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The weekly tribune and the Cape County herald. (Cape Girardeau, Mo.) 1914-1918, October 17, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066617/1918-10-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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ALL THE
HEWS WHILE IT IS
NEWS
WNE
I
I
IMSE1 M
GEORGE P. MARSH
CRITICALLY ILL
WITH INFLUENZA
CAPE SOLDIER IS STRICKEN
WITH NEW DISEASE IN
TEXAS ARMY CAMP.
WIFE AND MOTHER
HASTEN TO BEDSIDE
HE HAS MADE EXCELLENT RE
CORD IN ARMY TWICE
WON RECOGNITION.
George P. Marsh, one of the best
known young men of Cape Girar
deau is critically ill at Camp Mc
Arthur, Waco, Tex., where he is en
camped. He is suffering from Span
ish Influenza.
Mrs. George P. Marsh, who for
merly was Miss Helen Vogelsanger,
departed yesterday for Texas to be
with her husband. She was accom
panied by Mr. Marsh's mother, and
they departed from St. Louis.
Mr. Marsh has been in the army:
t,raa months, and has made an
1U1 tv.
exceptionally good record. He be
came ill several days ago with in
fluenza, and whan he was removed to
the "hospital, he telegraphed for his
wife and mother.
It was reported from the camp
yesterday that his condition was ser
ious. It is not known here whether
he is suffering from complications
or not.
Mr. Marsh, who has been first ser
geant of his company, has twice been
recommended for the officers' train
ing corps, but each time was reject-
sd on final examination oecause x
minor physical defect. He still
of entering the school
has
and
ilVVW
winning a commission.
Mr. Marsh came to Cape Girardeau
three years ago and joined The Trib
une, where he remained fcr two
years. After leaving The Tribune,
he entered the insurance business
with Joel T. Nunn. When the Uni
ted States entered the war . against
v msufe aoDlication for
the officers' reserve corps, but then
was also rejected because he did not
come un to the physical require
ments.
He is one of the most popular
mums' mpn in Cane Girardeau, and
his host of friends will hope for his
recovery.
FRISCO EMPLOYES
HELP BOND SALE
DEPARTMENT HEADS VISIT THE
CAPE AND SELL $4,850 IN
LIBERTY BONDS.
Frisco railroad officials and broth
erhood heads visiting Cape Girar
deau in a special train held a meeting
f ha roundhouse shoos at 1 o'clock
CAM
raaterdav in the interest of the lib-
j -
ertv loan.
Although all, or approximately all
of the employes at the shops and oth
er departmentshad already bought
bonHs, $4850 more were sold yester
day.
The officials present were S. S
Butler, chairman of the Fourth Lib
erty Loan for the Frisco system; Su
rwm'ntendent C H. Claiborne, chair
man for the district; C. C Higgins,
superintendent of motive power; W,
B. Thompson, master mechanic; W.
H. Powell, chairman of the black
smith union; H. B. Smith, chairman
'
FRISCO DEPOT
TO COST MORE
THAN $35,000
Railroad Heads Tell Mayor
Haas Bids Exceed Snm
Appropriated
LOWEST OFFER IS
TO BE ACCEPTED
Work Will Begin Within The
Near Future Is Belief Of
City Executive
Mayor H. H. Haas returned last
night from a business trip to St. Lou
is and while there called on general
manager Kern and architect Stephens
of the Frisco.
Stephens informed the mayor that
15 bids had been submitted for the
contract to build the depot at Cape
Girardeau and that the lowest one
was several thousand dollars above
the $35,000 which the company
had
appropriated for the building.
The
time
high cost of material at this
was the cause of the high bids it is
supposed.
Notwithstanding the fact that all
bids were above this amount the de
pot will be built anyhow, the archi
tect told the mayor. The contract
will be awarded to one of the lowest
and best bidders and the company will
appropriate more money to cover the
increase over the $35,000 already ap
propriated. The contract will be let
right away, he was told, and the work
will begin soon.
