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New Ulm weekly review. (New Ulm, Minn.) 1878-1892, September 19, 1883, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064939/1883-09-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY
JOS. BOBLETER.
Office ovei City Drug Btof*.
TERMS:
One Dollar and a half per year in
advance.
Rates Advertising:.
FURNISHED UPON APPLICATION.
Advertisements in double column, double the
ingle column rates
Business Card" of Ave lines, one year ffi,0O, each
additional line 75 cis.
411 transient advertisements to be paid for in
advance.
Advertisements Inserted tntheloeal notice eol
nrans, ten cts a Hue for the first insertion and 5
cents a line for each subsequent insertion but no,
notice inserted for less than 50 cts
Announcements of marriages and deaths insert
ed free but obituary notices, except in special
cages, -will be charged at advertising rates.
Legal notices will be charged 75 cts per folio for
the first insertion, and 25 cts per folio for each
subsequent insertion. All legal notices must be
upon the responsibility of the attorney oidering
them published, and no affidavit of publication will
be given until the publication fees are paid.
In connection with the paper, we have a splen
id assortment of jobbing material, and we ate
epared to execute all kinds of printing in a.style
surpassed and at moderate rat OR.
J. R. FOSTER,
DENTIS
NEW ULM, MINN.
A full set of teeth for ten dollars.
Gas administeied by Dr. Berry,
teeth extracted without pain.
Office
Store.
and
over Kiesllng & Keller's
|"\R. A. MAKDEIi,
RESIDENT DENTIST,
Office, corner Mian and Firsttf.8U.
HEW ULM. MINNESOTA
|"|K. C. BERRY,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
OmOS AT HUB ClTT L*J StOKB.
'E ULM, MINNESOTA
DRnTcARL,
Physician and Surgeon.
NFW ULM,
MINN.
fticemid residence on German St.
^MOTwTBWfci^^COME,
PHYSICIAN SURGEON.
Sleepy Eye. Minn.
WMTWAKEFIELL
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
Will answer calls in city or country
all boms of the day and night.
OFIICK witn Di. C. Beny, over
Kieshna. Keller & Co's Stoic
JOHNWHITE,
G'uclu!iUolOiiUiio\Ueniiu\ tollige, Toionto,
yotermnry Snirge*!.
TreaU all Disease-, of Domestic
Aiiim.Ji
Ollice .it Cuvs. ROSSKOIM shvciy h.un
NEW ULM, MTNN.
Notary Public, Conveyancer,
and agent foi St. Paul
FIRE & MARINE INSURANCE CO
SpungfleUl, Brown Co.. Minn.
JOS." ATECKSTEIN,
Attorney and Counselor
Titles examined and peifected.
Particular attention given to collec
tion!
(^Office over Brown Co. Bank
NEW ULM.
JOHNL1ND I. RANDU.L
MINN.
CA HAOBLUG
Lind & Randall,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
COLLECTORS.
PRACTICE I N ALL THE COURTS
NEW ULM, MINN
W\m T. Westphnl.
Keeps on hand a large and well
assorted stock of millinery, fancy
goods and zephyr wool, opposite
the Union Hotel, between second
and Third North streets.
NEW ULM MINN.
MILLINERY
AND
DRESS MAKING
Mrs. Anton ding,
NEXT DOOR TO
gOMMER'S STORE, NEW UliM.
Has on lnnd a good stock of MHInery Goods con
slating in pmt of Hats, Bonnets, Velvets, Silks
Kibbons, Fe ithei Hainan Hair, yioWers. &c
Also Pattewigfor stamping monograms. Stamp
in* of allkuid all embroidery Woik and Fashion
able dressmaking done to older
MERCHAKTS' HOTEL,
CHAS. BRUST, PROP'R.
Cor. Minn. First Streets
New Ulm, Minn.
FIRST
CLASS accommodations. Location con
venient to badness and depot. Sample rooms
best i'i the city.
BEAUTIFUL,
Catalog!!*
FREE I
ULBS
MILLIONS
OFTHEM
For FLORISTS and
AMATEURS.
Dutch Bulbs, Japan
Bulbs, French Bulbs,
American Bulbs. Also
PlantoforOreenhouseB
and Window Gardens.
HIRAMSIBLEr&CO.
BKEDSmit,
Bocbrtor,N..*Obicago,ni.
BROWN CO. BANK.
II OTIADBOURN
President
C. H. ROSS,
Cashier.
Cor, Minn, and Centre Strs.
NEW ULM, MINN.
Collections and all business pertaining to banking
promptly attended to.
individual Responsibility
$500,000
Frank Burg,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in**
CIGARS
TOBACCOS, &
PIPES.
Minnesota street, next door to C.
Sommer's Store.
NEW ULM MINN
CENTRE STREET
Sample IR,oom
AND
IN BASEMENT OF
rKZieslian-g-'s Blocls.
The best of Wines, Liquors and
Gigars constantly kept on hand.
Louis Felkel, Prop'r,
Meat Market.
CHAS. STOEBE, Prop'r.
