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The weekly tribune and the Cape County herald. (Cape Girardeau, Mo.) 1914-1918, November 24, 1916, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066617/1916-11-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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Cap Normal School.
Cape Girardeau, Mt.
WJ
H
H. H
THE TRIBUNE'S CIRCULa
TION IS THE LARGEST IN
CAPE GIRARDEAU.
THE TRIBUNE COVERS
SOUTHEAST i-MISSOURI
LIKE THE DEW", t t
NEWSPAPER THAT PRINTS ALL THE NEWS THAT'S FIT TO PRINT AND PRINTS IT FIRST
VOL. XV
THE CAPE COUNTY HERALD, CAPE GIRARDEAU MISSOURI, NOVEMBER 24. 1916.
NUMBER 46
15 YEAR OLD LAD DR. VORBECK TO
WINS 2ND PRIZE TEST LEGALITY OF
IN CORN CONTEST PHARMACY LAW
QUADRILLE BALL
CRAIEVA TAKEN
PRIZE WINNING BOY FARMERS OF CALFIORNIA
FOR LADIES OF BY THE GERMANS,
60 YRS. COMING MANY CAPTURED
t' v: w w
04
I
' o ei t a
I? f v?
Harold Lewis, a Cape County
Boy, Produces 97 Bushels
on One Acre of Ground.
SHANNON COUNTY IS
GIVEN FIRST PRIZE
Eric Palmer of Eminence Gar
nered 107 Bushels From One
Acre Field Crop Slumps.
Harold Lewis, a lo-year old Cape
County boy, won the second prize in
the annual com contest, hold liy the
Cane Normal School, under the super
vision of Seth Babcock, the well-known
agricultural expert.
Farmers living in all sections of t
Southeast .Missouri participated in the
contest. Eric Palmer, of Eminence,
Shannon County, who produced slight
ly more than 107 bushels of corn on
an acre of ground, carried away the
highest honor, according to the list
of awards announced by Prof. Babcock J
last night. Palmer is 20 years old.
Young Lewis, who lives a few miles
southwest of this city, produced 97
bushels of corn on an acre of ground,
which he tilled alone. This lad's rec
ord is remarkable because of his youth
and his inexperience. When he an
nounced that he was going to compete
with the champion farmers of South
east Missouri, his parents told him he
was only wasting his efforts, but they
wished him good luck.
He prepared the ground according
to the rules laid down by Prof. Bab
cock, and he followed the advice of
the Normal expert to the letter in tak- j
ing care of the crop. His success was
the boast of the neighborhood, and
veteran farmers came miles to inspect j
the growing corn and see the youthfuJr;
agriculturist in action.
His acre of corn made his father's
crop look like the work of an amateur.
When the stalks quit growing and be
gan to take on a comber hue, they,
stood like saplings with ears a foot
long hanging two on a stalk.
Prof. P.abcock .stated last night that
Harold was the youngest farmer to
land a prize. The child's efforts came
as a distinct surprise to Mr. Babrock.
Palmer, who captured the first
award, has a reputation as a champion
corn grower. Last year he produced
121 bushels of corn on the sam acre
of ground that grew 107.t this year.
Prof. Babcack stated that there was
a noticeable decrease in the yield in
almost every locality this year as com
pared with the crop grown last season.
This is attributed to the unseasonable
year, which showed a slump in the
production of all kinds of grain
throughout the country.
The yields of the prize winners in
the 1916 contest, as announced by
Prof. Babcock, were:
Eric Palmer's yield was 105 bushels
and 9 pounds; Harold Lewis gathered
in 07 bushels and r'.'.-a pounds of corn.
Matthias Brown of Catawissa, Frank
lin County, 00 bushels; Richard Hop
per of Sikeston, Scott County, 81
bushels and 10 pounds: Fank Yount,
Quaker, Washington County, 76 bush
els and 20 pounds; William Stum
baughn, Jewett, Madison County, 75
bushels and 19 pounds; Claude Ed
wards, Holland, Pemiscott County, 57
bushels and 55 pounds; Samuel Mc
Kee, Zalma. Bollinger County, 56
bushels and " pounds; Ernest Funk,
Annapolis, Iron County, 522 bushels
and 16 pounds; Eric Duncan, Tied
mont, Wayne County, 45 bushels.
