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Willmar tribune. (Willmar, Minn.) 1895-1931, December 10, 1895, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081022/1895-12-10/ed-1/seq-4/

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WILLMAR, MINNESOTA.
DR. P. NELSON,
VETERINARY SURGEON,
WILLI AR, miXHESOTA,
DR. C. JOHNSON,
Physician
6c Surgeon,
WILLMAR,
BOOTS & SHOES.
This coupon will be accepted us
ten cents in cash for any cash
purchase the holder may make
at our store amounting to one
dollar or more on or before Jan.
1st, 1896, if not detached.
Willmar Shoe Co.
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DR. E. S. FROST,
Physician & Surgeon,
Office over Carlson Bros. &
Frost's Drug Store, or residence
on Becker Avenue.
WILLMAR, MINN.
^WILLMAR
RESTAURANT
Is open day and night. First
class service guaranteed.
E. T. SANDBO, Prop.
MINN.
Obstetrics and internal diseas
es a specialty.Office at residence
on 2nd street.
MARLOW HOUSE.
—(Norsk Hotel)—
OLE J. BECK, PROPRIETOR.
Good Accomodations
for Travelers and Good Stabling.
WILLMAB, MINN.
A. H. SODERLINC,
Merchant Tailor
WILLMAR, MINN.
Business Suits, $15, $16, $18
and up. Dress Suits $20 and up.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Shop three doors south of post
office.
$2 Per Doz $2.
For Fine Cabinet Photos.
Guaranteed
fully as good as the
best work at any other
Gallery West of the cities, or
the money will be as
cheerfully refunded
as taken.
I ALSO MAKE CABINETS FOK $3
AND $4.50 PER DOZ.
PLATINO PICTURES AT
^AME PRICES,
Family Groups with Babies are
Photographed with the greatest
ease.
G. A. CARLSON,
Cor. Fourth & Benson aves.,
N
Willmar, Minn
ANDREEN & LARSON,
House
Painters,
Decorators,
AND
SIGN PAINTERS.
Deal in WaU Paper, Window
Glass, Putty, etc. Shop on 3rd
Street, Willniar, Minn.
NO.
DRUGS, BOOKS, ETC.
This coupon will be accepted
|as 10 cents in cash for any cash
urchase the holder may make
at our store amounting to one
,d ollar or more before Jan. 1st,
il 896, if not detached.
Carlson Bros. & Frost.
DEBS LEAVES THE JAIL.
Early in the afternoon 300 dele
gates representing various trade
and labor unions, assembled at
the Chicago and Northwestern
depot to take a special train for
Woodstock and greet Debs on his
first step into freedom. Presi
dents and vice presidents of a
score of labor organizations and
and all the men who are regard
ed as leaders by the organized
working people were there to
testify to the esteem in which
they and the organizations they
represented held the man who
had served six months in jail for
doing what they applauded and
indorsed.
DRY GOODS.
This coupon will be accepted as
ten cents in cash for any cash
purchase amounting to not less
than one dollar that the holder
may make at our store before
Jan. 1st, 1896, if not detached.
Dale, Roise & Qvale.
RECEIVED of
When this delegation, which in
its object has no precedent, ar
rived at the seat of McHenry
county, when these men beheld
the careworn face and gaunt
figure of Debs, whom they al
most idolize, when they saw the
marks which confinement had
left upon that once stalwart rail
road man, there was a scene
which is without parallel in his
tory. Those brawny toilers,
whose emotions and finer sensi
bilities are stifled by sordid lives
they are compelled to lead, wept
and cheered and. laughed and
cried as they stood there in the
snow. They fell upon their hero
and kissed him in the sight of
thousands. Those who were
nearest him lifted him upon their
shoulders and bore him through
the ranks in triumph, that all
might touch his hand, and they
carried him through the quiet
country town away from the
frowning bars and bolts of thelar
jail
RECEPTION IN CHICAGO.
His reception in Chicago when
the special train arrived was, if
more temperate, fully as emo
tional. A great crowd packed
the depot, the viaduct and the
bridge, standing in the driving
rain tq see I)ugene V. Debs.
