OCR Interpretation


Willmar tribune. (Willmar, Minn.) 1895-1931, November 07, 1900, Image 8

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081022/1900-11-07/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

is
I.'
a
V/ILLMAR TRIBUNE
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY AT
WILLMAR, MINNESOTA,
RY THE
TRIBUNE PRINTING CO.:
VICTOR I. LAWSON. CDITOR.
A. O. FORSBBRG, ASSOCIATE BDITOR. I
J. BMIL NELSON, BUS. M'G'R.
CONTRIBUTIONS of news Items or short,
pithy articles on questions of general inter
eat are thankfully received, when the name
the writer Is made known to the editors.
Regular news correspondents inted in
fvry locality not already represented.
rite for terms and inatruetions
ADVERTISEMENTS.—Display ad's inser.
ted for 85 cents per inch per week. Liberal
discounts when taken In large quantities or
when leftstandlng. Local reading notices
will be Inserted for lOoents per line each
week. Write for terms for the publication
of legal notices.
The WILLMAR TRIBUNE has a larger een.
eral circulation in Kandiyohi county thaD
any other newspaper. Our subscription
booksare open for inspection to advertisers
SUBSCRIPTION price, if paid before end
of first year, $1 00 a year: if delinquent long
er. *1.25 a year will be charged.
OFFICE IN TRIBUNE BUILDING.
208 Fourth Street.
I Entered at the postofflce at Willmar, Minn.,
as second class mall matter.!
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7, 1900.
RESULTS OP ELECTION.
The election returns as reported
elsewhere in this issue tell the tale of
a wonderful political wave that has
swept the country in favor of the re
publicans. McKinley has been re
elected with an increased electoral
vote and his majority in Minnesota
may possibly reach 70,000 The din
ner-pail argument was a potent one,
and the foreign policy of the admin
istration has been indorsed in no un
certain way. The TRIBUNE hopes
that the warning it has tried to pro
nounce against imperialism, large
armies and centralization of wealth
have been merely a "bugaboo" and
that the administration will not now
turn around and claim that tLe peo
ple voted for the very things which
they have Dretended were purely
imaginary. Our judgment, however,
tells us that the stand we have taken
is right. While we bow to the will of
the majority and hope that the new
course our country has taken will
prove for the best of all, we have
grave fears for the future. Who
knows but that the crisis which will
inevitably come from the over
capitalization of the trusts is not so
near at hand that hai. Bryan been
elected his administration would have
received the blam^for it. Woe unto
the republicans if they fail to make
their extravagant promises to the
people good. The pleadings for to
continue the administration in power
in order that it might have a chance
to work out some kind of a solution
of the Philippine problem won a great
many votes, but a re-action will set in
if it is not settled speedily and ac
cording to American principles. If
the huge corporation trusts use the
advantage they have now gained to
furtheMntrench themselves and to se
cure a closer grip upon the functions
of government and a closer control of
the laboring people, as they are al
most certain to do, there is certain to
be an upheaval sooner or later and
it is our prayer that it may be left to
the peaceful arbitrament of the ballot.
McKinley and his party will have ab
solute control during the next two
years and will be responsible for all
acts of the administration.
The great majority of McKinley in
Minnesota and the peculiar intoxica
tion of desire for party success
renders the result on the gubernatorial
fight in Minnesota a matter of doubt
Probably at least 75,000 voters who
voted with McKinley on national af
fairs have endorsed the able and
statesmanlike adnvnistration of Gov.
John Lind by giving him their votes.
The state central committee late this
afternoon claimed that there was a
probability that Lind would be elected
with a small plurality. But even if
elected, he will be shorn of his great
est power to assist the farmers and
shippers, because there is no doubt
but that the republican railroad and
warehouse commission has been
elected. The two years of Gov. Lind's
administration now about closed will
forever shine in the annals of Minne
sota history with a lustre that even
defeat cannot dim.
