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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, November 25, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066313/1912-11-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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UNIYEBSITT MISSOUKIAN MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1913.
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UNIVERSITY MISSOURIAN.
An Errnln Daily by th Mudt In tlie
Srliool or Journallt.ni at the t'nlvfrsltj
of MImourI.
HAUKY I). UY
Managing Editor.
Unliersltr Mlssourlan Association ( Inc.)
J. IlnrrlHoii Ilronn. president ; ltolert
S. Maim. Secretary ; James :. May. Ward
A. ell. I'aul J. Tlioiiinson. II. J. McKay,
V. i:. Hall. T. S. Hudson, Ivau II.
l.ppvrnou.
Ulln-e : In Vlrelnla IIIdK.. Donn Stair
Entered at the I'ostolDce of Columbia, Mo.
an secoml-clahs mall mailer.
TWO Dollars :i Year ly Carrier or Mall.
Aildrehs all communications to
t'XlVEItSITY MISSOUKIAN.
Columhla, Missouri
Well, we are glad we published be
fore The Game that editorial on "The
Evil of Betting."
PHYSICAL TRAINING FOB ALL.
Classes in physical training have
.been organized for the faculty, the
short-course students, the Sunday
school children. The School Exten
sion Society will give the same priv
ilege to the public. In other words,
physical training soon will be provid
ed for all.
The object or physical training is
better health, of course. The demand
for it is the result of the wide-spread
trovement for the conservation of
health, and for the use of preventives
rather than curatives.
Gradually the public is coming to
see that prevention is better than
cure. The way to stay well is to
keep up a strong resistance against
disease. Disease gets hold when the
individual is weak and unable to re
sist. Physical training is to build and
to keep this resistance.
As the conservation of health is
the most vital thing to every person,
it is no wonder that physical training
is liecominc nonular. As soon as the
public sees the full value of it, vital J
statistics will show a great change.
A GENTLEMAN'S GAME.
And the University of Missouri
played the University of Kansas a
great game of football Saturday.
Not the players representing the
two universities so much their work,
is taken for granted but the stu-
dents in the bleachers. Never in the
last four years at least has there (
been so wholesome a spirit shown on
both sides.
The rivalry of course was intense.
The Tiger supporters flattered them
selves that both in numbers and in
lungpower they held their own with
their hosts, the Jayhawks. Bnt
throughout the game the bleachers
treated each other with courtesy. It
was one thing to cheer for Washing
ton, a team that the Tigers were run
ning over, and quite another to cheer
for the Kansans, who were holding
the big end of the score.
The game itself was as clean a
game as one could hope for. Penal
ties were infrequent. The penalties
that were called were chiefly for off
side play, with one or two cases of
holding both of them offenses due to
over-eagerness and a head excited by
the fierceness of the play. "Dirty
work" was not to be seen.
Games such as this one are what
keep the game in good repute despite
the bitter attacks made upon it.
Football as a gentleman's game is too
valuable to lose.
GOING-TIIE-OLD-TIME WOMAN.
Farmers' wives and daughters are
too proud to do household work now
adays, is a statement contained in a
report just issued by George K.
Holmes, chief of the division of pro
duction and distribution of the Uni
ted States Department of Agricul
ture. The "lure of society" which
has reached the farm is much to
blame for the condition, continues
the report. It is a rare thing to see
a young woman who knows how to
knit. In time past the pride of the
housewife was great stores of pre
serves dried and pickled fruit and
vegetables and berries. But now thet
local store is depended upon for all
these eatables. The farm women of
today are not willing to repeat the
manual labor performed by their
grandmothers. Country girls, too, as
well as city girls, regard household
work for hire as undesirable. The
rise in the price of living on the farm
is accounted for, in a measure, by the
fact that the women of the farm are
, indulging In "social functions" which
are held to be incompatible with the
uerformance of household labor.
This loss of the old-time industry
among women, especially farm
women, is deplorable. Surely the
time will never come when home
made kraut, apple butter and pickled
pigs feet will exist in history only.
May the enrollment in the home
economics department of the Univer
sity of Missouri increase more rapidly!
TWENTIETH CENTURY ENGLAND.
America boasts of its finely con
structed government, protecting the
rights of its subjects, conserving
their interests and providing for their
needs. But the nation cannot always
be contentwith the government It
has today. Conditions are constantly
changing. Washingtonlan lawa can
not cope with the problems of the
twentieth century. The nation must
continually march forward. This has
ever been the American spirit.
Now Great Britain, from which this
nation sprung and from which many
of our institutions originated, has be
come enbued with that same spirit,
which, in the language of one of its
representatives, "has shown to them
that the Empire depends for its
strength, its glory, nay for its exist
ence, upon the efficiency of its peo
ple." The Liberal government under
David Lloyd-George, remaking the
conditions of human life in England,
insuring a nation against sickness
and two million workers against un
employment, opening the lands to the
people, and realizing a vast scheme
for social regeneration, is writing a
new history for this people.
