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New Ulm weekly review. (New Ulm, Minn.) 1878-1892, August 29, 1883, Image 2

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Wednesday, August 29, 1883.
HEPDBLICM STATE TICKET.
FOR GOVERNOR,
LUCIUS F. HUBBARD,
Of Goodhue County.
For Lieutenant Governor,
CHARLES A. GILMAN,
Of Stearns County.
For Secretary of State,
FRED VON BAUMBACH,
Of Douglas County.
For State Treasurer,
CHARLES KITTLESON,
Of Freeborn CountJ.
Foi Attorney Genetal,
W.J. HAHN,
Of Wabasha County
Koi Uiilioad Commissioner,
H.BAKERis FranJAMES James,the cutlaw, now
undergoinOf trialEarth at Gallatin, Missou-
Blue County.
11.
Capt. J. D. Rhodes has conclud
ed to forego the fool-harded feat of
swimming the whirlpool rapids of
Niagara.
By the death of Count de Chani
bord, which occurred last Friday
morning, the last of the Bourbon
dynasty in France is blotted out.
Twelve men were instandly killed
in a coal mine in Cornwall, Eng.,
on the I5st inst., by the breaking of
a rope attached to a car in which
they were being hauled to the sur
face.
Mr. Bierman has signified his
acceptance of the Democratic nom
ination for Governor by the Cen
tral Committee, and the Democrat
ic State ticket is no longer without
a head. It is reported that the Standard
Oil Company, one of the greatest
and wealthiest monopolies of the
United States, has bought up its
only existing competitor,the Tide
water Pipe Line of Pennsylvania.
This virtually gives the Standard
Oil Company the possession of theIn
pretrolenm trade in the country.
A full-blooded negro in Logan
connty, Ark is gradually becom
ing white. has a beautiful
white epidermis all over his body,
except his face, which has a mot
tled appearance, being yet full of
the small dark spots surrounded by
a white skin. This discoloration
or shedding of the black skin has
been going on for many years.
J. Reille, the would-be assas
sin of Judge Sherman Page, of Aus
tin, in 1881, was shot and killed in
the Stevens Point (Wis.) jail last
Friday night by some unknown
party. For a number of months
previous to his death Reille was pro
prietor of a notorions resort, and at
the time of his taking off he was
under arrest for assaulting a youn'*
man.
The German Teacher's Conven
tion of Illinois, at their last session
in Chicago favored instructions in
gymnastics in public schools also
occasional excursions of schools
through tr woods and meadows,
under the guidance of teachers, to
call the attention of scholars to the
beauty of plants, flowers, trees and
lessons drawn from rocks and
stones.
Of the Indiana campaign of 1880
the Indianapolis Journal (Rep.)
says: "The question of campaign
corruption in Indiana in 1880 has
at last simmered down to the fol
lowing: The Republicans had mo
ney. They spent it in the legiti
mate work of the contest, and car
ried the State. The Democrats had
money. The local candidates and
strikers stole it, and used the same
for selfish purposes, and did not
carry the State.
A sensational telegram comes
from Hailey, Idaho, that a party of
sixty Texan desperadoes are in the
Yellowstone Park regions ostensi
bly for the purpose of capturing
President Arthur and party and
cairying them away into the moun
tain c.tves, there to be kept until
rnnsoi).e by the United States or
their personal friends. The bandits
havp an idea, of thus realizing al
least half a million of dollars. One
man who was induced to join the
gang under a misapprehension says
a number of the desporafloes were
guerrillas in the late war, and five
Indians act as guides.
A fearful case of poisoning is re
ported from Winsted McLeod coun
ty, Wm. Tudor and family were
taken sick just after eating lunch,
on the 22d inst and by one o'clock
p. m. one had died, during the
night two more died, and the rest
are not expected to live. There
were nine in the family, and all
but two are down. The neighbors
were attracted to the house by thedistinguished
cries of one of the children and
when they arrived a teiriblp scene
confronted them. Th sick and
dying family was strewn all over the
premises, some lying in the house,
some in the yard and a few were
found in an unconsious condition
in the field near the lunch basket
No one knows how they got the
poison into their system, but the
supposition is that they had some
poison in the house and it ac
cidentally got into their food.
