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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, October 10, 1912, Image 2

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UNIYEBSITT MISSOUKIAlf, THUBSDAT, OCTOBER 10, 1912.
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UNIVERSITY MISSOURIAN.
An Evealnff Daily by the Student In the
School of Journamm ai mc uuimij
of MUsouri. ,
HARRT D.
xjp
MBDBglUB IiUllH
ValTerslty MUMarlan AaiorlatUn. Inc.
J. HARRISON BROWN. President
ROBERT S. MANN. Secretary.
W. E. HALL, Treasurer.
Jnmes O. MaY II. J. McKay t
Ward A. Sen! T. S. IUldon V
Paul J. Thompson I. S. Epperson
OBoe: Dawn 8Ulr In Vlrlnl Building.
Entered at the Poitofflce of Columbia, Mo.,
aa aecoad-clais mall matter.
By carrier or mall $2 a year.
Addreaa all communications to
UNIVERSITY MISSOURIAN.
Columbia. Missouri.
OUR HEX.
The lay of the hen is fast making
Missouri famous. Recent statistics
show that this state leads in poultry
production that our hen is the cham
pion. Last year Missouri hens laid
101.417,700 dozen eggs, enough to give
eery person in the United States
fourteen. Poultry products of Mis
souri bring the farmers more money
every year than the entire wheat crop
of Kansas, and nearly as much as the
combined cotton crop of Florida,
Louisiana and Tennessee. The Pana
ma Canal as a pan would hardly hold
the omelette these eggs would make.
We are glad to welcome the hen to
our hall of fame. Hereafter the
cackle of the "dominecker" will be a
potent factor in keeping the state in
the front ranks of the common
wealths. PUBLIC WOOING PARLORS.
The Institutional Church of Kansas
City has taken one more step toward
social betterment, in opening parlors
where young people may meet and
spend the evenings together.
The region around the church is
made up largely of boarding houses,
in many of which there is no oppor
tunity for young women boarders to
receive their friends. In the summer
they can stroll about the streets, but
in winter the places where these girls
can meet their men friends are prac
tically limited to the theater and the
dance hall. The cost of these is pro
hibitive except at infrequent intervals.
Now, however, the church has pro
vided six parlors four of them with
pianos, which the young persons of
the neighborhood are welcome to use.
The success of the undertaking is not
doubted by anyone who knows the
want it is destined to meet.
REAL BOSTONIAN DEMOCRACY.
Bostonian democracy is not the
same thing as democracy in Boston.
Rather it is democracy among Bos
tonians, who form only a small pro
portion of the inhabitants of Boston.
"Bostonian Democracy", the defined,
would seem to be a paradox.
It is not a paradox, however, but a
real tangible thing and that in the
heart of the famous self-sufficient
Back Bay district. Bostonians who
formerly considered their social ser
vice done when they had contributed
to their charitable organizations, are
now learning to go out of their way
to meet the strangers within their
gates; and meeting these strangers,
to leae them not frozen by too for
mal courtesy, but warmed by contact
with friendly fellow beings. And that
is real democrac3' especially for Bos
tonians.
Of course there Is a cause for this
chance His name is Alexander
Mann, and he is pastor of Trinity
Church Phillips Brooks's church. It
has been said that he is not a
preacher, but a "readier", with a won
derful personal influence. Certain it
is that he has had a surprising effect
on his congregation.
Doctor Mann is a Westerner that
is, he came from west of the Hudson
River, in New York. And with him
from the West be brought the abil
ity which his congregation envies
him. of being dignifledly democratic
in his relations with all classes of
men. Phillips Brooks won the Back
Bay Bostonians; his successor, E.
Winehpster Donald, made Trinity -al
strong, unified church; and nqw Doc
tor Mann is showing Trinity Church
and these Bostonians their duty to
the world about them
Of course they had done their share
charity among the "submerged tenth".
-but never before had they opened
their hearts to those who needed not
charity, but friendship.
Boston is said to have a larger
number of students Ho the square Inch
than any other town, even Columbia.'
