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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, November 09, 1908, Image 1

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UNIVERSITY MISSOUHIAJSr.
VOLUME I.
COLUMBIA, MISSOURI, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1908.
NUMBER 40
ITS
U. OF H. STUDENTS
PREFER FICTION
TIGERS WHIP DRAKE UNIVERSITY TEAM
BY A SCORE OF II TO 8, COMING FROM
BEHIND IN BITTERLY CONTESTED GAME
STORM CIT! JAIL
ARE HOSTS TO 200
Effort Made to Rescue Two
Men Arrested for
Rioting.
Guests Are Received by Usher
Growth of Library is Shown
in Figures Compiled by
H. O. Severance.
in Costume of Imperial
Chinese Guard.
Hoodoo of Three Previous
Defeats at Hands of Iowans
is Overcome by Missouri on
Field at Des Moines.
TIGER WHO HELPED ROUT HOODOO
AND ONE WHO LOST HIS TROUSERS
Ml
MAYOR IS CHASED TO SHELTER
WHITE DOVES ARE FAVORS
ANNUAL CIRCULATION 106,104
" i ' i
UJHUISSIUUUIS UKIbNTAL STUDEn
5
hvo
S
4
h
Several Are Hurt During the
Celebration of Victory
Over Iowa.
J3j- United Press.
CHAMPAIGN, 111.. Nov. 9. One
thousand students of tlio University of
Illinois, celebrating tlie victory of their
football team over Iowa. Saturday night
tattled with the police, hurled bricks at
Mayor Blaine and chased him to shelter,
injured stural persons and finally at
tempted to sionn the city lockup, where
two of their companions had been im
pri soiled.
George Morton, supeiintendent of
streets, was struck on the head by a
brick and badly hurt, and Policeman
Goblc received a wound in the face.
The heads of si(ial students came
in contact with policemen's clubs but
the rioters took their injured from the
field of combat without their names
becoming known.
The fight started when the students
attempted to storm the Walker Opera
House, where a vaudeville show was in
pi ogress. A squad of city police re
sponded to a riot call, and a lively bat
tle ensiled. Walter Jones, pole vaulter
on the track team, and Albert Jones, a
Junior student, were seized by the of
ficers. EAIN AND HAIL ADD
INSULT TO ALREADY
BERUFFLED DRAKES
Cloudy Tonight and Tuesday, Not Much
Change in Temperature,
Is Forecast.
The Weather Man added insult to
injury today when he poured forth rain
and hail on the already beruffled
Drakes. Thev received a rough duck
ing at the hands of the Tigers Satur
day, but the Weather Man is not yet
satisfied.
The official forecast is: "Partly cloudy
tonight and Tuesday; not much change
in temperature."
The temperature at 7 a. m. was 35
legrees ; at noon, 45.
'BUSTER" CAROTHERS
SLEEPS IN BERTH 13
AND IS OUT OF GAME
He Said He Wasn't Superstitious But
Changed His Mind at
Des Moines.
"Buster"' Carothers, understudy for
"'Easy'' Anderson as the Tigers' left
guard, is firmly convinced that a hoo
doo is attached to number 13.
"Buster" drew berth 13 in the Tiger
special going to Des Moines. He scorned
the idea that he could be superstitious.
At Des Moines, however, he changed
his mind. He was anxious to play in
the game against Drake, but got a
chance only on the last two downs,
after Anderson went out. Coming home
'Buster' slept uneasily in the same
berth, because none of the Tigers would
trade with him.
DR. HILL MIGHT HAVE
BEEN CLERK AT $60 PER
Offer From Country Store Once Tempted
Him to Quit Teaching.
An offer of a ?C0-a-month clerkship in
a country store to Dr. A. Ross Hill,
President of the University of Mis
souri, when lie was a country school
teacher almost caused him to abandon
the profession of teaching, he said in a
talk at the Central High School, Kansas
City. Dr. Hill had told the pupils not
to be hasty in deciding on a calling.
