and 3dairt
North Sh-eofru. ind that they are
prepared to do all kinds of photo
graphic work in the most approved
and elegant styles. Special attention
will be given to family groups, En
largements and also to copying of
pictures of deceased
One of the Alfcists will always be
ready to take views of residences.
We will, on demand, finish the
pictures in oil or water colors, also
frame them neatly. Only first-class
work delivered and all work war
anted.
Anton Gag*
J.B. Vellikanie.
**A fc A
*mm*mm I I MIMImail, ^mitsmyMiwmm&mmafyiW-ymmmvmt
Why Suffer with Salt-Rheum
NEW ULM, MINN., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22. 18%
WE DONOT CLAIM
that HOOD'S SAKSAPARILLA will cure every
thing, but the fact that on the ptuity and
vitality of the blood depend the vigor and
health of the whole system, and that disease
of\anous kinds is often only the sign that
nature is tiying to remove the disturbing
cause, we aic naturally led to the conclusion
that a remedy that gives life and vigor to
the blood, eiadicates scrofula and other im
purities from as HOOD'S SAKSAPARILL
undoubtedly docs, mus th mean ofpre
ventin many
without its use hence the field of it useful
ness an extended one, and ar
warranted i lecommendin for all de
rangements of the stem which are caused
by an umiatuial state of the blood.
MESSES. C. I. HOOD & Co., Lowell, Mass.
GentlemenI was a great sufferer from
Salt-llheum on my limbs, foi a dozen years
previous to the summei of 1876, at which
time I was cured by Hood's Saisapaiilla.
The skin would become diy chap, crack
open, bleed and itch intensely, so that I
could not help sciatchmg. winch of course
made them woise. At the time I com
menced taking Hood's Sarsaparilla (in the
summer of 1876) they were so oad that they
discharged, and I was obliged to keep them
bandaged with linen cloths. The skin was
drawn so tight by the heat of the disease
that if I stooped over they would crack open
and actually l)img tears into my eyes. The
fust bottle benefited me so much that I con
tinuedtaking it till I was cuicd I used one
box of Hood's Olive Ointment, to lelieve the
itching Hoping many otheis may leain the
value of Hood's Sarsaparilla and receive as
much benefit as I have, I am,
Veiytiuly yours,
MKS. S. 8. MOODY,
No. 75 Broadway.
Lowell, Mass., Jan. 15,1878.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Is sold by druggists. Price $1, or six for $5.
Prepared by.C. I. HOOD & Co., Lowell, Mass.
FOR $4.50 IN ADVANCE
*We will send
The Spectator one year, ftJSO
THE HOUSEKEEPER one year, to.75
The Waterbury Watch, -J 4.00
Total, 96.25
fa the best and most useful of all the household
publications. It ia published by The Buckeye
Publishing Co, Minneapolis, Minn, who
will send yon a specimen copy FREE. The same
firm publishes and has sold 175,000 copies of the
'BUCKEYE COOK BOOK "(thelargestsale ever
made of a book of Its class.) without doubt TUB
BEST COOK BOOK IN TUB WORLD.
THE WATERBURY WATCH
is the size and style represented in the cut, and
is the best cheap watch made. It is a stem winder
in nickle silver case, which will not tarnish, and
Is an excellent time-keeper. The watch retails
regularly at $4.00 and is well worth the money.
(If eent by mail enclose 24 cents for postage and
we guarantee safe delivery.)
WE MAKE THIS, THETMOST
LIB-
ERAL OFFER WE 1 HAVEI EVER
MADE, TO ALL* SUBSCRIB-/
ERS WHO PAYiUPiARr
REARSAND ONEYEAR
IN ADVANCE.**""
r
We will send to any subscriber whohas already
paid in advance, TUB HOUSEKEEPER one year
and the Waterbury Watch for $3 25 and postage.
This is 75 cents less than the retail price of the
watch alone.
fUTT'S
PILLS
TORPID BOWELS,
DISORDERED LIVER.
and MALARIA.
