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Willmar tribune. (Willmar, Minn.) 1895-1931, November 20, 1912, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081022/1912-11-20/ed-1/seq-2/

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BOY CRUSHED BY AUTOMOBILE
TEN-YEAR-OLD JOSEPH LeMUER
18 FATALLY INJURED.
Peter Johnson, Driver of the Machine,
le Grief-Stricken Over
Accident.
Minneapolis, Nov. 13.—The seventh
fatal automobile accident within the
last two months occurred when Joseph
Le Muer, 10 years old, the only son o{
John Le Muer, employed at the Leam
ington hotel, was struck by a car driv
en by Peter Johnson on Franklin ave
nue, between Ninth and Tenth avenue
south, and so badly hurt that he died
two hours later in the Swedish hos
pital.
Johnson, who is being held in Cen
tral station, is utterly broken down
over the accident, although he has not
been told of the death of the child.
He is said by the police to be the only
one of the many who have been ar
rested for a similar offense to show
any emotion.
It Is said that the boy had caughl
onto a city dump wagon and that h«
was clinging to the rear of the dumj
cart when the collision occurred.
Peter Johnson, the driver of the ma
chine, said that he saw the cart ahead
»f him. Both were driving west oi
Franklin avenue. Suddenly, Johnsoz
lays, the cart seemed to stop, and
threw on his brakes, but the pavement
was wet and his car skidded into th
sart with considerable force.
The boy was struck and thrown
one side. His skull was fractured, ai
were the upper and lower Jaws on th
right side. His head was otherwise
bruised, but not his body, which wouk
Indicate that he was not run over.
The driver of the cart said that h«
was turning into an alley to get to hit
home at the time, and that It wouM
appear that he momentarily stopped
The force of the collision was so great
that a wheel was taken off his wagon
Read the "Want" Column.
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Total Number x&se&a
f-Mf
MAN TIPPED OUT.
Arthur Blackhurst of Deer
Meets Death in Pelican
Lake.
Rlvei
Elk River.—Arthur Blackhurst, whe
has been working at Otsego, and
whose home is at Deer River, Minne
eota, was drowned late Sunday at Pel
lean Lake, near St. Michaels and
about ten miles southwest of here. H«
and his employer, Ed. Koechli of Ot
•ego, had been hunting ducks on the
lake in a small wooden boat Koech
li left the lake a short time before the
accident and it is not known how it
occurred.
Farmers heard the cries of the
drowing man and at once hurried to
his rescue. They could see him hang
ing to one end of the boat which was
overturned, struggling to keep above
the surface. Before they could reach
him he had disappeared.
Several efforts were made to re
cover the body, but the searchers
were not successful. The Minneap
olis authorities were communicated
with for assistance and the search
will be continued tomorrow morning.
CROWDS AT LAND SHOW.
First Day's Attendance Betters Last
Year at St. Paul by
2,600.
Minneapolis.—The seven thousand
people in attendance tells the story of
the successful opening of the North
western Land Products exposition at
the new armory annex. Last year,
during its 10 days, the admissions at
the St. Paul land show, in December,
totaled nearly 100,000, and the predic
tion has been made that the atten
dance at the Minneapolis show this
year will be one-third larger. Judging
from the attendance on the opening
day it will be double
The conservation congress to be
held four days of next week at the
armory can le expected to add many
thousands of visitors in addition to
those attraoted by the land show it
self.
By CHARLES STELZLE
S social questions generally agree that the family Is the nnll
of societ Whatever destroys this foundation is a menace to the na
tion I significant that the most important social problems which
we are facing today affect the home as they affect nothing else. The number
of marriages increased 43 per cent from 1887 to liM)G, but the number of di
vorces Increased 61 per cent during the same period. Along with this serious
situation should be considered the rapid decline in the birth rate in this coun
try. The size of the family in continental United States decreased from 6 1
In 1870 to 4.7 In WO
O The prevailing size of the family was three in three
eighths of the states and territories in 1890 and in three-fifths of them in 11XX)
Three was also the prevailing size of the family in three fifths of the cities
having at least 25.000 inhabitants in 1890 and in seven eighths of such cities in
WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN MDUS1W
Percentages in each occupation group 1870*1900
C»K figures not available.}
Years-1870 wso isso isoo
Bom^ticandjlrsoTial Servife
60
AS.