From time immemorial, students of
English conditions tell us. the poor
have lacked adequate attention in ill
ness, and not only have millions gone
to premature graves in consequence.
but the efficiency of the whole work
ing population has been lowered. Now
under the new Insurance Act, con
ceived by Lloyd-George and his party,
nearly 14.000,000 people are to be
united In one great co-operative
brotherhood for helping those who
I become sick and those who are un
avoidably out of work. One of the
most important points in this act is
the appropriation of $7,500,000 as the
beginning of a nation-wide crusade
against tuberculosis.
Taxation, also, has been largely
shifted from those least able to bear
it to those most able. The health and
living conditions of the working class
have been improved in numberless
ways. The legislation for the conser
vation of child life has been -most
notable. But England's prbgram for
social reform does not end here. """A
vitalizing principle has been injected
into British affairs' that will persist
whatever party Is in power.
Winston Churchill, now first lord of
the Admiralty, said in a speech not
long ago, "The supremacy and pre
dominance of our country depend
upon the vigor and health of its pop
ulation; Its true glory is in the hap
piness of its cottage homes." This is
the spirit which actuates the new
.English movement and its most able
exponent, David Lloyd-George. He
and his allies are not only remaking
the conditions of English politics;
they are remaking human life in
Great Britain.
To Insject Missouri Orchards.
W. H. Chandler, assistant professor
ophorticulture, left Wednesday night
for Southwestern Missouri. He will
spend several days inspecting the or
chards of that section.
Phone 55 for Mlssourlan Want Ad
Dept
SPOOP THF rr"
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TOMAKTOU THE FAMH-M SERVANT- DEAS MAKE M( 1 f00" COFFEE C DAR6.00 OOMiL
DOMESTK SCIENCE (7 TWL FAMH-M SERVANT - FOOT TIRED IN WW8ie "lDWf 'OR. J tQrt NTO TriE PARVJOR1. i
ED.TWt-XTW,u. rtjfey Hltf SMOKE, XM TO J THE ELBOW-X I v POACHED? J s ff ACKTOE? I
BE UP TO Ou YCk WRITE A COLUMN A Dftt WONDER. F HE. K f cJ) a Mfk i I IkvTIHEH FORVOURi)
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A couotAN a I W, Ifamiu seraants! To sot the-; "bmBs gHR c3F$t &:KyfyW
Echoes of Yesterday.
Fie Years Ago.
The Athens, the Powers and the
Gordon had just installed long-distance
phone booths operated by a
nickel-in-the-slot device.
Mrs. John P. Sebree chaperoned a
bevy of Washington University girls
to Columbia to see the football game.
Ten Years Ago.
The well on the campus had been
drilled to a depth of about 840 feet.
The drilling was to be continued to
a depth of about 1,000 feet.
Twenty Years Ago.
"Columbia is experiencing a genu
ine boom, and since it has arranged
for water works and electric light,
nothing is too good for It."
Forty Years Ago.
"The other night as our local re
porter was going to his 'roost' at a
late hour, he heard in the distance
sweet strains of music, or, at least,
what he first supposed to be music,
but which proved to be principally
"strains" and other dismal sounds
that seemed to come from a bosom
racked with anguish or a stomach
overloaded with raw oysters and
chicken salad. Softly our reporter
drew near, and at last discovered from
whence the sounds proceeded. A
youth stood leaning against a gate
post, with his eyes fixed upon a cham
ber window in the second story of the
house before him. In his hand he
held a guitar, upon which he picked
with the air of one who is not cer
tain he is on the right string, while
from his parted lips came the follow
ing son:
I have Io-Ioved the-he Zula Zo-
hong,
Fo-hor thl-hy life was all a so-
hong
'Twa-has all a chee-heerful
smt-hile;
'Twa-has su-hunshine all the
whl-hile.
(Here the young man paused to spit
and inflate his lungs, and then struck
into the chorus):
Oh. Zu-hula, moulder-hing Zu-
nula,
Si-hiient is thy si-hilver so-
hong!
Oh, Zu-hula. da-harling Zu
hula, De-hear, departed Zu-hula Zo-nong-on.
"The singer here took a rest of t
few minutes, looked anxiously down
the street to see that Jim Ficklin, the
town marshal, was not In sight, then,
throwing a peculiar, plaintive sound
in his voice, he sang:
When the mo-hoon is shl-hl-
ning o'er the la-hake
Oh the-hen '111 thl-hink of thee-
he-he! "
Oh the-hen, oh the-hen
I'll thi-hi-hl-hink of thee-he-he!
"Here the front door was suddenly
opened, and a sepulchral voice said.
