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New Ulm weekly review. (New Ulm, Minn.) 1878-1892, September 12, 1883, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064939/1883-09-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME VI. NO 4 9
ciUjetMxj Umjew.
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY
JOS. BOBLETER.
Offloe oyer City Drug Ston.
TERMS:
One Dollar and a half per year in
advance.
Races of Advertlainff.
VUttNISHED UPON APPLICATION.
Advertisements in doable column, double the
ingle column rates
Business Cards of five lines, one year $5,00, each
additional line 75 cts
Ml transient advertisements to be paid for in
advance
Advertisements Inserted inthelocal notice col
umns, ten cts a line for the first insertion and 5
cents a line tor each subsequent insertion but no
notice inserted for less than 50 cts
Announcements of marriages and deaths insert,
ed free but obituary notices, except in special
cases, will be charged at advertising rates.
Legal notices will be charged 75 cts per folio for
the first insertnon, and 25 cts per folio for each
subsequent insertion All.legal notices must be
upon the responsibility of the attorney oidering
them published, and no affidavit of publication will
be given until the publication fees aie paid.
In connection with the pipor, we have a splen
id assortment of jobbing material, and we are
ropared to execute all kinds of printing in a style
usurpassed and at moderate rates
J. R. FOSTER,
DENTI ST.
NEW ULM, MINN.
A full set of teeth for ten dollars.
Gas administeied by Dr. Berry, and
teeih extracted without pain.
Office over Kiesling & Kellei's
Store.
pvR. A. MARDEM,
RESIDENT DENTIST,
Office, corior Mian and Firrt H. 8U.
*EW ULM. MINNESOTA
K. C. BERRY,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
O KB AT THE (JlfY IJUUO &TOKK
F\ UL\f, MINNESOTA
DR. B. CARL,
Physician and Snrgeon.
NFW UI M,
V,
1
1
MINN.
nice and residence on German St.
DR. J. W. WELLCOME,
PHYSICIAN SURGEON,
Sleepy Eye. Minn.
WM. WAKEFIELD,
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
Will answer calls in city or countiy
All houis of the day and night.
Omen with Dr. C. Beiry, ovei
Kieshne, Keller & Co's Stoie.
JOHN WHITE,
GaduiteofOiitniio\(tennir College, Toionto,
Veterinary Surgeon,
Tieats all Disease-, of Domestic
Animals
Office at CH vs. UossKorF shveiy bain
NEW ULM, MINN
J. J. RA\,
Mary PuWic, Conveyancer,
and agent foi St. Paul
FIRE & MARINE INSURANCE CO
Spungfield, Brown Co., Minn.
JOSTA.
Lind & Randall,
ATTORNEYS AT LAWNEW
COLLECTORS-
PRACTICE IN ALL THE COURTS
NMW ULM, MINN.
Mm T. WestpMl,
Keeps on hand a large and well
assorted stock of millinery, fancy
goods and zephyr wool, opposite
the Union Hotel, between second
and Third North streets.
NEW ULM MINN.
MILLINERY
AtfD
DRESS MAKING.
Mrs. Anton Olding,
NEXT DOOR TO
gOMMER'S STORE, NEW ULM
Has on hand a good stock of Millnery Goods con
sisting in part of Hats, Bonnets, Velvets, Silks
Ribbons, Feather Human Hair, Flowers. &c
Also PaHejmgfor stamping monograms. Stamp
inx of alltawd all embroidery Work and Fashion
able dressmaking done to order
CHAS. BRUST, PROP'R.
Cor. Minn. & First South Streets
New TJlm, Minn.
FIRST-CLASS
BROWN CO. BANK.
II CTIADBOURN
President
Frank
THEe
ECKSTEIN,
Attorney and Counselor
Titles examined and perfected.
Particular attention given to collec-
tiona _.
gfTOflAce over BiownCo. Bank
NEW ULM. MINN.
JOHN UND RAND VLL A HAGBERG
acommodahons Location con
venienttobusiness and depot. Sample rooms
best in the city.
Catalogw
FREE I
ULBS
MILLIONS
OFTHEM
For FLORISTS and
AMATEURS.
Butch Bulbs, Japan
Bulbs. French Bulbs,
American Bulbs. Aloft
HantsforGreenhouses
and Window Gardens
mBKl
ROSS,
Cashier*
Cor. Minn, and Centre Strs.
N EW ULM, MINN.
Collections and all business pertaining to banking
promptly attended to.
Individual Responsibility
$500,000
Burgf
Manufaetmer of and Dealer in
CIGARS,
TOBACCOS, &
PIPES.
Minnesota street, next door to C.
Sommer'is Store.
NEW UL MINN
CENTRE STREET
Sample Room
AND
IN BASEMENT OF
ZKZieslingr's iBlocls:.
The best of Wines, Liquors and
Cigais constantly kept on hand.
Louis Felkel, Prop'r,
Meat Market.
CHAS. STDEBE, Fiop'r.
A large supply of fresh meats, sau
sage, hams, lard, etc., constantly on
hand. All orders from the country
promptly attended to.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES.
