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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, January 29, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066313/1913-01-29/ed-1/seq-2/

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UNIVERStTY MBSOURIAN.
Mjr fcr t
la tfe
HAXBY D. OUT
UauflBg Kdltor.
Calrenltr MlMomrUa AaaodatloB (Inc.)
1. Barrlaoa Brows, President: Robert
B. Mann. Secretary: Jasie O. May, ward
A. Neff. Pal J. Thompson. H. J. McKa:
w. E. Halt, T. 8. HBdaon, Iran
Epperson.
Offlce: la Virginia Building". Down Stair.
Entered at the Poatofice of Columbia, Mo,
aa secood-claaa Bull matter.
Two Dollara a Tear by Carrier or Mall.
Addreaa all communications to
UNIVEKSITV MIBSOUUIAN,
Colombia, MiaaoarL
ani R. was taafeaeiUe for, Mm to
"prevent "tae'etaer half from going
foe.
But, anyway, can yon blame talra?
Echoes of Yesterday.
COLUMBIA BOXES.
More than half the students who
attend the University of Missouri
hare rooms in the homes of Colum
bia. For the boy whose pocket-book
is lean, work is supplied; for the lad
who is spending his first winter away
from home, a home-like friendliness
drives away the "blues"; for the boy
whose studies are hard and discour
aging, a pleasant and hopeful word
is ready; for the student who is neg
ligent of duty, there is a word of kind
advice and caution.
To the good mothers and fathers
in Columbia, many University gradu
ates owe. In large part, their success
in business and in character. Do
students really appreciate the hospi-
tallty, kindness and helpfulness of
Columbia homes? Do those who take
students into their homes realize the
Influences for good and for helpful
ness they may exert?
Fire Tears Age.
At a meeting of the Independent
board, H. B. Kilmer was chosen editor
of the University Independent to suc
ceed William Cross, who went to St.
Louis to take a position in the S
Louis School of Philanthropy.
Tea Tears Age. ,
Dr. Jacob Gould Scburman, presi
dent of Cornell University, visited Co
lumbia. The Columbia D. A. R. held their
first meeting at the Powers Hotel.
The Missouri Press Association and I
Northwest Missouri Press Association
met In Columbia.
GREEK ASD JOURNALISM.
Eery person who expects to enter
the newspaper profession should study
Greek not for an acquaintanceship
with the language itself particularly,
but for the drill in accuracy.
The beginner in Greek becomes ac
quainted with funny little marks
above letters, some slanting one way
and some another. He soon learns
that without these peculiar marks,
set in the right place and at the pro
per angle, his Greek is not Greek. For
a whole year he struggles with
breathing marks and accents. Con
stant study, patience and practice are
required in the writing of correct
Greek. Absolute accuracy is de
manded.
As every little dot or mark in
Greek script is important and proper
in its place, but useless and wrong
when out of place, so there are in
Journalism points of extreme import
ance. Improper usage brings trou
ble. The eye of the city editor and
the copy reader must be as quick to
see mistakes in copy and to find the
little dangers that may be hidden
there,, as the Greek student is to ob
serve the mistakes in his prose com
position. The reporter, too, must be
as careful in the gathering of news
and In writing his story, using only
facts, as the Greek student is in ar
ranging the phrases in their correct
order and observing the proper use
of tenses.
The mastery of Greek demands the
same thing as success in journalism
accuracy, accuracy, ACCURACT.
Twenty Tears Age.
Cold weather halted the construc
tion of the Physics and Engineering
Buildings.
The Law Building was receiving iU
finishing touches.
Fifty Tears Ago,
This, announcement appeared in the
Columbia paper: "Ail persons who
do not apply on or before Monday
next will not be vaccinated free."
Ci ,sv - $Xct ?is ' ",-0 PSkJU -
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Viewpoints
A Cause ef Colds.