ILLMO GIRL OPERATED ON"
Miss Emma Roth Has Appendix Re
moved at Hospital.
An operation for appendicitis was
performed yesterday on Miss Emma
Roth, the daughter of Casper Roth of
lllmo. She is a patient at the St.
Francis Hospital, where the operation
was performed by Dr. L. S. Mayfield,
the family physician.
Miss Roth was brought to the Cape
Wednesday morning, and after an ex
amination it was found that an opera
tion was necessary. The young lady
recovered soon from the effects of the
anaesthetic and is thought to be on
the way of complete recovery. She
is the daughter of a well-known farm
ei of near lllmo.
Employs M. A. Dempsey and
Senator Lane to Fight the
State Board.
DENIES BOARD CAN
DESTROY PROFESSION
Arbitrary Authority of Commis
sioners Can Ruin a Physi
cian, He Shows.
Dr. J. C. Vorbeck yesterday employ
er Sonator Thomas F. Lane and M. A.
j Dempsey, two well-known attorneys.
to defend him against the State Hoard
of Pharmacy, which is endeavoring to
revoke Dr. Vorbeck's certificate to
practice pharmacy
Dr. Vorbeck was given a license to
practice pharmacy by the State Board
in 1901 and practiced under it for
eight years. He permitted his license
to elapse in 190!) by not paying the
j annual tax of $1. He was not prac
ticing pharmacy at the time and per
mitted the matter to go by default.
When he was ready to open the
Vorbeck-Dohogne drag store on Good
Hope street several months ago, he
sent the State Board the amount of
the penalty for permitting his license
lo lapse.together with thetotal amount
of the license for eight years. After
holding this money for a month, the
board returned it to Dr. Vorbeck with
a statement, declaring that he would
have to take another examination. In
the meantime certain druggists in the
Cape furnished the board with the in
formation that Dr. Vorbeck had em-
pioyed a druggist who was not licensed
to prat.tice in this State, and the board
threatened prosecution,
n Vorbprk ,vrole the Dvesident of
the body a letter, inviting him to go
into the courts and test the law. The
physician also declared that lie had
no intentions of taking the examma
tion. "If I was a druggist when 1
began the proctice of the profession in
1001, I must be just as competent to
practice
it now," Dr. Vorbeck con-
tended.
He also says that the action of the
board is prompted by spiie work on
the part of certain individuals in this
city.
Dr. Vorbeck last night issued the fol
lowing statement, explaining his posi
tion: "The State Board
of Pharmacy, j
knowing mat- i am not omy a i"at
only a prac-
tittoner of medicine and surgery, nui
that I was a qualified pharmacist of ,- t w M.,partv 0f Cairo 111.
Qt.t. f Mi..,.,,..; fo, ten vears1' . , ' " ' ' , . f r 1
--" "
before their present law, which the
druggists' association slipped through
the State Legislature went into effect,
presumes to harass me into a m-j
quishment of my right to practice a J
profession which I not only studied for
but which I actually carried through
with many sacrifices.
"After spending twelve years in lit
erary institutions fitting myself for
the study of medicine and pharmacy,
and walking two miles to college every
day for eight months during three
years, I qualified myself for the prac
tice of medicine, surgery and phar
macy in the State of Missouri. I
qualified in these professions and have
in my possession certificates from the
State of Missouri showing that I have
submitted the proper evidence of my
qualifications to practice them.
"The State Board of Health knows
my ability and accords me the right
to handle and dispense to the public
any drug, poison or medicine under
the sun; but despite the fact that I
also have a certificate as a registered
pharmacist, the members of the State
Board of Pharmacy demand that I
either employ a druggist or permit
them to again examine me or rather
quiz me on the subjects of materia
medica and pharmacy. Why? Be
cause they either are urged or they
are inclined to use their official power
as an engine of malice and spite. The
law permits them to accept the phar
macy certificate I have as an evi
dence of my qualification to practice
pharmacy in the State of Missouri, but
they prefer to arbitrarily oppose this
course.
