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The Evening Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1917-1920, September 26, 1917, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066315/1917-09-26/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE EVENING MISSOUBIAX, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 56, 1917.
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ADVISED TO KETCRN TO WORK
ALLIES NOT FOR PEACE NOW
3,000 Back to Norfolk Nary Yards Say
Union Officers.
Ily Associated Tress
"WASHINGTON', Sept. 26. Inter
national officials of the labor unions
inrniiT! in the strike of more than
3,000 mechanics at the Norfolk Navy 's awaited with a certain amount of
Yards have advised the head of the curiosity here I find that in well in
local unions there to return the men f0rmcd quarters, the terms of the
Reply of Germany to Pope Is Not Ex
pected to Be Final.
(By Karl Walter.)
LONDON, Sept. 24. While the Ger
man answer to the Pope's peace note
to work pending negotiations to ad-
Just the differences.
Red Cross Chapters Must Report.
The American lied Cross has com
pleted plans for obtaining frequent
standardized reports from all of its
2,600 chapters as to their financial
transactions and membership, says a
letter from the national headquarters.
Under the new system of decentral
ized administration recently adopted
under the direction of Harvey D. Gib
son, general manager of the Red
Cross, the chapters will report in de
tail every month to the thirteen di
vision managers, who in turn will
summarize the records of their re
spective divisions and report to na
tional headquarters. All of the work
formerly handled by the Bureau of
Membership at Washington will now
be divided between these thirteen di
vision headquarters, at each of which
a prominent business man, volunteer
ing his sen ice, is in charge.
Assembly Dance Crowd to He Limited.
The management of the Daniel
Boone Tavern announced today that
the number of couples to be allowed
on the floor of the ballroom at the as
sembly dances would be limited to
seventy-five. The number attending
last week's dance was perhaps the
largest in the history of University
assemblies. The new cafe at the tav
ern will be open for one hour after
the dance for special plate-supper
parties.
Funeral of J. S. Chandler Tomorrow.
The funeral of J. S. Chandler will
be held at his home on West Broad
way at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning.
The Rev. Madison A. Hart will con
duct the services.
answer will not in any case be regard
ed as having any influence upon the
situation beyond possibly indicating
what is the internal political situation
in Germany today. Even should the
answer contain the large measure of
political restitution to Belgium fore
shadowed by a certain section of the
German press, this will not draw from
the Allies anything in the nature of a
response which could be interpreted
as a step toward peace. One might
go still further, to judge by the best
opinion, and they say that even should
Germany offer a settlement in France
as well which would in itself be ac
ceptable to the Allies for instance on
the basis of the dis-annexation of
Alsace Lorraine it would only be re
garded as an attempt to cause dis
sension among the Allies.
It is not expected that the German
answer of today will Include any such
strong bids for peace talk, but there is
little doubt that, having taken what
ever length of a step in that direction
the answer may be, the German gov
ernment will before long be forced to
go to greater lengths in the only war
policy no iv open to it. These are the
more straightforward peace intrigues
anticipated in my cable of August 24th,
and, as between a German debacle andj
a gradual approach to surrender such I
as these indicate, the latter still ,
seems to be the more probable course;
of events. j
The reasons for not accepting any
steps of this kind as a basis for
negotiations, may seem obvious to a!
people naturally disposed to let Ger-'
many wait until they have tried their '
own steel upon her. It may be inter
esting, however, to know just why,
here in London," a settlement on the
SheaffefS
SELF FILLING PEN v-
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"221
western front would not be considered
a basis for negotiations.
In the first place complete victory is
generally believed to be In sight In
England and France there Is absolute
assurance that this will come with the
aid of American arms and perhaps be
fore. But a new aspect of the situation
is presented by conditions on the
eastern front. Here Germany holds
the greatest extent of her conquered
territory. To accept a western settle
ment, without complete restritutlon of
this territory to the Russian and
Polish democracies, would virtually
'mean that Eneland and Frnni-p worn
betraying Russia, now, of all coun
tries in the world the one in which it
is our most serious duty to aid in
making the world safe for democracy.
Then there is the other eastern
front, where German militarism has
set up the Turkish barbarians as the
VAt iTTinupnpwl ncencinQ rt i rttrta TTnv
the Armenians, now more than ever.
it is essential that the new Russian
democracy should have the fullest
support "of the Allies. One result of
the revolution has been a consider
able withdrawal from reconquered
Armenian territory, if this is not to
remain under the abominable Turk, if
In Palestine the hopes of the Jews are
not to be defeated, if Germany is to be
prevented from setting up in the
strategically important area of Asia
Minor a military alliance that at any
moment, might set out to terrorize any
one of three continents, a southeastern
settlement just as humiliating to
Prussianism, as restitution and re
storation in France and Belgium, will
be equally essential.
To make Europe, Asia, and Africa
safe for the great democratic develop
ments which victory promises all
peoples, "Germany and Austria must be
shut out of this area altogether. The
obvious means of defeating any future
unholy alliance of Turk and Hun is a
strong democratic settlement in the
Balkan States. This imperatively in
volves a Teuton withdrawal from
Serbia and Roumania also, as com
plete as any that can be effected from
Belgium and France. In this light.
