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Scott County kicker. (Benton, Mo.) 1901-1917, January 11, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066234/1913-01-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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Moott County Kicker
NnHlaHeel ay Workare Printing Company,
benton, Mo.
Beard at Director! : C. It. Weaver. PrM. :
JuUus Albrocht. J. H. B run am, Ixrana
Diabold. Phil JL Haines-,
I (ft tha peatoffloe at Beaton. Ma.,
mauar.
a very Saturaajr. Bubeortstte
ytaa fl.ee par rear.
e. .
SUSPENDERS.
Society has frowned on the masc
line suspenders. So the suspender
must go has gone almost, say those
who sell wearing apparel (or men. It's
the age of the belt. Manly shoulders
must be unhampered by straps; only
the patient diaphragm Is to be subject
ed to a harness. So passes another
useful device, sacrificed to fastidious
ness. We used to eat mashed pota
to with a knife till someone with su
percilious manners came along and
told us the fork was the proper uten
sil for that Important duty. Formerly
people poured out their hot coffee Into
saurers. "blew" It cole! .Tid then drunk
It from saucers, ail unconscious of the
terrible Impropriety Involved. Nor
was It formerly considered an Indica
tion of boorlfh origin for one to sip
tea from a spion. Oh. th-se changing
times! ?i:sr-nders gone the way of
the bicycle and the Crocheted necktie'
Is no one bold enough to do then rev
erence? Fashion is a tyrant. It takes
no cognizance of man's various
shapes his embonpoint, his fullness
or deficiency of girth It merely Is
sues n flat and expects a!! to obey The
time Is opportune for a new declara
tion of Independence. Let every n.aa
who prefers suspenders to a belt buy
a pair forthwith and wear It In defi
ance of the world.
Son people are determined not to
let Christopher Columbus rest In
peace. Not long ago a celebrated
Jewish rabbi Insisted that the great
explorer was a Jew, and now come
a member of the Royal Geographical
society with the claim that Columbus
was a Spaniard and not an Italian.
The Spanish scientist says that the
veil of mystery that has for four ecu
turles enshrouded the cradle of Co
lumbus has at last been toru aside to
reveal him without doubt or argument
as a Spaniard Dr. Horta says that
the Italian lineage of the dlSCOVtNf
was accepted because there was no
"authentic, respectable, and authorized
historic documents' to prove to tha
contrary. On the other hand. the
Spanish historian says tha only ac
cepted proof of the Italian birth ol
Columbus was his own statement thst
he was born in Genoa.
An Englishman In Shanghai was
twitting the eldest son of Dr. Sun
Yatsea ubout his father's cosmopoli
tanism "Nobody knows for certain
where your father was bom," he said
"Canton -ialuis him and so Joe? Hon-
lulu. PeLre the' revolution he had
not been here In Chir.a for many year?
The English port cf Hongkong waj
the nearest he ever approached. I
don't see hew your father can call
himself n Chinaman, and in fact. I
don't know what to call him." "Part
of what you say Is true," answered
the sou of the famous patrk it. "For
fifteen years my fa:!: or was a man
without a country, but now," and tha
boy siril'd proudly, a country bat
beer, tenda fr him."
Ireland is to st:nd a deputation tc
this country to protest agninst tha
tending at Quoenstowo of certain men
tally defective persons alleged to be
Irish and having Irish names, but de
clared to be from other countries' ot
origin than Ireland. These objection
ables ar- eicluded frum the United
States as undesirable Immigrants. It
Is sail trey have t.o claim on Ireland.
Certainly they have no claim on the
United States.
The mines Jepartmeut of Canada is
preparing sn official announcement
that the effective malting of Cana
dian 'Tes is a commercial possibility
The ir--,n business ;as undergone a
revolution every few years for r.er
than a century. Is another due? Will
It result In tha general adoption ol
electric (melting?
Scientific axpi rln ti demonatrat
lug that caffeine Is fatal to rabbits
and that nicotine paralyzes the optic
nerve shnuld Impress the public
Hrrafter no truly humane persons
will give the rabhits coffee for thelt
breakfasts, nor put cigars, smoking
or chewing tobaccos In their own or
others' eyes.