Editor the Mlssourlan: May not
one cause of so many colds among
students of the University be the Im
proper heating and ventilation of the
class rooms? Many times a class
room is so cold that the occupants
are not comfortable in their over
coat and cloaks. The same students
who have spent an hour in this frigid
atmosphere may be found the next
hour in a room with the temperature
at 85 and the windows closed. Yet
if a student commits the unpardonable
sin of Bleeping In class, he is severely
criticised by his professor. Is It any
wonder that we have colds ?
S. C.
A RING OS HALF A RING!
When a man gives a girl a diamond
ring, is it his duty to see that she
wears it? If so, is not there a limit
to patience?
Out in San Francisco, where lots
of things happen, a 600 ring is said
to lie at the bottom of the ocean,
dropped there Intentionally. Results:
One girl mad, and one man threat
ened with a larceny charge.
It seems that the man gave the
girl the ring. Shortly afterward he
noticed that she was not wearing it
She gave him the pawn ticket and he
redeemed it for her. Chivalrous man!
Soon the same thing happened again.
And again. And again.
Now when a fellow leaves a girl
4600 worth he ought to be above
minding such slight incidents aa that
Bat perhaps they had fried onions at
this chap's boarding house that after
noon, or something like that At any
rate after he had invested $390 more
la the sparkling circlet he became
peevish and dropped it overboard
treat a ferry boat
Lapsing at it dispassionately, it
weald seem that the young fellow
had beaght bis way into a half Inter
est la "the ring. No doubt it was his
aatt that he Intended to threw away.
More Fash aad Less PhIL
Editor the Mlssourlan: Too many
students are going through the Uni
versity by pulling the right string at
the right time rather than by pushing
the right thing all the time. Often
students in arts and science receive
an A. B. degree and are cast upon
the world with no aim. These stu
dents are always "hoping that some
thing will "turn up" or that some
one they know will give them easy
jobs at salaries never less than $5,000
a year.
It will be interesting to note that
these same students are the ones who
have "grafted" through their school
career. They have been able to make
fair grades and have done as little
work as possible, always willing to
let someone else help them. May this
not be the. reason why there are so
many good positions at the top of the
ladder that are not filled? This classJ
of students can always fill a Job that
is already filled. But ,can they fill
the ones that are open? The same
case applies to the students studying
for a profession. Unless he takes ad
vantage of the opportunities offered
him in school, there will be better
lawyers, better engineers, better doc
tors and better Journalists than he 13
and pull will do him very little good.
He must have acquired the art of
pushing. If he has pushed himself
through the University, he will push
himself Into a good position and into
success. A. M.
r?
CASH
for your
Second-hand
Books
!&&mtei
Just Off the Campus on Ninth I
iKimnwauiiunjwJ!
The object of 'physical training is
not primarily muscle baUdtag,' bat to
put the body la each ceatftioa thaflt
will give Its owner the highest 'de
gree of efUcleacy when It Is called up-"
on. And yet many men spead several
years training their minde to he equal
to any test, but neglect their bodies
so that they can not get the greatest
amount of efficient work from their
minds.
Physicians agree that the greatest
help to recuperating lost energies,
both mental and physical, Is fresh
air. Many trainers insist that only
a minimum of exercise be taaen in
doors and that cross-country running
in all kinds of weather, is the most
beneficial form of exercise. There's
a hint for the student who studies
haid all day and evening and always
feels tired and nearly every night has
a sugnt neaaacne. tesi your Drain
by relaxing from all mental work; get
out In the fresh air and let the oxygen
build up the worn-out brain tissues.
At. the University of Missouri at al
most any time of day the student can
find something to do at the gymnas
ium. The golf links and tennis courts
offer opportunities for pleasing out
door exercise in good weather and the
golf links can be used for cross-country
running at all times of the year.
Football, baseball, track and soccer
give plenty of fresh air exercise In
their seasons.
