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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, April 19, 1915, Image 2

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UlrtYERSlTY MISSOUMAX, MONDAY, APRIL 19, 1MB
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UNIVERSITY MISSOURIAN
(Monday, April 19. 1915)
BETTER HOMES.
A few years ago Secretary WHboii
of the United States Department of
Agriculture said that the greatest
curse of that part of American farm
ers who make money was land greed.
As fast as the farmer got a few
hundred dollars ahead he contracted
for another piece of land. The man
in the city valued himself by the
number of houses and blocks which
he owned. The business man reached
out for more business. The profes
sional man overworked himself to get
ahead of his neighbor, he could "not
take time to enjoy that which he
made. The employer spent no time
for rerrtction from his business. The
employe put every ounce of his en
ergy trying to "get ahead" by long
hours of labor, enforced and volun
tary. The home was neglected by all
classes of these men. Wives grew
lonesome. They did not find their
'former sweethearts lovers, still. Di
vorces multiplied. Children were
neglected and American unfllial re
spect became proverbial.
Happily all this is changing. It
Is proposed that ownership of real
estate is limited. Comforts and
science are being added to our
homes. Our parents are making more
of their children. Mothers are un
derstanding their sons and fathers
their daughters and the whole family
is making more of home companion
ship, despite the "movies" and the
automobile and the rush of our pres
ent living. These things, even, make
for better homes.
THE MAX AND THE OFFICE.
Even though a man is elected to a
high office, he is still a man, not at
all different than he was before elect
ed. The office adds nothing to him,
it makes him different in no respect.
If he was a man before, he is still the
same man and the reverse. The of
fice holder cannot in any way degen
erate the office. He may disgrace
himself but never the office.
It is a popular delusion that when
one is elected to some high office, the
presidency for instance, that the
man becomes hallowed with some
thing almost touching on the divine.
The people somehow feel that his
every act is dictated by some unseen
power other than that which comes
from the man. The man is no longer
the man his neighbors knew but by
some unseen force Is lifted above to
some higher plane.
This Is nothing but -a delusion, a
superstitious belief. The man who
sits in the White House is the same
man who sat in his office in Prince
ton University. The man who wears
a gown and sits on the bench of the
Supreme Court, is no wiser because
of the gown or the title before his
name. His acts are subject to the
same criticism as any other person's
and should be given the same kind of
praise. He Is Just as Robert Burns
said: "A man Is a man for a that"
CONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH.
The college man's lack of ability
to write good English Is a matter
quite worthy of consideration.
Another is his bad grammar. Nor
is his choice of words usually of
the best, A small vocabulary is one
of the factors that mars any one's
speech. It is strikingly noticeable In
the case of the college man. There
Is little excuse for the man with the
higher education being a sinner, in
this case.
One can not walk the length of the
campus without hearing, "I -alnt"
going to do so and so. "Alnt" is the
crime of every one's conversation,
but most noticeable when a collegian,
who ought to know better, is guilty.
"Don't" is none too euphonious. The
use of "at" In "I got off at HItt
Street" is very common, while most
everyone abuses the word "Say" in
salutatlons such as "Say? Where are
you going?" There are many other
faults of ordinary speech which are
widely used by people of nicer sen
sibilities who ought to know better
and who ought to guard against such
carelessness in conversation.
Everyone does not resort to writ
ing as a business; in fact many peo-
pie seldom write. They can not be
expected to be scrupulously perfect
in things In which they do not spec
ialize. But every person in a college
community where higher learning is
the commodity most generally sought,
the power of speech Is universally en
joyed. Man and woman alike use
spoken language many hours "every
day for conveying thoughts. The
medium for transmission of thought
so generally and widely used de
serves careful study. The expression
of one's thoughts in perfect English
i tamps the speaker as a person of re
finement and culture. The posses
sion of all college degrees known and
a professorship of science In the
greatest of colleges would not make
the ungraJnmatlcal man seem cul
tured. A person's speech is the beginning
of an observer's estimation of him.
Study the English language and ex
press yourself clearly and nicely and
you will 'appear at your best 'before
others.
The Literary Trawler
Do It Now.
If with pleasure you are viewing any
work a man is doing,
If you like him or you love him tell
him now;
Don't withhold your approbation till
the parson makes oration
As he lies with snowy lilies o'er his
brow;
For, no matter how you shout it, he
won't really care about it;
He won't know how many teardrops
you have shed;
If you think some praise is due him,
Now's the time to slip it to him,
For he cannot read his tombstone
when he's dead!
More than fame and more than money
Is the comment kind and sunny.
And the hearty, warm approval of a
friend,
For it gives to life a savor, and It
makes you stronger, braver,
And it gives you heart and spirit to
the end;
If he earns your praise bestow it;
If you like him let him know It;
Let the words of true encouragement
be said;
Do not wait till life is over and he's
underneath the clover,
For he cannot read his tombstone
when he's dead. Selected.
The Open Column
Again, Clean Up.