Minn. Str., New Ulm. Minn.
M. EPPLE,
Dealer in
Live Stock,
Hides, Lard, Wool*
Cattle bought and sold in large or
small numbers. Contracts solicited.
Meat Market,
ZIEHER & BREY, Prop'is.
MINNESOTA ST. NEW ULM,MINN
undersigned would ispeotfully mfoim
th public that thty have established a meat
market one door non of the Union House We
will spare no pains or means to keep our market
supplied with only the best liesh treats, sausage
and everything else usually found in a first class
lmeat market, and om prices will always compire
nvorably with those of our competitor If so de
sired, articles purchased of us will be sent to the
durchaser's house withoutextra charge The high
est market puce will always be paid for fat cattle
hides, etc
ANTON ZIEHER
ANTON BREY
C. F. HELD,
Undeitakei and Dealer in
All KINDS OF FURNITURE
Piopnetorand Manufacturer of
THE FARMERS FRIEND
Fanninsj !M\ii
The best fanning mill in the market"
Store and Factoi yon Centie Street neai
the City Mill
ULM, MINN.
NEW MACHINE SHOP.
Centre Street, Opposite Mueller &
Scherer's Lumber Yard,
NEW ULM, MINN
t\eo. Kob2u?#l), PfopV
lam now piepaietl to execute all
oi dei with dispatch. Repaiung of
Threshers and Reapeis a specialt5.
My Machinery is all new and of tne
most improved pattei n. All work war
ranted os lepiesented. All those In
want of anything my line are cordi
ally invited to give me a call.
THEO. KOBARSCH.
H. WERRING,
DEALER I
Dry Goods, Notions,Boots & Shoes
GROCERIES,
Med He ines & Farming Implements.
Golden Gate, Minn.
H. Rudolphi,
MANUFACTURER OF & DEALER I N
Boots and Shoes!
Minn. & 3d N. strs. New Ulm, Minn.
A. large assortment of men's and
boys' boots and shoes, and ladies' and
childrens' shoes constantly kept on
hand. Custom work and lepairing
promptly attended to
M. JUENEMANN
MAKlTPACrUnEB OP AND DEALER Tv
HARNESSES,
COLLARS,
SADDLES,
WHIPS,
SADLERY,
BLANKETS
iuunmuuwuu,, Upholstery, and all custom work
UIR1M CIRI FY fifl r,ei taming to my businessV promptly at
t0
nde
Bocherter,n..*ohiowo,ni. gohuobrich's saloon,J^SAY
Minnesota stree next door
TJlm.
R. PFEFFERLE,
Dealer in
Canned, Dried and Green Fruits,
FLOUR AND FEED
STONE,WooDKN AND WlLLOW WAI.E.
Minn. St. New Ulm Minnesota.
LSn
HEALER MJy
FRESH AND CANNED
UITS
And eveiything else belonging to a
fiist-class
NOVELTY STORE,
NEW ULM, MINN
C. BALTRUSCH
-DnALLR IN
Drj Roods,
Hats and Gaps,
Men's and Boys' Clothing,
Ladies Jackets and Dolmans
LADIES' AND GENTS'
Furnishing Goods,
GROCERIES,
CROCKERY & GLASSWARE
BOOTS AND SHOES,
And the very latest patterns in
Dress Goods & Trimmings
My pui chases have been made di
lect and ioi cash, and I am thereby
enabled to make the lowest prices.
Call and examine my stock and com
paie pi ices befoie purchasing else
where.
BALTRUSCH.
CASH PURCHASES
and CHEAP SALES
JOHN NEUMAN
Dealer in
DRY GOODS
Hats, Caps, Notions,
Groceries*, Provisions,
Crockery and Glassware,
Green, Dried and Canned
Fruits etc, etc.
I will always takefaim produce in exchange!
foi goods, and pay the highest market pi icefoi ill
kinds of paper ligs
In connection ith my stoie I hi\e a first class
saloon furnished with i splendid billiard table and
mycustomeis will always find good liquors and
cigiis,and every forenoon a splendid lunch.
All goods purchased of me will he delivered to
my pirt ofthe Uty fieo of cost
Minnesota Strtxt, New Ulm, Minn
H. Laudenschlager,
Dealer in
STOVES,
HARD WARE, TINWARE A NT
LIGHTNING RODS.
The Celebrated White, Howe,
New American & Singer
SEWING MACHINES.
Cor Minn. & Is S Sts., New Ulm, MINN
Eagle Mill Co,
Manufacturers of
ROLLER FLOUR
BY THE
Gradual Reduction Boiler
System.
N EW ULM, IMINN.
GEO BENTZ & CO-
Importers and Wholesale Deaiers in
WINES &
LIQUORS
PHOTOGRAPHS!C. 3 W 3d St., S PAU L, Minn.
The undersigned would respectfully
inform the public that they have
opened a
PHOTOGRAPH UALLERY
ou the corner of Minnesota and 3d
North Streets, and that they are
prepared to do all kinds of photo
graphic work in the most approved
and elegant styles. Special attention
will be given to family groups, En
largements and also to copying of
pictures of deceased.