They prefer to 'weed' me out
in the language of the president of
the board and I take it that this would
(Continued on pajje three)
Z tpZe &L - itwMAr Sr
: f t??
ft Jwi I - m I n Vsu Ft IP? f If sA fi
I r . . - ; I u w w uL-J Uua L-J P u U J UU U Pi
Twenty-four prize-wiuniii- boy farmers of the stale of California Arrived in New York .-iiy. :ifier malting a
transcontinental tour. During their two lays' Mop in the metropolis, the boys were taken aroiind to all the in
terestink' places. The purpose of the tour is to obtain new ideas in farming and the market in;: of their proiluee.
KiH-h boy makes notes of everything of interest that comes under his observation. The c.penses of the tour are
being paid by the University of California.
GRANT HEGWOOD IS
RELEASED ON BOND
Portasevillc Pos.mas.er Coder
.ri'JI Pr'
pr..tng$S2J.
Grant Hegwood, postmaster of Hay- j
wiii-d Afo . who wax 5irreteI on Vnv !
11, was released vesterdav on a $1000 '
bond, furnished by Robert Schoolfield j (,ai nP1 was solemnized last night at j G. Carroll, will be he'd this afternoon
and John Brinklcy. both of Portage-j the home of the bride's mother. Mrs. ! and evening at the home of Miss Car
ville, Mo. He had been in jail ever i'f. B. Garner, of 1001 Bloomfield street, j '-oil, 227 South Spanish street. Sam-
since his m-rest. ',
Hegwood, who is about CO vpar.s old. j
was indicted by the October Federal ;
Grand Jury on a charge of misappro- !
priaiing the Government funds en-j
trusted to his care. The warrant ac-;
.uses ...... ... d soo.t.m. ... .......
arrested, Hegwood explained that he
.! had aot discriminated between his pri- I
I vate funds and the Government money,
land that he might have gotten his ac-
(counts twisted in that manner.
i His case will be tried on Jan. 20!
(in the United States District Court.
The bond that gave him his liberty is
returnable on that day.
SWEET WATER FACTORY DLD j
. , . I
Buvs Spanish Street I
W. E. McCarty
,
Tne Rajp of tn(, svvoot water plant on i
South Spa
gouth ypanish street was made last;
. Grassham of Paducah,
me teai was arranged ny i.cu vm-;
yjml the real Pstato Ir,an. c.rassham
n boen in town P0vcra days lo.)king
after bus;ness affairs and also making
a,T enients for the sale of the prop-
prtv
McCarty has the agency of a miner
al water firm in Cairo and intends to J
operate the Spanish street plant in
connection with the 'other. The sale
w i eoonn
price is said to be $2000.
This plant was damaged by fire
some time last winter. It had not been
in operation since. The rumor that
the plant would change hands had been
current for some time.
GOVERNMENT AND ROADS
TO TEST LAW TOGETHER
Railroads Permit ted to Pick Suit
Which Will be Made
Test Case.
Washington. D. C, Xov. 2". An
important move was made today lead
ing to an early decision of the United
States Supreme Court on the validity
of teh Eight-Hour Law, when the
railroads signed an agreement with the
Attorney-General to co-operate with
the Government to rush the case
through the higher courts.
Under this agreement, the repre
sentatives of the railroads will select
from a large number of cases one that
is typical of all issues involved.
All other proceedings will be sus
pended until the Supreme Court has
passed on this case.
The Government agrees to permit
the railroads to make this selection
j themselves. From all indications the
case of the Santa Fe Railroad will be
selected as the test case. The decision
in this case will be universal and be
applied to all others.