When he appeared he was again
raised up the strong arms of his
admirers That the crowd might
see his face and he was carried
across the viaduct. But he pro
tested mildly against this exhi
bition of enthusiasm, insisting
that he wanted to walk with "the
boys." A carriage was in
wait-ascertained
ing, but he firmly refused to ride,
and, taking his place half way
down the line, in the midst of a
group of his friends, he strode
along through the mud and rain
down the echoing streets be
tween lines of people who stood
in the storm to see Engene V.
m*^&^**jMi*Hai±ll^.^^J^JjyiUli!i Mi.\,~.!li!*mi .WilUBMSSl
subscription to the WILLMARTRIBUNEforoceyearfromdateand entitles
ONE DOLLAR IN MERCHANDISE
From the merchants of Willmar whose names appear on attached coupons, on the cond
tions printed on each coupon,
FURNITURE.
This coupon will be accepted
as 10 cents in cash for any cash
purchase the holder may make
at our store amounting to one
dollar or more before Jan. 1st,
1896, if not detached.
I. C. Olson
(From the Chicago Dailj Chronicle.)
No such magnificent demon
stration as that with which Eu
gene V. Debs was honored last
night (Nov. 22) has ever been wit
nessed at Chicago. Never before
have hundreds tramped in
theon
rain through the streets of this
city singing, shouting for joy and
cheering to welcome a man just
released from prison. It was
a spectacle which will be ever re
membered by those fortunate
enough to have seen it and one
which in a measure savored of
the triumphal return of a Roman
warrior rather than the coming
from a prison cell of a leader of
the working people. And not a
tithe of those who participated in
the strange demonstration real
ized that they were doing some
thing never done before, some
thing which will live in history
We'll hang Judge Woods to a sour
apple tree,
We'll hang- Judge Woods to a sour
apple tree,
We'll hang- Judge Woods to a sour
apple ti'ee,
JEWELRY.
This coupon will be accepted as
10 cents in cash for any cash
purchase the holder may make
at our store amounting to one
dollar or more before Jan. 1,
1896, if not detached.
Anderson Bros.
WILLMAR, MINN. 189
Coupons will be void if detached. Not transferable.
JOHNSON & LAWSON,
By
As we go marching on.
When the voices of the march
ing singers grew faint cheers for
Debs rang out iu a continous roar.
At Baltery thousands waited
to hear Debs make his first
speech since sentance of Judge
Woods was pronounced. It was
a gathering which in size has sel
dom been equaled in Chicago and
the reception which the president
of the A. R. U. received brought
mist before his eyes as he looked
out upon the shouting thousands
who repeated his name. It was
almost overwhelming, and al
though Debs had been prepared
by the other receptions tor a
strong demonstration, he hadat
noi reckoned upon so magnifi
cent, so touching and so unprece
dented a demonstration. His ad
dress stirred the great audience
to the wildest enthusiasm and
when he left the hall thousands
crowded around him to bid him
god's speed.
"Strange too that the Doctor over
looked the fact that Mr. Eddy's defi
nition of money covers the very ind
of money that Uncle Sam has adopt
ed! The gold dollar, or 25.8 grains of
gold coined or uncoined will discharge
a debt of one hundred cents in e\ ery
civilized country on earth
Once in California gold bars con
taining $30 worth of gold were used
as money, and they passed as readily
as coined gold in all of Uncle Sam's
dominions and no doubt would have
passed just as readily in every civil
ized nation under heaven. Legal ten
der laws are not needed for the be»t
money, but only for the purpose of
compelling people to take a kind of
money, that is not as good as some
other kind. Again the doctor says:
"We venture to say there isn't a man
that is so dense in his uppei* story as
not to know that this government can
only make money for this country
alone."' Yes, but the Almighty has
made a kind that is good in every
civilized nation on earth, and Uncle
Sam ha3 simply adopted the best dol
that the Almighty has ever made,
Dr. Johnson to the contrary notwith
standing.