The result in Kandiyohi county was
the most surprising of all to us Mc
Kinley's majority of two years ago
was nearly doubled. John Lind's
majority of over 900 in 1898 was wiped
out and the county given to Van Sant
by 136. This last result was not ac
complished by fair means and a re
action has already set in among the
voters who were deceived into voting
against the man whom they had
learned to trust and respect. The
county ticket was defeated in toto,
except one commissioner, A. J. Smith
son of the Third District, who gained
the day by six votes. The peoples
county campaign was fought out on
issues of grave importance to the
moral welfare of the county, and any
one who feels jubilant over the result
is either ignorant or indifferent as to
the far-reaching results of the election.
Now that the campaign is over the
publishers and assistants will again
devote their best efforts to making
the TREBtjNB a newspaper that every
body will want to read regardless oi
'politics. During the campaign the
many additional duties resting on us
have sometimeB forced us to neglect
the news department. Now we shall
deyote our entire attention to the pa-
REPRESENTATIVE.
Gandrud—Rep
Bosch—Peoples
AUDITOR.
Johnson
Sletten
TREASURER.
Norin
Dale
REGISTER OP DEEDS.
Olson
Hedin
COUNTY SURVEYOR.
Jenness
Highstrom
CORONER.
Frost—Rep
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
Firs Olson
District Leary
Third a
Distrk Smithson
Fifth Hedin
Disi net Johnson
t*V
W
0
&

&
O
3
09
0
CANDIDATES.
pi
PRESIDENT.
McKinley—Rep
Bryan—Dem-Peo
Woolley—Prohib
Debs—Social Dem
Malloney—Socialist Labor
126
23
GOVERNOR.
Van Sant—Rep
Lind—Dem-Peo
Haugen—Prohib
Fairchild—Midroad Pop
Lucas—Social Dem
Kriz—Socialist Labor
B. R. AND WAREHOUSE COM'RS
Mills—Rep. (four years)
Miller—Rep. (four years)
Staples—Rep. (two years)
Ringdal—Dem-Peo. (fouryears)
Knox—Dem-Peo. (four years)..
Owen—Dem-Peo. (two years)...
Parks—Midroad Pop. (4 years).
Moran—
Hibbard
3IEMBER OF CONGRESS.
Eddy—Rep
Daly—Peo-Dem
Aaker—Prohib
Boen—Referendum
105
42
115
26
129
24
120
33
118
37
106
46
CLERK OF COURT.
Ramsett—Rep
SHERIFF.
Odell
Nelson
101
46
JUDGE OF PROBATE.
Nordin
Styles
COUNTY ATTORNEY.
Johnson
Frye ..
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS.
Fink
Sivertson.
120
33
111
40
130
34
110
42
per. The result of the election will
have no depressing influence on the
TRIBUNE. It is no campaign sheet
dependent on campaign contributions.
It depends on the good will of the peo
ple who like to see a wide-awake en
terprising newspaper, fearless and in
dependent. Such the TRIBUNE has
been such it shall continue to be. No
efforts will be spared to make it in
teres.iog to everybody. The news de
partment will be made as full and
complete as possible. Correspondents
will be secured in every town. The
latest general news from all parts of
the world will be presented to our
readers. The editorial department
will not confine itself to political
questions alone, but will endeavor to
give clear and concise comments on
matters of general interest In short,
we shall endeayor to make it as good
a country paper as we can produce.
We ask our friends who have so nobly
stood by us in the past to* aid us by
speaking a good word for the paper
and inducing their neighbors to sub
scribe. The larger our circulation
the better paper we shall be able to
produce.
Better to go down to defeat in a
righteous cause than to be victorious
in a wrong cause. A man that fights
for what he conscientiously believes to
be the right has no occasion to bow
his head in humiliation if his side is
defeated. It may seem hard at times
to see one's labor and time appar
ently wasted. But it is not wasted.