From these sources arise three-fourths of
the diseases of the human race. These
symptomsindicatetheirexistence:JAMM ot
Appetite* Bowels costive* Slek Head*
ache* fullness after eating, aversion, to
exertion of body or mind, Eructation
of food* Irrlt. bllity of temper* Zow
spirits* A feel'ng of bavins neglected
some duty* Dizziness*FluttcrlnKatthe
Heart*pots before the eyes, highly col*
ored IJrlne, CONOTIPATIOIlT and de
mandthe use of a remedythat acta directly
on the Liver. AsaLivermedicineTUTT'S
rili have no equal Their actionon the
KidneysandSkinis alsoprompt removing
nil impurities through these three scav
engers of the system,** prodacingppe
tite, Bound digestion, regular stools^ clear
skinondavigorousbody. TOW'S PDML8
cause no nausea or griping nor Interfere
with daily work and area perfect
ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA.
holdeverywhere,3!fc. Office,44Murray8t.,N.Y.
TUTTS HAIR DYE.
GRAY HAIB OR WHISKERS changed in
Btantly to a GfcossT BLACK by a single ap
plication of this DTE. Sold by Druggists,
or sent by express on receipt of St.
Offlco, 44 Murray 8treet, New York.
TUTTS MANUAL OF USEFUL RECEIPTS FREE.
PKOPltlETGll OFTHE
New Ulm Foundry
& MACHINE SHOF
Corner Centre & Front Streets.
NEW ULM, MINN
The Foundiy luis been thoroughly refitted and
U6W p*t ne.l to lo..l ICIIKIH of woric on shod
notice. Repaii ins of nil kinds of machinery and
AsncnHuriil Implements speciality Only ex
perieucod workmen 'ire employed nnu woik en.
trustedtoiny cine wiOII be executed with neatness
mul diipitch. AI.LvRK WAIUONTKO
rilAS. LEONHARDT
mm
wu
THE HOUSEKEEPER.
a beautiful monthly,
75 cents a year. Ev
ery woman who keeps
house needs it, and will
have it when she hears
of it, if she has to go
withont her Spring
bonnet. Specimencopy
and Grand Premium
List Free Specimen
pages of the BUCKBYB
COOK BOOK, (which ev
erybody knows is the
Best in theWorld,)free
with it. Address,
Buckeye PuVg Co.,
's**x Mlnnepolis_Minn
mm. msmm
WITH A SACK OVER H.S HEAD.
&n M. D.'s Unusual Adventun in an Un
known Fart of Arizona Territory.
Some time ago the little railroad
Town of Williams, A. ua the scene
A quite a strange nd\cntme, at least so
far as one of its prominent citizens was
concerned.
Williams is on the line of the Atlantic
& Pacific Railroad, at the foot of Bill
Williams' Mountain. Nearly directly
opposite the depot, and about midway
in the built-up portion of the sticet, is a
low board office, upon the door of which
this legend is enscrolled: "Dr. Bishop's
office. It was in a portion of that of
fice that the strange ndventuie of that
November night began, and it was in
this room that the whole history of that
night was related by the Doctor to the
writer.
"About the middle of Inst Novem-
ber," began Dr. Bishop, "on a very dark
and chilly night, after reading until
quite late, I turned down the light and
was soon wrapped in slumber. It must
have been 11 o'clock when I was awak
ened by a knock. I asked what was
wanted. The answer came that a man
had been badly hurt, and required my
presence at once. After lighting a can
dle the door was opened and in stepped
two gentlemen, both well dressed, and
both indicating: by their faces that their
education had been in no wise neglected.
In fact, they were Eastern-born and
Eastern-bred.
The spokesman, who was the tallest
of the two and who, by the way was a
splendid type of manhood, urged upon
me the necessity of being somewhat in a
hurry about making my preparations
"for," said he, "you must go with us,
and we have along ride to take before
morning." The doctor demurred at
going at all, and said that it was cei
tainly a very strange proceeding to ask
a man 50 ears of age to go out onworth
such a night, and especially with two
men of whom he knew nothing what
ever.
"It doesn't make a particle of differ
ence who we are, what we are or where
we are from," i*emarked the tall
stranger. "You have got to go with us,
and the quicker vou make up your mind
to do so the pleasanter jt will be for all
concerned."
"How was the man hurt?" inquired
the doctor.
"He was shot," was the answer.
Arguments b:ied on the age andit?"
health of phj sicians were of no avail,
and in a shorter time than it takes to
tell it, the party, including Dr. Bishop,
were out in the cool damp air of the
night. It took but a few moments for
the strangers to find their horses and to
point out a splendid big chestnut whose
every motion and form proved Jiim to
be a thoroughbred, as the animal upon
which our friend, the doctor was to make
the unknown journey.