Editor The MIssourlan: The idea
of civic pride should be encouraged
among the people of Columbia. The
"city beautiful" should be the slognn.
A "paint up and clean up day" this
spring is the most obvious means to
this end. .
Columbia has as many visitors as
towns twice its size and for this rea
son should always present a neat ap
pearance. For Instance during Jour
nalism Week there will be a great
many visitors here and the impres
sion which they get of Columbia will
be aired all over the state, and other
states, too.
So let's all get together and make
the "clean up days" April 28 and 29
the banner days of all. D.
Y. W. C A. WORKERS HERE
Una Sherrebcck WW Talk to M. U.
Women on "Association Work.''
Miss Ina Sherrebeck, territorial
secretary of the south-central field of
,the Y. W. C. A., arrived in Columbia
Friday night and will remain until
Wednesday conferring with the differ
ent committees of the Y. W. C. A.
and giving talks before the women of
the University.
The Y. W. C. A. will meet Wednes
day instead of the usual time which
is Thursday, in order that Miss Sher
rebeck may address -the meeting. She
.will talk on "Association Work." and
will explain in detail the different
works of the Y. W. C. A. The meet
ing will be In Room 205, Academic
Hall, at 4:15 o'clock.
UNIVERSITY MISSOURIAN
PafclUbed dally except Saturday by the
taaenu in in Benool or Journalism at
the Unlrentty of Hlstonrl.
JOHN W. JEWELL
Manager
University Mluonrlaa Association.
(Inc.): Directors: Pres-
l2ttSUY Jueni. x-. a. unason: J.
K35flBBbV A. Murray. Bnssell M.
Bandy. Jr., O. Griffith
Carpenter, Ralph H.
Turner. D. D. Rosen
felder, A. C. Bayleu,
Iran H. Epperson. H.
W. Halley.
jfisan n?V
w
Office: Virginia Building;, Downstairs
Entered at the postoffice, Columbia, Mo.,
as cvuuu.ciBBs mail.
Address all communications to
UNIVEBSITY MISSOUBIAN.
Columbia. Missouri.
Phones: Business, 55; News, 274.
SnbscrlDtlon Rates: Year. 1220: month. 23
cents; copy, 6 cents.
GIYE PHYSICS DEMONSTRATION
C. H. S. Students Perform Practical
Experiments at Assembly Period.
At the weekly assembly period a the
Columbia High School Friday morn
ing the physics class performed ex
periments that are practical in every
day use. Miss Mary Patton and Miss
Grace Lockrldge explained and showed
how sound was transmitted. Arline
Henderson and Wilbur Jarvis told
the principle of the suction pump and
gave some of the practical uses to
which it is put
Lucian Remley and Moss Davis
demonstrated the air pump. William
Coleman and Melvin Shutt explained
the principle of the siphon and told
how it was put to use on the farm.
Pulleys and their use were explained
by Herbert Eubank. Modern usages
of the electric magnets were demon
strated by George McCowen and John
Reese. An explanation and demon
stration of the electric bell and ma
chine was given by Earl Bailey, Leo
McKee, Vivian Cannon and George
Brown.
After the program by the physics
class, Miss Bell Hope Robinson gave
a short sketch of Virgil's Aeneld
which will be presented by the Latin
class in the Christian College audi
torium tomorrow night.
SHORT COURSE MEN AT WORK
Nine of the Tea la Creamery Class
Have Beea Employed.
Nine of the ten men who recently
finished the creamery short course
have obtained positions. R. W. Brice
Is at Checotah, Ok.; T. C. DIckman at
Springfield, Mo.; Robert Dillon at
Holdon, Mo.; E. L. Brockschmidt at
Cole Camp, Mo.; J. P. Donavon at
Tulsa, Okla.; Roy Mallins at Kansas
City; Otis Peebles at Marlonvllle. Mo.;
George Robb at Omaha, Neb.; Morris
Suleyman at Sugar Creek, Mo. Ben
Zehh has had two or three offers but
has not accepted any yet
Baptist Church Gaining Members. .
The First Baptist Church of Colum
bia has received fifty-seven members
this year. Several were baptized last
night The church will observe
Mother's Day the second Sunday in
May.
Ice.
For good service, prompt delivery,
and courteous treatment, calf 478.
Hill, Davis & Watson. Ice Company
Office, old Ice plant (Adv. 182-tf.)
BOONE NATIONAL
SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION . . .
DIRECTORS:
S. F. Canity. L. M. Dtfoe. Marshall Gar
Jon. J. C. Jontt. C. O. Sliders. S. M.
Stevinson. W. S.St. Clair.
OFFICERS:
S. F. Canity, Prtiidtnt: L. M. Dtfoe, Vicf
Piesident;S. C. Hunt, Treasurer: Mc Bain e
Cf Clark. Attorneys: IV. S. St. Clair. Secy.
Office 24-4. Guitar Bid.
3fore Books for Historical Library.