Justice will outrun injustice in the
long run. Deeprooted prejudices, lust
of power, the lower proclivities of
humanity, have many times appar
ently led a ation astray yet the
world has steadily progressed toward
better and nooler conceptions of
human rights. It may appear iiow as
if this republican victory was a vic
tory for the idea of war and conquest,
disregard for the best principles of
our government! force supplanting
justice but we do to- believe that the
American people as a "whole passed
judgment on our foreign or colonial
policy. The republican party hid
that issue under specious talk of pros
perity under republican rule and
threats of disaster if Bryan was
elected. Undoubtedly they will now
proceed to accept the result as an in
dorsement of a policy they denied
during the campaign. Undoubtedly
they will so far lead the nation into
the path of "criminal aggression" as
to make it difficult to retrace the steps
taken. But? we have confidence enough
in the sense of the people to believe
that they will realize whither the na
tion is tending and heroically regolve
to right the wrongs done and return
to the right path.
Of course if we expect to reach this
desirable result we must not like faint
hearted cowards lay down our arms
and quit for one defeat. The man or
party that sees an injustice dqne is
morally bound to protest and keep at
it till justice is dc ne.
An opposition party is an absolute
necessity in a republic. Without op
position the party in power will be
come the mere tool of corporations.
With a vigorous opposition party
ready to criticise and take advan
tage of any mistake or misdeed the
Unofficial Canvass of Incomplete Returns
From Tuesday's Election in Kandiyohi County.
O
25
93
24
87
33
W
0
p-
116
62
67
35
78
96
102
30
dominant party will have to exercise
some care in what it does. So even
though defeated again and again our
mission is not ended.
Just what may be the alignment
of the parties in the future it is now
too early to predict with any degree of
accuracy. The Gorman-Hill Bourbon
democracy may now regain control of
the democratic party and draw to its
standard eastern capitalists who are
opposed to McKinley's foreign pol
icy. In that case the real Bryan
democracy will have to leave the
party and unite With the populists in
some way. It may be anew party, or
it may retain the populist name. The
result of this defeat may in the end
prove a victory for populism. Take
heart, brethren our mission is not
ended. Let us keep our organization
and be prepared for future action.
RETURNS FROM BURBANK.
The Tesult of the vote in the town of
Burbank is as follows:
PRESIDENT.
McKinley 36
Bryan 51
GOVERNOR.
Van Sant 21
Lind 65
MEMBER OF CONGRESS.
Eddy 27
Daly 58
Aaker 2
REPRESENTATIVE.
Gandrud 35
Bosch 54
AUDITOR.
Johnson 24
Sietten 64
TREASURER
Norin 25
Dale 62
REGISTER OF DEEDS.
Olson .29
Hedin 59
CLERK OF COURT.
Ramsett 48
SHERIFF.
Odell 33
Nelson 49
JUDGE OF PROBATE.
Nordin 27
Styles 60
COUNTY ATTORNEY.
Johnson 27
Frye 59
SUPT. OF SCHOOLS.
Fink 25
Sivertson 73
COUNTY SURVEYOR.
Jenness 17
Highstrom 72
CORONER.
Frost, 42
The vote on county commissioners
resulted in the election of Olson in the
1st district, Smithson in the 3rd, and
Hedin in the 5th.
High School Notes.
Miss Gjems visited the High school
last Monday afternoon.
Mrs. Ramsett was a visitor in the
grades of the High School building
last Friday.
George Tyler, one of our old High
school boys, spent Sunday with his
parents in this city.
We found our holiday on Tuesday
so enjoyable that we wish presidential
elections occurred every month.
Miss Ella Gould of the Lincoln
school went to Minneapolis last Fri
day. Her plane was supplied by Miss
Florence R. Porter.