Other pastors had preached to such
of these students as came to their
churches, but Doctor Mann, the
''readier," has set about gathering
them in and showing his church how
to make friends with them. A woman
who is in effect an assistant pastor,
has been employed to look after the
women students of the town. Various
receptions are held, at which the
students and other strangers are able
to meet socially the foremost men and
women of Boston. Bostonians were
not cold and unsympathetic; they
were merely awkward and self con
scious about making new acquaint
ances. But they are getting over
that, and their doing so is a triumpn
for Alexander Mann, who is, as Col
lier's said recently, "a strong minded,
sanely balanced rector with convic
tions." MISSOURI NOTES
The Hannibal Courier-Post in a
headline gives this startling informa
tion: THE Y. M. C. A. BOYS HAVE
SUPPER THIS EVENING.
Hannibal would likeo employ a
good dog-catcher.
The Mexico Evening Ledger has
started a Democratic Campaign Fund.
One day's contributions totalled $166.
The Mexiso Evening Ledger phil
osophizes that "While the sweet corn
is good, it hardly seems worth while
to buy store teeth."
The Marshall Democrat-News in its
Slater column chronicles the fact that
Miss Pauline Liggett went up to Mar
shall Saturday to take her music les
son. St. Joseph is holding its annual au
tumn gala week. Some of the at
tractions will be a coursing meet, the
Reign Royal Robidoux ball, a flower
parade and a baby parade.
Maryille is proud of its Are de
partment. The Maryville Democrat
Forum contains the news that "The
fire wagon was taken to Barmann and
Wolfert's repair shop Monday and
will be painted."
The "First Grand Baby" lives in
Marshall, according to the Marshall
Democrat-Xews. The baby, however,
is the first grand-daughter presented
to one of Marshall's prominent citi
zens and not the first grand baby in
the United States.
,, ... . - t i
Maryvnie. according to its Daily
Tribune, has the distinction of hav -
ing a post office "which has a per -
manent location, but moves itself to
the mail trams and performs its
functions right out on the depot
platform sen ing the public just the
same is uie post omce naa
house around it." The reason Uncle j
Sam's property moves .around this
way is to cancel the late mail, thus, w p; SwItzlerf tells also of a mon;
adding a bit to its salary. I ument t0 Washington that at one
1 time stood on the University campus.
Il.aclede has a tender-hearted city ' At the same time that Professor Fleet
marshal, who will undoubtedly win sited Virginia and saw the Jeffer
the friendship of all escaped prison- son monument, he also arranged for
ers passing through Laclede in the Doctor Laws the purchase of the
future. According to the Laclede bronze statute of Wasnington that
Blade, the marshal apprehended a 1 had stood for a quarter of a century
deserter from the United States army jn the nark about the state house at
and started to take him to Fort
Leavenworth. They stopped in Kan
sas City to get supper and the pris
oner pleaded so hard that the mar
shal finally removed his handcuffs so
he could better eat his supper. The
next time the marshal looked at the
prisoner he was escaping by way of
the railroad yards.
Wren's pharmacy in the
Building is handy for you.
most any thing you want.
Virginia
We have
adv.
SCOOP THE CUB
,JVJr IMPORTER
TrGoir4&-"roAlSrHE PtC& OP-
A "nacer ro the. world series
M X HWE TO STICK, somebody
OP AMD TAKE tT AWAY FPOM 'EM '.
THE STORY OF THE MONUMENTS
Memorials to Thomas Jefferson and David
Barton Among M. U's Treasures Dr.
Jesse's Reminiscences.
The University of Missouri is pecu
lirly honored in having on its campus
a monument that was designed by
Thomas Jefferson and stood for forty
years over his grave. Yet few of the
students know the history of this
monument or of the other that has
been erected to David Barton, one of
Missouri's statesmen.
In front of Academic Hall, near the
entrance to the auditorium, stands
the monument to the author of the
Declaration of Independence. It is
chipped and worn and there is no
mark on it to tell for whom it was
erected. Only the record of birth and
death, thaplndistinct, can be seen.
In the summer of 1883 Dr. S. S.
Laws, then president of the Univer
sity of Missouri, wrote to the Misses
Randolph, great-grand-daughtefs of
Thomas Jefferson, asking them that
the old monument be given to this
University, the chief school of the
greatest state carved out of the terri
tory purchased under the administra
tion of Thomas Jefferson and known
as the Louisiana Purchase. That's
what the forty-fourth catalogue, is
sued in the session of 1885-1886, sas
about it
A new monument of the same de
sign had been recently built by an
appropriation from Congress of $10,
000. The Jefferson heirs granted the
request of Doctor Laws, who was as
sisted in getting the relic by A. F.