"That is jour hone, doctor," said
the strangers. "He is a good one, and
as surefooted as any man in Arizona.
You need ne\ er be afraid of him for a
moment he's as gentle as a kitten."
Into the saddle went the now thor
oughly mystified man of medicine, and
the two strangers mounted two horses
nearly, if not quite, tne equals of thethe
chestnut stallion. The party had hard
ly got clear of the few midnight lamps
at Williams when a halt was called and
our M. D. was informed that it would
be necessary to blindfold him, as hisbut
companions had no idea ot allowing
him the faintest conception or the di
rection in which the trio were travel
ing.
The Doctor, of course, objected to this
kind of treatment, but he was quickly
voted down and compelled to submit
himself to the inevitable. A sack, which
one of the party carried, was quickly
drawn over his head and then they wert
again ready to advance.
Imagine, if} on can, the feelings ol
this follower of Esculapius, in the com
pany of two men, neither of whom he
had ever seen before, riding he knew
not whither, seated upon a magniiicenl
thoroughbred stallion, and this all hap
pening at the dead of night on the sandy
mesas of Arizona
The hores were given the spur with
the admonition to the Doctor to "give
him a free rein," and away the band
dashed. On the) lodo, hour after hour,
up hill and down hill, now crossing a
narrow steam, now a broader one, into
and across atro\as, through what seem
ed to be dense forests, and out again on
thf sandy plains, never once stopping,
not even speaking a loud word, the
whole being bent on the early arrival
at some specified point. Night began
to break into morning and morning into
broader daj, the sun came tip in all its
Western splendor and jet our travelers
never once spoke of stopping. It must
have been 8 o'clock, when all at once
the rein of the chestnut stallion was
grasped and a halt called. And now for
the iirst time since midnight Dr. Bishop
was allowed to look atound him, his
forced blindness having been lemoved
by his guides.
They seemed to be in a beautiful val
ley, down which trickled a stream of
clear, sparkling water, and all around
them the earth was covered with a gar
ment of gramma grass. They had halt
ed immediately in front of a small but
neat-appearing log-house, the doors of
which stood open. Only three persons
were in sight, the two strangers, com
panions in the night's ride, and another
man whom the doctor had not before
seen. "Go dowu to the brook, doctor,
take a drink of water, and refreshing
bath, and by that time breakfast will be
ready."
"I did as directed," said the doctor,
"and I don't believe there is another
such stream of water in Arizona. I can
assure you it was to me the grandest
bath I ever took."
As yet the surgeon had not seen his
patient, but breakfast was soon disposed
of, the bacon and beans being devoured
With a relish, and then the patient was
disclosed, lying upon a pile of Navajo
blankets in one corner of the log build
ing.
"He must have been a man of 30years
Of age, black hair, black eyes, and fully
eix feet tall and heavy set in proportion
but every pound of weight seemed to be
muscle/' said Dr. Bishop "I knelt
down beside him and found that the
ronnd waa immediately ov^f the heart,
and that it had been made by a large
sized revolver.
The preliminary examination and a
few questions elicited the fact that al
though a forty-live-caliber ball was still
inside, yet it was by no means danger
ous. The bail was probed for and ex
tracted, the patient never uttering a
complaint. The wound was bandaged
up, an application prepared for its
dressing, and the surgeon mission was
ended.
All day and the first part of the even
ing was spent at the camp and then the
horses were again saddled, and the ride
homeward was only a repetition of the
night before, including the blindfolding
of the Doctor
wmmwm
"We arrived in Williams at 4 a. m.t
before anybody was moving," said Dr.
Bishop, "and I was landed in my little
home here none the worse for my thir
tjr-six
hours' experience. The tall
stranger, without asking me as to my
charges, immediately counted out $50,
and handing it to me, remarked that
they were a little hard up just now4
but would paj me fully in A short
time."
The Doctor went on to state that the
stiangest part of the whole affair hap
pened oulj a few dajs ago. "The
wounded man came over to my office
just before the tram pulled out, and,which
laying $100 on my de.k, remarked that
I ought to consider mj self paid. Rush
ing out, he just caught the train, and
that is the last I haw ever heard of any
of the trio."
Dr. Btahop could not explain in any
way the stiange occuricnce, but sur
mised that tuere might have been a duel
between men of some standing, and
that, having failed to bring a surgeon
with them, he had been called on to act
in that capacity.Albuquerque {N.M.)
Review.
On Ice.
