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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, November 20, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066313/1912-11-20/ed-1/seq-2/

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bctyibsitt nssoirmiv. Wednesday November 20, 1912.
UNIVERSITY1 MISSOURIAN.
Am Imlil Dally fcy tfce SUsentt la tkt
ehl o? Joaraaltim at tke UnWerilty
f Mliaouri.
MASRT D. (iUY kfanatiax Editor.
University Miisonrlan Association (Inc.)
J. Harrison Brown, president: Robert S.
Mann, secretary; James G. May. Ward A.
Neff, Paul J. Thompson, II. J. McKay, w.
E. Hall, T. S. Hudson, Ivan H. Epperson.
Office: In Virginia BIdg. Down Stairs.
Entered at the FoitoBlce of Columbia. Uo.,
as aecoad-class mail matter.
Two Dollara a Vear by Carrier or Mall,
Address all communications to
UNIVERSITY MISSOUKIAN,
Columbia. Missouri.
SHOP EARLY.
Does Christmas mean the same
thing to the tired, over-worked shop
girl, the messenger boy and the mail
carrier as it does to us? To us,
Christmas is a time when we ex
change gifts, a time of home-coming,
a reunion of the dear ones. Does it
mean this to the other olass? In
gladdening the hearts of others by
our gifts and deeds of kindness are
we forgetting that class of people to
which Christmas should mean more?
Perhaps most of us are not able
to come In personal contact with
these deserving bread-earners. But
we can help. It is such a little thing
to do and we can not realize what a
kindness we are rendering. Let us
make up our minds this year to buy
our Christmas goods early. Begin
now. A little shopping now and then
will not only lighten the burden of
those who stand behind the counters,
but the leisurely purchasing of pres
ents becomes a pleasure and not a
task to be dreaded. Early Christmas
shopping lessens the strain and grind
that makes Christmas a "dread to
those working In large stores.
THE KATY SLEEPER
The Katy sleeper to St,-Louis is
probably, Columbia's best railroad ac
commodation. Unfortunately the
Athens of Missouri is not on a main
line of some railroad. Long waits
and transfers always come to the
traveler through Columbia.
But the sleeper is a through car to
St. Louis. One may go to bed at 9:30
o'clock at night, and when morning
comes he is in St. Louis. The trip
can be made while you get a good
night's rest.
The Missouri, Kansas and Texas
Railroad cannot furnish this service
unless it Is better patronized by the
citizens of Columbia. The car has
been taken off for a few months and
then put back for another trial. This
time seems to be the last chance the
company intends to give Columbia.
The officials say that the car will be
kept long enough to insure a fair test.
Patronage will keep it
OUR CONDUCT AT LAWRENCE.
The annual Missouri-Kansas game
brings the students of the University
before the people of Missouri, Kansas
and surrounding states. Those who
go fo Lawrence to see the game will
note the conduct of the students from
the "show me" state. Those who stay
at home and read the newspapers to
find the result of the game will also
look to see how the students con
ducted themselves.
There are people in the state who
think the University Is made up of
"rah-rah" boys and "campus
queens". Such people, who are skep
tical concerning the University as an
educational center, are eager to take
up any little thing that one student
may do and hold that as common to
the entire student body. They speak
only of the "rough things" that occur
and never mention the good things.
'it is, then, the duty of each indi
vidual to uphold the conduct of the
University and behave in such a way
that outsiders will have no cause to
talk. A good impression made by our
actions at Lawrence will go far
toward giving non-residents a better
impression of the University. Many
people judge a neighboring state by
its university.
Truly, when victory comes, students
are expected to celebrate. They
should do It But there are two ways
of celebrating good and bad.
At Lawrence, Missouri rooters will
celebrate, but it will be in the good
way. Missouri will be known as a
school that knows how to celebrate
in the right way as well as a school
that plays clean athleUcs.
Echoes of Yesterday.
Fire Years Ago.
The carrying of mail on the Ash
land hack line was discontinued. The
Statesman In an editorial said that
it would gladly join in a demand that
the old order of things be re-established,
as Ashland was one of the
most important business communities
in Boone County.
A Cowherd-for-Governor Students'
Democratic Club was organized at
the courthouse. Floyd E. Jacobs of
Kansas City was president
Ten Years Ago.
At the City Council meeting the
street commissioner was ordered to
advertise for bids for the construc
tion of a plank sidewalks on the
north side of Rollins street.
Twenty Years Ago.
James Wilson of the firm of Bed
ford and Wilson of Columbia was
awarded a patent upon a heating
stove he has invented. The patented
feature was an arrangement giving a
draft from tHe top of the stove, some
thing after the order of a black
smith's forge. Mr. Wilson had manu
factured in Columbia a number of
these stoves and those in use gave
satisfaction.
Thirty Years Ago.
The Columbia Herald said: "Our
picture gallery is not quite complete,
but we have secured the likenesses of
two of Columbia's most handsome as
well as most enterprising men. They
are on this page and they speak for
themselves, both in the paper and in
their lively grocery store."
Forty Years Ago.