One of the Artists will always be
ready to take views of residences.
We will, on demand, finish the
pictures in oil or water colors, also
frame them neatly. Only first-class
work delivered and all work war
anted
Anton Gag
J.B. Vellikanje
1
N EW ULM, MINN., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEBER 12' 1883.
WE DO NOT CLAIM
that HOOD'S SABS^AHIL LA will cure every*
thing, hut the fact that on the purity and
vitality of the blood depend the vigor and
health of the whole system, and that disease
of vanous kinds is often only the sign that
nature is trying to remove the disturbing
cause, we are naturally led to the conclusion
that a remedy that gives life and vigor to
the blood, eradicates scrofula and other im
purities from it, as HOOD'S SARSAPARILLA
undoubtedly does, must be the means of pre
venting many diseases that would occur
without its use hence the field of its useful
ness is quite an extended one, and we are
warranted in recommending it for all de
rangements of the system which are caused
by an unnatural state of the blood.
Why Suffer with Salt-Rheum
MESSRS. C. I. HOOD & Co., Lowell, Mass.
GentlemenI was a great sufferer from
Bait-Rheum on my limbs, for a dozen years
previous to the summer of 1876, at which
time I was cured by Hood's Sarsaparilla.
The skin would become dry, chap, crack
open, bleed and itch intensely, so that I
could not help scratching, which of course
made them worse." At the time I com
menced taking Hood's Sarsaparilla (in the
summer of 1876) they were so Dad that they
discharged, and I was obliged to keep them
bandaged with linen cloths. The skin was
drawn so tight by the heat of the disease
that if I stooped over they would crack open
and actually Dring tears into my eyes. The
first bottle benefited me so much that I con
tinued taking it till I was cured I used one
box of Hood's Olive Ointment, to relieve the
itching. Hoping many others may learn the
value of Hood's Sarsaparilla and receive as
much benefit as I have, I am,
Very tiuly yours,
MRS. S. S. MOODY,
No. 75 Broadway.
Lowell, Mass., Jan. 15,1878.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Is sold by druggists. Price $1, or six for $5.
Preparedby.C. I. HOOD & Co., Lowell,Mass.
FOB $450JN ADVANCE
We will send
The Sptctator one year,\-^K.-~l$1J0
THE HOUSEKEEPER oneyearfr.75
The Watorbury Watch, *=m.-W4.00
&
-1*
ThejHousekeeper
Is the best and most useful of all the household
publications. It
ids publishe175,00The
J?
nea
a
by Buckeye
Publishing Co, Minneapolis. Minn* who
will eend you specimen copy MIEE. The same
&JPJ&1
has sold 0 copies of the
an
BUCKBYB COOK BOOK," (the largest sale eve?
made of a book of its class,) without doubt Ta
BSST COOS BOOS EN TBS WOULD.
THE^WATEBBURY WATCH
Is the size and style represented in the cut, and
is the best cheap watch made. It is a stem winder
In nickle silver case, which will not tarnish, and
Is an excellent time-keeper. The watch retails
regularly at $4 00 and Is well worth the money.
(If sent by mall enclose 24 cents for postage and
we guarantee safe delivery.)
WE MAKE THIS/THE^MOST^LIB-
ERAL OFFER WE A HAVE EVER/
MADE, TO ALLt SUBSCRIBE
^ERS WHO PAYUP.AR^"
N REARS AND ONE YEARff
IN ADVANCE.]
We will send to any subscriber who has already
paid in advance, THE HOUSEKEEPER one year
and the Waterbnry Watch for $3 25 and postage.
This is 75 cents less than the retail price of the
watch alone
fUTTS
PILLS
TORPID BOWELS,
DISORDERED LIVER
and MALARIA.
From these sources arise three-fourths of
the diseases of the human race. These
symptoms Indicate theirezistence: Loss of
Appetite, Bowel* costive* Stele Head*
ache, rallnes after eattns, aversion to
exertion body or mind, Eructation
of food, Irritability of temper, Low
spirits, A feelfng of havine neglected
some duty, Dizziness, Fluttering at ne
HearVpots before tbe eyes, lUgnly col*
ored ITrine, COIVSTIPATIOIlT and de*
mand the use of a remedy that acts directly
on the Liver. AsaLivermedioineTUTT'B
PIII have no equal. Their actionon the
Kidneys and Skin is also prompt removing
aU impurities through these three scav
engers of tbe system," producing appe
tite, sound digestion, regularstools a.clear
skinandavigorousbody. 'I'UTT'S WIXS
cause no nausea or griping nor Interfere
with daily work and area perfect
ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA.
Boldevervwhere.aSc. Office,44Murray8tN.Y.
TUTTS HAIR DYE.
GRAY HAIR O WHISKERS changed in*
stantly to a GLOSSY BLACK by a single ap.
plication of this DYE. Sold by Druggists,
or sent by express on receipt of SI*
Office, 44Murray Street, New York.