^•*.
^*-«5:
..•'
.-•*
2.647.1S7 40OS.532 s&a&yfl
1900. There were 586 children of white population five years of age and under
per thousand females between the ages of fifteen and forty-four in 1890. In
3900 there were only 608 such children. The census figures Indicate that among
native white women the birth rate is rapidly decreasing, especially In the
cities. The modern industrial situation is largely responsible for this condition
The number of wage earning women sixteen years of age and over has in
creased from 14.7 per cent in 1870 to 20.6 per cent in 1900 But in the occu
pations which have to do with home life there has been a decided decrease in
the percentage, as the accompanying chart indicates. Note the sharp decline
In the percentage engaged in domestic and personal service as well as that In
agricultural pursuits. The increase was In those occupations which are taking
women and children from the home and sending them into the store, the otttc*,
the factory. Without raising the question of the rights of women to vote or
to share In the affairs of government, when women become the competitors
of men In Industrial life they always suffer, and when women desert toe home
for the factory toe nation suffers.
%*$
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VOTE ON AMENDMENTS INCREA*
INQ A88E88MENTS TABULATED,
INDICATING FINAL RESULT.
BAIL TAX IS IN DOUBT
ttv«n-8«n«tor Bill Meett Crushing
8tate Defeat—Predictions
Fulfilled—Vote Given
By Counties.
St Paul.—With the vote from nine
teen counties on constitutional amend
ments tabulated, a comparatively defin
ite line on the final result has been
determined in the office ot Julius A.
Schmahl, secretary of state. Only
figures on three of the amendments
rere compiled, the increase of the.
road and bridge tax, the increase oi
the railroad gross earnings tax and
the so-called seven-senator bill
Apparently the amendment author
Ising the increase of the road tax to
1 mill will carry with a safe major
lty. The Increase of the railroad
gross earnings tax will have a rub,
and not until final tallies are made
will it be known what fate the amend
ment has met. The seven-senatoi
amendment unquestionably is lost.
The affirmative vote in the nine
teen counties follows:
County. Vote
Anoka {,413
Benton
Big Stone.
Carver
Chippewa .,
Chisago
Clay
Clearwater
Cottonwood
Crow Wing
Oross Seven-
Road Earn
Tax
1.521
1,042
1.054
1.532
1,721
1.650
1,889
676
951
2,036
1.254
3.309
1,534
1.674
1,888
2.170
2.225
820
2.365
ings.
1.331
1,044
946
1.479
1,592
1.642
1,741
664
988
1,890
1.190
3.392
1.370
1.681
1.800
2.056
2.198
806
2,384
Sen
ator.
821
675
686
1,051
1.1*1
1.013
1.334
434
76C.
1.451
891
2.621
1097
1.269
1.430
1.461
1701
621
1.561
2.107
1.695
2,923
2.745
2.996
S.166
1.152
2.073
3.436
2.081
Dodge
Goodhue 6.964
Jackson 2,877
McLeod 3.122
Meeker 8,413
Redwood 3.370
Renville 4.113
Wilkin 1847
Wright 4.492
Seven-Senator Plan Fails.
Vote on the seven-senator amend
ment, so far as tabulated, shows that
its unfairness was evident to all sec
tions of the state. Its defeat was
predicted immediately after the Moon
an-Duxbury-Haycraft-Weiss "frame-up"
got it through the Senate at the 1911
session. The vote on the increased
railroad gross earnings amendment,
however, causes some surprise, be
cause it was believed the voters of
the state were awaiting an oppor
tunity to "swat" the roads for in
creasing the passenger rate to 3 cents
a mile and opposing freight rate re
ductions ordered by the Railroad and
Warehouse commission. However,
there is a strong possibility of this
amendment having carried, and early
Indications are that the balance is in
its favor.