"Your views will change as you grow
older," he said, "and you will be able to
decide more wisely. Don't permit an at
tractive offer to divert you from the
"broader purposes in life.
"After you finally have decided on a
profession don't take a short cut in
learning. Don't be narrow in your prep
arations. Have due regard for the fun
daments and don't consider only the
technical training."- Kansas City Star.
Gets a Carload of Fish.
Prof. George Lefevre, of the Depart
ment of Zoology, received a carload of
fish this morning. He will experiment
on the propagation of fresh water mus
sels for the United States Bureau of
Fisheries.
Japanese Sing National Hymn
"Missouri, Banzai!"
is the Yell.
By an usher dressed in the uniform
of an ancient guard of the Imperial
Chinese palace, more than 200 teaeh
eis and young men and women of the
University of Missouri were welcomed
to the Oriental entertainment of the
Cosmopolitan Club in the University
women's parlors Friday evening.
The rooms were decorated for the oc
casion from one corner to another with
national Hags, between which were hung
many white doves made of paper and
Chinese and Japanese hand-painted
scrolls of various colois. A Japanese
student appealed in the full kimono of
a Japanese dignitary, and a Chinese
woie a bright crepe silk gown of silvery
color, over which was a blue vest with
embroidered ornaments hanging from
the buttonholes.
Music and Speeches.
A unique program, arranged by Tod.i
Clio, was carried out successfully.
"Pekin," composed by a Chinese grad
uate of an American university, was
played by James G. Ware of China and
a Japanese solo was sung by June Hi
kida. J. V. DeLeon of the Philippines,
Wilniot Boone of China, and Akamatsu
of Japan entertained by speeches and
by telling stories of their own lands.
When the Japanese students sang
their national hymn, all arose and stood
until the close of the song. The meet
ing closed with the singing of America
and the yelling of: "Missouri, Banzai!
Banzai! Banzai!" which was interpreted
"Long lie Old Missouri!"
Favors for the Guests.
An informal reception was held after
the meeting and the guests were shown
around the rooms by Edward Felgate
of China who explained the various
Oriental articles and curios on the ta
bles. The departing guests were in
vited to carry home the pretty white
doves, emblems of peace. These doves
were the work of Tome Kitagawa,
chairman of the decoration committee.
Toda Clio, acting president of the
Cosmopolitan Club during the absence
of Dr. Carl C. Eckhardt, told a reporter
for the University Missourian that he
wished to thank the man- friends of
the club who had to leave on account
of lack of room. The Europeans will
have the next meeting in charge and
President Cho invites their friends to
come out as they did last Friday even
ing. DR. SCHORER ASSEMBLY
SPEAKER FOR TOMORROW
"Some Common Causes of Death" Will
Be Subject of Discussion.
Dr. E. II. Sehorer of the Department
of Medicine will talk about "Some
Common Causes of Death" at the as
sembly in the Auditorium of the Uni
versity of Missouri tomorrow morning.
The assembly will begin at 10 a. m.
Dr. Sehorer has the gift of making
medical discussions interesting to the
"layman," and the assembly tomorrow
is expected to be one of the best of
the series.
Prof. B. F. Hoffman Lectures.
Prof. B. F. Hoffman spoke in the Uni
versity auditorium yesterday afternoon
on "The Modern Goliath." He told the
storv of the Goliath of old and then
drew a comparison between that giant
and what he termed the Goliath of the
present the liquor traffic. As the Go
liath of ancient times met his David,
so Prof. Hoffman predicted that the
Goliath of today will also be conquered.
To Settle Freak Bet.
An election bet is to be settled to
morrow morning at assembly hour,
hen F. P. Leiuallen, treasurer of the
Brvan-Cowherd Club, will push G. II.
Boehm, vice-president of the Taft-Had-
lev Club, in a wheelbarrow Irom tne
Baptist church to the postofficc.