"Why, bless me, my fuend," said the
proprietor of an ice ci earn restaurant,
"I don't know yvluch to be the most
thankful forthe cold weather, which
makes ice, or the warm yy cather, yvhich
makes people eat it. Jn the uncomfort
able feexing days of yy inter I button up
mj- oycico.tt with th philosophical
thought that tin- :ttm *p cie is laying
up my simnuei -link in u.ide. And to
day I cast asui ni\ collar and est with
the giatcful feeliitg that mituieagain is
yvorking in mj bchalt, *o that the hotter
it is the better I like it, and the colder
it is, in the proper season, yvhj, then,
the better Hike that."
"Saj\ mister, sriniine me a ceut's
of ice, will jet? and a barefoot
ed, coatless urchin peered anxiously
into the face of the st.ilwart iceman.
"What do jou want of a cent's yvorth
of ice, my little man
"Well, douehei MV, mister, mammy
she's gone away, an' me an' Tim an'
another gill, we'ie left to home, an' yve
yvant ter make some ice cream an' frozen
pudden, jer know, but jer don't yvant
ter giye it ayyay, now."
"Well, yvell," said the iceman, laugh
ing "I'm afraid one cont's worth of ice
wouldn't be enough for all that, would
"I dunno, sir but we hain't got no
more'n one cent'nless jou trust usfer
'ntither."
"I'll see to thai There, hoyv will
that do jou?" said the icenvm, as heto
chipped oft'seyeral sin ill pieces and put
them into the eager hands of the joung
customer and his interested compan
ions.
The most cuiious Use has been in.
vented by a Frenchman yvho publishes
a receipt for cooking ice. No one has
ever dcclatcd how nice an article of food
it makes, but certain it i that the feat
of frj ing it in Hour batter ran be done
successfully, the opeiatiou being per
formed s* quickly t1
1
mm
at the ice has no
time to melt.
"Oil tell phat it is, me jewel,"s^id
bartender, "oice i an indispinsable
luxury to a stiffenn' hum:initjr.
a luxury phat niankoirid can't get along
yvidout it. Mo:nd \e/ its not thethe
whuskj the paple wants in summertime,
joost a siimcll at the oice, bedad.
The oice comboined wid de beautiful hot
yvithcr indooces the public at large to
come to mj tUigant quarters for refrish
mint, an* therefore, '-..ij oi, oi bliss that
man that fust itivintud oice."
"Ice!" exclaimed the man who draws
soda fot the thiisty multitude yvhich
traverses an impottaut thotoughfarc of
ourcitj "I don't know what you fel-and
lows would do if it wasn't for the trick
water has of gcttiug solid in cold yveath
er This living in a hot city in summer
yvould sort of lose its point If it yvasn't
for ice. It's queer to think of it. Here
at noon time there is such a eiowd
about this counter that jou can't see
across the place, and the higher the the
mometer runs the lower runs the soda
tank and it's all owing to the simple
fact that nature allows us to bottle up a
little of her cold weather and save it
over to bring doyyn the temperatute
little in the hot months That may
sound a little philosophical for a soda
yvater man, but that's yvhat I've been
thinking of as I'ye stood here, yvashing
out glasses for the next lot. Hoyv much
of a business do the iirm do? Oh, there'
one soda fountain in town yvhich it takes
150 pounds of ice every day to feed
during the hottest weather."Boston
Globe.
-^--ta
A Panicky Atmosphere.
"The country, sir?" said a man on
Austin Avenue, "the country! What
country arc j'ou talking about? This
country? This country won't last six
months longer."
"How do j'ou know this country
won't last six months longer?" inquired
a bystander.
"How do I know it?" It's in the air.
The premonitory symptoms are all
around thicker than picnic ants. Com
ing events cast their shadows before
Yes, sir, we are on the verge of a finan
cial panic which will ralflc us from cen
ter to circumference."
"Do j?ou
Boring an Oil Well.
A letter from Bradford, Pennsylvania,
to the Drug Reporter gives a very clear
description of the above operation, as
follows:
The machinery used in boring one of
these deep oil wells, yvhile simple
enough in itself, requires nice adjust
ment and skill in opetating. First comes
the derrick, sixty feet high, crowned by
a massive pulley.