There is little doubt, apparently,
that the R. C. Dunn road tax amend
ment has pulled through safely. Only
a majority of all votes cast is neces
sary to pass a constitutional amend
ment, and the road tax proposal has
tt-ore than that in the votes thus far
counted.
Six Carry In Ramsey.
Six of the seven propositions sub
mitted to voters passed in Ramsey
county. The total vote cast waa 32,
261. It required a majority of this
vote to pass the propositions. Six
were amendments to the constitution
and one was for increasing the gross
earnings tax on railways from 4 to 5
per cent. The seven-senator amend-,
ment was the only one to fail.
The amendment providing a 1-mill
tax for road improvement got an af
firmative vote of 21,272 and 3,922
against.
For the hail insurance measure
there were 17,914 votes for and 4,493
against.
The vote for the gross earnings tax
Increase was 19,485 for and 4,682
•gainst.
For the amendment of the home
rule charter section there were 18,773
votes for and 3,814 against.
The amendment authorising school
fund loans on farms got 18,752 affirm
ative votes and 3,401 against.
The amendment making school su
perintendents educators got 18,834
votes for and 3,109 against.
For the amendment limiting state
senators to seven from any one coun
ty, 11.827 for and 10.013 against
Deo Causes Accident.
St. Cloud.—Four men were injured,
a new Ford automobile was wrecked
and a business trip was spoiled, but
the dog that caused all the trouble
escaped unharmed. George R. Whit*
ney of this city was one of a party
of four to leave Royalton on a busi
ness trip. While going at twenty
n.iles an hour the machine hit a farm
er's dog and turned over, pinning the
four men underneath. Mr. Whitney
had three fingers injured, Mr. Keeher
of Royalton was injured internally,
Mr. Lozechs sustained two broken ribs
and Peter Moeller had a sprained leg,
but when they emerged from beneath
the machine the dog was capering
about ready to enter the fray again.
Stats Bank Changes Hands.
Sauk Center.—The First State Bank
of Sauk Center, which now has
a capital stock of $25,000 changed
hands, the entire Kells interests helna
sold. Lucas Kells, president, founded
the bank In 1880 and conducted It ai
a private bank until .three years ago,
when it was made a state bank. Th«
purchasers are: J. A. Caughren, J,
A. Dubois, J. F. Cooper and Thos. Sul
livan of Sauk Center and M. F. Wood
bury of Hornell, N. Y„ and A. G.
Whitney ot St Cloud.
W. J. Burns Possible Police Chief.
Minneapolis.—A special committee
of representative Minneapolitans have
launched a project to secure William
J. Burns for the position of chief of
police of Minneapolis. The subject was
broached by James Ford Bell and Eu
gene J. Carpenter. Mr. Bell announc
ed that he would be willing to head a
committee to secure a subscription
that would make it worth Mr. Burns'
hile. According to Mr. Carpenter,
be city should have one of the best
olice officials Is the country at toe
of its polico foros, -_,..:
The governments of the three Scan
dinavian countries issued similar dec
larations of neutrality on the occa
sion of the breaking out of the Bal
kan war. This Is not the first time
that they have agreed on such mat*
ten, however. The same thing hap*
pened during the Crimean war. Even
before the breaking out of the war
between the western powers and Rus
sia, in December, 1853, the Scandi
navian countries issued declarations
of neutrality, which were identical in
til the main features.
DENMARK
A school for Danish art handicraft
has been opened in Copenhagen. The
attendance was large from the very
start.
The Danish government has ordered
ten gigantic locomotives from a Ber
lin firm. They are to be delivered
in April, and will at once be put in
service on the government railways
of Denmark.
Danish employers claim that they
will be forced to declare -a lockout
involving 40,000 employes. The rear
son for this threat is, that strikes
have been in force for three months
In four different branches, and that
the strikers are not willing to arbi
trate.
Hadsten, near Aarhns, is a town
without a fire department. Fire broke
out in the steam mill of the place,
and the people were helpless. But
Bremen from the neighboring towns
came and checked the fire when it
had done damage to the amount of
$10,000.