1 quite apart from the justice due to the
Balkan peoples now under the Prus
sian heel (and the case of Serbia is not
one bit less hard if less heroic than
that of Belgium) it is clear that any
propoals put forward by Germany to
make peace talk will be regarded as
intrigue, if they do not include a
surrender of conquered territory in
the Balkans and abandonment of the
Turk to his fate.
So whatever the terms of the.
Kaiser's answer to the Pope they will
not alter the fact, that the Allies are
determined to obtain a settlement
which obviously can only be won by
the thorough military defeat of the
Central Powers.
SCOUTS TO AID SECOND LOAN
3Ieetinp of Columbia Members To Be
Held Friday.
The Boy Scouts of Columbia will
meet Friday night in the Y. M. C. A.
Auditorium to discuss the part they
are to take in the next liberty loan
campaign. Medals are to be awarded
to Spencer Shore, Corwin Edwards,
Clarence Moss and Harold Green for
their work in selling bonds in the first
government war issue.
Can't Make Wage Increase, They Say.
ISy Associated I'ress
WASHINGTON, Sept. 26. Mine op
erators in Indiana, Ohio, Illinois and
Western Pennsylvania notified the
miners' representatives in conference
here today that they would be unable
to meet the miners' demand for a
wage increase of about 25 per cent
unless the government revises the
prices on bituminous coal.
RYZON
"THE PERFECT BAKING POWDER"
RYZON
$1.00
Baking Book Free With Each Pound Package
(One to a Customer)
W. B. NOWELL
Wul MvtW " jy Mirl luff
1S
Mr
Tow Are Invited
Cu
to an
illlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!l!l!lIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIt:
To University Students and Registrants
of Columbia Schools
C
Junior Ci
HRISTIAN JUNIOR L0LLEGE
(founded 1851 by James Shannon, President
of the University of Missouri) invites your in
vestigation of its Special Departments before
registering.
Private lessons arranged lo suit student schedules.
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 22 new pianos,
E including 5 grand pianos. More than 200 stu-
dents. Isaac Edward Norris, Ph. B. ( Pupil of
Leschetizky), Director. Miss Anna Laura John-
E sou, Head of Vocal Department. Teacher for 15
years in Eastern Conservatories; associate teacher
with Perley Dunn Aldrich. Robert J. White,
E Head of Violin Department; associate teacher
E with Ferdinand Schaefer of Indianapolis Con-
servatory.
3 University men students, graduates of our Con-
servatory within the past 4 years, now at the
head of Music Departments in Illinois and Kansas.
SCHOOL OF ART, Miss Mary Gordon Rok, (Art
E Institute, Chicago), third year as Director.
SCHOOL OF EXPRESSION, Miss Harriet Jean
Trappe, (Emerson College, and Academy of Dra-
made Art), eighth year as Director.
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 'Mrs.
Marion W. Hertig, (pupil of Madame Pote and
of Bacon Ni's Posse), seventh year Director.
Gymnasium; Athletic Field; Basketball; Tennis.
A $10,000.00 Natatorium, perfect in sanitation and
and equipment, completed November, 1917.
3 For appointment With Secretary, or, with Director
E of Art, Expression, Physical Education, call
44-Green. For Director of Conservatory, call 607.
Staff of Cressdt Named.
The senior class of the Columbia
High School yesterday afternoon
elected the following staff for the
Cresset: Editor-in-chief, Ermont Mont
gomery; assistant editor-in-chief.
Alice Frances White; literary editor.
Mildred Hudson; assistant literary
editors, Authur Baeimon, Madge La-
Force, Raymond Miller: art editor, I
Cliffe Wiggins; assistant art editors.
Tom Everiy, James Taylor, Aueusta
Spencer; athletic editors. Edna
Baskett, Eleanor Trowbridge. Robert
Braily, Butler Wloods; business
manager, John Palton; assistant
business manager, Estill Guitar.
Exposition of the
Fall Modes
Tomorrow, Thursday, Sept. 27
From 9 A. M. until 5 P. M.
Introducing the new modes for Autumn in their most beauti
ful and authentic developments, offering models of charming in
dividuality in Millinery, Wearing Aparel of all kinds for wom
en, Silks, Woolen Dress Goods, etc.
Br
1
MUSIC
By the Quadrangle Orchestra 10 to 11:30 a. m.
and 2:30 to 5 p. m.
Come out and bring your friends
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY
rOK nKN'T Modern G-room Imu-ie.
Ill:: I'.iquin. fSTt per month. V. K.
rarley, phone rM-Black. F-1S
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if John H. Estes Dry Goods Co. m k (li
-.51 .Yf 7fS 11 IJm,V:m I S'fl 3 3 M WHI
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- REGULAR FELLOWS -
ARMY SHOES
MUNSON LAST
$5 and $6
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800
Broadway
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MRS.LW.ST.CLAIR-MOSS,
President
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