In New York there Is a man who
has been married 11 times. Nobody
except a New York waiter could pay
alimony to ten women.
London haB a hotel that has gained
fame through Its onions. Certainly t
smart bid to fame.
A naturalist Informs us that the lob
ster is becoming extinct, but the two
legged variety we have with us al
ways. A college professor has solved the
mystery of the curve ball, but It takes
a horny handed lowbrow to bit 'em
where they ain't.
Mossy, the hygienic cow, now looks
hungrily upon her owner's straw hat
that will soon be hers to devour.
A Texas editor declares that he had
read the Congressional Record regu
larly for two years. Perhaps he Is
taking it as a remedy f -r a chronic
case of Insomnia
New York immigration officials are
detaining a man who speaks nothing
tout Latin and Greek. That man
ould bare landed at Boston.
TALKING "MOVIES"
SHOWN BY EDISON
"KINETOPHONE" REPRODUCES
WORDS AND ALL SOUNDS AS
PICTURES ARE SEEN.
TO BE "CANNED DRAMA" NOW
Invention Will Be Put on Exhibition
n Theaters Within Thirty Days
Wizard Objects to Com
plimentary Remarks.
New York Thomas A. Kdlson. offi
cially pronounced the final test of hit
marvelous "kinetephene" I success.
In other words, the talking moving
pictures upon which the wizard of
Orange has been working for so many
years are now a reality and within
thirty days Will he shown in seven
theaters In Manhattan and three W
Brooklyn
"In the next year or two." laid Mr.
Edison, after thi completion of the
tests of his new contrivance, which
seems to have solved the problem of
synchronising the motion picture and
phonograph, "it will be no unusual
thing to p - nl Rfl entire play or
opera, as we now are able to produce
a p'alet or scei., from the big
plays."
A;i Seundl Heard.
The tes took place ill the little the
ater in the Edison laboratory, at Or
ange. N. J. win re all the film pic
tures of every description are thrown
upon screens and passed upon by Mr.
Kdison or his representatives.
In the first picture) shown, a lec
turer walked upon the Stage. ,tud
after bowing to the audience, rroceed-
.1 to describe the "kinetophone" In
the voice of a campaign orator.
"We Will now show you what satinds
we can reproduce," said the phantom
lecture: as he walked to a table. "I
will break this plate."
The figure dashed the pla'e to tho
floor, shattering it. the sound of tha
falling fragments being plainly audi
Me A man c Otered the picture and
began playing the piano, the notes
floating softly through the theater. A
young woman violinist appeared and
played "Home, Sweet Home" with
excellent effect, the pianist accompa
nying lvr Then entered a women
Who sang the old melodies, accompa
nied by a violin ar.d piano.
O'derc Praise Cut Out.
Nex' a huztar appeared and sound
ed his btigle calls. Then two collies
entered the scene, barking furiously,
and the picture was ended by the lec
turer, who btgan to throw oral bou
quets at Mr. Kdison.
"Have that cut out." said the in
ventor, "the public doesn't i are te
hear about me."
33 CONVICTED IN BOVB
CASE ARE TO BE FREED
Chlcaio. The United States circuit
court of appeals granted the write of
supersedeas in the case of 83 of the
88 union iron workers convicted at
inliauapniig and ordered tlu-lr releass
ou bonds. Hockln declined to ;ic'.n
in gppeal, Each man Is to give ball
on bas!3 of 1)0,000 for each year ol
sentence.
District Attorney Miller, who con
victed the iron workers, fought the
writ with til- statement that the men
would flee the country If given thelt
liberty and that as the offense with
which they were eharg d was not ex
traditable, they never would be pun
bed.
Hat-nsii-c Names Dt-nocrat.
Concord. N. H. The New Hamp
shire legislature-, in joint convention
elected us governor Sam tit I D. Felker
the Dera icrattc candidate, at the last
election. He received 222 votes to 101
for Franklin Worcester of Holllf
(Rep.), twenty-six Progressives vot
ing with the Democrat.
Smugj'ers Get $90,000.
Vali nca-Do-MlnhOi Portugal. A dar
ing band of smugglers ou the Poittt
guese-Bpanlsh frontier carried off 90,
000 after a fierce battle with a cattle
raiser and 1" Of his herdsmen, during
which nine of the cowboys were killed
id 14 severely wounded.