The Trondhjem male chorus is going
to make a concert tour to America.
The singers intend to go with the
first ship of the Norwegian-American
line on its first trip across the At
lantic. They are going to stay three
weeks and give a dozen concerts in
America. The budget of expenses is
put at $16,000, and the singers think
they can make the ends meet when
they put in an average of $80 for
each of them. There will be about
50 men in the company.
What may be intended as a strat
egic manoeuver in connection with
aerial warfare la the effort of the
German postoffice to establish an air
ship mail route between Germany and
Denmark. It is announced that Ger
many has approached the Danish gov
ernment with the view of ascertaining
whether it would be interested in em
ploying German airships for the trans
Port of the mail across the Baltic.
Denmark, according to the German
proposal, would contribute a small
subsidy which would be devoted to
SWEDEN.
A large mass meeting at Gafle
passed resolutions requesting the na
tional government to do something by
way of abating the moving picture
nuisance.
The new street railway company oi
Stockholm is still punishing those of
its employes who took part in the
great national strike in 1909. Before
that strike they were receiving from
$36 to $39 a month, with good chances
to receive still more. Over 100 oi
those who went on strike at that time
are still working for the company, but
the highest monthly pay received by
any one of them is scarcely $30. It
is estimated that said strike has cost
those men no less than $37,000, and
no one can tell how much they are
going to lose in the future. Some of
I he men have worked for the company
for more than thirty years.
NORWAY.
Many of the paiishes In Kristlania
4-re raising money for the establish
ment of old people's homes. About
$16,000 in cash has been raised, and it
is expected that the city government
will aid the movement.
Miss Beatrice Gjertsen, a Minneapo
lis girl, whose father was a Norwegian
and whose mother is a German, and
who has scored a great success as
prima donna soprano of the Grand
Ducal opera at Weimar, Germany, has
been decorated by Kaiser Wilhelm
II with a diamond brooch, bearing
toe imperial crown and cross, follow
ing her singing before the emperor.
The emperor was the guest of the
grand duke at a "Festspiel" in the
opera house, during which Miss Gjert
sen sang the role of Elizabeth in Wag
ner's "Tannhauser" with such success
that the kaiser led in the applause
after each act At the close of the
festival Miss Gjertsen was summoned
to appear before the grand duke and,
the presence of the court retinue
and members of the opera, he pre
sented the emperor's gift with the
monarch's expression of appreciation
of her art.
The two new ships of the Nor
wegian-American steamship line are
•.win screw steamers of about 12,000
tons, with a dead-weight capacity of
7,000 tons on 26 feet draught, and a
speed of 16 1-2 knots per hour. They
are 530 feet long, 61 feet wide and
40 feet deep. There are three com
plete decks with a forecastle com
bined bridge and poop extending over
two-fifths of the vessels' length. There
are nine watertight bulkheads extend
ing to the upper deck and double
bottoms extend all fore and aft. Ex
ternally the vessels will have a strik
ing appearance, with two masts and
two funnels. The hull is painted a
light gray, and the funnels are yellow,
with red, white and blue rings near
1 the top. The vessels hare accommo-
the construction and maintenance of dations 4or 130 first class, 200 second
large airship station on the island class, and 700 third class passengers,
of Amager, near Copenhagen. Den- 1 The ships are to be lighted through
mark is quoted as viewing the project out with electricity and heated and
'with great interest.'
ventilated by the Thermotank com
pany of Glasgow. They will have
wireless telegraphy as well as sub
marine signalling, and marine tele
phone. There will be twenty life
boats, capable of holding more than
1,000 persons, and besides there will
be a number of collapsible boats.
I There will be a life belt in every
The Swedish Rifle clubs, in re- berth. Special attention has been
sponse to the American invitation to
send a team of marksmen to the
United States, are making efforts to
organize the strongest possible com
bination of riflemen to participate in
the tour.
It is intimated that Danish lotteries
have a yearly income of $500,000 from
Sweden. The authorities have never
been particularly iond of this traffic,
and now the government is going to
draw up a law for putting an effective
check on it.