Fleet, professor of Greek in this Uni
versity at that time.
The monument was designed and
plans drawn for it by Jefferson some
time before he died. Here is an ex
tract from his letter stating what he
wished done after his death:
"On the grave a plain die or cube
of 3 feet, and this to be surmounted
by an Obelisk, 6 feet of single stone,
Not a word more than the
inscription:
Here was buried
Thomas Jefferson, '
Author of the Declaration of Amer
ican Independence of the Statutes
of Virginia for Religious Freedom,
and Father of the State University,
of Virginia,
because by these, as a testimony that
. I have lived, I wish most to be re-
' membered." , -
i t
I rn tlm dTn tc Kn :nnA:..A:A - '
I .. mc uic io nn; UISUIIIILIUII;
Born April 2, 17-13, O. S.
Died July 4, 1826.
Jefferson also asked that the mon-
j ument be made of cheap stone. It is i
i noticeable that he says nothing about
i the Louisiana Purchase, though that
was probably the second greatest,
eent in our history with which he
was directly connected.
At the chapel on January 9, 1891, j
after the monument had been placed'
in position here, Professor Fleet
spoke on the Louisiana Purchase. A,
Iart or nis speech is printed in the
cataIogue for that year, Prof R
Aenf n(ffi. emerltm nrofessor then
In charge of the EngUsh dei,artment(
also t0, the studentg lhat when ne
WM at school at th UnlTerBlty of
Virginja he used often tQ sjt and
study at the f00t Qf th,B monument
on the slopes of Monticello.
An unpublished history of the Uni-
versirv of Missouri uritfpn hv r"nl
Richmond, Va. He paid $5,000 for it.
When he left, since the University
had no funds with which to buy the
statue, he took it with him. It now
stands in Cincinnati, Ohio, where it
is owned by a cousin of Doctor Laws.
The other monument on the cam
pus is that in memory of David Bar
ton. It stands near the entrance to
the library. It differs only slightly
from the Jefferson monument in be
ing a little more ornate.
David Barton was a native of Ten-
I'LL MAKE APASS FOR MM HIP
POCKETT eANO IP THAT DONTWORK
J-tl-ruiMT rrtviPfe ATHirFOR.
. T.. . - .
WIS AMD5CAREH1M, IIHTO
COMtHfr ACWflSS
nessee, but a citizen of Missouri. He
was the first United States senator
from Missouri. He is buried at
Boonville, and the monument now
here stood over his grave there for
a long time. It was brought here
about fifteen years ago, because his
friends thought it was neglected at
Boonville.
The inscriptions oa three sides of
the monument can be read easily.
They tell briefly the history of this
man. On the front side is this:
In memory of
David Barton.
Born in Tennessee the sixteenth of'
December, 17S3. Died in Boonville1
the twenty-eighth of September,
1837.
On the west side:
He became a citizen of Missouri in
1809. He was attorney-general in
1813, circuit judge in 1815 and
Speaker of the House of Repre
sentatives in 1818.
On the east side:
He was president of the convention
that framed the state constitution.
He was senator in Congress from
1820 to 1831 and in 1834 he was
state senator from St. Louis.
In addition to these two monu
ments Doctor Jesse thinks that there
should be a monument to Dr. John H.
Lathrop, who was the first president
of this University and also of the
University of Wisconsin. He after
wards was president of this Unier
sity again.
"I would not have the campus
cluttered up with monuments and
statues," said Doctor Jesse, "but I
think there should be some monument
or statue of Doctor Lathrop here, the
man who was the first president of
two great state universities." C. M. E.
3L U. ENGINEERS TO KEOKUK
'After Seeing nam, Students Will Go
, on Inspection Trip to St. Louis. i
The senior chil engineering class
of the University of Missouri will de
part tomorrow afternoon for a week's '
I inspection trip. They will go to Keo
I kuk. Iowa, and spend Saturday and I
L
U.
Columbia, Missouri
October 10, 1912.