A large supply of fresh meats, sau
sage, hams, lard, etc., constantly on
handi All orders from the country
promptly attended to.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES.
Minn. Str., New Ulm. Minn.
M. EPPLE,
Dealer in
Live Stock
Hides, Lard, Wool.
Cattle bought and sold in large or
small numbers. Contracts solicited.
Meat Market,
ZIEHER&BREY, Prop'is.
MINNESOTA ST. NEW ULM,MIN N
THEe
undersigned would it.gp ctrully ltiloim
th public that they have istablishou a mutt
market one door north of the Union House Wc
will spare no pains oi means to keep our maiktt
supplied with only the best Iresh ireRts, sausage
and everything else usually found in a first class
iineat market, and out prices will alwoj compare
nvorably with those ot our competitor Ifso de
sired, articles purchased of us will be sent to the
durchnipi 'B house withoutextra charge The high
est mark( price will alwa be paid for fat cattle
hides, et
ANTON ZIEHER
ANTON BltEY
C. F. HELD,
Undei taker and Dealer in
All KINDS OF FDHIRUHB
Pioprietorand Manufacturei of
TIN: FARMERS FRIEND
Fannins M\iir
The best tanning mill in the maiket*
Stoie.uul Factory on Centie Street neai
the City Mill
NEW ULM, MINN.
JEW MACHINE SHOP.
Centre Street, Opposite Mueller &
.Sfherei's Lumber Vaid,
NFAV ULM, MINN
I am now prepaied to execute all
oideis with dispatch, llepaiiing of
Thicshcis and Reapers a specialty.
My Machinery is all new and of tne
most improved pattern. All woik vvsu
lanted as lepresented. All those In
want of anything in my line .ue couli
ally invited to give me a call.
TIIKO. KOBARSCII.
H. WERRING,
DEALER I N
Dry goods, Notions,Boots & Shoes
GROCERIES,
Medicines & Farming Implements
Gohhn Gate, Minn.
H. Rudolphi,
MANUFACTURER OF & DEALER I N
Boots and Shoes!
Minn. & 3d N. strs. New Ulm, Minn.
xv large assortment of men's and
boys' boots and shoes, and ladies' and
childrens' shoes constantly kept on
hand. Custom work and repaiiing
promptly attended to
M. JUENEMANN
MANUFACllTIEn OF AND DFAI HI Iv
HARNESSES,
COLLARS,
WHIPS,
SADDLES
SADLERY,
BLANKETS
Upholstery, and all custom work
pertaining to my business promptly at
nde to. Minnesota strea}' next door
S Yuobrich's saloon,#QA\
TJlm.
PPEFFERLE,
Dealer in
Canned, Dried and Green Fruits,
FLOUR AND FEED
STONE.WOODEN AND WILLOW WARE.
Minn. St. New Ulm Minnesota.
LSDTER
K.1,ER IJV
FRESH AND CANNED
RUIT S
And everything else belonging to a
first-class
NOVELTY STORE,
NEW UlsM, MINN
C. BALTRUSCH.
-DEALER IN
Drj Goods,
Hats and Gaps,
Men's and Boys' Clothing,
Ladies Jackets and Dolmans
LADIES' AND GENTS'
Furnishing Goods,
ALSO
GROCERIES,
CROCKERY & GLASSWARE
BOOTS AND SHOES,
And the veiy latest patterns in
Dress Goods & Trimmings
My pmchases have been made di
rect and for cash, and I am thereby
enabled to make the lowest prices.
Call and examine my stock and com
pare prices befoie purchasing else
wheie.
BALTRUSCH.
CASH PURCHASES
and CHEAP SALES
JOHN NEUMAN
Dealer in
IDRir O-OODS
Hats, Caps, Notions,
Groceries,' Provisions,
Crockery and Glassware,
Green, Dried and Canned
FruitsM etc, etc,
I will always Ukifaim pioduco in exchange!
foi goods, ami pay the highest market pncefoi all
kinds of paper lags
In connection ith my stole I h.ive a ihst el'i^s
saloon furnished with i splendid billiard table and
niyc ustoineis will always llnd good liquors and
cigiis,.iiid cvciy forenoon a splendid lunch.
All goods purchased of me will be doliveitd to
my pait of the city free of cost
Minnesot ihtrctt, New Ulm, Minn
H. Laudenschlager,
Dealer in
STOVES,
HA TtD WAKE, TINWA REANV
LIGHTNING RODS.
The Celebrated White, Howe,
New Anieiican & Singer
SEWING MACHINES.
Cot Minn & Is S Sts.. New Ulm, MINN
Eagle Mill Co,
Manufacturers of
ROLLER FLOUR
BY THE
Gradual Reduction Roller
NEW ULM, MINN.
GEO BENTZ & CO
Importeis and Wholesale Dealers in
WINES &
LIQUORS
3 W 3d St., ST PAUL, Minn.
PHOTOGRAPHS!