The officials said that they had
spoken to the federal director and
they thought there would be no diffi
culty in getting him to agree to allow
more money to be appropriated. He
had already agreed to allow the ap
propriation of an additional $10,000
for concrete platform work and this
sum can be enlarged to cover the ad
dition required for the depot.
PERRY COUNTY BOY
OPERATED ON AT THE
ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL
Dr. G. A. Palisch of Frohna, Perry
frtrmTr hmnctit. the 1 1-Vpar Old Son
VOL :XVII
mmm
V UlkJ w. r ,
of Gottfried Bergt of that place tol1"1? nme
the hospital here yesterday morning
for an operation to relieve a sore
leg. The flesh was cut open, the
bone scraped to remove the accumu
lated pus and drainage estabtablish
ed. He was reported to be getting
along fine yesterday afternoon.
of coppersmiths; R. A. Crutchell,
chairman of machinists; J. W. Gallo
way, chairman of boilermakers; E. A.
Brown, car foreman at Chaffee
The car department bought bonds
to the amount of $550; the store de
partment $350; the section gang
$400; yard crews $500; machine shop
and round house men $3000.
While the speeches were being
made the hat was passed round and
enough money was collected to buy
a $50 bond which was donated to the
local Red Cross Chapter.
The amount bought by the machine
shop and round house force yester
day makes $11,500 in all which they
have purchased. This makes an av
erage of about $230 each for the 50
men employed in this department
The total amount purchased by the
car department is $3450, or an aver
age of $167 for each employe. The
sum of $7700 was subscribed at Chaf
fee yestellay morning when the spe
cial was there.
After the meeting here was over
the special went down the Hoxie line
to try to sell bonds to employes al
ong that branch.
HE CAPE COUNTY HEEALD
J (J CrJ DirO)
1EFLE1
ELKS WILL BURY
J.MAWKINS
FUNERAL OF WELL-KNOWN
MAN WILL BE HELD TOMOR
ROW AFTERNOON.
J. Albert Hawkins, freight agent
for the Frisco here, died suddeniy
yesterday morning at 9:30 at his
home on North Fountain street. Mr.
Hawkins went to work as usual yes
terday morning but after being there
a short time complained of feeling
ill and went home. He. only lived a
short time after he arrived home. His
death was due to a heart trouble,
with which he had been afflicted for
a good while and which his physician
had told him might carry him off at
Mf-
Hawkins wa3 born in Um-
merce out came nere wan ma vi
ents when small and lived nearity all
his life here. When 16 years of age
he went to work for the Houck rail
road and worked up to the position
of general freight and passenger ag
ent. When the Frisco purchased the
Houck lines he continued to work as
an employe of that company. He was
away from Cape Girardeau only
three years but still called it his
home. He was employed by the
Frisco at Memphis and Littfe Rock
for three years and returned here m
March to succeed Warren Baker as
freight agent.
Albert Hawkins was the son of the
late Judge D. I Hawkins, who was
once judge of the circuit court, and
who was later appointed to a respon
sible position with the interior de
partment during the Cleveland ad
ministration. He is survived by his
wife, and two children, Mrs. William
Bryan, of Pittsburg, Pa., who is on
the way home to attend the funeral,
and Daniel, a high school student liv
ing at home, and three sisters, Mrs.
Chris Betten of this city, Mrs. Ra'ph
Schultz of an Antonio, Texas, and
Mrs. Fred Argo of Los Angeles, Cal.,
and one brother Charles Hawkins of
Louisville, Ky.
Mr. Hawkins was a splendid man
and citizen and had many friends in
Cape Girardeau and Southeast Mis
souri. ' The funeral will be he'd at
, C APEGIRABQEAU, MISSOURI OCTOBER 17 1918
THE TRIBUNE TO CHANGE
i
With this issue, The Tribune temporary suspends as a daily newspaper.
The Weekly Tribune will continue, and yie expect to devote all of our
thought and energy to wake it adequately fulfill the place of the daily.
We feel that The Daily Tribune has been a live element in disseminating
news, and promoting the prosperity and) advancement of this community.