Last Wednesday afternoon the little
ones of Miss Wharton's room in the
Garfield school enjoyed a Hallowe'en
party*
65 50
39 66
138
86
45
104
39
106
111
66
113
66
92
50
119
60
114
66
110
70
93
77
100
36
92
24
100
41
108
73
135
68
126
GO
103
45 63
32 22
96
73
40
42
95
44
95
73
56
28
107
36
110
59
52
91
104
73
90
81
99
38
79
93
23
62
54
82
51
113
66
73
97
75
87
53
92
77
102
46
171
83
Farm for Sale.
The Fleckten farm in the town of
Kandiyohi is for sale. It is situated
between Lake Waconda and Little
Kandiyohi, and consists of 289 acres,
25 acres natural timber and 5 acres
planted, 150 acres under cultivation,
70 acres meKdow and the balance is in
pasture. For particulars call at the
farm of V. A. Fleckten, Kandiyohi,
Minn. 37-4
Hogs and Horses for Sale.
I have for sale hogs ranging from
small pigs to the age of 1| years,
from registered stock Poland China.
Sows, bred to farrow in November
and December, for $15 each.
I also have twenty head of horses,
drivers and heavy work horses, for
sale, and if sold within the next twenty
days I will sell them at half price.
J. S. Anderson,
37-3 Atwater, Minn.
Now Blacksmith Shop.
I wish to announce to my friends
that I have dissolved partnership with
Mr. Parson and have opened a new
shop on Trott avenue and 2nd street.
I am now prepared to do all kinds of
blacksmithing and repairing and will
be pleased to have all my old custo
meis as well as new ones to call on
me when you need anything in my
line. If you need your horses shod I
can save you money.
38tf J. H. PERSON.
Notice of Dissolution of Partnership.
The firm heretofore consisting of
S. E. Stansberry and Russell Spicer,
and doing business under the firm
name and style of Stansberry &
Spicer, in the retail farm machinery
and implement business, in the village
of Willmar, county of Kandiyohi, and
state of Minnesota, is this day dis
solved by mutual consent, S. E.
Stansberry having purchased the en
tire interest of Russell Spicer in said
stock, and said S. E. Stansberry will
continue the business of said firm.
All outstanding debts and liabilities
of said firm are to be settled by said
Stansberry & Spicer, and all debts
due said firm are payable to said
Stansberry & Spicer but no future
obligations are to bind the said firm
dissolved.
Dated this 27th day of October, A.
D. 1900.
STEPHEN E. STANSBERRY,
38-3 RUSSELL SPICER.
Farm for Sale.
320 acres unimproved land in Red
River Valley, three mileB from Red
River, Richland county, North Dakota.
Will sell for $15 per acre, or exchange
for city property. Inquire of
MRS. MARY LARKIN,
17-tf Kandiyohi, Minn.
2S
go
5"
O
270
131
264
131
2201
1134
1067
211
210
213
118
1773
1593
180
248
163
240
154
2122
1349
773
272
151
257
152
2231
1347
884
307
120
48
36
271
125
23521156
1206
274
155
246
170
2292
1339
953
229
195
231
190
1940 251
1689
238
191
233
181
2120
1422
698
273
153
267
146
2297
1307
990
261
lie
250
161
2132
1411
717
96 304
80 123
273
137
2547
1621
49
926
Having disposed of my business a
te-ests in tow. I will seli^myjleai Ei
tatt at bargain prices. DjJITj
50x150, with residence, on Litchfield
Ave., next west of Catholic church.
A FINE RESIDENCE LOCATION.
150x150 with residence, on lOthJSt.,
northwest of Park. t^^Ijn a'v
FINE RESIDENCE LOCATION—EASY
RENTER AT $10.
25x150, with flat house, or Pacific
avenue, between 7th and 8th street*.
AN EASY RENTER AT $f.
These must be sold at once, and
the first reasonable offer takes any or
all.
23lf W. D. WIGGINS.
Real Estate, Loans and Insurance
1 will loan money at low rate of in
terest and on favorable terms. Will
bu and sell real estate. Insurance
written in reliable Insurance compa
nies. boLOMON PORTER,
52tf Willmar, Minn.