The undersigned would respectfully
inform the public that they have
opened a
PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY
on the corner of Minnesota and 3dam
North Streets, and that they are
prepared to do all kinds of photo
graphic work in the most approved
and elegant styles. Special attention
will be given to family groups, En
largements and also to copying of
pictures of deceased.
One of the Artists will always be
ready to take views of residences..
We will,, on demand, finish the
pictures in oil or water colors, also
frame them neatly. Only first-class
work delivered and all work war
anted
J-B. Vellikanj
WE DO NOT CLAIM
that HOOD'S SARSA?ABILLA will cure every,
thing, hut the fact that on the purity and
vitality of the blood depend the vigor and
health of the whole system, and that disease
of vinous kinds is often only the sign that
nature is trying to remove the distuibing
cause, we aie naturally led to the conclusion
that a remedy that gives life and vigor to
the blood, eradicates scrofula and other im
purities from it, as HOOD'S SARSAPARILLA
undoubtedly does, must be the means of pre
venting many diseases that would occur
without its use hence the field of its useful
ness is quite an extended one, and we are
warranted in lecoraniendinc it for all de
rangements of the system which are caused
by an unnatmal state of the blood.
Why Suffer with Salt-Rheum
MESSRS. C. I. HOOD & Co., Lowell, Mass.
GentlemenI was a great sufferer from
Salt-Rheum on my limbs, for a dozen years
previous to the summer of 1876, at which
time I was cured by Hood's Sarsaparilla.
The skin would become dry, chap, crack
open, bleed and itch intensely, so that I
could not help scratching, which of course
made them woise." At the time I com
menced taking Hood's Sarsaparilla (in the
Diad
keep 1
bandaged with linen cloths. The skin was
summer of 1876) they were so
discharged, ana I was obliged t*to kee
that they
them
diawn so tight by the heat of the disease
that if I stooped over they would crack open
and actually oring tears Into my eyes. The
first bottle benefited me so much that I con
tinued taking it till I was cured I used one
box of Hood's Olive Ointment, to relieve the
Itching. Hoping many others may learn the
value of Hood's sarsaparilla and receive as
much benefit as I have, I am,
Very truly yours,
MBS. S. S. MOODY.
No. 75 Broadway.
Lowell, Mass., Jan. 15,1878.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Is sold by druggists. Price Si, or six for $5.
Prepared by.C. I. HOOD & Co., Lowell, Mass.
FOR $1.50 IN MANGE
We will tend
The Spectator one year, A &1J>0
THE HOUSEKEEPER one/ear,^.75
The Waterbury Watch,, -M4.00
Total, (96.25
The^Housekeeper
Is the best and most useful of all the household
Publications.
ItulIds
published by The Buckeye
has sold 175,00 0 copies of the
Publishing C, Minneapolis, Minn., who
will senbd you a specimen copy FfiEE. The flame
25n
Js
eBJo
JP5
"BUCKEYE COOK BOOK,"(the largest sale ever
made of a book of its class,) without doubt TUB
BSST COOK BOOK IM THE WORLD.
WATERBURY WATCH
is the size and style represented in the cut, and
is the best cheap watch made. It is a stem winder
in nickle silver case, which will not tarnish, and
Is an excellent time-keeper. The watch retails
regularly at $4.00 and is well worth the money.
(If eent by mail enclose 84 cents for postage and
we guarantee safe delivery.)
WE MAKE THIS, THE MOST LIB-
ERAL OFFER WE HAVE EVER
MADE, O ALL* SUBSCRIBE
ERS WHO PAY UP AR-.
REARSAND ONEYEAR
IN ADVANCE.fr
We will send to any subscriber who has already
paid in advance, TUE HOUSEKEEPER one year
and the Waterbury Watch for $3 25 and postage.
This 1B 75 cents less than the retail price of the
watch alone.
fUTT
PILLS
TORPID BOWELS,
DISORDERED LIVER.
and MALARIA.
Fiom these sources arise three touithsof
the diseases of the human raee. These
.symptoms Indicate their existence: Xo at
Appetite, Bowel* costive, SIek Mead
uilic, fitlliiesa after eating* Aversion to
exertion of body or mind, Eructation
ot food, Irrit. blllty ot temper* Iiow
spirits, A feeVng ot having neglected
aome duty, IMzziness, Fluttering at the
Heart, Dot* before the eyes, highly col
ore Urine, CONSTIPATION? and de*
mand the use of a remedy that acts directly
on tho Liver. AsaLivermedioinoTIITT'S
1'ILXS have no equal. Their action on the
Kidneys and Skin is also prompt removing
nil impurities through these three scav
engers of the system," producing appe.
tlte, sound digestion, regular stools, a dear
skm anda vigorousbody. TTJTT'S PIL.L.S
cause no nausea or griping nor interfere
with daily work and area perfect
ANTIDOTE TO MALARIA.
kohleverywhere,2ftc. Office,44 Murray St.,N.Y.
TUTT8 HAIR DYE.
GRAY HAIR on WHISKERS changed in*
stantly to a GLOSSY BLACK by a single ap
plication of this DYE. Bold by Druggists,
or sent by express on receipt of SI.