In the gymnasium there are many
classes, or plenty of forms of exercise
for those who do not want to Join
a class. The regular gymnasium
classes have calisthenics, games and
apparatus work. Clubs have been or
ganized for wrestling and boxing. A
good way to get in the proper condi
tion to study is to take a little mild
wrestling and produce a normal phy
sical fatigue over the whole body. A
new game has been started this year
hand-ball. Courts have been mark
ed off in a aponcoB'the second floor
of the gynmaBium The game is play
ed by hitting a ball with the hand
and bouncing it against the wall, mak
ing it come back into a certain court
each time.
The faculty of the University nave
a special class. Gymnastic dancing
under the direction of O. F. Field,
instructor in physical training, is in
teresting many of the professors and
is giving them exercise and relax
tiori from mental work. The men
who are especially good at apparatus
t j.t, ,
work have formed a gymnasts
GYM FOR IClllGYJ! Jl SE
the high bar, parallel bars, horse aad
mat Many students play basketball:
Aad besides all these classes there
are the chest weights, high parallels,
dumb bells, Indian clubs, medicine
ball aad many other forma of appa
ratus for developmental exercises.
. The man who does day labor and
has tried taking a University course
will tell you that day labor is the
easier. That is because he has no
worries or mental strain. Rest your
brain so that you will not be tired by
giving your body a chance to do Its
work, supplying it with fresh air and
exercise.
And if you can't possibly get even
one hour a day to go to the gymnas
ium, throw open your window and try
these exercises which a physical direc
tor has recommended for resting the
brain. First, stand with feet spread
apart and arms extended and twist
as far from one side to the other as
possible, until you are tired. Second,
place feet together, hands on hips,
and bend backwards as far as pos
sible, bending at the waist Third,
do the full squat touching one hand
to the floor, and raising the other
above the head, alternating. This is
a good all-round developmental exer
cise. Fourth, place feet together.
arms extended, lean backwards, and
come up again, lower chest first, then
upper, and flnallythe neck and head,
raising one rib at a time.
Try it and see. C. M. E.
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'SsmmmmmmBBsssmmsmsj '
SLIGHTLY fpicea
front Hide of -white
Madras.
MUUb
Exceedingly
2 for 25c
Arrow
COLLARS
Cfaett, Pcafcodr Co, Trey, N. Y.
KEIrVfS ORCHESTRA
Composed of student-Musicians.
Hear it before engaging others.
Tels 849 or 644-white.
H. E. KEIM, Mer.
Your second
hand books:
CASH
Bring them
at any time.
m
CO-OP
CO-OP
CO-Oii
The Bible College of Missotih
CATTLE FEEDING TESTS MADE
College ef Agrlaltare Experiments
With Crashes Grain.
Cattle feeding experiments are be
ing carried on by the College of Ag
riculture to determine the advantages
of grinding grain. Former experi
ments have indicated that crushed
corn is better relished and digested
than ear corn, but the advantages
were offset by the Increased cost
Now that cattle have risen in price,
feeders welcome any method that will
cheapen production or bring larger
gains.
Additional Classified Ads.
WANTED Every student organiza
tion in the University to give us a
chance at their printing. Programs,
Letterheads, Envelopes, Placards),
Posters, or anything In the job print
ing line. Rush orders our specialty.
Our new location, 804 Walnut street
New Guitar Building. Phone 431.
Columbia Printing. Co. (d26)
When in St Louis, all Columbia People Stop at
THE MER
All Rooms have Private Bath Rates 51.50.
CM
)1
offers the following courses for the second Semester, for which the Ui
versify grants credits:
History of the Hebrew People, 3 hrs. Tues. Thurs. Sat 8 a. m.
(Another Section will be arranged if the demand is sufficient)
Hebrew Language, 3 hrs. Time to be arranged.
Bible a. Literature. 2 hrs. "
Christian Ethics, 2 hrs. Tues. Thurs. 12 m.
(Another Section will be arranged if the demand is sufficient)
Comparative Religion, 2 hrs. Sec. I Tues. Thurs. 8 a. n:.
I Sec II Tues. Thurs. 11 a. m.