31 P.ehels A"c Lynched. V
El Paso, T x Thirty-one Mexican
reb Is have been a ided to the collec
tlon which the Mexican government
has swinging from telegraph poles be
tween Mexico City aud Toluoa, the
capital of the state of Mexico.
Wcman Athlete Breako Neck.
Pontine, Mich Mrs. Emily Sawyer,
a trapeze performer, fell 14 feet
through an unfastened trunk u.u at
a local theater here, and was instant
ly killed. lier neck was broken by
i be fail.
: United States Soldier Killed in Fight
Kl Paso, Tex As the result of a
light with Mexicans, Corporal Mali
i nowski, Company e of the Twenty
second United Sta'es infantry, la deed
I at Fort Bliss hospital, and Private
I Johnson of the same company li
1 stabbed.
Helpless Firemen Watch Blaze.
f'arrington. N. D. Firemen stood
helpless while an entire city block
burned here, as the city's water sup
ply was exhausted soon after the flit
started. The loss was $60,000.
Congressman Drowns.
Washington. Representative Wil
liam W. Wedemeyer of Ann Arbor,
Mich., who suddenly went insane at
Colon. Panama, at the time of Presl
dent Tuft's recent visit to the Isth
mus, jumped overboard from a shij
on which he had been taken at Colon
His body has not been recovered.
Confederate Diplomat Dies at 73.
New Orleans. Judge Emil Host, 73
secretary of the diplomatic mission ol
the confederate states to Franco and
Spain, which was beaded by his fath
or, John Post, died here.
SENATOR
DAVIS OF
ARKANSAS IS DEAD
SUDDEN ATTACK OF APOPLEXY
FATAL TO SOLON IN LIT
TLE ROCK.
SUCCESSOR UP TO DONAGKEY
Was Governor cf State Three Terms
News Shocks Capital Where He
Had Left Ooc. 13 to Pass
Ho.idays at Heme.
Little Kick. Ark. United Statos
Senator Jet! Davis di. d at his home
in Little Rock of apoplexy. Lis de ith
was unexpected, despite the fact that
he had cou plained of feeling shakily
Indisposed.
Senator Darts, who had Ken a
Bomber or the senate since ISO?, pre
viously served throe terms as gov
ernor ol Arkansas, in the Democrat
ic primaries last September lie was
oppos' (l for nomination by former
Ooagressmsn stehen Brundtdge, He
was nominated, however, after the
Closest race In 'he history of his ca
reer. Gov. Donsghey declined to discuss
the possibilities of his successor, as-serili"--
he would not take up the mat
ter for two or throe day..
As Gov Ponaghey's urm of office
spires Januar) 14. it is possible an
effort will be made by the forces of
Qov.-elect ,ioe t. Ri Mason to defer
the selection ot Senator Davis' suc
cessor until after the inauguration.
Davis ones held the office of attor
ney general of Arkansas, He was
born In Little River county, Arkansas,
In 1862, and was educated at Russell
vllle, Ark., and at Vanderbilt univer
sity. He was admitted to the bar at
the age of 19.
Death News Shocks Washington.
Washington. The sudden death of
Senator Jeff Davis of Arkansas came
as a distinct shock to his friends in
the capital. The senator left Wash
Ington December 13 to spend the
Christmas holidays at his home and
at that time was in the best of Hpirits.
He had not been in good health for
some time, although his condition did
not occasion his friends much alarm.
On one or two occasions, his friends
say, he had suffered from attacks ot
dizziness. On recovering from these
attacks, he Invariably made light of
them.
Since taking his seat in the senate
In 1907. Senator Davis had grown
steadily in the esteem of his fellow
members
At first he was regarded as au ex
treme radical in his views.
Bailey Sings Swan Song.
Washington. Senator Joseph W.
Bailey of Texas sang his "swan song"
in the senate a bitter denunciation of
the initiative and referendum as "re
pugnant to the principles upon which
the American republic was founded."
The Texas senator planned to make
this the last set speech of his senato
rial career. Ills formal resignation
probably will be submitted to Gov.
Colquitt before the expiration of his
term on March 4.