We have invested money, brains and energy in the enterprise, seeking no
favors, preserving no grudges, wishing well to everyone, and endeavoring
to the best of our ability and understanding to help our neighbors and the
vorld in general to be brighter and better. -
We feel, that our contribution to the t&ought and general welfare of the
city of Cape Girardeau has been valuable and is properly appreciated. Con
ditions, owing to war prices, with reference to cost of materials, scarcity
and high price of labor, make it necessary for us to change the form of
our service, at least temporarily, l
Under the present labor conditions we have found it impossible to publish
the kind of a daily newspaper that we should like to issue. But by devoting
all of our time and energy to The Weekly Tribune, we can make it worthy
ct the community and up to the demands of the most critical public. With
this in mind, and this only, we cast the die and cross the Rubicon.
There will be new features added to The Weekly Tribune from week to
w eek, and it will grow better and stronger each issue. Every subscriber to
The Daily Tribune, whose subscription is paid in advance, will receive the
new Weekly Tribune. U will therefore go into more than 2,000 homes, when,
multiplied by five, as the Government estimates the number or persons rn
the average family, The Weekly Tribune will be read each week by more
than 10,000 people.
We are grateful to our friends and the friends of our friends for their
support during the four and one half years that have come and gone since
The Tribune began publishing a morning newspaper. If we can retain their
friendship, which carries with it their support, The Weekly Tribune will serve
Hs purpose and its management will be satisfied.
If, after the war, conditions are restored to normal, we expect to reenter
the daily newspaper field, but for thep recent, this is our swan song. .
MEDICAL BOARD IS
ESTABLISHED HERE
LOCAL DOCTORS TO PASS ON
SOLDIERS DECLARED PHY
SICALLY UNFIT.
A medical examination board to
examine draft men with physical de
fects wrtl be established in Cape Gi
rardeau within the next few days. The
physicians composing the board will
be Doctors Walker, Hope, H. C. Cun
ningham, Howard, and Roberts, den
tist. The work of this board will be to
give a thorough examination to men
whom the local draft board examiner
finds to have physical defects. Men
found to have physical defects will
be sent here for a more complete ex
amination than the county board can
give, to see if the defects are such
as to entitle the man to exemption
c'faims or to find if the defects can
be rectified by surgical or medical
treatment.
The county draft board is now ex
amining the new registrants and is
"about half through with the task.
The board will have plenty of mater
ial on which to work as soon as it
can .get together and commence
i work. The physicians in the city are
very DUsy on account of the epidemic,
Guetav Vogel has been assigned to
duty as clerk for the board. He re
cently was called for service under
tha draft and was given his first
duty with the county draft board
who have stationed him here with the
examiinng board..
INFLUENZA TAKES
GELDMACHER CHILD
Little William Geldmacher, the 19
months oM son of Mr. and Mrs. Ar
thur Geldmacher of 227 South Fred
erick street died Tuesday night with
influenza after an illness of a few
days. - Funeral services were held "at
the house by Fr. Pruente of St
Mary's church yesterday. Interment
was at St. Mary's Cemetery.
the home at 2 o'clock Friday under
the auspices of the Elk's dub of
which he was a member.
1ICME
f 0: STOT1E1
V
GEO. MATTINGLY
HAS INFLUENZA
(REPORT FROM CARUTHERS
VILLE SAYS HE IS IN PRE
CARIOUS CONDITION.
It was reported yesterday after
noon that Georgo Mattingly, a well
known traveling salesman of Cape
Girardeau, was dying in Caruthers
ville, at which place he became ill a
few days ago with Spanish Influenza.
Mattingly has rooms at the home
of Mrs. Louis Hendrickson at 421
Broadway, where he lives when in
the city. Mrs. Hendrickson left yes
terday afternoon for Caruthersville
to see after the sick man. No in
formation as to his condition could
be obtained last night.
Mattingly has lived in Cape Girar
deau several years and traveled for
the Weber Implement Company of
St. Touis. Last May his son, Randall
Mattingly, who was in the marine!
service, was killed in the Chateau-1
Thierry fighting in France.
JACOB MEEKER IS DEAD.
St. Louis Congressman Married -at d
Then Expired.
ST. LOUIS, MO., October 16.