Catarrh
The remarkable result in a dis
ease so universal and with such a
variety of characteristics as Ca
tarrh, prove how effectually Hood's
Sursapanlla actiug through the
blood, reaches every part of the
human system. A medicine, like
everything else, can be fairly judg
ed by its results. We point with
pride to the glorious record Hood's
Sareaparilla has entered upon the
hearts of thousands of people jt has
catarrh of catarrh,
wm$
TERRIBLE TORNADO.
Rochester, Minn,, in Ruins.
Thirty-five Killed
Many Wounded.
That portion of the city north of
the railroad track suffered the most.
Not one house was^left standing.
The Zumbro mill was demolished
and the proprietor, Mr. John M.
Cole instantly killed. Two loaded
freight cars were thrown into the
mill race. The covered railroad
bridge across the Zumbro river was
blown to pieces, the dopot unroofed
and badly wrecked Horton's large
elevator was cut in two in the mid
dle and one-half thrown across the
railroad track, and for three days
the passengers had to be transferred
around the wreck by teams. Th
Rochester Harvester Works build
ings were completely demolished.
Rochester twenty-six were in
stantly killed and forty-five badly
hurt. 500 people were rendered
homeless. The storm began its
ravages in Dodge county at a point
five miles southwest of Dodge Cen
tre. From that place it proceeds in
a due eastern course acros? the coun
try, leaving destruction in its path
which was fully one mile wide.
Mayor Whitten's farm south of
Dodge Centre was desolated. His
loss was fully $5,000. Five persons
were killed i:i that county. Th
cyclone struck Olmsted county in
the town of Salem a little north of
the centre on the west side. Con
siderable damage was done in the
vicinity of St. Chailes and Lewis
ton. Mr. Helenbrecht of Dodge
county on seeing the storm approch
ing chained himself and wife to a
post in the yard. He remained
chained, but his wife was blown
away by the cyclone and torn to
pieces, all of her body being found
Dextday excepting one leg- The
Rochester relief committee has sent
out the following circular:
"On the evening of Aug 21 a terri
fic cyclone struck this city, complete
ly demolishing 125 dwellings and to
tally destroying the contents. A
large number of otheis were unroofed
and otherwise badly damaged. Thir
ty-one pei sons were killed and about
100 wounded, seveial of them fatally.
The ruined houses weie neaily all
owned and occupied by mechanics and
laboiers, who have lost eveiything
they had in the woild, except the
clothing they had upon their persons,
and the naked lots. In many case
heads of lamilies weie injuied. The
cyclone entered the county at the
western bolder, and in its couise des
troyed the crops and buildings on
about forty farms. Others lying con
tiguous weie damaged. The relief
committee has a detailed list of 10 4
families entirely destitute. We ap
peal to the public for aid, Leading
business men of the city aie all heavy
loseis and cannot therefore do as much
as they would do for the sufferers.
They have, however, contributed lib
erally. None of the public buildings
have escaped damage. One school
building is destroyed, the court house
unroofed, churches seriously injured,
onethe Methodistdemolished, ele
vators and warehouses are in litins.
Provisions aie plentiful. More cloth
ing and carpenteis are needed.
Oneweeks
bundled thousand dollars expended in
lumber, etc., for the penniless, would
scarcely set them on their feet suffic
iently to enable themselves. All con
tributions are placed in the hands of a
th.oiough.ly oiganized committee of
citizens."
Large sums have already beeu con
tributed for the relief of the suffer
ers, Winona, Minneapolis, St. Paul,
each contributing between $5,000
and $10,000, but more is needed.
Two million, two hundred and six
ty-five thousand bushels of wheat have
been shipped from the Duluth port
since the opening of navigation.
Hastings boasts of a hen which has
herself by laying a dou
ble egg having the white and yolk
side by side and connected by a tube
three-quarters of an inch in length.
Since the fall of the Basford block
at Austin, the old Oou^t House, Shaw
& Hallos block, and Jones's hall hare
been condemned and will have to be
taken down. The trouble is caused
by the failure of the foundations,
which are built of Austin stone.
Oliver Gibbs, Jr., of Lake City,
secretary of the Minnesota Horticul
tural society solicits contributions of
fruit for the Minnesota department at
the exhibition of the American Pom
ological society to be held at Phila
delphia, September 19.