Willmar Market Report
[Corrected cver^ Tuesday afternooD
by ANTON SUNDBEKG, dealer inFlour,
Feed, Fruit and W etables.
Wheat No 1
Whoat No. I
Wheat No. 3
Wheat No 4
Oats....
Rye
Barley
Flax .. ..
Potatoes 30
Eggrs 19
Butter I5@20c
Onions 65@gl50
Beans fl.50®$2.00
Hay |4.00@$4 50
Cattle *i.50©*3 5
Hogs $3.50 to $4.00
Slice p... .|3.00 to $3.5C
Chickens 5@6.
rkeys 6®7c
Ducks 5@fir
Geese B(»8«
Hides 5c
Wool 13@15i
Flour f4S0@*4 6
Bran I3.«i
Snorts $13 50
«0 67
65
.62
50
27
.41
lrt
60 YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
TRADE MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention is probably patentable. Communica
tions strictly confidential. Handbook on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency lor securing^patents.
Patents taken through Hunn dc Co. receive
special notice, without charge. In the
Scientific American.
A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir
culation of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 a
year four months, $L Bold byall newsdealers.
MUNN&Co''"™^NewYgrf[
Branch Offlca, 81* Washington, D.C.
WIGDAHL,
Dealer
WOOD ANn COAL.
All kinds of Hard and Soft Wood.
Office and Yard near Mill.
MINN
LOCAL BREVITIES.
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A S A S A A a
Dr. C. E. Gerretson, dentist. Office
in Mikkelson block, Willmar. 22tf
One carload of feed just in at Sund
berg's. Also good flour. 37tf
Window glass, all sizes, at Carlson
Bros. & Frost's.
Dr C. E. Gerretson, dentist. Office
in Mikkelsonblock, Willmar. 22tf
If you need milk or cream we solicit
your valued patronage.
35tf FERRING & Co.
Willmar, New London, Kerkhoven
and Graceville best flour at Anton
Sundberg's. 37tf
WANTED—A competent girl for
general housework.
34tf MRS S. B. QVALE.
For reliable fire insurance as cheap
as any, Bee B. T. Otos, in TRIBUNE
building. 16tf
WANTED—A good competent girl to
do general housework. Inquire of
Miss Gertrude Booth at the Rectory
of St Luke's church, near the court
house. 34tf
Chas. Hardy, who for several days
has been dangerously ill, was moved
from his room over F. V. Everdell's
residence to the spital. yesterday
afternoon.—Breckenridge Gazette.
I have 25 cords of dry red oak
wood for sale, miles north of
Spicer: sawed body wood at $3. per
coid. I want corn for 10 cords at 35c
per bushel. G. B. DOTY,
38-4 Spicer, Minn.
H. C. Larson has formed a partner
ship with Henry Traue in the bakery
business. Mr. Traue has decided to
take personal charge of the baking
and will give to this department his
undivided attention. Watch for their
announcement next week.
The Latest Election Bulletin.
Special to the TRIBUNE:
ST. PAUL, Minn., Nov 7, 7:80 p.m.:
—Reports show result is close. It is
anybody's fight Chances slightly in
our favor. Lind feels quite confident.
R. W. S.
ORIftlNOFTHETERM "MOB"
Uaed In Ita Firs Meanin In me of
Chancer.
As Indicating the populace, prover
bially fickle and easy to be moved (mo
bile, from Latin mobillis), the expres
sion "the mobile people" is as old as
the time of Chaucer, tut in its later
sense, that of the disorderly crowd,
and in its contracted form, "mob." it is
not older than the postrestoration pe
riod. In Roger North's Examen, 1740,
reference is made to the Green Ribbon
club. 1680-2, and the wuiter adds:
"I may note that the rabble first
changed their title and were called the
mob in the assemblies of this club
first mobile vulgus, then contracted in
one syllable." It was used hesitating
ly at first by Dryden ("Don Sebastian,"
1G90), Durfy ("Commonwealth of Wo
men," 1688) and Shadwell ("Squire of
Alsatia," 1688), and Richardson points
out that Dryden uses both "mobile"
and "mob" in the sense of rabble, the
former in the stage directions as the
common word, the latter as if it had
not long been introduced.