Haselton's weekly letter in the
Gazette. We publish the above
to give the
TKIBUNE
readers a
sample of this lawyers knowledge
of law. Take this statement for
instance: "the gold dollar, or 25.8
grains of gold coined or uncoined
will discharge a debt of one
hundred cents in every civilized
country on earth."
Now as a matter of information
for our school children we should
like to have Clerk of Court
Ramsett and Treasurer Porter
state whether they will, or can
take a lump of uncoined gold of
weight and fineness
in the discharge ofjudgment and
taxes? Or a statement from any
reputable lawyer whether a debt
can be collected, or a judgment
for it rendered, payable in any
thing else but dollars,—coined
metal and government ^paper
money, made legal tender by law 1 cold, •aarprteeI--Pari8 Letter.
One Dollar, which pays
HARNESS, ETC.
This coupon will be accepted
as ten cents in cash for any cash
purchase the holder may make
at our store amounting to one
dollar or more on or before Jan.
1st, 1896, if not detached.
C. Jorgenson.
Debs go by.
And then there happened a
strange thing which never be
fore occured in Chicago, an inci
dent which smacked of theStates
French Revolution. The march
ing crowd under the American
flag, with badges of labor unions
their breasts, began to sing.
Loudly the chant arose above the
hum of the city streets and the
words sounded strangely to the
listeners on the sidewalks. The
crowd sang:
Haselton says that the Almighty
has made a kind (of money) that
is good in every civilized nation
on earth." But the United
constitution says that Con
gress "shall have the power to
coin money and regulate the val
ue there of", for this nation.
Is Haselton bet ter authority
than the constitution?
Oh, Bio. Crosby, get somebody
to write for your otherwise valua
ble paper that knows a white bean
when he sees it! It will dis
grace the Gazette to dish out
such2nonsense week alter week.
'Tis said that Hazelton's articles
drove the Argus out of circula
tion so that it isa question wheth
er it had 240 bonafide subscrib
ers to make it a legal newspaper
whenhe quit. Pardon us green
horned anarchists for this piece
of well meant advice.
HARDWARE.
This coupon will be accepted as
ten cents in cash for any cash
purchase the holder may make
at our store amounting to one
dollar or more before Jan. 1st,
1896, if not detached.
John Lundquist & Co.
S O
Salaries of Heads of Nations.
The Presse has drawn ont a table of
what—for the want of a better word—
may be described as the salaries of the
heads of the leignmg houses of Emope.
The president of the French republic re
ceives 1,200,000 francs, the American
president 250,000 francs, while the pres
ident of the Swiss republic has only
18,500 francs. Dealing with the sover
eigns of Europe, it gives the allowance
of the queen of England and her family
50,000,000 francs, the king of the
Belgians at 4,000,000 francs, the little
queen of Holland and her mother at
2,500,000 francs, the emperor of Ger
many at 11,700,000 francs, the king of
Italy at 14,250,000 francs, the king of
Spain and his mother at 7,450,000
francs, the king of Portugal and hisretail
mother at 3,800,000 francs, the emper
or of Austria-Hungary at 23,325,000
francs, the king of Sweden and Norway
at 6,500,000 fiancs, the king of Den
mark at 2,400,000 francs and the king
of Greece at only 1,300,000 francs.—
Galignani's Messenger.
Where Corncob Pipes Are Made.
Many towns have little dingy estab
lishments where cob pipes are made as a
side issue. But in this town cob pipe
manufacture is the leading industry. In
round numbers 12,000,000 cob pipes ev
?ry year are manufactured by two firms
in this city. That means one pipe each,
year for every voter in the United States
All other cob pipe factories in the Unit
ed States are one horse affairs when
compared to the two concerns here.
These pipes are famous and dear as
well to every pipe smoker on the conti
nent. The brier root is to the Missouri
meerschaum what a stoga is to a per
fecto. Throughout the year 140 persons
are daily employed at Washington in
manufacturing corncob pipes. One\big
addition, the liandsomest in the town, is
known as the "corncob addition." It
contains the palatial homes of the men
who have grown rich in manufacturing
corncob pipis.—Washington (Mo.) Let
ter in St. Louis Republic.