A correspondent who visited the
penitentiary at Stillwater states that
of the 2?9 persons there, forty-five
are murderers under sentenceforlife,
a larger number than will be found
in any other similar institution, This
is an unfavorable resnlt of the' aboli
tion of capital punishment.
mm* mmmm
and
$500%000 Worth of Property De
stroyed.
By far the most destructive storm
since the terrible tornado which
destroyed New Ulm two years ago
passed over Rochester, Minn., and
adjacant country about 7 m.
last week Tuesday. The Post des
ciibes the storm as follows:"The
day was hot, with a strong south
west wind. About 7 o'clock it be
gan to rain and the wind came at
first in fitful guests, gradually be
coming more steady until at last it
became a gale. Suddenly the wind
changed slightly to the west and in
an instant its terrific power had
done its destructive work. Trees
bent down as wax caniles in a fur
nace chimneys, roofs, spires, cupo
las, fences, barns and houses sunk
before its awful force as men sink
down in battle. The presence of
the storm was mysteriously oppres
sive. A indefinable feeling of
dread seemed to hover in the air
and to impress both men and beasts
with a sense of impending danger.
Language cannot describe the scene
that met the gaze of the people as
they emerged from their dwellings.
The streets were blocked with de
bris of trees, house roofs, lumber,
great rolls of tin from the roofs of
blocks. The public buildings are
minus domes, spires, cupolas and
roofs houses and barns utterly de
stroyed."
A LADY'S ADVENTURE.
It has become quite the proper
thiug for almost every business to
have an exchange. Besides the
Stock, Mining, Pioduce and Cotton
Exchanges, we have a Butter,
Cheese and Egg, a Metal aud all
sorts of Exchanges. We are now
to have a Distilled Liquor or Whis
key Exchange. A number of lead
ing brokeis in liquor got up the
movement, an organization has
been effected aud will be begun in a
week or two. At present there is
really no fixed price for liquors.
The object of the exchange is to
establish regular quotations as well
as to crowd out adulterated and bad
liquors. This Exchange is a good
idea aud there is no doubt that
it will prove a success. Seats at
present have been sold for $100.
There is no doubt that in a few
they will double in value.
"When will you begin running
the cars on the Brooklyn Bridge?"
I asked of Col. Paine, the chief en
gmer.
I can't tell you," was the reply.
"There are so many things to be
looked after that it is hard to pre
dict. I look to about a month,
however, to be about sufficient."
Talking about the bridge, re
minds me of the fact that there
ought to be a stronger police force
on tho structure. The passageway
is made the rendezvous for a set of
cheap "mashers," who offend la
dies by ogling and addressing them,
and very frequently fiightea them.
It is not every female who has
the courage to do what a lady did
last week. Three woulb-be swells
were leaning against the railing of
the bridge one evening about seven
o'clock as two ladies were crossing.
"Isn't she a beauty," audibly re
marked one of the fellows to the
others. "Yes, and I know she
likes me too," said the other. Th
lady stopped and walked over to
them. '*Yes," she said, "she is a
beauty, and she has got a beautiful
hand too,'* and with that she slapp
ed his face in vigorous style, so
much that it grew as red as a boil
ed lobster, aud that his hat fell in
to the water below. "No you
rascals," she said, "b off with you,
or I will have you arrested." Th
fellows slunk off without a word.
-y^fflfiiiiiiniliiliiMiiiiiBiWWi
N12
GOTHAM GOSSIP.
THE REPUBLICAN STATE COMMIT-
TEE.WOKKING FOB HARMONY.
TILDEN AND KELLY AT SARA-
TOGA.THE FEAST AT THE BOR
GIAS.THE FAILURES I S WALL
STREET.A DISTILLED LIQUOR
EXCHANGE TO BE FORMED.THE
CARS ON THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE.
NEW YORK, August 24, 1883.
The Republican State Commit
tee of New York has met, and se
lected Richfield Springs, as the
meeting place of the Convention
which is to begin its work on the
18th of September. A number of
places made strong bids to thehis
Committee, particularly Saratoga,
but Richfield Springs outbid them
all. The deliberations of the Com
mittee were marked by the most
thorough good feeling and a deter
mination to bury all spirit of fac
tion and disharmony, and there is
no doubt that by the 18th of next
month, the delegates from this ci
ty will go to the Convention with
the best of feeling towards each
other and with the determination
to do anything for the party's
best.