TUTT'8 MANUAL OF USEFUL RECEIPTS FUEL
Leonharc
PKOPRIETOB OFTHE
New Ulm Foundry
& MACHINE SHOP
Corner Centre & Front Streets..
NEW ULM, MINN"
The Foundry has been thoroughly refitted and
am now prepared to do all kinds of work on short
notice. Repairing of all kinds of machinery and
Agricultural Implements a speciality. Only ex
perienced workmen are employed and work en
trustedtomy care wiOH be executed with neatness
and dispatch. ALL wRK WARRA NTED
CHAS. LE0NHARDT
THE HOUSEKEEPER.
a beautiful monthly,
75 cents a year. Ev
ery woman who keeps
house needs it, and wul
have it when she hears
of it, if she has to go
without her Spring
bonnet Specimen copy
and Grand Premium
List Free. Specimen
pages of theOhrcKKYH
COOK BOOK, (which ev
erybody knows is the
Best in the World,) free
with it. Address,*
"Buckeye PuPg Co.',
Minnespolis.Minn
Baby in Church.
Aunt Nellie had fashioned a dainty thing
Of Hamburg and ribbon and lace,
And mamma had aid, as sbc settled it 'round
Our beautiful babv'sfucc,
Where the dnnplrs plaj and the laughter lies
Like faunbhine nid in her v.oiet eyes
"If the day is pleasant and baby is good,
She may go to church and wear her new hood."
Then Ben, aged 6, began to tell,
In derly-brotherly way,
How very, very good she must be
If she went to church next day.
He told of the church, the choir and the crowd,
And the man in front, who talked so loud
But she must not talk, nor laugh, nor sing.
But just sit as quiet as anything.
And so, on a beautiful Sabbath in Mav,
When the fruit-buds burst into flowers,
(There wasn't a flower on bush or tiee
So fair as this blossom of oui
All in her white dress dainty and new)
Our baby sat in the family pew
The grand, sweet music, the reverent air.
The solemn hush and the voice of prayer.
Filled all her baby -ou with awe,
As she sat in her little place,
And the holy look that the ante's wear
Seemed pictured upon her face.
And the 6ueet words uttered so long ago
Came into my mind with a i thinic flow:
"Of such is the kingdom of Heaven," said He,
And I know he spoke ot such as she.
The sweet-voiced oigan pealed forth again.
The collection boxes came iound,
And baby dropped her penny in,
And smiled at the clinking sound.
Alone in the choir Aunt Nellie stood,
Waiting the close ot the sott prelude
To begin her solo. High and strong
She struck the first note clear and long.
She held it, and all were charmed but one,
W ho, with all the might she had.
Sprang to her little feet and cried
"Aunt Nellie, you'se being budl"
The audience smiled, the minister coughed.
The little boys in the corner laughed,
Tbe tenor shook like an aspen leaf
And bid his face bis handkerchief.
And poor Aunt Nellie nevei could tell
How she finished that terrible strain,
But-says nothing on earth would tempt
Her to go through the scene again.
So, we have decided perhaps 'tis best,
For her sake, ours, and all the rest.
That we wait, maybe, for a yeai or two,
Ere om baby re enters the family pew,
[New York Independent.
FINDING THE TRAIL.
Here in the shadow of this grim moun
tain is a camp of cavalry200 men in
faded and ragged blue uniforms, every
face sunburned and bronzed, every
sabre and carbine showing long use,
every horse liftmsr its head from the
grass at short intei vals for a swift glance
up and down the valley.
Here, at the foot of the mountain, the
Apache trail, which has been followed
for three days, has grown cold. Ave,
it has been lost. It is as if the white
men had followed a pa'th which sudden
ly ended at a precipice. From 'this
point the red demons took wings, and
the oldest trailer is at fault.
The men on picket looked up and down
the narrow valley with anxious faces.
Down the valley, a mile away, a soli
tary wild horse paws and prances and
utters shrill neighs of wonderment and
alarm. Up the valley is a long stretch
of green grass, the eaith is level as a
floor and no visible sign of life. The
pines and shrubs and rocks on the
mountain side might hide ten thousand
Indians, but there is not the slightest
movement to arouse suspicion, ft is a
still, hot day. Not a bird chirps, not a
blanch waves. The lynx could detect
nothing beyond the erratic movements
of the lone wild horse adown the valley
and circular flight of an eagle so
high in the air that the proud bird
seemed no larger than a sparrow.
For an hour every man and horse has
looked for "signs," but nothing has
been discoveied beyond what has been
described. It is a lost trail. There is
something in it to arouse suspicion as
well as anno} ance. Ten miles away
the tiail was as plain as a country high
way, and the Indians had no suspicion
of pursuit. Five miles back there were
signs of commotion. Here, in the cen
ter of the valley, every foot print sud
denly disappears.
Look, now! A sergeant with grizzly
locks and lighting jaw rides down the
valley, followed by five troopers. They
are to scout for the lost trail. Every
man has unslung his carbine, every
saddle-girt has been tightened, and every
mau of the six looks over the camp as
he rides out as if he had been told that
stretches clear across the valley before
a word has been spoken. Then it faces
to the right and 200 Indians, in wat
paint face the grim old sergeant and
his five troopers.