Sick" him, Tige!' and out'bounced a
dog about the size of a flour barrel,
and with a good set of natural teeth.
The singer turned a back-somersault
out of the gate, and with the dog nip
ping at his coat-tail at every jump.
disappeared 'round the corner.
"Our reporter turned and left the
spot, but not until he had seen a middle-aged
man in single gannen roll
ing over in the hall-way convulsed
with mirth, and saying, whenever he
stopped laughing long enough to say
anything
"O the-hen Oh, then I'll think of
thee!'
"The reporter had walked several
blocks from where the scene de
scribed occurred when he met the
dog returning with a wild expression
In his eye, and a pair of suspenders
and a portion of a coat-tail in his
mouth."
Will Sjieak on Negro Problem.
Dr. Charles A. Ellwood, of the de
partment of sociology, will speak on
"The Negro Problem" at the T. W. C
A. meeting at 4:30 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon In Room 24 Academic Hall.
This is the fourth of a series of lec
tures on American and foreign: mis
sions. Phone 55 University Mlssourlan.
THE FAMOUS
'Clearness, Condensation, Point" the Attri
butes of a New York Daily That Has Been
Called "The Newspaper's Man's Paper"
Dropped In among the great sky
scrapers of New York City is a minia
ture structure which has been called
the greatest Institution of learning in
the United States. The building is
old-fashioned and blackened by years
of wear. Nevertheless it remains in
constant use both day and night
for here is published the New York
Sun, a newspaper that is one of
America's institutions.
Seated at the desks and typewriters
any night in the week are the men
who are keeping up' the Sun's reputa
tion of being "the newspaper man's
newspaper." It is said that the ordi
nary graduate of the literary depart
ment of Harvard could not hold down
a position as a reporter on The Sun.
An alumnus of the Sun school would
be welcomed by any newspaper in
this country.
A peculiar air of democracy per
vades this editorial room. Maybe It
is because the night editor sits in one
corner at a desk no better than the
cub reporter's. Or it maybe that the
remembrance of Day, Beach, Dana
and Laffan mingling with the report
ers in this room nurses this spirit of
good will.
The reporters are mostly men who
have been graduated from other
newspapers to the Sun and who, be
fore entering newspaper work, took
a degree from a university. It is said
75 per cent are university men. After
catching on to the knack of the Sun
style and making good, their posi
tions are theirs for a life time. There
never has been a shake-up.
It was Charles Anderson Dana who
sat up the high ideals of journalism
now practiced by the Sun. After
serving an apprenticeship under Hor
ace Greeley on the New York Tribune,
Dana became editor of the Sun in
1868. He did not change the make
up of the Sun; indeed its appearance
is much the same as when Day estab
lished it in 1833. It has been marked
by this consistency.
Dana's bequest to the Sun may be
summed up in the words he used In
the beginning: "The Sun will study
clearness, condensation, point, and
will endeavor to present its daily
photograph of the whole World's do-
'Ings in the most luminous and lively
manner. It will not take as long to
read the Sun as to read the London
Times or Webster's Dictionary, but
when you have read it, you will know
about all that has happened in both
hemispheres
And Dana knew good writing when
it came to his desk or went into the
"paper. It Is still related how he used
to walk over to the city editor after
the paper was out and point to a sen
tence he had marked, asking who had
written it. The editor did not1 know
what was coming until, telling the re
porter's name, he would hear Dana
say: "No, no, that is the work of
Homer."
Also, the "daily photographer of the
world's doings" has been a wonder
fully true one. Even when many re
liable papers were hoodwinked into
printing a press agent story lately
about Gaby Deslys's jewels being
stolen, the Sun came out with the
fact that a thorough hunt showed the
actress had no valuable jewelry. Sun
reporters get the truth even if It
takes the most work. A story is told
how one cub reporter was praised by
the managing editor as a great re
porter when he had been scooped on
a big story which he and another re
porter had given their word to keep
out of the paper three days.
Another feature of the Sun stories
is the manner in which human-interest
points are brought out. An anal
ysis of the front page of the Sun
shows- that many of the shorter sto
ries are based only ou the fact that
they picture life.
All of the stories are written in a
bright and piquant style. The stories
start with a lively lead and hold your
interest all the way through. "How
much can you write interesting?" is
the Sun's standard of the worth of
Don't Try To Joke The City
"SUN STYLE"
a story. If the reporter has an orig
inal idea In presenting his story it is
worth several times what other pa
pers would give to it.
The following is a typical opening:
"If a gray sky hadn't stretched itself
like a soggy army blanket just above
the cornstalks and cows of Orange
County the night before last and
spilled most of itself onto the race
track at Goshen, across Main street
from the court house, the county seat
of Orange yesterday afternoon would
have seen what it had assembled to
see Supreme Court Justice Arthur S.