Office, 44Murray Street, New York.
TUTT'S MANUAL OF USEFUL RECEIPTS FREE.
PROPRIETOR OFTHE
New Ulm Foundry
& MACHINE SHOF
Corner Centre & Front Streets..
NEW ULM, MINN
The Foundry has been thoroughly refitted and
now pieuared to do all kinds of work on short
notice. Repairing of all kinds of machinery and
Agricultural Implements a speciality. Only ex
perienced workmen are employed and work en
trustedtomy care wiOll be executed with neatness
and dispatch. ALL wRK WARRANTED
CHAS. LE0SHARDT
THE HOUSEKEEPER.
"WmE
Ml
Anton Gag
a beautiful monthly,
75 cents a year. Ev
ery woman who keeps
house needs it, and will
have it when she hears
"of it, if she has to go
without her Spring
bonnet. Specimen copy
and Grand Premium
List Free. Specimen
pages of the BUCKEYE
COOK BOOK, (which ev
erybody knowB is the
Best In the World,) free
with it. Address,
Ai They Did the "Uasd-To-Ba.
The mother gathered the children together,
She folded them cloee to her heartIn glee
For the red sun hud biought them rainy
weather
And what they should do the never could
see.
And they cikd in a quem'om lone, "Mamma,
Now think back ever and ewr a far.
And think if ou ever bad rainy daj
That troubled your pmns and spoiled our plays
And what you did when they used to be.
The mother laughed with a low soft laughter,
She was "remeinber.njr," they could see.
"1 know, you rogue?, hut you are all after,
I'll tell you a tale that happened to me
Me and some little wee bits of girls
With bair as yellow as shaving curls.
When it rained for a day and a night and a day
And we thought it meant to keep on that way.
And we were as tiied as tired could be
"Up in the atticin i
Th
HER PAINFUL DUTY.
Through the illusive glitter of the
warm, golden July moonlight, the last
impression that Bertha Dernorest re
ceived was that of a tall, graceful fig
ure vanishing through the uusky gloom,
while his good-night words lingered
pleasantly with her:
"Remember, Bertha, if you are not
at the picnic to-morrow I shall not care
a fig for the whole nll'.iir. Don't forget
that you have promised me that you
will be there."
"I am not in love with him," Bertha
said to herself, as, returning to the par
lor, she sat down in the tender dusk,
letting the curls dioop over one slender
hand that supported her head as shewould
mused and dreamed. "Of course I am
not in love with him," she thought,
feeling the warm blood Hush to her very
temples at the word "I have only
known him a month. I wonder if he
really cares so much whether or not I
go to the picnic?"
She was a fair little gill with bright,
blonde hair and heavenly blue eyes, and
Mr. Frank Gerome, the handsome young
engineer who had come to Westvalc to
attend to putting in the machinery in
tho great block of mills recently erect
ed, thought her the loveliest creature he
had ever seen in his life, and particu
larly this evening, as he went home
ward to the picturesque old farm-house
where he was temporarily living, and
whose majordomo was Mrs. Cornelia
Crawford.
Cornelia Crawford and Bertha Dern
orest were both women, but there all
analogy ceased. Bertha was seventeen
Cornelia was forty, Bertha was fresh,
fair and a maidenCornelia, faded and
a widow.
"A delightful evening, Mr. Gerome,"
Mrs. Crawford gaily said as he came up
the steps.
"Yes," he assented.
And then Mrs. Crawford edged her
self a little to one side.
"Won't you sit down and enjoy the
moonlight a little while?" she asked
persuasively.
"Thanks," he said. "I am in a hur-
ry."
And rather di&satislied with the inmean?"
different succe&s other attempt at so
ciability, Mrs. Crawford turned to an
other of her boarders, who was sitting
inside the window.
"I suppose he prefers a cigar in his
own room to the society of ladies," she
remarked.
"But ma\ be he is in a hurry to go
and see Bertha Demorcst. They say he
is making up to hei."
"Bertha Demore&t!" echoed Mrs.
Crawford scornfully. "Why, she is a
mere child, with ellow hair and great
big blue eyes! Nobody could see any
thing in her to admire."
"Well, you know there is no account
ing for taste. What I say is only what
I heard, and I have heard that they are
engaged, or next door to it."
"I don't believe a word of itr"
"1 suppose
grandma's attic
Irawers or there used to
here's a chest of
be,
Though we had many a chargp emphatic
Not to go near enoujrh to *ee
But one rainy day we opened it wide
And strewed the contents on every side.
We diessed ourselves in the queer old caps
And brass-buttoned coat* witu long blue flaps,
Yeswait a minutepapa wants inc."
They waited and waited and waited and waited,
"Forty hours it seemed to mo!"
Cried weary Kitty with ejes dilated,
"Let's do it ourselves1 can find the key I"
So they climbed the stair, "as still as a mouse"
(You might have heard it all over the house).
And they dressed themselves in trailing
dresses.
And powdered wips and hempen
"Just like they did in the used
The warning stair kept creaking and squeaking,
There was no time to turn and flee.