Tilden and Kelly are flirting with
each other like a pair of giddy
young people. First Sammy inti
mates that he had always admired
Mr. Kelly's noble character. Then
"Honest John" intimates through
his organ that harmony must be
aroused at the Democratic camp at
any price. Next Mr. Kelly comes
down from the Grand Union Ho
tel at Saratoga and summons the
Tammany braves to the council
fire. Meanwhile Sammy slips off
to Saratoga, and instead of stop
ping at the United States Hotel
where he has always sojourned he
goes to the Grand Union. Kelly is
to leave for Saratoga again this ev
ening. "What's in the wind?"
says every politician. It is evident
that these two arch, enemies are
cooking up some plan by which
each means to use the other and
then stab him in the back after
wards. Such a love feast reminds
one strongly of the poisoned ban
quets of the Borgias.
The panic in Wall Street, which
in previous letters I have forecast,
has come sooner than it was ex
pected, but fortunately everybody
was looking out for squajls, and
thus all financial ships scudded
along under as little canvass as wa-j
possible. The air however is not
clear yet, and the storm is not yet
appeased with the sacrifice of the
two victims Ballou & Co., and
Stedman & Co which it received.
If the market does not soon assume
some defined character other fail
ures are sure to follow. Much
sympathy is felt for the members
of both the above firms, for they
were both old established houses
and their dealings were character
ized by genuine old fashioned busi
ess methods and integrity. Bal
lou & Co. tried to steady themselves
by straddling the market, but this
device, usually one of safety on this
occasion only hastened the collapse
which left them high and dry. Mr.
Stedman's losses were brought
about by the indiscietions of his
son, a young fellow of twenty-four
years, who thought he knew more
about financial operations than his
father, and launched out boldly at
a time when everybody else sought
to make port. Everybody has the
utmost sympathy with the old gen
tleman, who in the evening of his
days finds that the rruits of his
labor of a life are struck with a
blight.
==s
The Northern Pacific railroad is
now completed across the continent,
the two ends being united last
Thursday near Deer Lodge City,
Mont. Th road will be form
ally opend Sept. 8th when Henry
Villard and Jay Cooke will drive
the golden spike in preseuce of the
high-joint pxcuisionists.
tJiA* Review W
^:mw
F0REI6N LETTER.
NAPLES, August 24th, 1883.
As report after report of the
earthquake in Ischia comes to hand
the horror grows to awful and his
torical proportions. An early con
jecture might have placed it at the
head of the dreadful occurrences of
the century but no one at first
tould have imagined the terrible
magnitude which the disaster was
to attain until, the schock that had
wrecked an island having passed,
those who hastened to view the
spectacle of desolation could wit
ness in heaps of crumbled masonry
and mutilated corpses the scene of
the tremendous calamity. Foremost
among the spectators is King Hum
bert himself, who has nobly done
duty in visiting *his field of death
to assist in mitigating, so far aswages
may be possible, the distressing ef
fect of the catastrophe.
Only on the spot can the extent
of the disaster be fully realized.
The havoc wrought is the more
appalling from the suddenness of it.
There were none of the premoni
tions which often herald earth
quakes. The deadly stillness, the
sun a broad moonlike globe set
ting in a sea of blood the moaning
noises heard afar as though the
mighty imprisoned spirit that was
to rend the solid earth were mut
tering to itself ere it put forth its
incalculable power, the strange
rushing sounds like the voice of the
wind among trees the stupefaction
of bird, beast and insect the sud
den going and coming of natural
springs and fountains denoting the
internal throe, all these hints of
the approaching devastation-related
in past visitations of the kindare
wanting. The night is described
as cloudless and beautiful, the sun
had sunk behind the sea in summer
splendor, and amid a Dreathless at
mosphere under which the blue
waters of the Bay of Naples had
stretched a surface as purely
smooth as glass. At the moment
of the earthquake the night fecene
presented by the doomed island
and the surrounding dark water,
melting into gloom towards the
horizon where the stars hung low,
was one of lovliness and repose.