In 1711 The Spectator instances
"mob" as an example of the popular
tendency to curtail many of our words
in familiar writings and conversation.
The verb "to mob," derived of course
as above, does not occur until the pe
riod of Horace Walpole, many years
later, and Shakespeare's expression,
"the mobled queen" ("Hamlet"), refers
not to the "mob" (mobile), but to the
headdress in disorder.—Boston Tran
script
Addresse he Jury
A man who bad never seen the in
side of a courtroom until he was intro
duced as a witness in a case pending
in one of the Scottish courts, on being
sworn took a position with his back
to the jury and began telling the story
*o the judge.
The judge, in a bland and courteous
manner, said:
"Address yourself to the jury, sir."
The man made a short pause, but,
notwithstanding what had been said
to him, continued his narrative.
The judge was then more explicit
and said to him: "Speak to the jury,
sir. the men sitting behind you on the
benches."
The witness at once turned around
and making an awkward bow said
with perfect gravity:
"Good morning, gentlemen."—Buffalo
Courier.
A Catalogue.
"Miss Mary," said the sable maiden,
"we 'spect to have an en'tainment at
our chu'eh nex' week, and I got to
speak a piece. I was jest goto to ast
you if you had a book with some ob
them pieces in?"
"Why. yes. Dora, I have a book of
recitations. What kind of a piece do
you want?"
"Well, I was thinkin ob somep'n in
de nature ob a catalogue."
"A what?"
"A catalogue—you know, apiece with
one person a-talkin and 'nother one
answerin 'em back. Has you got a
piece like dat? I'd like It fust rate."—
New York Tribune.
A Secret of Youth
One night at a reception which Sen
ator Beverldge and I attended soon aft
er his election the hostess said in mock
surprise:
"Are you Senator Beveridge. the sen
ator from Indiana?"
The senator bowed modestly.
"It hardly seems possible. Why, you
area mere beardless youth!"
"Madam," replied Mr. Beveridge with
out a smile, "I shave."—Saturday Even
ing Post.
Paraguay Tea.
When the yerba mate, or native tea
of Paraguay, is cultivated, the seeds
are treated to an add bath before
planting. This softens the hard shell
which surrounds the kernel of the
seeds and enables them to sprout In
three or four months. If planted in
their natural state, it requires three
or four yean for the seeds to germi-
i4i~&C*%k->is
A DOSE OF JUSTICE.
IADLED OUT WITH A LIBERAL HAND
BY JUDGE HOKE.
he Court Consider* he Case of Art
Sam Genera Ba Man, a
Dlapoaes) of It W it he Al of
A Hla a
[Copyright, 1900, by C. B. Lewis.]
*This yere case," said Judge Hoke,
as he called the court to order, "ap
peals to me not only as the legally
elected and only jestice of the peace fur
the county of Cold Chuck, but to every
man in these diggin's who carries a gur
and is supposed to hev the sand to take
keer of hisself. It is the case of Arizona
Sam versus Pete the Half Breed,
and Sam is the complainant. I see he's
got a lawyer yere to gab fur him, but
that lawyer won't hev no talkin to do.
"Let us begin at the beglnnin. Ari
zona Sam strikes this town a year ago.
He has a yell like a fog horn and he
weighs 200 pounds. He wears two
guns and a knife, and he bites the
tops off a dozen beer bottles to show
that he was born in a cyclone and era
died in a hurricane. He wan sized up
fur a bad man, and fur months and
months he's bin cock of the walk. I
can't remember that he's killed any
body, but that was bekase everybody
swallered his bluffs and stepped around
softly. He has defied the vigilance
committee and be has bluffed this court,
and it'll astonish ye to find out jest
whflt sort of a critter he is. Yesterday
mornin he smarts over the hills fur Tin
CUD City. On the way he meets Pete
the Half Breed. Most of ye know
Pete and most of ye be*7 heard thpt
he's got no backbone Pete was ridin
his cayuse and Sam was hoofin it.