EDNA GARNER WEDSHOCAL ARTISTS WILL
MEMPHIS, TENN., MAN I GIVE EXHIBIT TODAY
, R. UwMa orieia!c9'at M.rri-
I --Se Ceremony of Cae Girl
. lo II. E. Rajroer.
The wedding of H. E. Kaymer of
em',n'
Tenn., and Miss Edna K.
: The ceremnnv e: novfM-ivnjJ Vr Pa..
'
J' K Larson. Paor of the Presby-
torian Church. Friends and relatives
were present at the impressive event
an)j bestowed their congratulations un-
i
,on newIvwefs
' y P'-
j came acquainted with her husband
(when in Memphis. They have known
! each other for about icrllt VMrj TKn
bridegroom is the owner of a large
poolroom and restaurant in Memphis.
The couple will depart today for
.Memphis to visit the parents of the
bridegroom. After a short stay
in
Memphis they will make a trip north
Jni lour me Aonnorn Mates, iiiev
I will stay in Chicago for several weeks ;
and visit other points of interest.
After completing their honeymoon
,.; -r.- ..n.i -m... t?o,., .-it i i.
L ,
! t Memphis, where they intend to
.....
make their home. A nicelv furnished
apartment is awaiting the arrival of
the newlyweds.
SOW KILLS BIRD DOG
OF CLAUDE D. SPEAK
. ,)it.k s CaHRju and Kiod hr ,fo?
j h-i..-.., vt u- r. .
h:!e Flushing Quail in
Stoddard County,
I),ck c,aU(le Speak's veteran bird
i dog, which was sent down to the
j Speak farm in Stoddard County to
spend the winter, is dead. The old
pointer was assassinated by a sow,
which he encountered while attempting
to flush a covey of quail last week.
The dog made a stand in a thicket,
while hunting with several boys. When
one of the hunters urged him to flush
the birds, he rushed into the under
brush. He leaped into the bed of a
large sow and her pigs. She seized
Dick before he could get out of the
brush and killed him. The boys made
j an effort to rescue the dog, but the
. enraged hog worked too rapidly for
them.
Dick had been the property of Mr.
Speak since puppyhood. He was ene
of the best hunting dogs in the city.
Mr. Speak sent the pointer to his farm
because the dog. due to old age, was
becoming savage.
BITTEN BY SNAKE. HE
OPERATES ON HIMSELF
Albany, Ga.. Nov. 23. -Because he
had presence of mind to quickly cut out
the flesh surrounding the wound in his
leg caused by a rattlesnake's bite, Wil
K -J 14
IJ
w?3
Pupils of Miss Carroll Will Show
j. Skill i. Chi..
Display.
I
A display of the artistic work in!
china, made bv the class of Miss Marie
! riles of luster sind etobine- will lu
I
j show n to tnose who are interested in
! this work and wish to see the display.
' Among the art pieces to be exhibited)
is a medallion of Richard Carroll. I
i
I father of the
artisf,
who is giving
this display. The original of this me
dallion was modeled by Miss Carroll,
who later had it cast in bronze. The
medallion is about 12 inches in
diameter.
Miss Carroll, a scholar of Professor
Bringhurst formerly of Washington
University in St. Louis, is a talented
artist, and has produced some remark
able pieces of art.
She has a class of eight, all being
either married women or young girls.
Professor Bringhurst, who received his
training and schooling in the art
i sVionls of the old country, is one of
L, t- t r i i . ;
the greatest artists of his class in this
country. It was only recently that he
severed his connections with the uni
versity to devote all his time to the
art of sculpture.
PREDICTS COLD WILL SEND
NEGROES SOUTH AGAIN
Atlanta Ga.. Xov. 2". It has been
generally believed in Atlanta that a
large number of negroes had felt the
mysterious call of the North in the
weeks preceding the national election.
The total number from this city alone
is said to be fully 2500 and this is light
as compared with the inroads made on
some sections.
Many residents of this city have re
called a similar exodus of negroes to
the North about ten years ago. These
persons feel confident all the blacks
who have left their homes will find
their way back before many weeks
have passed, for, they say, it was zero
weather that made them return before.