The rich perfume of flowers and
fruit, moistened by dew, might be
tasted in the motionless air. From
the shore went the sound of music
mixed with melodious wash of the
summer surf. Then in a breath the
picture changed A roar as of thunder
rolled up and deepened into the
furious slinging peals of batteries
of artillery. Every light was ex
tinguished, earth and rock heaved
in billows a huge cloud rose and
overhung the island, blotting out
the stars the surface of the sea was
tossed and torn and amid the
crishing of houses falling in frag
ments and the detonations of tne
splitting soil, there was to be heard
the cries and groans of hundreds of
the wounded and ding
A manifestation of volcanic pow
er so vast and destructive as this is
not likely to be let pass without
scientific inquiries which will have
no reference to the horrors it has
accumulated. In the opinion of a
learned Italian authority it is due
to the subsidence of the land.
There is no reason, however, to
doubt that it was au earthquake of
the true volcanic type, though un
heralded by the symptoms to which
the population of the West Indies
and South Aui-iica are accustom
ed.
Ischia is distant about twenty
one geographical miles from Mount
Vesuvius, and a line drawn between
them might probably indicate the
diameter of the surface of the sub
terrun commotion whose forces
found vent at Ischia and at Vesu
vius. Be this as it may, the com
parative tranquility of the sea dur
ing the time of the upheaval is
noteworthy. I is described as ag
itated, but its agitation must have
been trifling, seeing that no disas
ter befell any of the small boats
which were afloat with pleasure
seekers.
In a sense it is the stupendous
traged} of Pompeii repeated. Ex
cavators among the ashes which
hid for centuries that fair city have
come across skeletons in many posi
tions of ease and industry, marking
the swiftness of the fate that over
took them in the bath, the boudoir,
the shop, and turned them into
stone. A Ischia mutilation at
tended death but there was time
for the frenzied prayer, the wild
rush, and for terror to do its para
lyzing work. Nevertheless, the
earth yawned under a world of life
full of activity and pleasure- seek-
ing.
WASHINGTON LETTER.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 24, 1S83.
Bids for furnishing 700 head of
cattle and 400 bulls to the Crow
agency, Montana, were awarded at
the Indian bureau to day to Strange
Brothers, Sioux City, Iowa, the
lowest bidders, their bid being $30-
000-$31.90 per head for stock cat
tie and $59 for bulls.
The Fuvt Comptroller of the
'Treasury has suspended the ac
counts of Wm. T. Timberly, of
Mississippi, formerly an internal
revenueagent,pending an investiga
tion of the charges made that he had
openly boasted that he had per
formed no services for the Govern
ment, except of a political charac
ter. He will be given an opportuni
ty to refute the charges made.
The cash receipts of the Treasu
ry from the customs and internal
revenue, for the first fourteen days
of August, were less by $1,874,006
than the receipts from the same
sources for the first fourteen days
of the preceding month. The re*
ceipts from customs fell off from
$10,630,000 to $8,703,000, while
the receipts from the internal rev
enue increased from $4,410,000 to
$4,463,000. Since August 1, how
ever, there have been large ''repay-
ments to the Treasury, consisting
mainly of about $12,000,000 on the
pensions account. It is not exthe
pected that there will be another
heavy draft on the Treasury, to pay
pensions until October, and it is re
garded as probable that the inter.
est on the last bonds called$32,- 4
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST SO,
000,000 of 3 per cent.will be an
ticipated. This interest, including
the November instalment, will a
mount to about $500,000.
The. telegraph strike is practical
ly at an end. A fight like that, in
augurated by the operators must be
short, sharp and decisive in order
to succeed. I must win quickly,
if at all, and when it became ap
parent that companies would yield
nothing, not even for the sake of
public convenience, the defeat
of the strikers was almost inevita
ble. The struggle was m-ide a
question of endurance between
rich and powerful corporations and
men dependent upon their daily labor
for a living. If it had been a mat
ter of subsistence only of the strik
ers themselves they could hjve pro
longed their resistance but the
of the telegraphers support
many families. Operators with
wives and children to provide for
could not, for any considerable
length of time, depend upon the
uncertain contributions of trades
union organizations. The numer
ous desertions from the stnkers for
two days past show th tt the opera
tors have despaiied of coercing the
companies into any recognition of
their demands.
MINNESOTA NEWS.
Highway robbers tackled a young
fellow and his girl, out riding in Fer
gus Falls, and went through them
for cash.