When they come together Sam holds
up his hand and says:
'Git off'n that hossr
'What fur? asks Pete.
'Bekase I want him.'
'But he's mine.'
"Then Sam calls him 8 string of
names 40 rods long. He abuses Pete's
father and mother and all the rest of
"GTT OFF'N THAT HOSSi"
his relations. He chanks his teeth and
roHs his eyes and pulls his guns. He
wants that cayuse, and he wants him
inside of two minutes. Ye may figger
•hat Pete, who hadn't any gun with
him. turned pale and fell out of the
saddle with a thump, but ye'll be mis
taker if ye do. It took him some
leet'e time to realize the situashun, but
he didn't skeer. When he got things
s+raight he slid off his critter and li*
on to Sam. Did the bold, bad man who
has carried the county of Cold Chuck
in his pocket fur a year drill holes
through the half breed as he come?
Not a drill. Was thar an awful strug
gle lastin half an hour before victory
perched on either banner? Not a
struggle. That half breed, who was
thought to be a worm of the dust, takes
the bold, bad man by the nose and
leads him around fur awhile. Then he
strips him of his weepins. pulls hia
ears, slaps his jaw and kicks him
around a bend of the trail.
"What does the terrible terror of
Cold Chuck county do? Hevin given
hisself awav as a coward and a blow
hard does he fall over a cliff that men
may furgit him? Does he strike out
fur a p'int 1,000 miles away, that his
name may never be known? Not
much. He comes right back to town
and to me, and the fust thing he says
Is:
'Jedge, I want jestice.'
'Wba* sort of jestice?*
'Jestice fur bein held up and robbed
by Pete the Half Breed.'
'But why didn't ye shute?*
'He skulked up on me. Gimme ies
tlce, jedge—gimme lots of it.*
"That was Arizona Sam, bold, bad
man, and I believed his yarn and sent
out a warrant and had Pete arrested.
I was calkerlatin to gin him a mighty
dose of jestice, but hearin his side of
the story has changed my mind. 'Sam,
the bluffer, stand up. Are ye denyIn
that what Pete says is true?'
'He lit on me mighty sudden,
jedge,' was the reply.
'But you didn't try to pull a gun?
'Mebbe not.' 4
'And you didn't fight?'
444I
don't think so.'
'That's 'nuff. Ye a^ simply a great
big blowhard and a bluffer, and ye've
made every good man in this town back
water. We'll be the laughm stock of
Tin Cup, Pine Hill and all the other
diggin's, and we'll feel the disgrace fur
five y'ars. I can't send ye to jail fur
Win a bluffer and a duffer, but I'm
goin to sentence ye to be booted from
this vere temple of jestice to the Red
Dog saloon, and if ye ain't over the
hill and out of town ten minits later I
won't answer fur consequences. As
fur Pete, he is sot at liberty, and he
kin keep yer weepins and be the fust
man to apply the boot The rest of us.
includin the court, will fall in arter
him, and as ye feel yerself lifted cl'ar
off the earth I hope ye may come to
realize that though jestice is blind and
moves along like a kyote with two legs
broke, she keeps reachin out her band
till she gits the right critter by the
neck.'" M. QUAD.
The average man likes to pohrt to
the good traits In his children as a
heritage from himself.—Chicago News.
A Contractor.
Knicker—You say your son Is a con
tractor. What is his special line?
Boeker—Debts.
A man who inadvertently steps upon
a banana peel has doubts about the
sustaining power of the fruit —St
Louis Star.
English archers in battle used the
longbow. French archers the cross
bow. The longbow was certainly the
better.

xml | txt