The derrick is a most essential part of
the mechanism, and its shape and
height are needed in handling the long
rods, piping, casting and other fittings
have to be inserted perpendicu
larly. The bore or drill used is not
much different from the ordinary hand
arm of the stone cutters, and the blade
is exactly the same, but is of massive
size, three or four inches across, about
four feet long, and weighing 100 or 200
pounds. A long solid rod, some thirty
feet long, three inches in diaracten and
called the "stem," is screwed on the
drill. This stem weighs almost a ton,
and its weight is the hammer relied on
for driving the drill through dirt and
rock Next come the "jars," two long
loose links of hardened iron plajing
along each other about a foot.
The object of jar* is to raise the drill
with a shock, so as to detach it when so
tightly fixed that a steady pull would
break the machinery. The upper part
of the tyvo jars is solidly wielded to an
other long iron rod called the sinker bar,
to the upper end of which, in turn, is at
tached the rope leading up to the det
rick pulley, and thence to a stationaty
steam engine. In boring the stem and
drill are raised with a shock by the jars,
and the operation repeated.
If I roaj hazard a further illustration
of the internal boring machiucty of the
yvell, let the reader link loosely togeth
er the thumbs and forefingers of his tyvo
hands, then bring his forearms into a
a straight line. Conceiving this line to
be a perpendicular one, the point of one
elbow yvould represent the drill blade,
the adjacent forearm and hand the stem,
the linked tingets the jars, and the oth
er hand and foim the sinker bar, with
the derrick cord attached to a point rep
resented by the second elboyv. By re
membering the immense and concen
trated weight of the upright drill and
stem, the tremendous fotce of even a
shortfall niij bo conceived The dull
will bore manj feet in a single day
through solid "rock, and a feyv hours
sometimes suffice to force it fifty feet
through dirt or gi a vol. When the de
bris accumulates too thickly around the
drill, the latter is dr&wn up rapidly.
The debris has pieviously been reduced
mud bv keeping the drill constantly
surrounded by water. A sand pump,
not unlike an ordinary sj ringe, is then
let dowu, the mud sucked up, lifted,
and then the drill sent down to begin
its pounding anew. Gicat deftness and
experience are needed to work the drill
without bieakmg the jars or connected
machinery, and incase of accident there
are grapples, hooks, knives, and other
devices yvithout number, to be used in
recovering lost drills, cutting the rope,
and other emergencies, the briefest ex
Fimits
It is
fes
notice any peculiar signs of
a panic?"
"Lots of 'cm. Lots of 'em, sir. There
is a financial stringency in the money
market which, I dare say, might be ap
preciated ibv even jou. Haven't you
noticed it?"*
"Not particular] j'
"Not particularly, bah! Let me tell
you, sir, I can bring this fact home to
you forciblyforcibly, sir, or else I'm a
mistaken individual. I can prove it to
you before the whole crowd."
"Well shoot ahead, and prove it."
"Very well, sir. Didn't jrou
loan me
a dollar a couple of months ago?"
"Yes." "Can you let me have another to-
day?1
"I would"
"That's it! That's it! You are going
to refuse, and right here, before all'
these by-standers, you tacitly admit
that a financial stringency prevents me
paying you the one loan, or even nego
tiating another. If the state of the fiporarially.
nancial atmosphere isn't panicky. I
don't know yvhat it is."Texas Sifl
inas.
SceneA small lawn on Seneca
street. TimeNoon. PersonagesA
parrot sunuing itself on a porch beside
its open cage door and a strange dog
wandering upon the lawn. The parrot
speaks first. "Sick! Sick! Sick him!"
The dog with cars and tail erect looks
about for something on which to charge
he espies the parrot, and an exciting
scene ensues. From out of the confus
ed mass of dog hair and parrot feathers
comes the shrill cry: "Git out! Dr
?arrot,tafter
ou, gi out!" Dog breaks for street
lookiug at himself from
head to foot, gravely exclaims: Polly,
you talk too much,Cleveland Voice,
Sanation of yy Inch yvould exceed the
of this letter
The exciting moment boring a well
is when a drill is penetiating the upper
covering of sand tock yvhich overlies
oil. The force with which the com
pressed gas and petroleum I ushes up
ward almost surpasses belief. Dulls.
jars, and sinker bars are sometimes
shot out along with debris, oil, and hiss
ing gas. Sometimes this gas and oil
take tire, and last summer one of the
wells thus ignited burned so fiercely
that a number of dajs elapsed befqre
the flames could be extinguished. More
often the tankage provided is insufficient
thousands of barrels escape. Tyvo
or three years ago, at the height of the
oil production of the Bradford region,
8,000 barrels a day wete thus run
ning to yvaste. But those halcyon daj's
of Bradford are gone for ever. Al
though ninetecn-tyventieths of the wells
sunk in this legion "struck" oil andnen
flowed fieely, mo-t of them noyv flow
sluurgishl or have to bo "pumped" tyvo
ortmec tunes a yveck.