"We announce with pleasure the
completion of the Statesman Block, a
fine brick building on the corner of
Broadway and Ninth streets in this
place, the site of the old Statesman
printing office. The building Is of
brick, two stories high, covered with
tin and fireproof, with nine feet base
ment under the entire bullidng, and
presents a magnificent appearance, it
being located on one of the most
sightly and eligible corners of our
beautiful town." Columbia States
man. From Other Colleges
The University of Kansas "for the
second time in its history has a girl
enrolled in its engineering depart
ment. A board of control for student pub
lications will probably be elected at
the University of Wisconsin. The ef
fect of this new plan, if adopted, will
be to unify by definite organization
and common administration as far as
Tailors to men-
OVERCOATS, TOO.
Some men who always wear
tailor-made suits haven't yet
tried wearing an Overcoat that
is tailored to them they can't
quite see the advantage of hav
ing the tailors make an over
coat for just one individual.
But here is one distinct ad
vantage in the
Tailored-to -you
overcoats. One young man
who always wears Fashion
Shop Tailored Suits had us
make an overcoat for him
three years ago. He has worn
the coat every winter since,
and is now starting on the
fourth winter. And the looks
well, you couldn't distin
guish it in a group of this
year's coats.
THE FASHION SHOP
R. A. Ehinger
- Ten Eleven Broadivay
SCOOP jess
uromx.
IfBoss I've GOT" A
CORXBtZ 0PAST0RY
HERE. iN MY COAT
A Lt POUND A
BOMB IN A VACANT,
iJ-OT ANO -
possible, the various publications of
the University In the same way that
athletic and forensic activities are un
ified. The board of control will be
elected at large or through the stu
dents' council and will derive its pow
er jointly from the faculty an,d the
student body.
At the University of Texas a move
ment is on foot to provide a $100,000
loan fund for the use of young men
and women who wish to attend the
university but can not afford to do
so upon their own resources. The
money will be raised by popular sub
scription over the state.
According to figures compiled by a
member of the faculty at Cornell Uni
versity, the living expenses of under
graduates of Cornell have Increased
33 per cent since 1896.
For the first time in agricultural
history plowing of the soil was re
cently made an object of competition
for a prize at the University of Min
nesota. The senior agricultural stu
dents conducted a contest at a field
meet of the different classes, at which
the best handler of a plow received
a new $45 plowshare.
Resolutions were adopted at a re
cent meeting of the Texas Woman's
Press Association recommending to
the regents of the University of Texas
that a school of journalism be estab
lished as one of the departments of
the university.
The 5,000-year-old amulet, value at
$3,000, which was recently stolen
from the Haskell Museum of the Un
iversity of Chicago, has been recov
ered. The discovery was made by
means of a directions sent in an anon
ymous letter stating where the val
uable was hid. The amulet Js suppos
ed to have once belonged to King
Menes.
Arthur M. Ogle, editor of the Daily
Illlni, the student publication of the
University of Illinois, has been ar
rested by order of Judge!'Philbrick'jf
the circuit court, .on the ch'argtff
contempt of court The char"g
was brought on atfeount of an edl-
w
IN ALL CLASS AND,
COLLEGE COLORS
"'' tnddoie dctbiu.
Wm Athletic Gooda. Ciolor-9SO Free
f Sc?MM'S
KANSAS CITY, MO
A Choice Bit in the Tattler
Everyone enjoys the college paper and
6( rouma ceopwu lau secure a umt tann piiow
foA, 24 In. $qvrt, decorakJ with Kandiomely
ptlnlti Jttwtn12 Jaifnt f tied rem.
cLm2?'m
- ii : i iii
-H' SHE. v& tVFftfKYOTtA HOW MY DE5 TO UMT) THEN W8 VT IS A 6AU MTOOKTSEEMl I
I I A M1MYU Oin c IC 11- IB . 1 : 1 ' "tE '.'Z
-touch -rsoipurn- - - - - y --LJ BOMB - we u. be the, RWow- n WT
DE-MyC0TW gEALUf M ft BOMB XT V OMLM PAPER TO rtAVe ! NOW WHERe U Q JL
-r . rr ".:. ':x v v is v-westowand- ; ",r",c,reN r, r5k n a
'ctePiWJP " "TT ss ) Jm) sC il HEeouKv? v. Vl.
--'ir7,fcsr GK I &St4r -iLttsl Tv"?-. C M4- I " v 5 o rUJkW
torial which appeared in the Illinl
warning the students to be careful
what they told the grand jury which
was called to investigate the theater
riot In which the Illinois students
took part several weeks ago.
The $300,000 auditorium at the Un
iversity of Colorado Is nearing com
pletion. The auditorium is a modifi
cation of King's Chapel at Cambridge,
England.
For the first time in years the foot
ball team at the University of Wiscon
sin is truly representative of the state:
The coach is a Wisconsin man and
ten out of the eleven men on the reg
ular squad are natives of the state.
The University of Pennsylvania be
gins its one hundred and seventy
third year with a net registration of
5,041. The total enrollment has fall
en off 91 as compared with last year,
but there is an increase oT 82 in the
number of freshmen enrolled.