John McShane, working on a farm
near Appleton, had a finger torn out
by the roots while working a leaper
and binder.
The first car of wheat, of the new
crop, received at Minneapolis, came
from Luverne, Rock county. It is
of the White Russian variety and
yielded 31"bushels per acre for 01
acres
Chailes Seifert, of Mankato, the
other day, had his team run away
while hitched to a reaper was
tin own off and leceived a number of
severe wounds and was badly used
up. With good care it is thought he
may recover.
Nicholas Onden and his son John
of Crooked Creek, Houston county,
were suffocated Sunday morning in a
cistern. They had built a fire in it
Saturday to dry it, and Sunday morn
ing the son went down to start the
fire. The father seeing his son lying
at the botton procured a lope and
went down, and wnen putting it
about his son's body fell dead.
MARBLE WOKKS
Ig\ j^cltwendingei',
DEALER IN*
Monuments, Tombstones,
Mantels,
Foreign and
American Marbl.e
Shop on State Street between fourth
and fifth streets.
New Ulm Minn
J. B. Ar nold,
Dealer in
COOKING & HEATING STOVES
HARDWARE,
Tin-ware & Farming Implements
The shop is in charge of nn experienced hand
who gives the mending and lepalnngof tin-w.ue
his special attention. All work warranted
NEW ULM, MINN.
C. WAGNER,
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OP
FURNITURE
PICTURE FRAMES, MOULD
INGS, WINDOW SHADES
TRUNKS, SATCHELS,
NEEDLES AND
REPAIRS
FOtt ALL KINDS OF
Agent for the celebrated light running
HOUSEHOLD.
and new HIGH ARM
DAVIS
Sold on Weekly or Monthly
Payments.
Old Machines taken in
Trade for New Ones.
c- WAGNER-
PATENTS
CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT
Bend a rough sketch or (If yon can) a modelof your
Invention to CUBOIKHB]K. LEHOM, Waaaiw*
tea, Ik &, and a PmUaUaary ExaaUawaoa
Sen a rough sketch or (i
NHKHB
will be made of all United States patents of the
same class of inventions and you will be advised
whetheror not a patentcan be obtained.
VOn THIS PRELIMINARY EXAMINA-
TION MO CHARGE I S MADE.
WhatwilBl?
I1
Eatentable.
a PatentCostfee
youe areadVIsed that yourinvention is patent
Jt
2
.P
over,imen
&8
application
of #15, and#ftll.9forethe SS drawings required
Government. This is payablewhenapplication is
i"*^
th expense unlessa
aJ5d
patenbysthe
i al
lowed. When allowed, theattorney*fee(tSS) aria
the finalGovernment fee is lyable7Thus
iscbarged unless you do get a rocenc. An attorney
whose fee depends on his success in obtaining a
Patent wUl not advise you that your Invention Is
unless It really is patentable, so far as
.is bestJudgmentcan aid In determining the ques
tion hence, you can rely on the advise given after
a preliminary examination Is had. ItrSlga Patt- DealamPat
an the Bevtetrattoa or taSSS.Trm*i
mm and BfNlsaue* Caveat* pre-
P*ISJ"l"^.1???
_AP5?lcasecured..
lion8
'P revivo of fto
}ectdLAbaadoaed,or Forfeited Casesmade.
Very often valuable inventions are saved in these
classes of cases. If you have undertaken to secure
your own patent and failed, a skillful handling of
the casemay lead to success. Sendme a written re
questaddressed troattorney the Commissioner,of Patent-s
that he recognizne GEORGE E LEMON, of Washing*
Jmi-iStt
in the case givlnr
Mi
title of the invention and aqout the date of filing
yqur application. An examinationand report will
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regular Government rates, (Me. each.) Be
memberthlsoffice has been in successful operation
tlnce11865. and you therefore reap the benefits of
experience, besides reference can be given to an.
tnal clients in almost every county In the U. 8,
Yamphlet relating tq Patents free upon request!
tora^-A*^^^.^^'l"??irAmii
GEO. E. LEMON,
A*5 61 15th St., WASHINGTON. C.
tSB3/Mf%#tis^f^Cv3^^
$37.53 forOne Dollar.