7
Jfo&rBe.$
uiWift.v M.. . wiiiiqi urvfiDc ki. 11 nin
S3 '- ?k L j 18&$5 liwV aWtf'S'
EXF'I-,A.TATOFZY NOTES.
Observations taken at 8 a. m.. 75th meridian tlmt. Air pressure reduced to sea level. Isobars (continuous lines) passtferouch points
of equal air pressure. Isotherms (dotted lines) pass through points or equal temperature; drawn only for zero, freezing. 80. and 100.
O clc; O partly cloudy: 0 cloudy: rain: (s) snow; report mlsslne. Arrows fly with the wind. Fiat figures, lowest tem
perature past 12 hours; second, precipitation of 0l Inch or more for past 24 hours; third, maximum wind velocity. "
The highest temperature in Columbia yesterday was S9 and the lowest last night was 02; rainfall, 0.71. A
year ago yesterday the highest was CI and the lowest was 18. Forecast until 7 p. in. tomorrow:
For Missouri: Showers tonight and Friday; stationary temperature.
Weather Conditions: Rain has fallen oxer a considerable "part of the southearn Rocky Mountain slope, Mis-
souri, Mississippi and Ohio valleys. In the southern iart of the country the weather continues warm and rather
high temperature prevailed yesterday oer most of the -Middle West. It is colder this morning in the North
west; freezing temperatures prevail frcm Nevada northward to Canada also generally in the border states
eastward to the Dakotas.
In Columbia the weather will continue showery during tL3 next 36 hours;
much. 1
Scoop Has A New Idea.
TTUPVYtTHOvjRT
HAnds-owmam-
Before x make
ifOOR HEART
3 V-OOK
l AMJrtN & 3
' V IBB!!! SMOKE.'.) I
I a i-uurv. WKS m &rr. Sr33 1 -A.BA " a
y A -Cvtttc m-- 1S''i,TL SSS55SS A rKt U
' '-1 v-nctE-j v zjssi is r-- xfcp 1 w y s
Sunday inspecting the Keokuk dam.
From Keokuk they will go to St.
Louis, where they will visit the Red
Ring Cement Plant, the water works,
the Free Bridge and other points of
Do You Get
Clean Carbon
Copies?
Your second sheet
tells of the quality of
your carbon paper.
Can you use an eraser
on your original with
out splotching the
second sheet?
the letters on
second sheet clear
Are
the
and
easy to read? Is it a
second sheet worth fil-
ing
?
Co-Op carbon paper jives
clean, clear second sheet, free
from splotches or wavy lines,
a second sheets that is hard to
tell from the original. You
will like it.
CO-OP.
T
We've nearly starved
to death since You've
jeen away ! ! ! ! !
WILL YOUR
BUSINESS BE
APPRECIATED
ELECTRIC SHOE
REPAIRING CO.,:
108 S. Ninth. Phone;221-U
THE MISSOURIAN'S OFFICIAL WEATHER MAP
S. Department of Agriculture.
WEATHER BUREAU.
WILLIS L. MOORE. Chief.
a m. V l
Interest from -"Hie engineer's stand,
point.
A. Lw Hyde, assistant professor of
bridge engineering will be In charge
of the, party. 'i.-
ffl You can eat your
meals at any hour of
the twenty-four here.
We are always open
and ready to serve hot
meals just any time.
The
Up-to-date
Restaurant
No. ii N. Sth St.
Just a few steps north
of Broadway.
IFe make a specialty of
short orders.
The
Columbia Orchestra
H. E. KEIM, Mgr.
Music for All Occassions.
Phone271.
Why Rent Typewriter?
Own One.
' Buy standard machine, $-5 to $50.
t Cash or monthly payments Cheap
, er than renting. Rebuilt Underwoods,
I Olntrs, Smithb, Remingtons.
L. H. Rice, Herald, 14, No. iotb.
the temperature will not change
By "HOP"
-AlY ME-TV
BEST HOLD-up
J, MAN IN BEANVIU,
w -KVOUSiNl 7
vPWE. SPUOTP
'
a
l-i
V
4s
li
before this in the work of organized!
!..'
. .iiJsifw.n
-vaiiWnHi;'i rtti
abww

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