A Typical Mexican Family.
You can geneiallj lind the Mexican
"peon" family gatheied atound thedoot
of the humble dwelling at any hour of
the day. A model familj consists of
husband and wife, seven or eight child
ren of all ages, sizes and conditions and
in all stages of dress and undressgen
erally pteferiing the lieh blown tint
which nattuc gave them for dress and
paradetwo or three dogs, a goat or so,
several pigs, a cat and some chickens.
On passing the habitations jou will ob
serve its "Lord-major" seated upon his
haunches pulling on a cigarette and
wondering what it all means. He isgreatly
sure to bow politely to jou, and if not
too tired with the day's work he will
up and throw a volley of stones al
i dogs, which are sure to come jelp
ing after the coach. Mrs. Mexican is
seated at the side of the house, busy
pounding up a lot of well-soaked corn,
until it has been transformed into amass
of dough suitable for their bread. She
gencrallj' has time enough at her dis
posal to suspend operations and gaze at
the passing coach. The children are
scattered all around, some on top of the
house, some on the ground in front,
others, frightened, hide themselves, or,
like the pigs and coats, arc struggling
for entrance to their common home witr
their four-legged companions, eager tc
get where no harm can befall them.
Philadelphia Press.
_^-*-^
How One Man Got the Beat of the Bail
road.
It is not often that a big corporation
like the Southern Pacific llailroad
proves incompetent in a contest against
a penniless, single handed man, and we
record the following to note the excep
tion: The Southern Pacific engineer
while scouring the country for water on
the desert about twenty-four miles from
the Colorado river, saw a few tufts of
grass in a little valley. He put work
men to digging in the ground and de
veloped about four inches of clear run
ning water, furnishing a beautiful sup
ply for all purposes. As the work pro
gressed they abandoned (be spring tern
A prospector came along
and itopped at the spring to drink of
the pure liquid. Perhaps the intensity
of bis thirst induced him to gaze longer
into its pure depths. Perhaps, in his
fevered vision, after a long struggle
over dreary mountains and dusty des
erts, he saw mirrored in the water a
sparkling mine of silver. At any rate,
he tested the sand that drifted about
and got a trace of silver. This little
trace of silver resolved into $100 a ton.
Here, then, was the realization, of bis
hopes, and he went right to work to rob
the big corporation. He located the
spring for a mill site and the ground as
mineral landall of which is right and
holds in law. He notified the company
to quit using his water, and they nave
complied obediently.San Bernardino,
fCaM Index,-
3&&&P Safe
WHOLE NUMBER 4101
Health Foid.
While trying to reconstruct a tele
scoped spine and put some new copper
rivets in the lumbar vertabra this
spring, I have had occasion to thor
oughly investigate the subject of so
called health food, such as gruels, beef
tea inundations, toasts, oat meal mush,
bran mash, soups, condition powders,
graham gem, ground feed, pepsin, laud
able mush, and other hen feed usually
poked into the invalid who is too weak
to defend himself.
Of course it stands io reason that the
reluctant and fluttering spirit may not
be won back to earth and joy onco
more beam in the leaden eve unless due
care be taken relative to the food by
means of which nature raav be made to
assert herself.
I do not care to say to the world,
through the columns of the Free Press'
that wc niity woo from eternity the
trembling life with pie. Welsh rabbit
and other wild game will not do at first.'
But I think I am speaking the senti
ments of a large and emaciated consti
tuency when I say that there is getting
to be a strong feeling against oat meal
submerged in milk and in favor of,
strawberry short cake.
I almost ate mscl into an early
grave in April byfljing into the face
of Providence and demoralizing old
Gastric with oat meal. I ate oat meal
tyvo weeks, and at the end of that time
my friends were telegraphed for, but
before it yvas too late, I threyv off the
shackles that bound me. With a des
peration born of a terrible apprehen
tion, I rose and shook off the fatal oat
meal habit and began to cat beefsteak.
