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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, November 21, 1912, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066313/1912-11-21/ed-1/seq-3/

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UNIVERSITY XISSOUBIAX THUBSDAT, NOVEMBER 21, 1912...
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The place to buy
dressed poultry
We dress more poultry
than any other dealer in
town. Other stores buy
from us to fill your orders.
Why not buy from us
direct and save that mid
dleman's profit ?
Dressed Chickens
18c a pound.
Live Chickens
12c a pound.
Northern Potatoes
White stock. 60c a bushel.
PI L. IF. Berry
t
Arrow
DONCHESTER
Dress Shirts
The bosom
cannot bulge
$2 to S3
Cluett. Peabodr A Co.
Makers
Fit Guaranteed $3.50 and $4.25
J. H. Arbuthnot
Student agent for Men Fine Shoes
A phone call brings him to your room
7oS Hitt St. Phone 231 Black
24c
per cue.
if forl'a "limitedf'time
beginning Monday at
The
Tiger Den
for all scratch games
LiveTables
Good Lights
Easy Chairs
Courteous
Treatment
Special Invitation to
Students.
South of Broadway
on Tenth.
GEORGErJO
Official
Missouri
ARM
BANDS
10c
Joe
Janousek's
Art Shop
APPLE MEN LOSE
. BY POOR PACKING
City Buyers Want Neatly
Prepared Boxes, Says Hor
ticultural Secretary.
BARRELS NOT BEST
Sorting of Fruit Has Much
To Do With Attracting
.Customers.
Just before thiWbistle
; Blows in Lawrence
Saturday ....
two special correspondents of the University Missourian
men who know football will be busy sending, over
the wire, the preliminary news and events as theysee
them.
They will send the line-up of the Tigers and the Jay
hawkers so we'll know who's to fight for and against
"OldMissou". Then' II come reports on the condition of
the men the field news of the crowd the weather
and then, who won the "toss-up".
The kick-off, and every play and incident that hap
pens JjyjnjhfflJMwii fl ' bwitnessed bythesettwocor-
respondents who" have followed theTigersJall season
and who know, football as they know the men."
"The Missouri farmer loses from
25 cents to $1 on every barrel of ap
ples shipped to the St. Louis and
Kansas City markets," said Ashlelgh
P. Boles, secretary of the State Board
of Horticulture, tjday.
Mr. Boles is well acquainted with
the St. Louis and Kansas City mar
kets, having had considerable experi
ence In buying and selling horticul
ture products.
"I attribute this loss to a lack of
knowledge as to the value of our
present methods of grading and
packing. Not only the appearance of
the apples, but also the snugness of
the packing should be considered. If
the specimens are sorted into two
grades, the smaller ones will usually
sell as well as the mixed lot, and the
larger ones will sell much better.
"Fully 98 per cent of the Missouri
apples are shipped in bulk or in bar
rels and the commission men have to
handle them as they are received.
As a matter of fact they prefer to
sell Missouri grown fruit, and they
make the best possible use of it.
There is a strong demand, however.
for neat attractive packages, and so
far this demand has been supplied
largely by Western growers who
know the value of grading and pack
ing." According to Mr. Boles a compar
ison of the prices on the market of
apples put up in barrels with those
packed in boxes is very striking at
almost any season of the year. For
example, on October 26 the Kansas
City market quoted the same grade
of Jonathan apples in three-bushel
barrels at 35 cents lower per barrel
than the same number of bushels
packed in boxes. The St Louis mar
ket gave wider results on November
4, when it quoted Jonathan apples
at $3 to $3.50 per barrel, while the
sanje, grade of apples in. boxes were
being sold for $1.50 a bushel, making
a difference of from 33 to 50 cents a
bushel in favor of the boxes.
&nr$A!$foj
Kansas City, Mo.
Fox Furs
are Modest in Price
Every woman appreciates the beau
ty and becomingness of Furs. But
not every woman can afford the more
expensive species. With this in
mind we have assembled a most
interesting collection of the
III
feKSf
-
Furs of Reynard
Fox in its many varieties. Most
of these are very moderate in price
and all are very practical, standing
much wear and giving a soft warmth
that is delightful. The neckpieces
are in a number of forms, from the animal shape to the
large shawls; the muffs are big pillow shapes.
Isabella and Sable Fox sets sell at $19.75 to $39.50.
Red Fox Sets sell at $19.75 to $75.00.
Black Fox Sets sell at $25.00 to $125.00 the set.
Cross Fox Sets sell from $35.00 to $350.00 the set.
Many of these Furs are from the famous house of Revillon
Freres whose Furs are to be found only here in Kansas City.
Third Floor.
CHEMISTS TO MAKE EGGS?
Russian Scientist Thinks Imitation
Can Be Compounded.
The production of artificial eggs
will be the next great, feat of chemis
try, according to the great Russian
chemist. Paul Walden. AH that ' Is
needed is a proper mixture of oxygen,
hydrogen, sulphur and nitrogen.
These are easily obtained and cheap.
The egg shell is not involved in the
combination, but it is believed by Mr.
Walden that the proper receptacle
will be forthcoming when the egg stuff
itself is ready. The egg of course
will be in a fluid state and adapted 'to
frying, poaching, scrambling and beat
ing for cakes, custards, etc., but it Is
probable that it will not be utilized
for setting or raising spring chickens.