Music for the million. Vienna Bolian Organ
Sweetest and most delightful mnsie known. Pop
ular in Europe. Any tune can he played on it
from Old Hundred to Yankee Doodle. Even
those with no ear while away delightful hour
with this instrument. Any one can play its
Children play it one evening. Costs but one tenth
as much as the organette, Organnla, Etc. audi,
far sweeter and needs only eommon musie- T.
introduce our new music we will send a samps
organ, with bound book, containing full words
and music of 96 new and popular songs, which in
sheet form sell for$87.35, prepaid to any address
for only one dollar. C. O. D. As a guarantee
that every one will receive all they pay for, we
will send one sample book and organ by express.
Q-P-V-ifUtwotlMi three. $2?30 or more at
rate of $9 per dozen. We cannot prepay
?Jj.*,9#
Circular free Address MONADsgood
NOCK MUSIC CO. Lock bex 750, Hinsdale, N. Y.
June 1,83.
JULIUS D. LEVI
Successor to John, C. Zieske.
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
HARNESSES,
SADDLES,
COLLARS,
BRIDLES,
T. v. BLANKETfe,
ROBES &
WHIPS,
TRUNKS,
VALISES,
&C., &C., &c
Repairing Done Promptly & Cheap.
Main S Sleepy
Hink & Bertrand,rEye.Min
Dealers in
GROCERIES, READY
MADE CLOTHING, HAT
CAPS, BOOTS & SHOES
LADIES' AND
GENTS' UNDERWARE,
NOTIONS, to., &c, 4c.
Highest market price paid for
produce.
SLEEPY EYE MINN.
C. SIHOKET,
UPHOLSTERER,
Mnnofctnrer offlrstjclass parlor farnitme as
nijrijra CUJMMR, MJITTKJRSKS,
JJraperiet, nntbrequint, Mite.
A11 kinds of upholstered furniture neatlyrcpaud
A LARGE STOCh. OFjUPHOLSTKltED GOODS AND
FURM-IURE^ ALWA1S KEPT ON IlaND.
Oideis by mail piomptly attended to.
453 Wacoutalor, Eight St, ST PAUL
KMmm^^Y
Mll wtrttmncMsaiMmMmm
John H. MUi?z &, I**uft(!qiia
The leading ut tits' Furnishing House
of the Northwest
155 EAST Tmnu ST ST PAUL.
(old stand) Hattu* Jtrimtra.
Men's Furnishers and Shirt makers.
J. FEHNEKtS & CO.
CONFManufacturing E
and dealers in
NUTS, GREEN FRUITS,
etc. etc. etc.
351 & 353 E. Water St., Milwaukee.
,aw ek matloat home by tho industry
ous- Best business now before the pub
lic. Capital not needed. We will start
you. Men, women, boys and girls
wanted everywheie to work for us.
Now is the time. Yon ca work in
spare timeoi give our whole time to the business
other business will pay you nearly as well. No
engaging
$
one can foil to make enormous py
at once. Costly outfit and teiras free. Money
made fast, and hanorabl} Address TBTTK
& Co., Augusta Me, Nov
Empir Mill Co
ROLLER MiIL.
24 Rollers and 4 Burrs.
We take pleasuie in informing tru,
public that we are now ready for bus
iness. The best machinery aud all the
latest improvements in the manufac
ture of flour enable us to compete with
the best mills in the country
We are constantly buying
Wheat,
Bye,
Corn,
Oats,
Buckwheat,
&c.,&c.
At the Highest Market Prices
We sell all kinds of
1LOVB,
SHOUTS,!
BRAN, &c.t
AT LOW RATES.
Special Attention given to
Custom Work,
An extra stone for gi inding feed.
Steam Cornsheller.
Wood 1 aken for cash or in exchange
Sfopiie]\!illCo
Mothers! Mothers!! Mothers!!!
Are yon disturbed at night and broken off your
rest by a sU child suffering and crying with the
excri ciating pain of cutting teeth? If so go at
once and get a bottle of Mrs. Winslow's Soothing
Syrup. It will revive the poor little suffere im
mediate])depend upon it: there is no mistake
about it. There is not a mother on Earth who has
used it who will not tell you that it will regulate
the bowels, give rest to the mother and relief and
health to the child, operating like magic. It is
perfectly safe to use in all ases, and 11 i to
the taste, and is the perscription of one of the ol
dest female physicians and nurses in the Uuited
States' Sold at 25 cents a bottle everywhere.