Medical Society Meets.
The Medical Society of the University
of Missouri held its monthly meeting
in the Medical building Friday night.
Dr. Woodson Moss, Dr. Walter McNab
Miller, R. B. Hill and L. G. Lowry were
the speakers. Ten minutes was allowed
for the discussion of each paper.
Readers Frequently Turned
Away for Want of
Seating Room.
For reading outside of school hours,
students of the University of Missouri
prefer tlction, according to figures foi
one typical week, compiled by 11. ().
Seerance, University librarian. The
estimated annual circulation of the li
brary, based on records kept for the
week beginning Oct. 2(i. is 100,104 vol
umes, the largest in the history of the
library. Of this total, 14.520 books are
issued annually for home use and !U.
5SJ for use in the reading room of the
library.
The library has grown so that stu
dents are frequently turned away for
want of seating room between 10 and
1 1 a. m. It is not uncommon to sec
si; or eight students during the crowded
period standing by windows reading
books and magazines.
Circulation for Week.
The total number of books circulated
in the week of which record was kept
was 2,SG4, divided as follows:
Books for use in the room 1,430
Books used in the reference col
lection (estimated) 1,000
Books issued for over-night use. . 10S
Books issued for home use 320
The follow ing table shows the circu
lation for the last seven years:
Reading
Home use. Room use.
11)01-02 5,5(U 42.800
190203 10.381 34,990
1903-04 11,010 37.2.13
1904-05 11,4S1 40.302
1 905-00 7.005 58,804
190007 (no data)
1907-OS 14.520 91 ,584
Registered Borrowers.
The number of registered borrowers
Oct. 2G was 347. Of this number 130
arc faculty members and 217 students.
Number of books out of the library
Oct. 20, 1,202.
To faculty members 75G
To students 430
To citizens 10
Xumber of books issued for home use
during the week, 320.
To faculty members 124
To students 191
To citizens 5
Classes of Books Read.
Books issued for reading room use
during the week:
American literature 43 vols.
English literature 159 vols.
Education 339 vols.
Economics, Political Science. 281 vols.
History 359 vols.
Science Ill vols.
Miscellaneous 139 vols.
Books issued for home use:
Fiction, all classes 94 vols.
Philosophy 11 vols.
History 11 vols.
Biography 18 vols.
Education 2 vols.
Mathematics 2 vols.
Authors Represented.
The following authors arc represented
in American Literature: Louise Alcott,
G. B. Brown, Bryant, Cooper, Haw
thorne, Riley, Thoreau, Van Dyke. Eng
lish Literature: Chaucer, Coleridge,
Dryden, George Eliot, Keats, Lytton,
Milton, Tennyson, Scott, Stevenson.
French Literature: Daudet, Dumas,
Hugo. German Literature: Goethe
and Schiller. Russian Literature: Tol
stoi. The circulation of popular fiction was
larger this week than usual as the
books given the library by the Univer
sity, Book Club were put into circulation
only a few days ago.
The number of readers in the library
during the week is indicated by the
following:
Average, at 10 a. m., 118.
Average, at 3 p. m., 70.
Average, at 5:30 p. m., 35.
Average, at 8 p. m., 85.
The largest number in the room at
10 a. m. was 1GS, at 8 p. m. was 15G.
This is an increase over last year of
about 15 per cent. The number of read
ers last year was about 50 per cent
greater than the year before.
Official election returns show the de
feat of Marshall E. Burke, Republican,
alumnus of the University of Missouri,
for member of the house of representa
tives from Linn county, by fifty-two
votes.
jmn!y
K. I. lllI.CIIKIST.
ABSENT TREATMENT
HELPED THE TIGERS
Loyal "Rooters" Cheer Team
As Missourian's Bulletins
Are Read.
CHRISMAN LEADS THE YELLING
Hats Are Thrown Away As
Missouri's Victory is
Announced.