Official
Missouri
ARM
BANDS
10c
j-5
5"
Joe
Janousek's
Art Shop
s
a Fatima r oij
20
for
15
JU (Sr.
i Hill i
AZ AW
cs7..Aro
ft-" j
Ja5wcrrt aj
i f V
s in ' .r
vaauak oj
Now Why DID Ths City Editor Leave
Got (yawn) an
eight o'clock?
Yes (yawn), no time
for anything. There
goes the bell (yawn).
No breakfast (stretch).
Just thought of it
through the Co-Op for a
sandwich ham, nut,
pimento or down to
the store between classes.
Candies, too. Choco
lates to eat between
moments. Chocolates
in boxes. "Take the
grouch out of that
eight o'clock. No wait
sandwiches always
ready.
Co-Op
Henninger's
Headquarters for desira
ble gifts In fine Jewelry,
Watches, Rings and
Diamonds.- , :-: '.-
There are
Photographs and
PHOTOGRAPHS
by ? HOLBORN J
910 1-2 Broadway
CLASSIFIED ADS
Only a half cent a
a day minimum 15
BOARD AND BOOM
t
.Single meals served at Pemberton
Hall. Breakfast 25c; 7:30 to 8:15.
Lunch 25c; 1 to 1:30. Dinner 35c;
6 to 6:30. (Sundays 1 to 1:30). Flat
rate, board, $4 per week.
BOARD and Room for $4.50 a week.
104 Dorsey. Mrs.Little. - d24-
- MEALS First class meals for $3.50
a week; one week's trial will convince
you. 507 Hitt Mrs. G. A Keene. d26
LOST
LOST : An oval garnet brooch, set
With an opal In the center. Garnets
peculiarly set. Finder please phone-
741.
iiewaru given. ' v.- ,j
LOST Small gold watch, between
805 Virginia ave., and Academic Hall.
Reward. Finder Phone 86.
LOST Dark red sweater. Finder
please call Green 231. Reward. d6.
LOST High School pin. Letters
H. H. S. '09 Black and Gold. 203 S.
6th or phone 974 Green. 3
TO RENT HOUSES
FOR RENT Two large rooms, bay
windows, newly papered, new fur
nace and all modern conveniences.
Price $8.50 and $10.50, 605 S. 5th. d6t
TO RENT Two rooms tor young
ladles. 701 Hltt St Phone 816 Black.
tf.
WANTED TO RENT, furnished, 5
to 8 room cottage; by responsible
persons. Address H, care Missourian.
(d4t)
FOR RENT NIne-roem modern
house, corner of Stewart Road and
Westwood avenue, for $30 per month.
So Suddenly
Give Her a Box
of this Candy
If you want to give your
lady friend, sister or moth
er a box of candy that will
be appreciated, let us fix
one up for you from candy
made in our own shop.
All the finest kinds made
fresh every day. It has a
taste all its own. The
boxes are beauties, any size
or shape you desire. She
would appreciate a box of
this candy.
We also have Lowney's, Gun
ther's and other popular brands.
Any kind you want is here.
The College Inn
016 Broadway.
Columbia Candy
Kitchen
8th aad Walnut.
IF YOUR WATCH
JEWELRY
OR CLOCKS
NEED REPAIRS
bring them to Hennineer's where
they will be repaired by experts
and returned to you in perfect
condition.
PRICES REASONABLE.
WORK GUARANTEED.'
we wni reg- rjenntnsers
ulate your
watch free
JLM.I
MM .
, SlSBroadway
Phone ;55 for Missourian Want Ad
Dept
. b
word
cents
XDHOisrE
JL 55
Inquire at 110 N. 8th St, or phone
386 Green, or 394 Red. W. E. Farley.
(tf)
Room for rent One large front
room $4. " 448 White. 505 Conley. tf
WANTED Boarders by the day,
week or meal. 600 South 9th. tf.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOUND Silver mounted fountain
pen in Academic Hall. November 15.
Owner can have same by calling 825
black and paying for this ad.
Ear piano player will furnish muiie
for dances and parties. Sanford Eates,
phone '540 Green. (d6tj a
- .
WANTED Sewing at home or by
the day. Prices reasonable. Miss
Katy Bassett, 1006 Rogers. Phone
846 Red. (d6t) '-.
FOR SALE Pure bred fox terrier
pups from champion prize winning
ancestry. Arthur Rhys, East Hudson
Ave. (d6t)
MRS. BELLE GOODRICH. sugget-
tive therapeutic healer. Consultation
and examination free. 11 Price Ave.
(dSO)
DANCING Lessons given privately.
505 Conley. 448 White. d24
WANTED Position as housekeeper
by educated woman, with 8-yer oil
daughter. In bachelor or widower's
home. Wants good home and-thuga-ter's
education. No salary. Address
X 605 Elm. (d6t)
Save half the price on typewriters.
See L. H. Rice. Easy terms. Phone
742 Green. (d6t)
Phone 55 for Missourian Want A4
Dept
By "HOP
II
-l
-sj
As
The reputaUon of the state and of
" ' '',' ' SHH-IMTU-JIWD. I
the University is at stake.
I. - iV

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