"Into lineright dress!"
It is the sergeant who whispers the
order. Six to 200, but we will face the
danger. To retreat down the valley is
to be overtaken one by one and shot,
from the saddle, or reserved for torture.
Down the valley there is no hope up
the valley is the camp of rescue. The
two lines face each other for a moment
without a movement.
"Now, men, one volleysling car
binesdraw sabres and charge!"
A sheet of flamea roara cloud of
smoke and six horses sprang forward.
Then there is a grand yell, a rush by
every horse and rider, and a whirlpool
begins to circle. Sabres flash and
clingarrows whistlerevolvers pop
voices shout and scream, and then the
whirlpool ceases. It is not three min
utes since the first carbine was fired,
but the tragedy has ended. Every
trooper is down and scalped, half a doz
en redskins are dead or dying, a dozen
horses are struggling or staggering and
turning the bend at a mad gallop is the
sergeant's riderless horse. He carries
an arrow in his shoulder, and there is
blood on the saddle. In five minutes
he will be in camp, add the notes of the
bugle will prove that the lost trail has
been found.
Following Darwin Unknowingly.
I remember of hearing once a conver
sation between two young darkies at a
time when a circus and menagerie were
in town. One asked the other if he had
been to the show, and being answered
the affirmative, inquired what he en
joyed most. His companion said: "D'you
know, Sam, I done see nuthin' in dat
show dat please me like dem monkeys.
De way dey would swing derselves by
de tails nigh about killed me." Sam
looked at him gravely and said: "If I
was you, Jim, I wouldn't laugh and
make light bout dem monkeys in dat
triflin' manner." Jim stopped short
and looked at his friend in a puzzled
way, and asked, "Why, what d'you
mean dat I shouldn't laugh at demcan
monkeys?" The other answered slow
ly and with emphasis, "You nigger
want to be keerful how you laugh at
dem monkeys, or somethin' happen to
you one ob dese days." Then growing
more earnest and impressive, "Look-a-
heah, nigger, do you know who dem
monkeys is? Dem monkeys is ole time
people, and way back, long time gone
in de dark country, dey was 'lations o'
ours." Here was a tradition brought,
it m&y be, a century ago from Africa,
cropping out in this boy. Jim
looked as gravely as a judge on hear
ing this, and doubtless ever afterward
looked at a monkey in an altered light
St. Louis Globe-Democrat.
~~S
9 ^4
i- *^v^i^^^^'^%^i^^ji^&^
%f
fifc.5-*^
^toT^ vL*&^r
Provide Tour Own Mghtmng Ita!*
Dr. Geo. Thurber gives much valua
ble information in an article on thi
above practical question in the Amen
can Agriculturist for August
First As to the rod itself. It is wel
known that copper is a*much better
conductor of electricity than iron, bu
it is so expensive that iron is most gen
erally used, making the rodmuch large!
than would be necessary if it were
copper. The shape is of no consequence
and the twists and grooves in somi
"patented" rods are merely to beguih
the ignorant. The rod may be of roun
7-16-mch iron, or it may be a flat strij
an inch wide and 3-16 of an inch thick
If more convenient to procure, largei
iron may be used, but it should not
smaller than these sizes. It is very im
portant that the rods be continuous
The pieces of round iron may be joinec
by couplings, which are cut with
screw-thread on the inside, while tht
ends of the rods are made to fit Th
portions are usually joined by welding
Second. The manner of fastening
the building. At one time it was cus
tomary to pass the rod through a glass
ring, which was fastened to the build
ing, and the rod thus kept from contact
with it But insulators of this kind art
quite useless, for as soon as they are
wet they cease to insulate. The rod
may be attached by staples. There
not the least danger that lightning will
leave the rod to pass into the house bj
way of the staples. A flat rod may be
fastened by a strap of iron fashioned to
clasp it. Should the rod be painted!
Some years ago there was an idea that
the conducting power of the rod would
be injured by painting it. This is not
true. Paint the rod of any color thai
will make it as inconspicuous as possible.
Third. How far will a rod protect!
The old rule was that a rod would pro
tect an area with a radius twice ai
great as the hight of the rod. In prac
tice little attention is paid to this rule,
it being customary to provide each
chimney with a rod, which, in most
houses, will bring them much nearer
than the above rule requires. Each
chimney should have a rod, connected
with the mam rod, which runs along th
ETpon
eaks of the roof and to the ground.
all ordinary buildings but one
mam rod is needed. If there is a root
of tin or other metal, this, as well as all
iron crestings and other ornaments,
should be connected with the rod.
Fourth. The upper end of the rod.
Formerly much stress was placed upon
having the rod terminated above by a
very sharp point, which should be kepi
gilded to protect it from rust, and later,
platinum points were used. At present
neither of these are regarded necessary.
The rod extends afoot or two above the
top of the chimney, and isfiledto a point.