"What's all this?" (It was grandma speaking,)
'Til take every one of you over my kneel
(As I regret to say that she did.
All except Kitty who went and hid.)
And when they went and to'd mamma.
She only said with a soft ha-ha!
"Just what my mother did to me!"
Wide Awake.
Mr*.
Crawford said energeticalh
"That is s vou please."
But whether or not Mrs. Ciuwford be
lieved the itimoi. the tidings annoyed
her and when Mi. Geiome had gone
out later she wont upstairs, ostensibly
in her character of boarding-house
keeper, to see that Mr. Gerome was
well supplied with towels and fresh wa
ter, but really to prospect about a lit
tle.
She never looked for the good for
tune that befell her. She had thought
it just possible that Mr. Gerome might
have written or received a love-letter,
and possibly laid the torn fragments
conveniently in his waste-basket.
But it was not scrapsit was an open
letteryes, actually an open letter on
the table, the envelope addressed to Mr.
Frank Gerome, and the sheet beginning,
"My dear Frankmy dearest hus-
band!"
As if every muscle in her body was
suddenly changed to iron, Mrs. Craw
ford became straight and rigid in an in
stant.
"Oh, my!" she gasped. "Don't let
me judge my fellow-creatures too rash
ly. Let me look at the signature. Oh,
dear! oh, my graeious! if it actually
isn't 'Your own loving wife, Julie!' Oh,
how faint it makes me! To thinkto
think he is a married man!
"How thankful I am I never encour
aged his sinful attentions! Well, Ber
tha Demorcst will have her own bold
ness to thank for this. I always knew
that girl would come to harm, with her
mouth always on a broad laugh, for
nothing in the world but to show her
teeth, just because they happen to be
white and regularfalse teeth like as
not.
"Yes, it's my duty to warn that girl
my painful duty but Cornelia Craw
ford never yet shrank from duty."
Ah, if poor little Bertha Demorest's
skin had been less like a rose-petal, her
eyes less lovely blue, Mrs. Crawford
certainly would not have taken such
fervent pleasure in performing her
"painful duty."
Bertha was all dressed for the picnic
the next morning, and looking as dis
tractingly pretty as only a blonde can
look in pure white muslin, when Mrs.
Crawford was shown into the room.
"Ah, you look very nice, Bertha but
remember that all flesh is grass."
"Yes, I know it Did you wish to
see me, Mrs. Crawford?"
"Yes. Going to the picnic?"
Bertha, retainedWOn^iflfY
there?"
"II believe so."
"Then don't you go."
"Why not?" Bertha asked, arrang
ing the hyacinth bells in a rich blue
cluster for the waist of her dress.
Mrs. Crawford closely watched the
slowly-crimsoning cheeks.
"People say he is sweet on you. Ber-
tha."
"Well, then, people had better mind
their own business," Bertha flashed
back.
"Bertha Dernorest," Mrs. Crawford
went on, "I have come to warn you.
Beware of
thatou
grand,dsI
manbeware of him!"
"What do 3r
mean?"
"Just thisMr. Gerome is a married
man!"
"What utter nonsense!" Bertha cried,
angrily and incredulously.
"It is not nonsense, and 1 know it,"
Mrs. Crawford said. "1 have seen a
letter from his wifedo you hear that.
Bertha Dernorest?from his wife, writ
ten to him!"
"Did he show it to you?"
Slightly discomfited, Mrs. Crawford
was yet not to be routed.
"No matter about that. It is enough
that I saw the letter. And, Bertha, as
it is my duty to warn you, so it is your
duty, and the duty of all young people
like you and me, to punish his falsehood
and deceit."
"Mr. Gerome is nothing to me,"
Bertha said. "Good morning, Mrs.
Crawford! You will have to excuse me
I am rather in a hurry."
And when Mrs. Crawford was gone,
she locked her door and sat down and
cried until her sweet face looked like a
drenched flower.
"An thought he was so true, so
good!" she sobbed. "Oh,
ow could hehow could ho deceive
me so wickedly?"
Miss Dernorest was not at the picnic
that day, and Frank Gerome searched
about the grounds until it was quite too
late for any possibility of her arrival,
and then went to see what had changed
her resolution of the night before, and
found her looking very cold, and white,
and lovely, as she sat alone on the ter
race.
"Bertha!" he exclaimed reproachful
ly, "you promised mo faithfully you
be at tho picnic, and I find you
here. Whydidjou
"My name is Miss Demorcst," she
said haughtily.
Gerome bit his lip.
'Miss Dernorest,' if it pleases you
better," he said with a half smile at
what he believed to be a display of
girlish dignity, "why did you deceive
me so?"
"Why have I deceived you!" Ber
tha flashed "why have vou deceived
me?"
"I don't understand what you mean."
"It strikes mo you arc remarkably
difficult of comprehension. However,
I will put the question to jou as plain
ly as possible. Mr. Gerome, whj have
you never spoken to me about your
wife?"
"For a very good reason. I wouldn't
be apt to speak about what I haven't
got/'
"You are telling me a deliberate false
hood. You area married man, and you
have been playing a treacherous part
all this while.''