A Curious Coincidence.
James Payn relates a curious coinci
dence: "A young engineer was descub
ing to the occupants of a railway car
riage a late experience on an engine:
'We were making up time between two
stations, and going at a great rate, wben
we suddenly sighted an old gentleman
walking quietly front of us along the
line. We screeched and whistled, but
he was very deaf, and we could not at
tract his attention.' An old lady, horri
fied by the situation, and hoping there
was some way out of it, here exclaimed,
'But you didn't hurt him?' 'We were
down upon him, ma'am, like 1 o'clock!
Hurt him indeed I Did you ever hear
such a question, sir?' addressing a young
man in deep mourning, who had main
tained a melancholy silence. 'I have
heard the story before,' he replied in
explanation of his want of interest. 'In
was my father^jjl
French Boys Taught Fencing
In all the large schools of France
nine-tenths of the boys are taught fenc
ing, many beginning as young as 7 years
of age. The soldiers are drilled to nse
the foils as conscientiously as other ex
ercises, and on an average there are two
or three duels every month in each regi
ment. The men have to get the colonel's
leave to fight, and no one can go out
until he has served six months. A prom
inent French fencing master strongly
advocates dueling, as the fear of conse
quences keeps down quarrels, and the
fighting teaches men calmly to face the
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FLOUR & FEED.
This coupon will be accepted
as ten cents in cash for any cash
purchase amounting to not less1
than one dollar that, the holder
may make at our store before'
Jan. 1st, 1896, if not detached.
Rodlun Bros. 4
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The First Dresa Suits.
"I have read," writes a correspond
ent from Jacksonville, "the remarks
made by the Rambler apropos of the in
troduction of the dress suit Cincin
nati and the uncertainty of the date of
that important event. Permit me to sug
gest that it was some years earlier than
you indicate. If I am not very much
mistaken, I saw a dress suit in Cincin
nati in the year 1SG9 It v. as worn by a
gentleman who had jn^t arrived from
the east, and I lemember it attracted a
great deal ut attention This was really
the pioneer movement, and the fiist peo
ple to follow it were ihe volunteer fire
men, who were gieatly pleased with the
low cut vest which permitted such a
liberal display of "hut front. They oie
their suits on Sundays and occasionally
on other days when some celebiation
was in progress The habit became gen
eral in 1870, or 1878 as you say, and
there were a number of men who owned
their own evening clothes in those
years."—New Yoik Mail and Express.
A Club to Which Garfield Belonged.
The death of Mis Dr. J. Robinson
at Mentor a few clays ago, better known
as "Aunt Betsy," leaves only one mem
ber surviving of a club of five which
was organized at the opening of the
war. When the late President James
A. Garfield enlisted, the club was or
ganized and was composed of gen
eral Garfield, the Rev Isaac Errett of
Cincinnati, the Rev. Dr. and Mrs.
Robinson of Bedford, and the Rey. Har
rison Jones of Union. The club cove
nanted to give sympathy, encouiage
ment and aid to each other in sickness
or trouble whenev er needed Of the club
there is but ouo member now alive, the
Rev. Harrison Jones, 88 years of ago,
who is living in Mount Veinon At
Garfield's funeral Dr Robinson had
charge of the ceremonies the Rev Mi.
Errett made the addiess, and the Re\.
Mr. Jones offered the prayei —Ohio
State Journal.
Thief to Catch a Thief.
A noted ex-burglar is employed as a
private detective in one of the largest
dry good« stoics in New York
oity, and a gentleman connected with
the house said leceutly "that the ex
crook's services are invaluable He
was engaged on account of his wide ac
quaintance with shoplifters. A nurnbei
of professional shoplifteis, with whom
he is acquainted, are aware of the pesi
tion he holds and consequently keep
away from the building A female ex
thief is also employed in a similar ca
pacity in another large house. The pol
icy of setting a thief to catch a thief ap
parently woiks well theie.—Pittsbmj,
Dispatch.