The various ornamental crestings much
used on buildings answer as points. II
the chimney is along distance from the
gable-end of the roof, it is well to place
a short upright piece of rod there, which
should, of course, be pointed.
Fifth. The lower end of the rod. The
mere placmgof the lower end of the rod
in the ground, so that it will be out ol
sight, will make the rod intended as a
Inulding
irotection a source ot danger, and the
would he safer without it. The
whole object of the lod is to carrv ofl
the elcctiictty quietlv, and its usefulness
depends upon a proper termination in
the ground. Dry earth is a poor con
ductor moist or wet earth is a good
conductor. The lower end of the rod
should reach a place where the earth,
in the drvest time, is always moist.
Some dig down to this point and then
surround the lower end of the rod for a
few feet with coke, which absorbs
moisture and is an excellent conductor.
The ease of finding a moist stratum for
the rod will differ with the locality, but
it should always be secured.
No Such Person.
He had a fly-screen under one arm
and a bundle of sticky fly-paper under
the other as he entered a Michigan av
enue saloon yesterday and said.
"Why don't you keep 'em out?"
"Who vash dot?" asked the saloonist
"Why, the pesky flies. You've got
'em by the thousand in here, and the
fly season has only begun. Shall I put
fly-screens in the doors?"
"Vhatfor?" "To keep thefliesout."
"Why should I keep der flies oudt?
Flies like some shance to go aroundt
und see der city, same ash beoples. If
a fly ish kept oudt on der street all
der time he might ash vhell be a
horse."
"Yes, but they are a great nuisance.
I'll put you up a screen door there for
83.'f
"Not any for me. If a fly vhants to
come in here, und he behaves himself
in a respectable manner, I have noth
ings to say. If he don't behave I bounce
him oudt pooty queek, und don't he
forget her!"
"Well, try this fly-paper. Every sheet
will catch 500 flies/'
"Who vhants to catch 'em'"
"I doyoueverybody."
"I don't see it like dot. If I put dot
fly-paper on der counter somebody
comes along und wipes his nose mit it,
or somebody leans his elbow on her
und vhalks off mit him. It would be
shust like my boy Shake to come inund
lick all der molasses off, to play a shoke
on his fadder."
"Say, I'll put down a sheet, and if it
doesn't catch twenty flies in five min
utes I'll say no more."
"If you catch twenty flies I have to
pry 'em loose mit a stick und let 'em
go, und dot vhas too much work. No,
my frendt flies must have a shance to
get along und take some comfort. I
vhas poor once myself, und I know all
about it."
"I'll give you seven sheets for ten
cents."
"Oxactly, but I won't do it. It looks
to me like shmall pecsness for a big
man like you to go around mit some
confidence games to shwindle flies. A
fly vhas born to be a fly, und to come
into my beer saloon ash often ash he
likes. When he comes I shall treat him
like a shentleman. I gif him a fair
show. I don't keep an ax to knock him
in der headt, und I don't put some mo
lasses all oafer a sheet of paper und
coax him to come und be all stuck up
mit his feet until he can'tflyaway. You
pass alongI'm no such person like
dot*Detroit Free Press.
fc
Quick Growth of Oentury Plant Stalks.
In Z. W. Garfield's yard, north of
Napa, Cal., there are two century
Slantswere
growing and about to blossom,
'hey transplanted from small pots
eleven years ago and aro of immense
size. Only a short time ago a stalk from
the center of each plant began to shoot
upward until now they are twenty-seven
and twenty-eight feet in hight respec
tively. In one day one of these shoots
grew nine inches! From the tops oi
these shafts the blossoms will soon ap
pear and then the plant will die, never
to bloom again.
iv
&&$&&"-
J&I&
foreigners America.
An Englishman writes as follows to
the London Field-
"Six years' residence in the States
has quite convinced me that for quiet,
unostentatious refinement of mind and
sentiment for general spread of human
sympathy and human kindness, for lack
of petty, unworthy jealousies and sus
picions, for generous impulses and gen
erous acts towards those who are hon
estly trying to get on, the great mass
of the American people are far ahead of
ourselves. Far be it from me to say one
word which might unfairly seem to de
tract from the qualities of the kind,
true, honest English nature. But
ourtion
American cousins are under less pres
sure than we are, socially and financial
ly. They were generously treated as
children, and they treat their children
generously. They were thanked, ap
preciated and largely rewarded for loy
alty and hard work to their employers
and their friends, and they similarly
consider due to loyalty and honesty and
diligence those rewards which here it
is so often not in our power to bestow
that, when it is, we are apt to think the
recipient will be spoiled by so unusual
an exhibition of generosity, and with
hold it on principle.