"A married man!" he said, his voice
thrilling with incrcdulousuess "you
are talking in conundrums. I am not
a married man, and I have been play
ing no treacherous partto you, least
of all, Bertha, my little golden-haired
darling."
And then what did Bertha do butDose,
begin to cry in the most undignified
fashion.
"Then what did Mrs. Crawford
she demanded.
Gerome set his lips tightly together.
"Ah! Mrs. Crawford has been talking,
has she? What did she say?"
"That you were married."
"She must have been cra/,y between
spite and ill-nature," Gerome exclaim
ed angrily "I shall not allow her tongue
to wag after this fashion. Bertha, will
you walk down there with me?"
As a consequence of this invitation,
Mrs. Crawford was considerably start
led by the appearance of Mr. Gerome
and Miss Dernorest, as she sat darning
the household linen in the dining room,
and secretly bewailing that no one had
invited her to the picnic.
"Mrs. Crawford," Gerome said ab
ruptly, as he entered the room, "what
is this story you have been telling Miss
Dernorest about me?"
"f told Miss Demorcst no iory 1
told her only tho truth."
"What is the truth then1
Suppose
jou tell me
"That \on n* .i ni.illied ni.in, a vil
lain, a deceiver' There now'"
"Yes? Show your proof, if jou
please," Gerome requested calmly.
"I can do it. A letter from your own
wife upstairs, in your own room, on
your table."
"A letter directed to me?"
"A letter addressed to Mr. Frank Ge-
rome."
And then Mr. Gerome laughed heart
ily, while his lip curled with a sneering
expression.
"Exactly. But there are more Frank
Geromes than one in the world for in
stance, my twin brother Frankfort, to
whom that letter was written by hisloosely
own wife.
"Possibly, if you had taken the troub
le to read the whole, instead of a part
of what was not intended for your eyes,
you would have seen that the letter was
sent on for me to read, solely because
my sister-in-law, 'Julie,' alludes play
fully in its pages to the loss of 'Frank
lyn s' heart to this young lady at
mysistr
side. I will show you tne letter, Ber-
tha."
'But I would not read it," she said,
lifting her adoring blue eyes to his face
"I don't deserve to read it. How could
I be so wicked as to believe a syllable
against you?"
"As for you, Mrs. Crawford," Ge
rome went on, "I can only recommend
to you to follow out hereafter what
might have been called the 'Diamond
Rule'mind your own business."
After all, Bertha went to the picnic,
and in Mr. Gerome's buggy, behind his
bay trotter and best of all, far andarts
away, as his betrothed wife.
H. H. relates the- following in tb/tmore."
August Century, of the remnant of the
Mission Indians of San Pasqual, in Cal
ifornia: "During the afternoon, the
Indians were continually coming and
going at the shop connected with th
inn where we had stopped, soma four
miles from the valley. The keeper of
the shop and inn said he always trusted
thm. They were 'good pay.' Give
alw
them
them their time and they'l"Ialways pay,
and if they die their relations will pay
the last cent* Some of them he would
trust any time as high as twenty dol
lars
^PSW
Georgia has about 1,600.000 people,
of whom only 850,000 are white.
Rochester, N. Y. is said to have a
new public park at a cost of $300,000.
Rev. Dr. J. D. Fulton, of New York,
says he found in Wisconsin a thirty-acre
beer garden, in which every Sunday
10,000 people gather.
Bishop Williams, of Connecticut, is
reported as saying that the Pilgrim
Fathers fell upon their knees and then
upon the aborigines.
Men who cari*swim easily elsewhere
are often drowned in the lakes of Wyo
ming Territory, where a high altitude
reduces the buoyancy of the water.
Tho Portland Oregoman says that
Sregon
ersons accustomed to the climate of
no more expect rain there in sum
mer than they look for dry weather in
winter.
The Davenport Brothers were once
noted as Spiritualist mediums. One
died a few years ago, and tho other re
tired from business but now the survi
vor has started out again. He will
travel in a gorgeously painted car.
The Cunard Steamship Company has
contracted with the Clyde firm of John
Eldred & Co. for two steamers of 8,000
tons for 600,000, being the largest
price ever quoted. They are to doeasily
nineteen knots an hour and accomplish
the Atlantic passage in six days.
A poisonous gas hole among the stal
actite caves in the Yosemito is called
Stygian Cave. Birds drop dead flying
over the mouth, and small animals en
tering perish at once. It is filled with
crystalline pendants of deep emerald
hue.
General Thomas E. Eckcrt, the real
executive oilicer of the Western Union
Telegraph Company, is an Ohio man,
who Degan at the bottom of the ladder,
and was once on a country newspaper.
His countenance is of a bo} ish cast and
his address pleasing.
Munk Murphy, a br.ikemau, with a
claim to eccentricity, has established it
by l'iding into Boston coiled up on the
truck under a car, to win abet that he
could not steal a passage. Lacking a
flag^ to wave in token of victory, he took
oft his shirt and flung it to the'bree/c.