If there is anything in the '"absent
treatment" theory, the "rooting" done
in the Auditorium Saturday afternoon
was a big help to the Tigers in winning
the game with Drake. The Auditorium
was crowded with "rooters," and the
hall rang with yells for the Tigers from
the time the team went on the field
at Des Moines until the final score was
I announced here and then there was
some more yelling.
The bulletin service was furnished
free by the University Missourian,
which had a reporter on the field at
Des Moines. Bulletins were received
about five minutes apart, giving the
plays just as they were being made
there, so that the "fans" in Columbia
were able to follow the players through
the game.
Poor Telegraph Service.
Owing to the inadequate service of the
Western Union Telegraph Company, the
first bulletin, which left the Stadium
at 2:35, just five minutes after play
had begun, was not received here until
3:35. The company had no wire to the
field, and the telegrams had to be
carried three and a half miles to the
office by messenger boys.
O. D. Chrisman, yell leader, read the
bulletins to the crowd in the Audito
rium and kept them cheering for the
Tigers between bulletins.
It was an eager crowd that gathered
to hear the report of the game, and it
was enthusiastic from start to finish.
The strain on Home was rather severe.
When the first report came showing
Missouri gaining, with a good prospect
for a touchdown, but not giving the
touchdown, it was difficult for some to
sit still and wait, even for two or three
minutes, until the outcome of the play
was told.
Siren Whistled Imitated.
When the touchdown was announced
the crowd went wild. Everyone stood
up and yelled as loud as he
could. Some threw their hats
away. One engineer probably has a
sore head today as the result of the
way in which the news affected two
friends sitting behind him who happened
to have books in their hands. One stu
dent showed his joy by giving a good
imitation of the siren whistle at the
power house.
Chrisman was interrupted many times
in reading the bulletins by outbreaks
si a;.3t iu-"i" tcts
ft
vm
A. .'"
25?-&r3KSi
?;&... t-
Of
''Tubby" Graves.
"TUBBY" DROPS HIS
PANTS FROM TRAIN
Another Player Saves Him
From Wearing a Barrel
Home.
"BOOCH" MISTAKEN FOR TIGER
And the Waitress Insisted
He Should Drink
Only Milk.
If one of the Tigers had not taken
an extra pair of trousers to Des Moines,
"Tubby" Graves might have come home
in a barrel. On the return trip when
the train was about two miles out
of the city, 'Tubby" had the pleasant
experience of watching his pants slide
out of the window of the coach as he
was preparing to climb into his berth.
A gold watch and $35 were in the
pockets.
"Tubby" at once informed the rest
of the players in picturesque language
of what had happened. After the' had
broken the bell cord in frantic signal
ing, the train slowed down and ''Tom
my,'' the team's rubber, jumped off to
look for the trousers. "Tommy" came
home on a later train after a fruitless
search up and down the track. The Ti
gers arrived at S:15 yesterday morn
ing.
"Booch" and the Waitress.
"Booch" Venable, who accompanied
the Tigers, was rather surprised to find
when he arrived in Des Moines that
orders had leen issued that he should
drink milk. When he sat down to break
fast with the players Friday morning,
the waitress brought him the same or
der that members of the squad re
ceived. The breakfast looked good to
him, except the milk.
"I want coffee," said "Booch." "You
can't have it," said the waitress.
Then it dawned upon "Booch" that
he was being mistaken for one of the
players. He accordingly hunted up
Coach Monilaw, and had the order that
he should drink nothing but milk an
nulled.
Secretary Babb Away.
J. G. Babb, Secretarj of the Univer
sity of Missouri, is in Dunklin county
on University business today.
of enthusiasm, such as "Go it, Alex,"
"Go it, Driver," "Good boy, Nee," "Go
through 'em, Tubby," "Hurrah for
Death," "Step on 'em, Puny," "Keep
goin', Gill," "Nice workin, Driver,"
'Eat 'em up, Tigers."