Seven Dead in Wreck.
Huntington, W. Va. Seven men are
known to have been killed and the
lives of several others are believed to
have been loEt when a west bound
Chesapeake ft Ohio railroad freight
train crashed through a weakened
bridge across Quyandotto river, at
Quyandotte.
One Killed in Auto Smash.
Denver Mrs. Juanita Barrows, a
young Widow, Is dead, and a mnu and
two women are seriously injured as
the result of uri automobile accident
near here. The driver lost control of
the machine and the car plunged
down a steep embankment and was
smashed.
Turkey Concedes Demands.
London. Turkey's virtual conces
sion of every demand of the Balkan
league was considered in the capitals
of each of the allies, and it seemed
likely that few. If any, obstacles
barred the way to a speedy negotia
tion of peace.
Powder Trust Dissolved.
San Francisco. The first step In
the actual dissolution of the so-called
"powder trust" was taken here when
the Dupont Powder company formally
terminated its existence, according to
a decree issued by the federal court
at Wilmington, Del.
Boy Is Killed With Brick.
Kansas City. During a quarrel that
grew out of a playful scuffle, Walter
Davis, 14 years old, hurled a brick at
Hugh Landey, 13 years old, striking
him cn the head and killing him.
Man, Wife and Baby Burn.
Harrisburg, 111. In a destructive
fire at Stonefort, Claude Uuvall, 25
years old, his young wife and 1-year-old
son were burned to death. They
were occupying the second floor of
the residence.
Eight Miners Are Rescued.
Tamaqua, Pa. After being impris
oned behind a fall of coal, rock and
other mine refuse, eight of the nine
men entombed In the colliery of the
Bast Lehigh Coal company, near here,
were rescued alive.
Viceroy's Recovsry Slow.
DelhL India. The viceroy of India,
Baron Hardlnge, is not recovering as
quickly as expected from the wounds
be suffered when an Indian fanatlo
threw a bomb at him ou his entry to
the capital city.
Ship Aground Calls Aid.
Wilmington. N. C The British
steamer Alcazar, bound from Port A
Patx, Haiti, for Philadelphia, went
.ground on Cape Lookout. Her call!
or assistance wero picked up her
ay the revenue outter Seminole
TURKS CEDE MOST
OF THEIR EMPIRE
ADRIANOPLE AND CONSTANTI
NOPLE AND SMALL STRIP
TO BE RETAINED.
ALSO TO HOLD AEGEAN ISLE
Concession Wrung From Ottomans by
Balkan States at Stormy Ses
sion Conference Expected
to End In Two Weeks.
London. After their protracted dip
lomatic skirmishing the Turks finally
capitulated to a majority of the de
mands of the Balk. in allies at a ses
sion of the pence conference in St.
James palace. Through ltechad Pasha
they agreed to cede practically the
whole of the Ottoman empire's. Euro
pean dominions, except Adrlanople
and the tl rrltory between It and Con
tantlnople, to their victorious, but
traditionally despised neighbors.
The terms the Turkish delegates
pre.-, nted to the conference as a coun
ter proposal to the demands ol the
allies were i
1. The rectification Of the Turko
Bulgarian frontier by making the
boundary west of the line now occu
pi d by the troops of the allies In the
villayet of Adrlanople.
2. The question of the status of
Adrlanople to be settled by Turkey
and Bulgaria direct.
3. Tbe cession of the remainder of
European Turkey, Including Janltia
and Scutari, to the allies.
4. The" Albanian and Cretan ques
tions to be solved by the powers.
5. The Aegean Islands to remain
Turkish.
The announcement of these terms
was wrung from the Ottoman dele
gates with the greatest difficulty.
They came only after Rechad Pasha
had reiterated Turkey's desire to shift
the responsibility for adjudicating all
the vital questions to the great pow
ers and the representatives of the
allies had registered their unchange
able objections to such a course and
plainly had given the Turks to under
stand that the failure of the Ottoman
delegates to embark upon serious ne
gotiations would mean a resumption
of hostilities In southeastern Europe.
Marine Strike Is Threatened.