But on the other hand, the newly
arrived Englishman has not established
any claims on Americans, and, though
it is easier for him to do so there than
here, perhaps, still be has to begin, and
to work straight away without a break
from the commencement. In the West,
at any rate, it is a generally accepted
theory that Englishmen are either very
good or very bad only to an American
is conceded the privilege of being a
medium character. Indeed, I must ad
mit that, as a rule, this classification oi
my fellow-countrymen is apparently
justified. Ajoung Briton who goes to
work, remains sober and well conduct
ed, exhibits any capacity for positions of
trust, and honestly fulfill'* his duties, is
more certain to rise than is any Ameri
can. There is not a single large corpor
ation in America that does not prove
the above by its list of employes. On
the contrary, a rollicking, now friendly
and then sulky, Briton is left in the cold
in the most determined way by his
American neighbors There is no
chivalrous theory there as here, that a
foreigner, because he is one, is at liber
ty to make himself as disagreeable as
he pleases on the contrary, he is at
once relegated to persons, if any such
can be found by him, who will tolerate
his eccentricities.
This is done very quietly, but it is
done quite regardless of any position or
rank: equally to "a nobleman from the
country," the son of a New York mil
lionaire, or anybody else who adopts airs
and manners which assume on his part
that he is anything more than a gentle
man of education and refinement, or
more than what any ordinary American
gentleman is or would wish to be. This
may all savor to my readers a little too
much of "freedom and equality," but
these words area bugbear to American
gentlemen as much as to us in the cant
sense. We surely are as free as they,
and if'we do not consider them on an
equality with us, so much the worse for
ourselves, unless we decide to remain
at home. No importance is so great as
parochial importance, and of that, un
fortunately, all we English savor strong
ly, and we resent the world expressing,
as being given a chance to express, an
opinion on the matter.
How to Drive Flies Out of a Boom.
Observations made by M. Rafford, a
member of the Society d'Horticulture at
Limoges, show that a castor oil plant
having been placed in a room infested
with flies, they disappeared as by en
chantment. Wishing to find the cause,
he soon found under the castor oil plant
a number of dead flies, and alarge num
ber of bodies had remained clinging to
the under surface of the leaves. It
would therefore appear that the leaves
of the castor oil plant*give out an es
sential oil, or some toxic principle which
possesses very strong insecticide quali
ties. Castor oil plants are in France
very much used as ornamental plants
in rooms, as they resist very well vari
ations of atmosphere and temperature.
As the castor oil plant is very much
grpwn and cultivated in all gardens,
the Journal oV Agriculture points out
that it would be woith while to try
decorations of the leaves to destroy
the green flies and other insects which
in summer are so destructive to plants
and fruit trees. Anyhow M. Raflbrd's
observations merit that trial should be
made of the properties of the castor oil
plant both for the destruction of flies
in dwellings and of other troublesome
insects.British Medical Journal.
Ont of Sight of Land on Lake Huron.
We finally run away from all signs of
the shore, and are at last alone with the
lake. The heavens are clear all around,
with scattered white clouds here and
there, that seem like varied designs in
glass-work blown white upon the trans
parent sky, and the only darkness to be
seen is the long, lazy ropes ef smoke that
sluggishly pay themselves out from our
stacks and carelessly coil themselves
down in oddly convulted shapes along
the horizon. A mirage, having nothing
else to elongate, seems to lift the water
itself, until, as you look carelessly sea
ward in any direction, you cannot tell
sea from sky.
We seem to be at the bottom of an
immense liquid basin, trying to sail up
hill, and the impression that the im-so
mense wheel is going to screw us right
I of this weird njagic
doesn't cease its delusions. Away ahead
through the wall
sn rf
of us, the sun, getting ready for bed,with
seems to be raking out her fires, for
directly beneath her, it appears to be,
on some unseen shore, there is a gleam
on the water that grows and grows un
til it rounds upward into a huge mound
that glows red like the glare of molten
iron and as it grows higher and higher
there stretches out toward the ship a
lengthening cone of light, as if to burn
our course upon the waters through the
darkness that is soon to fall. Presently
it touches our prow and the flying spray
sparkles in the golden gleam. The sun
sinks lower ana lower the fires have
been raked, the mound of glowing coals
has disappeared, the cone itself, has
dwindled to a line of burning wire along
which there now sweeps a bright expir
ing flash, as if in pulling down the
blinds the dear old sun were wiring us
"good night and the day is gone, and
we are alone with the night She, too,
pulls her diamond dotted curtains down
around us, and we are alone with the In
finite.Corresspondence Boston Trans
cript.
Mrs. Frank Leslie denies that she is
going to marry any French count or
German baron. That's right What's
the use of going abroad for a nobleman
when you can find one behind a chair
in any barber shop in *his bros4JTi%u6-
jst. i^
WHOLE NUMBER 418
1 A
Information Wanted,
A City Hall official was about to de"
part for home and dinner the other day,
when a stranger entered and intro-j
iuced himself as John Linden, and add-j
*1:
"I presume you area smart man, or!
vou wouldn't be holding this position.'
want to ask you a question or two.
You own a horse?" i
"No, sir." i
"Don't, eh? If you did own one, and
he had symptoms of poll-evil, what
would you do?"
"I can't tell, sir. I am just going to
dinner."
"Yes, I know, but I've another ques
or two. Was Cleopatra a married
woman?"
"I don't know, sir."