There are now in England and Wales
between 300,000 and 400.000 women
who possess the franchisethat is to say
one woman to cver seven men. More
than 108,000 women possess, as house
holders, the municipal
franchise.n
number of women land-owrncrs
[ands
Tho
i Eng
land and Wales is 37,806.
The consumption of coffee in this
country in 1882 was 8 25 pounds for
each peison, and of tea, 1.16 pounds.
In 1879 the French used only 3.04 pounds
per capita, ami the English but .99 of a
found, but the people of the Ncther
consumed 17.90, tho of Belgium
9.13, those of Norway 8 7.) and those of
Cape Colony 7.72.
A report that there ate no state lands
for sale in Floiida is contradicted. It ap
pears that there are from 3,000,000 to
4,000,000 acres of swamp lands subject
to sale to actual settlers. The-so 1 inds
have been granted to railroad*., but un
til the law granting them has been com
plied with by the companies they are
still for sale
Tho famous "Sim Cholera Mixture"
is said to be an excellent remedy for
ordinary summer complaints, but will
probably not do to depend on in case ol
Asiatic cholera. It is as follows Equal
parts of tincture and opium, red pep
per, rhubaib, peppermint and camphor.
iive to tweuty drops in three or
four teaspoonfulls of water.
Father Booco, a famous Italian Cath
olic missionary is now in Paris. He ha.
erected seminaries which contain 80,000
poorbo}s. He ttirnishcs 600 priests
every jear to the church. Over 20,000
priests educated by him are now preach
ing in varioui parts of the world. He
is almost blind and very feeble. In
manner he is child-like, simple and
gentle.
Speaking of Henry llochefort, a
writer fiom France sa\ s* "An odd face
is hislong, thin, c.iger, ci.ink} no
beard except alight mustache and goa
tee an eye like the headlight of a loco
motive, the white showing all around'
a high brow aud turbulent grayish hair,
tumbling in cataracts over his ear-* and
rising in a geyser on top."
A Charleston church steeple finds it
self suddenly in commercial demand.
The owners of a few tug boats in thetally
harbor learned tli it an intominir baik
could be sighted Horn it-, -uuiniit while
\etuku ofl. BiHitic*,-, prospered will)
them, while their rivals, de-pite indus
trious ciuUiug ol the bar, could get nt
vessels At l.i* the -ecu oi the look
out was discovered and now the steeple
is to rent to the highest bidder.
The inhabitants of Rugby, Tenn.,
seem to have acquired the Americar
power of invention. One of them says
that he was out in a thunder storm,
wheeling a wheelbarrow, when there
suddenly descended* ball of lire. When
his dazzled eyes could sec there was
nothing left of the wheelbarrow or its
load but a twisted tire.
A citizen of Boston, whom the Ga
zette of that city docs not name, but
describes as "a well-known gen
tleman," has made three wills during
the last twenty years, appointing three
different sorts of executorsnine in all.
One after another every one has in some
way or another shown" himself unwor
thy of an important trust, and the tes
tator now finds it necessary to select a
fourth set of executors.
The Rev. John Jasper, who still in
that "de sun do move," is so pop
ula in Richmond, Va., that when a
stranger inquired the way to his church
the directions are to take a car to a
certain corner and then follow the
crowd. Dr. Ludlow describes him asperfectly
one of a very few of the old-time color
ed preachers left in the South. "As
such he is an historical study. But heof
is of still greater interest as showing
the capabilities of the negro mind, fl
forceful oratory, such power to sway
men of his caste, be compatible with
utter ignorance, what might not Jaspex
have become had he been educated^in
the forms of truth and trained in the
of expression?" These impres
sions were given by a sermon on Jas
per's favorite belief that "de sun do
He was a lamb from the country and
he fell into the clutches of a couple ol
Baltimore wolves, but they didn't fleece
him by "a large majority." George
Anderson was bis name, farming hit
occupation and Anne Arundel county
his home. It was the old story of a
"friend of your father's my dear sir,"
and he consented to take lunch and play
a game of cards "just for fun." Bui
when he lost $75 and saw that he was
swindled, the lamb was instaneously
transformed into a lion ol the most for
bidding aspect: He arose, grasped
one swindler with each brown paw, Mid
shook them until their teeth rattled likf
castanets and his money fairly jumped
out of their pockets. When they had
fled ho discovered that they had dis*
gorged $5 more than ho had lost which
was just about enough to pay him back
to the green pastures of Anne Arundel.
An English scientist in Australia ha
discovered a fungus that produces in
the rodent family a fatal skin disease.
He proposes to rid the country of field
mice, rats, and possibly the pestiferous
rabbit by inoculating a number of then
with this particular bacteria and tu
them loose to spread it The authori
ties have been advised to await the re
sult of further experiments before adopt
ing the plan, lest great harm come tc
the people. It is now known that tht
dreadful urichina is bred to perfectiot
in rats and transmitted to whatever ani
mals eat them, particularly hogs also,
that the germ of tape worm is found
almost, if not quite, exclusively in frest
beef, probably deposited there by som
sort of fly. It is also known that
germs dovelop differently according tc
tho kind of animal in which they nud
lodgement. All kinds of meat anc
bread are full of them, but they can al'
be destroyed at 212 degrees of heat
i
Tell-Tale Lines and Shapes.