Melbourne. Australia. A general
marine strike is threatened by the re
cent action of the high court nullify
ing a recent award in favor ol' the
geumeu by Justice Hlggins, president
of the arbitration court. Au effort Is
being made to settle the dispute ou
the basis of the Hlggins award.
Nine Entombed in Mine.
Tamaqua, Pa. Nine workers are
entombed in a flooded mine In the
East Lehigh colliery, near here, and
rescuers are working frantically to
dig away a mass of culm aud rock
which is blocking the gangway lead
ing to their imprisoned comrades.
Kills Fiancee's Father.
Peoria, 111. Warren Crabtree. farm
er, was shot and killed by Willis
Miles at the Crabtree farm, six nillea
southeast of Lewlstown, Miles, who
Is HI years old, was engaged to be
married to Mr. Crabtree's youngest
daughter. Crabtre e is known to have
Objected to the match.
Wife of H?l Crijce Obtains Divorce.
New York. Supreme Court Justice
Bijur sigiutl an interlocutory decree
of absolute divorce for Anne H. Chase
from Hal (.'base, the famous first
baseman of the New York Americans.
Mrs. Chose is awarded tho custody of
Harold, Jr., and $1,200 a year all
inouy. General Poses as Laborer.
Laredo, Tex. Gen. Francisco Villa,
former federal couuuauder in Chihua
hua, who recently escaped from n mil
itary prison where, he was serving a
sentence for showing leniency to
wards rebels, was found here dis
guised as a laborer.
Sydney Bank Is Ransacked.
Sydney, New South Wales. Bur
glars entered the Bauk of New South
Wales at Surry Hills and made away
with $15,000. They had recently tam
pered with the lock while the strong
box was open.
Indiana Coal Mine Burning.
Bvansvllle. Ind. Eire has been rag
ing In tho coal mine at Elberfeld since
Friday morning, and all efforts to
stop the blaze have failed. Nearly
100 miners are thrown out of work.
Negro Uprising Is Feared.
Kingston, Jamaica. The police have
discovered preparations for a negro
uprising here, which was fostered by
negro exiles from Cuba.
4 Killed at Grade Crossing.
Belleville, Kas. Four persons were
killed at a grade crossing two miles
north of here, when a Chicago, Rock
Island & Pacific engine struck a bug
gy in which were Wilson James, his
wife and two children.
School for Boys Quarantined.
Springfield, 111. The state school
! for boys at St. Charles was placed
1 under quarantine by order of the
. state board of health, following tho re
J port of a case of diphtheria iu the
nstitutlon.
Sulzer Gets "Message."
Albany, N. Y. Governor-elect Sul
zer received the suffragette pilgrims
at the executive mansion and, after
accepting their message, told them
that be would give his support to
their cause.
King Grants Two Peerages.
London. Only two peerages wero
among the New Year's honors granted
0y Klug George. Those elevated to
i he peerage are Col. Sir Qoorgo Syd
enham Clarke and Lieut.-Col. Sir
ieorge Kemp.
I MISSOURI STATE NEWS I
Saline County Leads In Corn.
Saline la the. banner corn county ot
Missoul for 1912, according to sta
tistics gatheml by the state board of
agriculture. This county alone pro
duced 6,413,364 bushels this year.
This is the largest yield of anyone
county. However, four other counties
went above the 5 million mark. They
are Nodaway. Atchison, Pettis and
Johnson. Seven others each produced
more than 4 million bushels: Audrain,
Carroll, Harrison. Lafayette, Livings
ton. Callaway and Cass counties. The
best average yield an aero was made
i In Cooper county, where corn made
I 45 bushels. Lafayette came next with
I 44 bushels and Carroll third with 43.
Tho twelve best producing counties
In the state, according to the board's
i figures, grew one-fourth as much corn
as the entire state of Indiana, prac
tically the same as either Michigan or
Wisconsin, more than one-fourth as
much as either Nebraska or Kansas,
ono-tlilrd as much as the entire state
of Texas, one-half as much as Okla
homa and more than all of Arkansas.
The combined output of twenty corn
growing states Is less than of that of
these dozen best Missouri counties.
Eleven counties In the state pro
duced more than half a million bush
els of wheat each. Platte county Is
first with 908,888, or nearly a million
bushels. Carroll. Lafayette and Sa
line each produced more than SOO.000
bushels.