JAKE P. ANDERSON
BLACKSMITH,
HORSE SHOING
A SPECIALTY.
Oenerjl ]Jdcksmithin Done
With Pr.-Mtness and Skill.
Wagon Work0F(
DEALER IN
ALL KINDS IN
CONNEOTION
All Work Guaranteed
NEW LONDON, MINN.
»GEER & BATTERBERRY,
House Movers!
N E W O N O N I N N I
Houses moved or raised'
and excavating done.
All work done promptly!
and satisfactorily.
A. BICE, President. tf. HANDY. Cashier
C. E LIEN. Vice President
_^OF—
ORGANIZED UNDER THE STATE LAWS
CAPITAL, $40,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS, $60,000.
Does a General Banking" Business.
Money loaned on
Real Estate andOther Securities.
Drafts on all principal cities
of the world.
Passage tickets to and from all
points in Europe.
WILLMAR, MWN.
Ne Londo Depi
The following list of New London firms respectfully solicit the cus
tom of TRIBUNE readers.
StateBankofNewLondon,
OigdmzeJ Inderthe btateLawt-
CIPITAL $25,000 00.
A General Banking
Business Transacted.
Money to Loan
On Real Estate at Low tntf rest.
COLLECTIONS
Kccen Careful Attention
Tickets to and from Europe.
Domestic and Foreign Exchange.
Job Printing
of all kinds
done with
neatness
and
dispatch
at the
Tribune office.
iCHARLESE.KRAUSEiK
-DEALER IN-
Shelf& HeavyHardware
FENCE WIRE, NAILS, IRON AND WOOD PUMPS TOOLS,
FARM MACHINERY, BUGGIES & CUT TERS,
FIRE ARMS AND AMMUNITION,
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES, BRUSHES, ETC.
=_*
Am also proprietor of a finely equipped Blacksmith Shop and am
always prepared to do in a firstclass manner all
Plow Work and Horse Shoeing.
Work done with piomptness and dispatch.
New Loudon, Minn.
S *T. -A.N"IDSI^S02Sr,
DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, GROCERIES,
& GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
1 frjde Country Produce, and boll lor cash only Quick Cash sales an Small ProfttB." motto
NEW LONDON, MINNESOTA.
*ARNE*LARSON,
NEW LONDON,
New Harnesses Made to Order All Kinds of Bepairing
Material and Workmanship Guaranteed
«sk
M^Hi^iAjf^jSJSi
Harness Maker,
Call and I will convince you that I offer
A A I N S I N A N E S S W O
PFTEU BROBERG Pros deut
JOHOENSON Vice President
JOSC ESlRbM. Cashier
MINN.
Done Without Delay
Work Done Cheaper than Anywhei*
Lewis Eckman,
—Dealer In—
Furniture,
—And—
UNDERTAKING
GOODS,
E W ONDON, MINN,
Having Machinery in Connection
I can do all Kinds of
Fine
Cabinet
Work,
And Repairing, Wood turning
for Porch and Stair work. etc.
C.A.GUSTAFSON,
WAGON & CARRIAGEMAKER
NEW LONDON, MINN.
WOODWORK REPAIRING
—of All Kind Done—
PROMPTLY & SATISFACTORILY.
Trucks Put Up And
W A O N S
—AND—
SLEDS
MADE TO ORDER.—
All Work Guaranteed.
NEW LONDON
LUNCH ROOM
1.0. Rinpess
PROPRIETOR.
KeepsforSale
LfUiicl) goods, Confectioner^
Fruit in Season, Xobaew,
5 and 10 eent goods.
P. A. BROGREN,
The
New
London
Tailor,
Has always on hand a selected
stock of seasonable goods, also
a full line of samples from
which selections of any
kind of goods can be
furnished on short
notice.
His prices are LOW.
WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED.
O. M. LAWSON-,
Contractor *m Builder,
NEW LONDON, MINN.
%J

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