DAKOTA HOUSE.
OPP, TOST OFFICE NEW ULM, MINN
ADOLPH SEITER, Prop'r.
This house is he most centrally lo
cated house in the citj and
foids good Sample Rooms.
Pencil,
Til
BREWER, HU.STER & BOTTLER
JA$ W Mm, MltfH-
This brewery is one of the largest, establishments
of the kin.I in the Minnesota Valley and is fitted
np with all the modern improvements. Keg and
bottle beer fnrnisbed to any parr of the city on
short notice. My bottle beer is especially adapted
for family use.
Country brewers and others that buy malt will
find it to their interest to place their orders with
me. All orders by mail wUl receiverayprompt at
tention.
AUG. SCHELL.
DR KARL SCHULIN,
OCULIST and AUMST,
Cor. 7th& Jackson St$. ST. PAUL.
inns-. 9 to 12 A, *43
$t%w
The undersigned wish
Stock of
S.D.
uRochester"and 4
S
KSST
m**rm
fSSSn^w fr
SLEEPY EYE
SPRINGFIELD
LAMBERTON
w&*~
-AT THE
New Ulm Cheap Cash Store.
wesf
TRACY AND TYLER.
to announce that their Large and N
READY-MADE CLOTHING, YOUTHS CLOTHING
DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, GROCERIES, CROCKERY
BOOTS & SHOES, LIQUORS, ETC ETC.
for the fall and winter trade is now being received, and we take tins
early opportunity to invite our friends and customers to give us a call
and examine our goods.
We will Not be Undersold
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS TO CASH PURCHASERS.
H. Behnke, Manager. Qb E- BEHUKE-
PETERSONP
AGENT FOR:
The Aultman & Taylor
Horse Powers Steetm. Engines
Massilion and Chicago
PITTS THRIS S E R, JS
THE CELEBRATED
Walter A. W d's
TWINE BINDERS,
Iigl( fining Sweep ffcke l{ekpei' kqel JVfowet'
(COMSZ2TES)
AND ENCLOSED GEAR MOWER.
THE
faction.A full line of Repairs for the above Machines always on h.m.s.
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES. BOOTS
That in Buying
Minneapolis "Appleby^
TWtlTB STt)gB$
THE
Buggies and Platforn Spring Wagons,
of every kind and discretion
THE
Hoc Island, J. I, Cas and Moline
SULKY PLOWS,
A N
Tfie Old Reliable Holinsworth Sulky Hay Rakes.
fkrwing &$, W who$ewin,
an
bef
vn
1
invit
ofMAcl*l
need implements
thos
and evenythinrg elsea usually needed in line
Phsing
A1
any kind to cal and
elsewhere.theIagricultural
sell
cheaper.on
0ffi ces
Branc
I For earing FmslComplsiati thei. Pill. hl-?2'.T*& witowd tooWhealth. if inch thingIiipoMibU
S D. Peterson.
PARSONS?"
''jflMS
KIESLING, KELLER &CO.,
DEALER IN
Hats & Caps, Clothing, Gents' Furnishing Goods.
NFV7ULM MINN.
ALLTHE WORLDKNOWS
BOOTS &
than in any other class of Goods
The Best isthe Cheapest.
It is gratifying for us to be able to announce to our patrons aud public
generally, that, while it has always been our study and pride
to GIVE MORE and BETTER GOODS FO LESS
MONEY than any other house in this line
of Busines, and have this year eclips-
ed all former efforts, and are
now prepared to ofler
FIRST-CLASS.
WELL MADE,
STYLISH
SHOES
oots&saoes'EDURABL&
A.T LOWERPRICSS
Than are asked by inferior houses for cheap and ill-made foot^ea
W have a complete assorlmcnt in every department, and are'iio
afraid to show goods and compareprice with anybody. Don't wait for
another invitation but take the first opportunity and
MAKE HENS UY
valuable. tolpiai
le NutbhiK on earth will make hena lav lik. M..2VI.!i5.?rS.Twosrte,Jr
I!
v-*
S
kat gu.uante satLsfltrf satis"
more
fl LOHEYDE
I 'wi te.tria.try.
Par
.*&
ft
immeoaelv
^v*

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