Missouri grew more blue grars this
year than all of the states north of
. Its northern boundary or all of the
states south of her southern boundary.
The board points out that this crop
Is one of the state's greatest sources
! ot wealth, since It feeds millions of
animals and constantly contributes to
! the fertility of the soil. The grass
I seed cro;. In the state this year was
, the greatest in the history ot Missouri.
M U. Newspaper Week in May.
President A. Ross Hill announced
that th" annual journalism week at
the University of Missouri would be
gin May 12. the Missouri Press Asso
ciation, the Women's ITeBS Associa
tion of Missouri, the Association of
Past Presidents of the Missouri Press
Association and the Dally Newspaper
Publishers' Association are among the
Organizations that will meet at that
time. The program will Include, as
in previous years, addresses by wide
ly known newspaper men In this coun
try. Christmas Fire in a School.
While Grade S of the ISowerman
school was filled with scholars and
visitors a candle set fire to a Christ
mas tree, which Immediately became
enveloped In flames. Miss Nell Klrk
patrick, teacher, sounded the fire drill,
and the pupils of this room and Grade
7, Into which all the pupils of the
eight grades had been crowded, wit
nessing Christmas exercises, marched
out with no accidents. The building
burned. It was a brick structure, wood
floors, and was built four years ago.
Matches Fatally Burn Girl.
Edna May Atkinson, five-year-old
daughter T Mr. nnd Mrs. John J. At
kinson of MoCrediOi was burned to
death when her clothing caught fire,
presumably from a lighted match,
with which she was playing.
Church at Salem Burns.
Fire destroyed I'ae Baptist church
at Sak-m recently. The loss is esti
mated at 4,000, half of which Is cov
eted by insurance.
Vernon County's First Rock Road.
The first half mile section of rock
read in Vernon county was completed
by the Vernon County Rock Roads
Club at a total cost of 84,600,
Bomb Under a Saloon Floor.
Six men In the saloon of George
Rodenmayers. three miles south of
Cope Girardeau, were Injured by an
explosion. A man who was ordered
from the raloon Is SUSpOOtOd of having
put dynamite under the floor. Several
legs and arms were broken, but the
condition of the men Is not dangerous. 1
Tho building was wrecked.
The M. U. Vacation Starts.
Four hundred of Fnlversity of Mis- 1
sonri students who live In Kansas City j
left Columbia for their homes to spend
the Christmas holidays. Special cars
were provided for the Kansas City
Students. The holiday vacation at tha !
university will continue until January
!. This is the longest Christmas va- I
cation ever given at the university.
Wedding Guest Dies of Excitement.
; A few minutes af'.er arriving home
; from attending the wedding of a niece
: Mrs. Ellen Ostergard of Springfield
I was seized with an attack of heart
disease and died within a short time,
i Excitement over the wedding is be
i lleved to have caused the fatal attack.
A Pioneer Woman Dead.
Mrs. Susan A. Dillon, who Is said to
have been the first white child horn
In the territory which is now the state
of Kansas, died at the home of her
daughter, Mrs. Joseph A. Tinker, 3904
Dixon avenue, Kansas City, the other
day.
Re-Elected by Agriculture Board.
P. P. Lewis of Crescent, was re-
j elected president of the state board of
agriculture recently. T. C. Wilson,
secretary; W. A. Bright, treasurer, at'
of Columbia, wero also re-elected.
3oy Killed by Frightened Horse.
While standing in front of his home,
Bland McCracken, 13 years old, son of
Grant McCracken, postmaster at Dia
mond, south of Carthage, was fatal);
hurt when a passing horse took fright
at a motor car and ran against him.
The lad died four hours later.
A Bethany Democrat Dead.
T. A. Dunn, 59 years old, prominent
In Democratic politics and one of tb
best known Masons of Missouri, died
the other day In a hospital In Kochest
er, Mlnu. His home waa In Bethany. I
IN THE BRONZE AGE
Rare Antiquities Secured by
Royal Irish Academy.
Specimens Recently Unearthed Prove
High Civilisation Centurlee Be
fore Christ People of Erin
Emerged From Barbarism.