Between bulletins the Missouri yells
were given, and each of the players was
given the nine 'rahs or the "long I."
When the team was in a tight place,
they were encouraged by "Duck the
Drake," "Kill the Drake," "Eat the
Drake," and "Hold the line."
SPECTACULAR OPEN PLAY IS
CHIEF FACTOR IN VICTORY
Driver Takes Ball Twenty
Yards for Deciding
Touchdown.
By a Staff Correspondent with the Tigers.
With defeat staring them in the face
at the end of the first half, the Mis
souri Tigers returned to the attack
a' ')es Moines Saturday with renewed
vigor and fighting spirit and overcame
the ancient Drake University hoodoo,
winning by a score of 11 to S. It was
the first time in four annual games
that a Missouri team has crossed the
Drake goal line and the first defeat
that the Iowans hae suffered this
season.
The teams trotted on the field shortly
before 2:30 o'clock, the Tigers wearing
the blankets presented by the Engineer
ing students. A crowd of 3,00(1 was
in the stadium. A dozen loyal Missouri
"rooters," who had come from Columbia
in the fashion of the Quo Vadis club,
cheered lustily for the Tigers. The
Held was swept by a strong wind from
the northwest.
Spectacular Open Play.
Brilliant and spectacular open work
marked the play of the Tigers. Mis
souri's first score came after six minutes
of play. After the Tigers, on straight
football, had taken the ball to Drake's
seven-yard line, Gilchrist went over for
a touchdown. Driver missed goal by a
narrow margin.
Drake's eight points were scored in
the first half on two field goals by Mc
Coy, the Drake captain and right half
back. Both were kicked with the wind.
Missouri's goal in this half was never
seriously in danger of being crossed for
a touchdown, Drake only once getting
the ball within the fifteen-yard line.
Forward Pass Used.
Drake on straight line bucking suc
ceeded in making first down only three
times during the game, but in the sec
ond half worked the forward pass twice
for an aggregate gain of thirty-seven
yards. Missouri excelled at line buck
ing, being held for downs but three
times. Both teams punted frequently,
McCoy doing the "tooting" for Drake
and Alexander for the Tigers. McCoy
had the better of the duel, partly be
cause the wind was at his back most of
the time.
The first half ended with the score
8 to 5 in faor of Drake. Missouri
came back with the same lighting spirit
that characterized the play against the
Iowa Hawkcycs. Half a doen times
the ball was pushed to within striking
distance of the Drake goal, only to be
lost on fumbles or poorly executed for
ward passes. Driver, Alexander and
Gilchrist starred in "round "ainiii" at
this stage.
Driver Breaks Through.
In the middle of the second half,
with the ball on Drake's twenty yard
line, Driver smashed through the line,
shook off two Drake men between him
and the goal and crossed the line for
the winning touchdown. He added a.
point by kicking goal, making the score
11 to 8 in favor of the Tigers. After
that the Tigers' goal was never in dan
ger. Nearly all of the play in this
half was in Drake territory.
Drake suffered most through penal
ties, losing eighty-live yards in this
manner. A thirty-five-yard penalty was
imposed after one of the Iowans had
"slugged" Nee.
Missouri players said the game was
the roughest in which they have taken
part this year. Gilchrist was carried
off the field after being struck in the
chest. He was able to walk after reach
ing Columbia.
DETAILS OF PLAY SHOW
GAME WAS HASD-FOUGHT
Drake won the toss. Bluck kicked
off against the wind to Purdy, who re
turned five yards. Drake was penal
ized five yard for off-side. McCoy
kicked to center of field.
Nee went five yards around end. Bluck
fumbled to Drake. McCoy gained three
yards around end. McCoy kicked to
Deatherage on the Tigers' ten-yard line.
Deatherage returned fifteen yards. Al-
(Continued on Third Pi.)
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