If it takes tbe place of the real ar
ticle for cooking, however, thanks
must be given to the chemist It's a
dream of chemistry, that Is all a
dream, some people, may think, but
there are great wonders produced by
science and the housewife hopes that
the artificial egg may come soon. It
cannot but be better than the cold
storage egg. Exchange.
r
Brief Local News
As these men see the plays they" will 'instantly fiashfto
Columbia what has happened that you who did not
go to Lawrence -will have the opportunity of following
the Tigets in their hardest and greatest game of 1912.
Your only chance in. Columbia to hear these reports
will be in the
University Auditorium
and it will cost vou but ten cents, COME EARLT
as the repirns.willbegin coming in before 2 o'clock.
Mrs. Harriet Clayton, who has been
visiting Mrs. J. T. Mitchell on Uni
versity avenue, left this morning for
her home in Los Angeles.
Mrs. J. T. Mitchell and Mrs. R. H.
Gray left this morning for a few days'
visit with friends near Rocheport
A Plea for Booting at Lawrence.
(Continued from page 2.)
Mrs. E. L. Brown and daughter,
Miss Francis Brown, who have been
visiting Mrs. Rosa Ingels, departed
this morning for their home in Independence.
Miss Mary Louise Miller, a student
In the University, departed this morn
ing for her home in Excelsior Springs
to visit her parents for a few days.
Dr. Cutler to Speak at KirksTlUe.
Dr. William P. Cutler departed
this morning for Kirksville to deliver
an address before the Porter" Rural
School. He will speak on "Ethics In
Farm Life." From Kirksville"" Doctor
Cutler will go to Kansas City, then
:to St. Louis and then return to Col
umbia.
'
Phone 55 for MiBsourUnWantAd
proclaim the fact that we cheer when
the play doesn't go our way, if we
don't do so? I have attended several
Kansas games when the lack of noise
from the Missouri side was noticeable
when the score was against us. Is
that "bucking a brick wall?" No, it
certainly is not.
Let everyone who takes the trip
keep saying to himself all the way
out "I can yell all the time," until he
finally believes he can. Our lives are
measured by what we do and not by
what we think. So the part of the
student body in the Kansas game will
be measured by what they do. Every
student who possibly can, should go,
and no sacrifice can be too much. I
know that if I had saved all the
nickels I spent going to the picture
shows I could have made several
trips to Lawrence and had some left
over with which to get lunch.
Every student is as much morally
bound to go and support the team as
the Tigers are to go and play. There
is always a way, where the will is,
and it behooves everyone to get that
will. Let the students who intend to
go, make life miserable for those who
are undecided, for you are all needed.
"Buck that brick wall" and buck it
hard!
Have the alumni shown the proper
spirit in "bucking brick walls"? How
many intend to go to the big game?
While conditions sometimes make it
impossible for them to get away.
there is not always the proper spirit
calling them. Let em get up and
do their share, and join with the stu
dents and outyell as well as outplay
Kansas. Let's all get together and
make this game the greatest and best;
one long to be remembered by the
size of the score, fairness of play and
superiority of yelling from the Mis
souri side. It can be all this and
more. If we all get together and "buck
our own brick wall."
H. S. GLADFELTER, '09.
We Clean
and Press
Suits,
Overcoats,
Waistcoats,
Gloves,
Ties,
Scarfs,
Dresses.
JVe invite your inspec
tion of Columbia V fore
most tailoring, cleaning
and pressing shop.- . .
Work called for and delivered.
PHONE 736.
Virginia Dafllv Rr" Virginia
Building V 005. Buiding
Building- an M. U. Garage.
Work on a temporary garage in the
rear of the Engineering Building has
been started. The brick walls are be
ing built on a cement floor that was
made to test a cement composition.
German students, leave subscrip
tions for the magazine "Aus Nan und
Fern" at Tbe Missouri Store. (adv)
Cab Service
day or night. We'll be there.
Phone?315. W. R. Houck
Payne's Orchestra
will furnish your evening's
entertainment with good
classy nutic
M. A.:PAYNE, Mjt.
PhontJ61-Rcd. SI2 8.5th St.
KEIM'S ORCHESTRA
Music for all occasions
Phones 402 Green or 271
H. E. KEIM, Mgr.
Up to date
DRESS MAKING
To suit your taste and the style
All Work guaranteed.
MRS. J. W. HORN
907 Lowrr Pkona S6i Grtca
PUBLIC AUTO SERVICE
At Seasonable Prices.
CALL 96
Y.. W. C. A. Initiation Dec. 1.
Dr. A. T. Olmstead spoke on Islam
at the regular weekly meeting of the
Y. W. C. A. this afternoon. There
will be a second initiation of new
members of the Y. W. C. A. December
1 at Read Hall for those who were
unable to be present at the first
Thls'wl"1 be" the last initiation this
fall. The form will be the regular
candle ceremony. .
.Phone 41. Cab and Transfer Co. .(ad
BARBER SERVICE
That will make you a Regular
Caller is the aim of
SHEARS
Recently Located Basement
Exchange Bank Bldg.
For fine
CLEANING,
PRESSING,
REPAIRING,
PHOHE 746 BLACK
Also Suits .and Overcoats
to measure.
BELL TAILORING CO
. .. 10th and Broadway.
COLUMBIA AUTO COMPACT
108 S. 9th Street.
PHONE 730 FOR FEED
Hay, Corn, Oats, Bran
TANDY Bl'ILDINC
Ii6 North 8th Street.
Richards & Smarr
Our bread, pies, cakes,
and everything we sell is baked in
our own sanitary shop home
made in fact.
The University Din
ing Club and Cafeteria use our
bread.
B. GENTSCH, BAKERY
20 N. 9th - 882-Red
Phone 61. Cab and Transfer Co. (ad
.. Phone 55 for MInouriaa Want Ad
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