Dublin. The Royal Irish academy
recently acquired some very flue spe
cimens of Irish antiquities which
show the wonderfully high level civi
lisation had reached in Ireland cen
turies before tho birth of Christ.
' These objects are now on view In the
' antiquities section of the National
museum in Dublin. They Include two
bronzo celts, two gold fibulae, a
bronze fibula and a number of amber
beads, which were dug up by work
men In a Held In County Cork In
1907.
One of the gold fibulae weighs over
three ounces and the other nearly two
ounces. The bronzo fibula is of n
rare type, and tho amber beads are
also of great Importance, as the find
ing of them In association with the
other objects placeB beyond dispute
the fact, which was often surmised
but never definitely ascertained un
til now. that many of the amber beads
found In Ireland can be placed In the
bronzo age.
Another object recently added to the
collection Is the well-known rapier
from I.lssane, County Dory, of which
the academy had previously had only
u model. This rapier Is the longest
ever discovered in the Britten Islands,
and It is one of the most perfect ever
found In Europe. It was discovered in
a bog at Lissano In 1867, and utter
passing through Various hands It
eventually came Into the possession
of tho Hon Mrs. Hennlker Heaton.
wife of tho British pestnl reformer,
from whom tho academy purchased It
this year.
There Is another rapier which was
1 found recently In Lough Erne at a
depth of 17 feet under water, close to
the old castle of Crcm, near Ennts
klllen. Mr. George Coffey, tho leading
Irish authority on this subject. de-
Rapier and Other Finds From Lough
erne. scribes this rapier as probably the
most perlect and best preserved that
has yet been discovered. The point
and edgo of tho blade are as perfect
and sharp as when they left the hands
of the worker centuries before out
era.
Mr. Coffey says It can be seen from
the 'objects now In possession of the
academy that the civilization of Ire
land tu tho bronze age was much high
er than has been commonly assumed
and was spread generally over the
country.
BIRD HAS TRAGEDY SECRET
Denver Police Hope Parrot Will Cleat
Death of Couple In a Hotel
There.
Denver, Polo. A group of detectlvei
began a vigil around the cloth draped
cage of n parrot in tho hope that the
bird would testify as the sole witness
to the supposed murder and suicide o!
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Johnson, whose
bodies were found in u hotel rooir
Tuesday.
The bird was found walking restless
ly along the footboard or the bed, mut
tering to the bodies. It hsd belonged
to Johnson for years.
The police, believing that there was
a quarrel before the tragedy, called
In an avlculturlst to cross-examine
the parrot. The bird refused to an
swer and as a final resort the bird
man suggested that the cage be cov
ered and watched. Believing itsell
along the bird might then croon som
sharp ejaculations and exclamation!
that would Impress It had a quarrel
occurred before the tragedy.
Mirrors to Cure Drunkenness.
Chicago Curing jagB by mirror li
the latest here since a man charged
with intoxication got a look at him
self in a mirror In Judge Hopkins'
court, and at once demanded a Turk
ish bath. Now the court has ordered
a mirror hung behind the rail and In
structed the bailiff to make everj
person charged with Intoxication looi
Into it before being arraigned.
8ays Spouse Tickled Her Feet '
New York. "He tickled my feet al
night and kissed the picture of a for
mer sweetheart right before mj
eyes," complained Mrs. Gertrudt
Draught, three months a bride, whet
she got a warrant for her husband'i
arrest on a desertion charge.
Miss Harrlman Breaka Her Toe
New York. Miss Carol Harrlman
daughter of the late railroad magnate
danced so enthusiastically at a re
bearaal of society's vapde vllle fr,
charity thatahe broke a toe.
IflL
HIGHEST SCHOOL IN STATP
eetta Was Attended by Many
gucsssful Men.
Peru, Mass -On the round about
vad from Cummlngton to Peru. Mas.
the traveler passes an old stone
"hoolhouse built in the
the eighteenth century which Is i noted
the place where some of the most
oelobrated of Berkshire's famous men
ned their education. . I. the;
highest scboolhouso In the state of
Old Massachusetts Schoolhouse.
Massachusetts, as It it bttilt on land
Which, Is 2,2l0 feet above SI a level
Close by there is a natural watt nned
whero the water, when It rains, go. I
on one side into the HottSatOUlO end
on tho other Into the Connecticut riv
ers. It Is the Hay state divide.