... .r, .... . .. f Sec. I Wed. FrL 8 a. m.
oocuu iamp 01 JeBu. are. . ge& n Wed. FrL 10 a. m. tf
Introduction to Religious Education, 2 hrs. (Credit only in School of
cation). Recitation hours to be arranged.
For further information call for Bible College Catalogue, or see,
G. D. EDWARDS,
Acting Deaa.
Classified Want Ath
The cost of Missourian want ads is but a half cent a word!
day. They bring greater results in proportion to cost
anyother form of advertising. Phone your wants to
BOASD A5D BOOM dog known. Affectionate and reli
TO RENT Two first class rooms Watch dog. Don't yon want a
See Dr. Cutler. Phone 767 bis
FOR SALE Good cord wood la
quantity. L. p. Stephens, phone 1
rea.
at 708 Missouri avenue.
(d6t)
J
JVe Satisfy Particular
- Users of Printing
Because:
....We are printers who take pride in our work.
....We try to make every job that goes out of our
shop as good as the best.
....We always give that little added attention that it
takes to make perfection in printing.
....We have the equipment to do all classes of com
mercial and society printing in the best manner.
....In addition, our prices are as low as is consistent
with good workmanship and should'prove an attractive
inducement for your business.
Statesman Publishing
Company.
.Down stairs in Virginia Bunding on 9th.
r
TO RENT A desirable $10 room.
417 Hitt, corner of University avenue.
Phone 257 white. . (d6t)
TO RENT Two communicable
rooms, close to Academic Halt $10
a month. Phone 521 red. (tf)
TO RENT Rooms for a few girls
at Sampson Apartment. (d3t)
FOR RENT Two first clash rooms
at 708 Missouri avenue (d6t)
TO RENT Furnished rooms at 506
South Sixth street Phone 379 black.
(d3t)
TO RENT Nice southeast room.
716 Missouri avenue. Phone 528
black. (dHt)
FOR RENT Second semester, one
$15 room, one $14 room. Also half
room $7. Meals $4 a week. Phone
900. Pemberton Hall. (d3t)
TO RENT Several desirable rooms
to men. 1 Watson Place, phone 257
green. (tf)
TO RENT To a single
Front room in modern house, steam
heat close to University. Call 244
black. fdt)
TO RENT Room with hot water
heat 307 College. Phone 615 red.
4t)
FOX SALS
FOR SALE Two best lots la SmMh
toa, fronting Worley street Lota
owned by non-resident Win be sold
at bargain. L. M. Defoe or K &
Price, Jr.
FOR SALE Pit ball terrier aaae.
Prince Burke strain. Beat all aromad
MISCELLANEOUS
GIRLS WANTED At the
Cloney Laundry Co.
1
STAY BACK makes the nomr
stay back and keeps the hair In 1
A harmless compound containing!
cuemicais or oil. Send 25c for
jar. aiay Back Company. 639
street Chicago, 111. (a
FOR FINE UPHOLSTERING, J
Mciam & Hughes, 809 Walnut
highest prices for second-hand
worn guaranteed. Call at oil
phone 600 red.
POSITION WANTED-By aa 1
encea, reliable stenographer.
ences furnished; if desired.
Lock Box 344, Salisbury, Mo.
MALLEABLE RANGES 19131
Model alumiaam steel body, three w
guaranteed not to rust The'
made at Palmer aad Johnson's.
1
HOUSEHOLD GOODS And
tag wanted. J. r. Miller'.
aaaa store, Ninth aad Walaat
ana see the bargains, or nhMai
black.
(I
SEE DR. DAVIDSON for
glasses. OSce seeeaa boot
Gnltar Bldg.
DANCING
SCS Coaler.
44t
given prli
wktt 'I
GO SKATDfO at the
Msugat samtsslon Xe: hair
aerth ef Wakaoa Station.
joy of glMnat; uswti the hall I
li
SCOOP S-. Monday I. An Awful Slow Day For GoodStoric By "HOP
rr'rVTv STyV ags?!y.yrm CiOk teT2 S&f S&SmST
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