The employes of the Northern Street
Railway company of Stockholm held
a large meeting and resolved to with
draw from the general labor union.
The reason for this step was the de
mand on the part of the general
union that all the members of the
Btreet railway men's local union who
had accepted work during the great
Strike should make a public apology
before being admitted as members of
the general union. But this demand
was too much for the street railway
men, and so they resolved to with
draw from the general union.
A funny paper, the Sunday Nisse
(Brownie), offered a silver cup to the
hindmost man in the Marathon race
of the Olympic games in Stockholm.
Nobody seemed to care for this ques
tionable honor. The cup was taken
at last, however, and the news is
given in all seriousness by an illus
trated Russian newspaper, which
says: "The man whose picture is
given above is the only Russian who
took part in the Marathon races, Mr.
Reiman, a member of the Jervis Sport
club of Dorpat, who completed the
required distance, and won the prize
of the Sunday Nisse, a silver cup."
Lieutenant Liljewalch and Mr. Thu
lin, his assistant, have returned from
their adventurous trip to South Amer
ica. Their special aim was to study
the life of the Indians, They started
on their trip last February. They
had with them an outfit for taking
moving pictures.
In discussing the terrible railway
accident at Malmslatt, the railway
men's union has tried to prove that
such accidents are apt to be due to
a defective signal system, ambiguity
or inconsistency in the rules, too long
hours, and too strenuous exertion 01
the part of the man.
SP
iv to
refrigerating space for the
carriage of fish and other perishable
goods. The first boat will make its
first trip from Norway April next,
and the other will enter the service a
year later.
Carl Lumholtz has laid before the
geographical society of Kristiania his
new scheme, which is to explore the
Interior of the world's second largest
island, New Guinea. Mr. Lumholts
Is a man well known to his country
men, having thrice conducted expedi
tions to Mexico, where he lived for a
long time among Indian tribes. Peo
ple who have had occasion to follow
the work previously done by Mr. Lum
holtz in Mexico, are sure he is the
fittest man for such a task. They
know ho is in a position to prepare
himself for all the difficulties and ob
stacles which an expedition to New
Guinea will have to contend with, and
that he will never hesitate to en
counter difficulties when scientific
trophies are to be obtained. Mr.
Lumholts declared that his expedition
would first start for Bat&vla, whence
it will proceed to Borneo. At Borneo,
Mr. Lumholtz intends to stay for three
to four months, to get acquainted with
the country and choose sixty to sev
enty good and reliable carriers of the
Dajak tribe. He intends to look for
a companion, who can draw maps, take
photos and develop them further, ho
must be able to serve an apparatus
for moving pictures. Besides this
man he wishes to have two Norwegian
assistants to make biological and bo
tanical studies. The expedition is
expected to last for one and a half
years it will leave Europe before the
end of this year.
Borghild is the name of a girl 11
years old on the Heller island, Nord
land. Both of her parents and two
older broihora went to the fishing
grounds last summer, and during theii
three weeks' absence Borghild took
care of the home. What did shs
have to do? She took care of three
younger brothers and sisters she
milked three cows and separated the
milk, and finally, she had to bake
bread, in which she was very suc
cessful. When the older folks re
turned home they found everything
In the best of order.
Don't Let Your Car Freeze Up
"A Stitch in Time Saves Nine"
:BUT CO TO THE:
BANDY & LEWIS MOTOR COMPANY
FOR THE FAMOUS KA-0L AND ALASK
A RADIATOR FLUIDS
Not Evaporate a O Filling Is Enough
V+kfte* 9 Cheape Tha N Radiators 1
OORRER LITCHFIELD EVE. AND 6th ST. WILLMAR, MIHsl.
SP/\SrA 7SZ
TOM PtfULeaY^tmTQ*t
SHAKE WELL BEF0R£ TAKING
BUT TAKE- WELLBEro^^HAKlNS
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LOST—THE EDITOR, OFTME,
INCUBATOP MAS ltST
H,?VALV
•ABLL SUBSlblfcEJ) SILVER^TCH
BsaKt2^2^0&JVT
The Metropolitan Barber Shop,
Bank of Willmar Building, B. T.