The principal lines o* the hand are
remembered: The life line,
which runs around the base of the
thumb the line of the head, which be
gins alongside of the line of life (some
times joining it), and crossing the mid
dle of tho palm and the line of the
heart, which goes from one side of the
hand to the other at the base of the
fingers. If the line of life is of a ruddy
color, long and unbroken, extending
nearly or quite down to tho wrist line,
it foretells good health and long life if
it be broken in any point it denotes se
vere sickness if short, early death if
double, it shows remarkable strongth
and vitality. The lines encircling the
wrist number tho j'cars of life, one line
marking thirty years.
If a character like the sun occurs on
the line of life, it denotes loss of an eye
or blindness and each cross or knot
means somo misfortuno or difficulty,
great or small according to the size of
the mark. The little lines arc the lesser
cares and troubles. Wavy lines in the
ends of tho lingers or elsewhere, fore
tell death by drowning. A crescent
shaped mark below the littlefingerand
below the line of tho heart denotes in
sanity. A well-defined short lino join
ing the life lino indicates marriage. If
no such lino appears, the person will
remain single, unless there be a short
lino or lines on the side of the hand be
low the little finger, as these also de
note tho number of times married. The
lines extending down between the third
or ring linger and the little finger to the
line of tho lieart, number the loves of a
lifetime. If but a single lino is visible,
and that is deep anil clear, the person
will lovo faithfully 'and warmly. A
long and well-defined line of the head
Ec
romises intellectual power, but it may
too long as, if it extends quite{9 the
edge of the hand it indicates too much
calculation, craft, meanness. It should
end under the third finger or there
abouts. If it is forked or double toward
the end it denotes deception and double
dealing, though in a hand otherwise
good, it may mean only extreme reti
cence or shyness. When this line is
very short and faint it shows stupidity,
foolishness.
If the line of the heart is long,extend
ing from the edge of the hand below the
little linger up between thofirstand
second fingers, it indicates an affection
ate disposition, and, also, promises well
for the happiness of the possessor. If it
sends down short lines toward the head
line, it shows that affection must be
founded upon respect but if these
small lines go upward, love is more a
passion mien the line of tho heart
is broken, it denotes inconsistency.
But judgment must not be formed from
any one appearance or line of the hand,
as there arc many things to be consid
ered.
We should look to the left hand chief
ly for honors, riches, loves and misfor
tunes, anil in the right for whatever
pertains to health and length of days.
All lines, if pale and wide, tell the ab
sence of the quality attributed to that
line, or the existence of the opposite
quality. For instance, a pale,wide line
ot the heart indicates coldness or even
cruelty. When the lines of the left
hand are clearest and ruddiest its pos
sessor resembles his mother, both men
and physically.
In the practice of the art of palmistry
some knowledge of physiognomy i*} of
gteat advantage indeed, the two sci
ences ir0 Ji-ind in hand, one supple
menting tin other. This is why the
dtrevvd fortune teller scans the face al
most uioie closely than tho hand of the
patron. A few set rules in regard to
the features aud characteristics of the
human face may well be added in this
connection.
And first of all the soul dwells in the
eye and the ability to understand its
language is inborn in most people with
out liaving to study it but a few words
in regard to it may not be amiss. Very
quiet eyes that impress and embarrass
one with their great repose signify self
command, but also great complacency
and conceit Eyes that rove hither and
thither while Iheir possessor speaks de
note a deceitful, designing mind. Eyes
in which the white has a yellowish tinge
and is streaked with reddish veins de
note strong passions. Very blue eyes
bespeak a mind inclined to coquetry
gray eyes signify intelligence greenish,
falsehood and a liking for scandal
black eyes, a passionate, lively temper
ament and brown, a kind, happy dis
position.
Of the noseA Roman nose denotes
an enterprising, business-like character
a long nose is a sign of good sense a
straight nose indicates a pure
and noble soul, unless the eyes contra
dict it a nez retrousse signifies a spirit
mischief, wit and dash a large noso
generally
indicates a good mind and
eart a very small nose, good nature,
but a lack of energy.
A Polish for Fine Carved Work.
Half-pint linseed oil, half-pint of old
ale, the white of an egg, 1 oz. spirits of
wine, 1 oz. spirits of salts well shake
before using. A little to be applied to
the face of a soft linen pad, and lightly
rubbed for a minute or two over the
article to be restored, which must after
ward be polished off with an old silk
"handkerchief. This will keep any length
of time if well corked. This polish is
useful for delicate cabinet work it is
also recommended for papier maoha
work,
"Here, waiter," the seaside hotel
keeper says eheerfully,as he sizes up the
economical guest I guess we'll hav
to give this gentleman that nice room
in the ajMicx. Show him to 781 on Uw
me***, back."
JS*

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