F. A. Sampson, secretary of the
State Historical Society, has returned
from St. Louis where he went in the
Interest of the society. He has
brought back 212 books, municipal
works, civil war books, historical and
biographical to add to the collection
of the society.
BEJB2?H
COTRELL &
LEONARD
Albany, N. Y.
makers of
CAPS and GOWNS
To Harvard. Yale.
Princeton, Cornell, Co
lumbia and the other
leading- American Unl
verities. Class Con
tracts A Specialty.
1-55833
:25E!T)iinotjaT
the
cities in
oma and
the Katy
wsiucs tan ocrvc
"you 'best, either
as a traveler or as a
shipper of freight.
t seek the opportonitj of KrricsTon and win cheerfully
tcrnuh any information deilred aboat rate and
H. L. WILSON, Ticket Agt.,
Columbia, Mo.
Star it Theatre Tonight
2 VAUDEVILLE ACTS ft
PHOTO PLAYS L
ROSE ST. CLARE
Comedy, Singing and Dancing.
KENNEDY 6 BURT
Topical Songs.
No advance in prices. First show 7:15
r
v
CLASSY MODELS IN
LADIES FOOTWEAR
1111
A visit to our store will ac
quaint you with the shoes of
fashion. Our attempt is to
handle the models of styles'
decision.
V.
till
Lipscomb-Garth Shoe Co
(on Broadway)
Picnickers Go to Brushwood Lake.
Several parties of picnickers spent
yesterday in the neighborhood of
Brushwood Lake. One crowd, chap
eroned by Mrs. Benta Whitaker, at
tempted to walk the seven miles back
to town, and were so unfortunate as
to be far away from shelter when a
quick shower broke.
Knox Connty Say Get Farm Adviser.
Prof. A. J. Meyer, director of the
agricultural extension service bureau,
went to Edina Saturday to meet the
officers of the Knox County farm bu
reau to discuss plans for getting a
county agent for Knox County.
K. U. Beat the Chinese Team.
The University of Kansas defeated
the Chinese baseball team of the Uni
versity of Hawaii by a score of 4-3
Thursday.
Bosti
I Ton Needn't (-'F Real Year
Cboke Tour V i so una
JCi3Li MJJJM lent J" jjw c -
lnc to wear NEVBBBIND. It can't
socles just enough to keep them
smooth. ...
Mercerized. 25c: double crip. 23c;
Diiav, vw j -."
ueorffo jrrois vo ata-ncra. lxmioa.
11
:c
TOBACCO and pipes are
-- like tunes an
fiddles. Only th
best of , em live to
grow old with that
mellow touch o' age
like VELVET.
(tffi
Ki j-r -TH
&&h.imK&f Sa
In VELVET the taste and fragrance that Nature puts into
Kentucky's best tobacco, Barley de Luxe, is brought out
to the full with that aged-in-the-wood mellowness that
makes VELVET the Smoothest Tobacco, 19c tins and 5c
metal-lined bag,. &ffJfy3S!G
JL
3C
31
rfcHLBOABD 4BJ
TALK ABOUT' fjffV "i
iTDt"
Marquette Hotel
err nrire
.A HOTEL fbryour W:f6.MotierorSIsta: '
.bbbbK bbVbbE7SS33
aHaBBBVaalKvaVfe?r
BBaSaBBSan i 3bhvCmS 3? ss
,v'- ir !" iTBmWI
tfyi &2ailta5fr3
Get In Swing
TTS golf or tennis or base
ball that'll put you in
swing, that'll make you forget
spring tiredness. Get equip
ped today.
Spalding Made at
the Co-op. Golf,
Tennis and Base
ball Goods.
Profits to Purchasers
CO-OP
i Academic Hall
READ THIS DIRECTORY.
C. L. O'Bryan, D. C.
Experienced
CHIROPRACTOR
Suite 16 to 20
ELVIRA BUILDING
COAL
PHONE 470
H. R. Jackson Coal Co.
F. R. DYSON
Flwfciig ait Heatisg BeprirlBg
gakkly and leatly aeie
PHONE 1SS WHITE
U S. 19th St.
We cordially solicit accounts of Faculty Members andStudertts
Central Bank
Columbia, : : : : Missouri
GEO. B. DORSEY, President
W. E. FARLEY. Vice-President
IRA T,. G. STONE. Cashier
J. W. SAPP. Assistant Cashlei
Clean and Progressive.
THE STORE TO BUT WALL
l PAPER
trim toe paper, so 70a eaa
Haas; It.
ALEX. STEWART, 7 Biwj.
GEDHARDT & FENTON
Ezperieaced Iaay
Chiropractors
Suite 229-222 Omltar Blag;
Pfceae 1SS6 White
Ycc Sing
will call for your
Laundry
12 8.7th.
Phone 745
SHOE SEPUXOrfi
, PISKEFS ORCHESTRA
F. W. Pirkej, Xaaager
Telephone - - - - - 632
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