Otos, proprietor, is the shop to get a
-stbave, hair cut and bath.—Adver
tisement.
CEBTiriCAT S OF INCORPORATION
Of the
Forum Investment Company.
We, the undersigned, for the purpose
of forming a corporation under and pur
suant to the provisions of Chapter Fif
ty-eight (58), Revised Laws of Minne
sota for 1905, and any amendments
thereof, do hereby associate ourselves
as a body corporate, and do hereby adopt
the following Certificate of Incorpora
tion:
Article I
The name of this corporation shall be
The Forum Investment Company
The general nature of its business
shall be to acquire, own, sell and other
wise dispose of, and deal in, stocks,
bonds, mortgages, securities, notes com
mercial paper of corporations and indiv
iduals, real estate and loans, banking,
publishing and printing, to engage in
manufacturing and mining, to promote
enterprises of whatever nature, to buy
and sell patents and patent rights, to
sell and lease territorial patent rights
and to engas *n any other business that
may be for the interest of said com
pany.
The principal place of transacting tne
business of this corporation shall be In
the City of Willmar. County of Kandi
yohi and State of Minnesota.
Article II.
The time for the commencement of
this corporation shall be November 1st,
1912, and the period of its duration
shall be thirty years.
Article III.
The names and places of residence of
the persons forming this corporation
are: J. Emil Nelson of Willmar, Minne
sota: A. O Forsberg of Willmar, Min
nesota E J. Wahl of St Paul, Minne
sota Lewis Johnson of Willmar, Minne
sota, and Swan Anderson of Willmar,
Minnesota.
Article IV.
The management of this corporation
shall be vested in a Board of Directors,
composed of not less than three and
not more than nine members The
names and addresses of the first Board
of Directors are. J. Emil Nelson, Will
mar. Minnesota, A. O. Forsberg, Will
mar, Minnesota E. J. Wahl, St. Paul,
Minnesota, Lewis Johnson, Willmar,
Minnesota and Swan Anderson, Willmar,
Minnesota. The first officers of this
corporation shall be. President, J. Emil
Nelson vice president, A. O Forsberg
secretary-treasurer, Lewis Johnson. All
the above named officers and directors
shall hold their respective offices afore
said until the next annual meeting ot
the corporation to be held on the 2nd
Tuesday in January, 1913. at which
time and annually thereafter, a board
of directors shall be elected from and
by the stockholders of this corporation.
The annual meeting of this corporation
shall be held at its principal place of
business on the 2nd Tuesday in Janu
ary in each year. Immediately after the
election of-directors, or as soon there
after as practicable, the directors shall
meet and elect from their number a
president and a vice president, and from
their number or from the stockholders
a secretary and a treasurer. Any office
except that of president and vice presi
dent may be held by one person. The
directors and officers of this corporation
shall hold their respective offices until
their successors are elected and entered'
upon the discharge of their duties. The
first meeting of the Stockholders and
Board of Directors shall be held at the
City of Willmar, Minnesota, on such
date as may be determined on by the
officers herein named and upon written
notice given to the stockholders and di
rectors by the secretary. ,* ^o*"-,
nDL 9UtXD\U\LUJ dLvu "7'T. A N CHE-V.K HET?
P0B WITH HIPP0POTOMUS *£*mtt|5H&YMl NOT COME THO &
STRAP% T.TC0&T US 5 DAVID I crAND
Article V. *&* &&&i$Zm
The amount of the Capital Stock of
la corporation shall he Two Hundred
WAL-LMAU»KI^KT. NO V/LMBEX |3-l9'3 \civ-I
SfcttWMaSr^
OWL afcCohis vg\K&:
I 15 CLAIMED THAT
"RtNviLLE
BI
THEY SAY^fHATV/lLKlM
COOK. MOWER. YELLO W
MEDICINE O A GOODHUE
OF BROWN
ANDlrm,MD*t
WINONA O E THAN
TEN WA&HIIH&TON E E
GWtMS A6\AS 0* WKE.1l.QUICK
VHLVi» Z. NtLL.HLRl IS
IF "REDWOOD
KANABEC OFCLEATSNVATEB
BUTTHE MULELACS A BIG
S O N E AHDTHE. MILLERS
kACOU! PA1UE..