Tompkins seated low in his sulky,
rein,s in hand, judicial legs stretched
out along the port and starboard
shafts and yelling, 'G'lang, gal!' to
Little Kate II. while he raced his dark
bay mare against County Judge Al
bert H. F. Seeger's dark brown geld
ing Amasis." That is one sentence
with 106 words, yet it hangs together
smoothly.
Sun head lines also fit in well with
the stories. Heads like "Always Ask
an Egg Its Age Before You Buy It,"
"Charged With Stealing Nap," "Judge
Cuts Price on Beauty," or "Here's
How J. Eads How Welcomed J. Eads
How" are found in every issue of the
Sun. They are sprightly and pleas
ing. The suggested cynicism in that lasti
head is typical of the Sun editorials.
They are well written, but sometimes '
an insincerity lurks between the lines.
Here is a sample of the style: "When j
Campus unto Campus speaks thoughts.
of great value, worthy cogitations
should ensue. The Hon. Woodrow
Wilson, formerly of Princeton, deliv
ered himself at New Haven, Conn., of
the 'message' to be expected from the'
IF YOUR WATCH
JEWELRY
OR CLOCKS
NEED REPAIRS
bring them to Henninger's where
they will be repaired by experts
and returned to you in perfect
condition.
PRICES REASONABLE.
WORK GUARANTEED.
vye win reg- waenntnsters
ulate your
ww .
AXi
; SlSBroadtvay
watch free
CLASSIFIED ADS
Only a half cent a
a day minimum 15
BOARD AND ROOM
.
Single meals served at Pemberton
Hall. Breakfast 23c: 7:30 to 8:15.
Lunch 25c; 1 to 1:30. Dinner 35c;
6 to 6:30. (Sundays 1 to 1:30). Flat
rate, board, $4 per week. '
LOST
LOST : An oval garnet brooch, set
with an opal in the center. Garnets
peculiarly set Finder please phone
741. Reward given. ( tf )
LOST Small gold watch, between
805 Virginia ave., and Academic Hall.
Reward. Finder Phone 86.
LOST High School pin. Letters
H. H. S. '09 Black and Gold. 203 S.
6th or phone 974 Green. 3
TO RENT HOUSES
FOR RENT Two large rooms, bay
windows, newly papered, new fur
nace and all modern conveniences.
Price $8.50 and $10.50, 605 S. 5th. d6t
TO RENT Two rooms for young
ladies. 701 Hitt St Phone 81ft Black.
tf.
WANTED TO RENT, furnished. 5
to 8 room cottage; by responsible
Editor.
wandering culture god of progress."
But such writing can only be done
by artists. Especially does it call
'orth praise when It is considered that
he Sun reporters turn out such work
every day. That is why the Sun is
called "the newspaper man's news
paper." P. J. T.
SHORT COURSE TRCK MEET
Indoor Contest for First and Second
Year MeH December 14.
The first and second-year short
course men are to hold a dual indoor
track meet in Rothwell Gynasium, De
cember 14. Captains of both teams
have been erected. The first-year cap
tain is B. Y. Edelen and the second
year captain Charres Fritz.
Trials for the teams, to consist of
eighteen men each, will be held a
week before the meet. There will be
twelve events and" no man may enter
more than three".
The object of the meet is to arouse
interest among the short course men
and to set records for those who will
enter in future years. No admission
will be charged.
Phone 55 for Mlssourlan Want Ad"
Dept
One cent
each
There arc hundreds
of them. They are
postcards of the best
makes. They include
views of the University
and Columbia almost
any view you can think
'of.
And the price only
one cent each. See
the 'big postcard rack.
Pi k out the ones you
want. Write and mail
them in the store if
you wish.
Co -Op.
word
cents
HONE
55
persons. Address IT, care Mlssourlan.
- ' (d4t)- '
Room for rent. One large front
room $4. 448 White. 505" Conley, tf
WANTED Boarders by the
week., or meal. 600 South 9th.
tf
MISCELLANEOUS
MEAL PERMIT-
U. D. Club pep
Paid to date. 205,
(dGt)
mlt for sale, $5.00.
College. 818 Red
FOUND Silver mounted fountain
pen in Academic Hall. November 15.
Owner can have same by calling 825-
black and paying for this ad.
WANTED Sewing at home or by
the day. Prices reasonable. Miss
Katy Bassett, 1006 Rogers. Phone
846 Red. (dt
MRS. BELLE GOODRICH, sugges
tive therapeutic healer. Consultation
and examination free. 11 Price Ave.
(d30)
DANCING Lessons given privately.
505 Conley. 448 White. d24
Save half the price on typewriters.
See L. H. Rice. Easy terms. Phone
742 Green. (d6t)
Phone 55 for Mlssourlan Want Ad
Dept.
By "HOP"
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