At first life hung trembling in the bal
ance and there yy as no change in the
quotations of beef, but later on there
was a slight, delicate bloom on the wan
cheek and range cattle that had barely
escaped a long, sevete winter on the
plains began to apprehend a new dan
ger and to seek the secluded canyons of
the inaccessible mountains.
I often thought yvhile I yvas eating
health food anil waiting for death, how
the doctor and other invited guests at
the post mortem would start back in
amazement to lind the remnants of an
eminent man tilled with bran!
Through all the painful hours of the
long, long night anil the eventless day,
while the mad throng rushed onward
like a great river towards eternity's
ocean, this thought was uppermost in
my mind. I tried to get the physician
to promise that he yvould not expose
me and show the yvorld yvhat a hollow
mockery I had been and how I had de
ceived my best ftiends. I told him tho
whole truth and asked him to spare my
family the humiliation of knowing that
though I might have led a blameless
life, my sunny exterior was only a thin
covering for bran and shorts and mid
dlings, cracked wheat and pearl barley.
I dtearned last night of being in a
large city where the streets were paved
with dry toast and the buildings were
roofed with toast and the soil was bran
and oat meal, and the water was beef
tea and gruel. All at once it came over
me that I had solved the great mystery
of death and had been consigned to a
place of eternal punishment The
thought was horrible! A million eter
nities in a city built of dry toast and oat
meal! A home for never ending cycles
of ages, where the principal hotel and
the postoflicc building and the opera
house were all built of toast, and tho
fire department squirted gruel at the
devouring clement forever!
It was only a dream, but it has made
me more thoughtful, and people notice
that I am not so giddy as I was.Bill
Nye.
Showing His Gratitude.
He inquired his way through the City
Hall jcsteiday until he finally found
limself in the presence of the Chief of
Police. Then he removed his hat, took
i chair and said
"You've got aright good lot of police
in this town.'"
"Yes." "I got drunk here one day seven
pears ago, and instead of lockiiig me up
ind sending nie to the Work House an
ffice walked me down to the depot
ind put me on the train. I'm a man as
lever forgets a kindness."
"No?*' "And I've said that if ever the sign
jome right I'd show my gratitude. The
jign has come."
"Make jour statement," said the
Chief.
"Well, I was yvaiting for the train,
when a fellow with a long, sharp nose
ind an eje like a hawk edges up to me
ind says he: 'Colonel, can you change
a ten-dollar bill?' Says I: 'Judge lean.'
Sajs he: 'Colonel, if you can it will
oblige me, for I'm after some
paiegonc foi a sick child.' And then it
yvas says I and sijs he until I gave him
two fives and awaj' he went. The ten
of his was a counterfeit."
"I see. When did this happen?"
"About six weeks ago, but this is the
first chance I've had to tell jou."
"Where was it?"
"Down in Ohio at a town called Ak-
ron."
"But what can wc do about it?"
"Send some of the police down there
to scare up and arrest the scoundrel.
Its the biggest sort of a chance to create
a sensation and let people know that
you arc wide awake. Think of what a
scoop it would be over the police of
Chicago! Just imagine how mad the
police of New York and Philadelphia
yvould be to bear that Detroit had taken
the cake!"
"1 can't help you anj\"
"And I can help you, eh? Do you
scorn my gratitude?"
"In this case I'll be obliged to."
"Well, that settles that," said the
stranger as he rose up. "I got drunk
here, was used like a gentleman, and in
my gratitude I've put ou to a big thing
a chance to rake in crowns and
wreaths and glorj' and fame till you
can't rest. You wave my gratitude
aside. She'll stay waved. Some one
horse Ohio constable will carry off the
cake and you won't be heard of. We
are square. Good day, sir!"
And he walked out with a spine as stiff
as a drum- major's, and refused to look
16 tt4 right or left. Detroit Free Prm.
The country is prosperous, and an
observing writer says: One of the best
evidences of prosperity is the large
number of marriages. There are thou
sands more who should seize the golden
opportunity and be^in to live. When
a man passes the thirtieth mile post and
has loved no good woman, he has lost
his best chances of life for happiness,
and the sooner he calls a halt and
thinks it over the better. It is all non
sense for a strong, healthy man to say
he cannot keep a wife.
Ldril Beaconsfield once said that he
could have no quarrel with Christianity
for one-half of the Christian world worV
snipped a man and the other balf a wo
man of his race* 'x
-^zS*.
as
H*

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