With the coming of snow and freezing
weather conditions it is believed the
negroes will return.
bur Wortman saved his life where
medical attention later would have
failed. He has been pronounced en
tirely out of danger by attending phys
icians. Wortman was spending the day in
the woods with a party of friends. He
became separated from the others and
was unable to attract their attention
when the repile bit him. After cutting
ithe poisoned flesh out he tied the
wound up with his handkerchief and
made his way to a negro cabin nearby.
Cemetery Association Plans!
Unique Fete to Obtain
Lorimier Funds.
WOMEN WILL DANCE IN!
HOOP SKIRTS, HONEST!
Costumes to be WbVn Will Be
Patterned After Martha
Washington's Styles.
A uad)iile ball, at which only la
dies of" (!0 years ami over and clad
in hoop-skirts and other Colonial
aim
ent. will dance, j
one of the unique
features planned bv the meinbers of' .' . , '
the ailachian lountrv. A larjre ntiai
tbe Cemetery Association in an effort , hpr pris.,ners were capture,!, bt.t
to obtain the amount of money neces- (the exact number was not stated,
.-arv to build a pagoda over the graves I
m ion i.uis i.onmier ami nis wiiq.
This entertainment was agreed up
on at a meeting of the association held
at the home of Mrs. lvkhan
one
of the charter members of the organ
ization. Mrs. I!aler. Mrs. G. W. P.ahn
and Mrs. 1-empsey. who helped to or
ganize the Cemetery Association, yes
terday agreed to take part in the
r 1-..- ... " "
. 1 !. ' " Z, " L
j. , ,;0. ,vilM, ,,,,, ,,
,;,, ,lam.c.
Hie quadrille, although regarded by
dancing masters as one of the most re-
Hined of all tcrpsichorcan steps, has
. . . i ii
not heen popular since ame-itemim
davs. Abraham Lincoln danced the j
quadrille to a sublime degree.
It was
; his favorite dance although he was
called a cat when it came to waltz -
inr The htmnv huir the fox trot ami
. 41,'it li'it'i-k li.nt ii.lt. 1 1 l:l VI7P.1 i
UU1" i- i'-'
by Gov. Major, were not known
Lincoln's time.
Mrs. Ella Dempsey conceived the j T!ie heaviest fighting was encounter
idea and it made an instantaneous hit. i rd on the south side of the city, near
Even- member present agreed that a jtj)a Guggenheim properties. The loss
quadrille ball would gel the money. t,s on o0la sides were very heavy, it
It has not been definitely .hcidec j was stated. Villa is said to have had
whether the dance will be given at the , personal command of the troops that
Elks Club or not. A committee ha rm,ght in the southern part of the city,
been appointed to wait on the oi!:cia's Another band took possession of the
of the club and ask for permission to western part of the city, but refrain
use the ballroom, jed from lighting. At Juarez Carran
The dancers will be ladies who are.. admitted that General Ti.nino
at least 60 years of age. They will be defending Chihuahua City. It is
dressed as Colonia' dames, and hair j ;,.,;( ;at ., .shortage of ammunition
dressed a la Martha Washington. Hoop j ..1S hindered the attack greatly. AI
skirts will come back into their own.t10Un telegraphic communication
for one evening. There are a number ' w ith. Chihuahua was still maintained.
f tK.,t.i .,ieiint skirt frames
111 tllf
VI HI -
Cane and the association will borrow -i
them for the evening. Every lady who
enters the ballroom will be attired in
costumes, the like of which the pre-!
ent generation has never seen, except
in picture books.
i An admission will be charged to tnr-
! entertainment, it was announced last
night. It is hoped that enough money jmrn prevailed at Juarez tonight
w ill be obtained from this dance to 1 ,vu ro rumor was current tha.
make up the sum needed to insure tne J villa had grabbed a heavy loot in Chi
construction of the pagoda. j huahua City. It is possible that Sli-
PRESIDENT WILSON HAS COLD
Cancels All Engagements at His
Phvsician's Request.