"Don't you? That's bad, for I've a
bet of three to one that you knew all
about it Well, we'll let that pass.
you think that Shakspeare lived happily
with his wife, and is there any truth in
the rumor I heard up on Michigan av
enue half an hour ago that he hated
cats?"
"What do I know about these things?"
exclaimed the official. "I am in anur
ry, sir!"
"So am I, but wait a minute more.
Let's see! Oh, yes, I wanted to ask you
if it would be of any use to try to revive
a person who had been drowned three
days?"
"No, sir!" shouted the official.
"Wouldn't, eh! Sorry for that, for I
have abet of ten to five that it would
be. Sit down a minute while I ask you
another question. Do you believe that
maternal instinct descends to fish
worms'*"
"I believe vou area crank, sir, and
"You do, eh? Then 1 win a bet of
twenty to five, and will never cease to
be grateful History tells us of the
youth
"1 am going home!"
"Certainly, and I'll walk up street
with you. History tells us of the youth
who fired theEphesian dome."
"I don't careI don't care a cent,
sir!"
"Yes, but what was his name, and
was the dome insured? Did thefirede
partment come out, and was the youth
arrested on charge of incendiarism? I
want your decision?"
"Go awaygo offI don't want
you!" shouted the official as he tried to
out-walk the other.
"You know, don't you?"
"No, sirno, sirgo'way from me!"
"You don't? Then I lose a double-bar-,
relied shot-gun on abet that you did.*
One more question."
The official rushed for a car and en
tered it, but the man walked along be
side it and looked through the window
and said
"What is meant by the term 'spon
taneous outburst?' I have frequently
seen it in print, and I thought I ask
you to explain."
A silver half-dollar changed hands in
the car, and a broad-shouldered laborer
jumped out and spit on his hands and
ran the information-seeker into a hard
ware store, where he had no sooner re
covered his breath than he said to the
clerk who came forward:
"I've always thought if I ever got
time to call here I ask you if it
was true that Henry VDI. invented Sar
atoga fried potatoes?" Detroit Free
Press.
A Dangerous Doctrine.
"I'm getting to be considerable of a
believer in the Darwinian theory," said
a well-known joker last evening as he
sat conversing with a group of cronies.
"I certainly believe in the theory ofthe
survival of the fittest"
"You do!" exclaimed a friend in an
incredulous tone of voice.
"Yes, I dor
"Well, of all things in the world, that
is the most foolish for you to believe.
It's suicidal, man!"
"How so?"
"Why, if that plan werein operation,
Jonger."
ou would live just about two minute*
The Wife's Influence.
Two gentlemen, at a large reception
in New xork last winter, were discuss
ing one of the foremost politicians of
the country, a man who, whether in of
fice or out, always keeps himself prom
inently before the public. "I knew
him at college," said one of the gentle
men. "He was a man with a clear
head, extraordinary memory, and much
personal magnetism. But I cannot un
derstand why he chose a public life or
has pushed himself forward so persist,
entry. He was a lazy, thoughtless, vis
ionary fellow, absolutely destitute of
ambition." "I can tell you the secret,**
said the other. "You will find it in his
wife's nose. There she is! did you ever
see a more perfect incarnation of energy
and love of command? Napoleon would
have chosen her for one of his Marshals
at first sight" His friend was amused
at the guess and said, presently: "There
is another of my old class-mates, P. He
was a thin, ambitious, scholarly fellow,
with refined tastes and high aims. He
now is a fat, indolent animal, without a
thought, apparently, but his cognac and
terrapin. Who is to blame for that?"
"His wife's mouth and her money. I
will show her to you." He pointed out
a gross, voluptuous woman, richlv
dressed. "P. he resumed, "has lived
in idleness since his marriage. He was
not strong enough to carry tne weight of
much wealth and so much vulgarity.
They have borne him down. He will
never rise." Young men at school and
college are very apt to be enraptured
a sparkling eye, a rosy cheek, or
some charm of manner in some young
woman that they happen to meet. They
are hardly masters of themselves anda
moonlight night, or a song, suddenly
tempts them to ask the enchanting crea
ture who has bewitched them to share
their future. They do not consider that
she will be the most real, active force in
their whole lives, almost irresistible
with power to drag them down or to
lift them up in body, mind and soul.
Youth's Companion.
i Uncle Oapen as an Expositor.
A humorous story in the August Cen
tury, "The New Minister's Great op
portunity," by the author of "Eli" and
'The Village Convict" relates this
among several anecdotes of the deceased
hero of the story: "I must tell you,** she
said, "One of Uncle Capen's sayings.
It was long ago, when I was first mar
ried, and came here. I had a young
men's bible class in Sunday-school, and
Uncle Capen came into it He always
wore a cap, and sat at meetings with
the boys. So, one Sunday, we had in
the lesson that verse,you know,
that if all these things should be writ*
ten, even the world itself could not
contain the books that should be writ
,ten: and there uncle Capen stopped
me, and said he: *I suppose that meant
the world as known to the Ancients.*
ia5^"--"-c--*-

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