Jacob E. Meeker, representative in
Congress for the Tenth (St. Louis)
District, died at the Jewish Hospital
at 7:05 a. m., today of Spanish Influ
enza believed to have been contract
ed when he made a visit last Wed
nesday to the military camp at Jef
ferson Barracks, where more than
1000 cases of the disease were then
under treatment.
His death occurred seven hours
after his midnight marriage at the
hospital to Mrs. Alice V. Redmon of
3433 Giles avenue, his secretary. The
ceremony was performed when it
was apparent there was no chance for
his recovery.
EI
UPHEAVAL BREWS
IN GERMANY IN
PEACE EFFORTS
People Demand End Of the War,
And Rumor Is Current That The
Reichstag Has Agreed To Terms
Laid Down By President Wilson
ALLIES PENETRATE 40 MILES OF
GERMAN TRENCHES IN FLANDERS
Many Cities Pass
Of British, French And Ameri
cans In Most Stupendous Drive
Of The Entire War.
Special Dispatch to The Tribune:
AMSTERDAM, October 16. Late dispatches from Berlin carried an un
confirmed report that the Kaiser had agreed to. abdicate the throne, follow
ing, an" agreement by the. Reichstag to
irvsiuent wnson. wnue no ouiciai confirmation has been received from
Berlin that Germany has forwarded its third peace note to Washington, and
.hat every condition demanded by the President has been accepted.
Coming with this report is the news that internal strife is thrchtened
throughout Germany as a protest against the German Government's failure
to make peace.
A rumor received early this evening stated that the Kaiser has fled into
Switzerland, but dispatches from Berne deny that the Emperor has token
refuge there.
Special Dispatch to The Tribune:
LONDON, October 16. News received here this afternoon and again thi3
evening from Holland, report that Germany has forwarded another note to
Washington, accepting the demands of President Wilson as the initial step
for peace. A series of rumors have been received from several capitals of
hostile discord in the large cities of Germany, but at a late hour tonighij
none of these had been officially confirmed.
Dispatches reaching the allied capitals from various sources !n Germany
show condusive'y that trouble will result in Germany unless the demands
of the people for peace are met. The ReSchstag was in session all of today,
discussing the note received yesterday from President Wilson.
pecial Dispatch to The Tribune:
PARIS, October 16. The city of
iate today, and reports from the front
j.ortion under their control. The fall
if it has not already passed into the
Special Dispatch to The Tribune:
LONDON, October 16. The Allied
greatest offensive of the war, and the
now pushing the? Germans back on a !ine more than forty mi-es long. Late
reports from the front tonight estimate the number of Germans eaoturef! in
the past three days to exceed 22,00(1
ivitn great quantities of ammunition,
Special Dispatch to The Tribune:
BRITISH ARMY HEADQUARTERS IN FLANDERS, October 16. Bel
gian cavalry this morning was reported to be within a mile of the important
railway center of Thielt. That town is only about 15 miles southwest of
Ghent.
Spefcial Dispatch tc Te Tribune:
VIENNA, via Basle, October 16. "We must admit there can be no peace
based upon a success oi arms," said Baron Burian of the Austrian foreign
affairs committee to a delegation of Hungarians.
Special Dispatch to The Tribune:
WITH" THE AMERICAN FIRST ARMY, October 16 -The Americans
have captured St. Juvin heights and have advanced northward from them.
Two hundred and forty prisoners were taken. (St. Juvin is just east of
Grand Pre).
Plunging through belts of German wire in the face of showers of hano
grenades, the men of the first army have mopped up Grand Pre, crossed
the pass through the Argohne and are pushing on.
Special Dispatch to The Tribune:
COPENHAGEN, October 16.-The Tewfik ministry in Turkey has resign!
and Izzet Pasha has been named grand vizier and minister of war, according
to advices from Constantinople today. . .
NUMBER 36
LAND
Into The Hands
accept- the peace terms laid down by
Lille was entered by the British forces
say the Germans are abandoning the
of this city is momentary exported,
hands of the army.
drive in Flanders has become the-
British, French and Americans are
Many large guns have also been taken

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