Washington, Xov. 2::. President
Wilson is confined to the White House
with a cold which he contracted a few j
days ago whil eautomobile riding.
His condition was such that the
physician attending him advised him
to cancel all appointments and calls.
It had been the intention of the Presi
dent to attend the football game be
tween the Army and Navy teams,
which was to take place on Saturday
afternoon in Xew York City. But
upon the advice of the physician Presi
Wilson canceled this trip. He has a
severe coid which it is feared might
result in an attack of la grippe.
EXPRESS MESSENGER HELD
UP AND ROBBED Of $1005
Chicago, Nov. Masked bandits
held up the express train of the North
western Railroad tonight and stole
over $1000 from the express coach.
The bandits were armed with re
volvers. While two held the express
crew at bay, the third forced the sare
and took the money. They then jump
ed from the moving train and disap
peared in the darkness.
Berlin Says New Victory Is
Von Falkenhayn's Great
est Achievement,
t
VILLA AND CARBANZA
ARMIES IN A CLASH
Reports Trom Scene of Conflict
Indicate Bandit Won
the Battle.
Herlin. Xov. :'.. The fa'! of Craiova
was announced by the German War
. 'Office at o'clock tonijr'tt. This ever.t
I ,v'arks t,u WgPt achievement of Von
' C-ilL'.nli;lt-n i.- K. .(..... ......1
; Special Pispalcii to Tiv Tribune.
London, Xov. 21. A
j)ecial agency
dispatch received from Hakti. Asiatic
Kussiji. via St. Petersburg, declares the
J Turks have ma-sacred between oOOt)
and t;;i()i Armenians at Sivas. Turkey.
II ichare.-t. Xov. 2::. "We n tiird
westward from Cvaiova." today's of.i
cial Kumanian War Oilice statemeni
aniioijnced.
lieiirement from points in the Ji.i
Valley to old positions was also stated
In the
Alt Vallev the statement d-
clnred that Rumanian troops were
maintaining their positions.
Sp cbl I'ispatch to The Tribune.
El Paso. Xov. 2::. While Carra-i-zistas
claim that General Vill.i was
I decisively in tin
sece.nd battle near
horth before noon
I Chihuahua itv
today, reoorts that v ere obtained from
other sources indicate that Villa was
, lfl mj-essful combatant in this bat-
I tie. It is conceded by Carranr.i.stas
(that Villa does not need Chihuahua
t vWm-h the control of .Northern Mex
ico.
It is said that he merely see
ia .stronger foothold in the north in
order to show what he can do a-ain -t
the enemy.
, (,.. .I0t...ils .-is fi the result of the b.lt-
t,.
were obtainable.
j .Military experts at Fort Bliss ae
, inclined to believe that Villa will
throw his forces th it are concentrated
n the west side of the city against
Trevino under the cover of darkness.
j,,, defenders are largely estimated
j from 4000 to 6000. Intense excite-
pout and his forces are holding the
city. A report of late tonight stat'-d
that a reguee train had left Chihuahua
Citv after the fightfng had begun.
CAN ADA TO EXPORT ABOUT
100.000.000 BUSHELS WHEAT
Ottawa. Ont.. Nov. 2:i. About 100,
000,000 bushels of wheat will be avail
able for export tin's year, according
to the latest departmental estimate!
which place the total Canadian crop
at 16,406,000 bushels.
TAGS ON WILSON'S TURKEYS
Railroad Men Pin Messages on Bird
to President.
Washington. Nov. 2-. President
Wilson plans to spend Thanksgiving
day at the White House with his fam
ily. The annual flock of turkey
"raiser! especially for the Presiden '
has already begun to arrive.
One will be selected for the While
House table and the others, according
to custom, probably will be sent to hos
pitals or for distribution among the
poor.
O.i the crate of one turkey wliich
came from Oklahoma, railroad men
had written messages such as: "How
about the high cost of living?" and
"Remember the eight-hour day.'

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