GIRL SAYS TO HIT MASHER
Margaret Gormely, Seventeen Years
Old, Tells How She Routed Man
With Her Fists.
Chlcago.When a masher speaks to
you, hit him in the eye nnd kick him
on the Bhlns. Then he will run.
This Is the advice offered by seven-teen-year-old
Margaret Gormely, 2746
North Fortieth avenue, who proved
that she had a "punch" In each fist
and a football player's kick, when she
overcame a man who attacked her.
Miss Gormely, who Is a slender
pretty brunette, was returning alone
from the theater when a strange man
spoke to her.
He was large and powerful, weigh
ing more than 170 pounds. The girl
came scarcely to his shoulder She
weighs about 105 pounds.
She Ignored him and quickened her
steps. The man followed and put his
arms about her.
'Then I landed on Mm." Miss
Gormely said in telling her story of
the attack. "I Jerked my right arm
free and punched him on the nose,
in the eye ajiy where 1 could hit him.
I also kicked him.
"He soon had enough and ran. I
ran after him and chased him more
than n Mock, screaming as loudly as
I could."
But Miss Gormely did not scream
because she was afraid She culy
wanted somebody to stop the masher
and have him arrested.
"He didn't frighten me," she s&ld,
"even though lie was twice as big as I
am. If he hadn't been so big . d have
knocked him down and stamped on
him. As it Is, I beliove I did u pret
ty fair job "
WOMAN'S HEIRS SEEK CASH
File Suit In Kansar for $3:5.000,
Claiming Fortune Was Taken
Without Right.
Kansas City -Sixteen heirs of Mrs
Jane Perkins, who died in Unicoi
county, Tennessee, years ago.
brought suit in the circuit court hers
to get possession of the $325,000 es
tate of Nathaniel P Simps-::, a r
clause who died bare last December,
The petition asserts that .Mrs. Pc-r
kins, by thrift, accumulated f lis, 000 in
Ceutral City, Cc'.o , where she kpt a
boarding house for miners, and had
tho privilege cf gathering was:,- -.ld
from the slush boxes at the mlr.es
Nathaniel P. Simpson, a miner, board
ed at her home nnd became her Lusl
ness manager. In is:;:, accompanied
by Simpson, Mrs. Perkins movi d tc
Tennessee.
Simpson had Induced her to invest
her money In securities. ;.nd when she
died, the petition States he left there,
taking all the valuable papers " ith
him, nnd for more than SO years Mrs
Perkins' heirs were unable to locate
him. When they read In the papers
of the death or Nathaniel P. Simpson
here, they began an investigation and
now claim he was the tame man that
acted as Mrs. Perkins' manager.
Simpson's son. Henry C. Simpson
of Lincoln Center, Kan., Is made de
fendant In the su;t.
BIG PRICES FOR PICTURES
Paintings From Rouarfs Collections
Bring More Than Expected
by Experts.
Paris. The first day's sale of the
collection of the lato Henri Rouart
consisting of modern paintings real
ized a total of $2,799. The bidding
was spirited throughout, and In many
cases the works fetched more than
double the valuation set by experts.
The best price of the sale was 146 200
for a Corot. Twenty-two other Corots
a?!?.?: prlces raQElng from $2,650 to
24,600. Manet's "bust of a woman,
"l 340'" ValUed at ,10,00' brouht
Apple Plea Win Husband.
Belleville, lll.-The luscious apple
pies baked by Mrs. Mary Miller caused
George Ovorbauer to woo her and she
has become his fifth wife. The other
tburdied. Bauer Is 58. '
Mrs. Wlckersham Gives Advice.
fi . r!f you dodge discussion of
the four D-e-dtseaae, dress, descend
Cke"hamaeetlC8-8ayB the Wl(e
8ays Actrssses Maka Good Wive.
New York-Actresses are the begt
nuslnes. women and make the mo"
m m f W'VeB' declarea Mrs. Ludlow
Wominn?e,; be,re the Professions
Women s League bazaar.
"Can Beer" la Barred.
Washington A ban has been m
on the sale of beer In buckets by Z
board of the District of

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