Hon MUCH do op.
[HE TEACHER
A LESSON
E PRAUCHT
THLFLYEP HE. FLEW
THEBUYEFtME.BEW
AMD THE SCttfEtHLK MOST
Now IF WADENA -STEELE
fcl,NE,
VVOULD LESUEL/R.?
CAN'T SAX BUT COTTONWOOD
BE AITKEN TO CARVER.
CHIPPEWA MIGHTY SWIFT,
I KNOW THAT.
4QW CM THB[ EXPECT
IF NiCGOLET
0U\ VSTHERE KAVJGcHT
CAMCYlE-CKHETt,?
and Fifty Thousand ($250,000 00) doll
ars, which shall be paid In In money or
property, or both, in such manner and
at such time, and in such amount as the
board of directors stiall order, subject
to action by the stockholders at their
first meeting if desired The capital
stock shall be divided into Twenty-five
Thousand (25.000) shares of the par
\alue of ten ($10 00) dollars each
Ten Thousand (10,000) of said shares
shall be preferred stock and Fifteen
Thousand (15,000) shall be common
stock The holders of the preferred
stock shall be entitled to receive rrom
the surplus or net profits of the cor
poration, when and as declared by the
Board of Directors, dividends at the
rate of five per cent per annum, pay
able annually at the annual meeting of
said coiporation in each year, beginning
with the year 1912
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, We
have hereunto set our hands, the 22nd
day of October, 1912.
J. EMIL NELSON,
A. O. FORSBERG,
E J. WAHL,
LEWIS JOHNSON,
SWAN ANDERSON.
In the Presence of:
CHARLES JOHNSON,
MELVIN J. JOHNSON.
State of Minnesota. (__
County of Kandiyohi, fBH*
On this 22nd day of October,
personally appeared before me Emil
Nelson, A. O. Forsberg,' E. J. Wahl.
Lewis Johnson and Swan Anderson to
me known to be the persons named in
and who executed the foregoing Certi
ficate of Incorporation and each ack-
&£££&'Capitol,
A. B. RICB,
President
LOVE, O WHITE. OF BUUX*
ER HILL. *.
.FOR 5 ILL. AK£ ST\U.»
1912,
A N A N r-lLL.
AND BILL AND KJLL A N
"JACK AND GILL"
AND NIL AND I I A N W
I N
A»ID QUILL AND WILL ANJ) 5t/GAR£D
PILL"
WILL ALWAY-S UHYM
jfj) LOVE TO "WRITE OFFOOT
I LAKE
FOR Buh AND LUMP AMD
RUMP AND JUMP
AMD VMP AND STUMP ABJD
FROZEN Pur^p
MAN PLUMP AND TRUMP AND
WILL ALWAYS E W
FOOT LAKE DUMP.
^s
JpHE 50Y
"ROSEAU
OBN SECOND WAftD HE STOOD
H4H AND SIQHED
AND ANXIOUSLY AT LAST HE
CRIED*.
STOOD ON
•BVT yo HMt Gtrr 70 ?UT
UP THE STORM WINDOWS*
nowledged that he executed the same
as his free act and deed for the uses
and purposes therein expressed
(SEAL) CHARLES JOHNSON,
Notary Public, Kandiyohi County, Minn.
My commission expires October 1, 1919.
State of Minnesota,
Department of State
I hereby certify that the within in
strument was filed for record in this
office on the 24th day of October A. D.
1912 at 12-45 o'clock and was
dulv recorded in Book W-3 of Incor
porations on page 79
All holders of common stock shall
be entitled to vote at all meetings of the
stockholders and each stockholder
shall have one vote for each share of
common stock held by him, the holders
of preferred stock shall have no vote
and such stock shall be nun cumulative
All actions taken by the Board of Di
rectors at their meetings shall be sub
ject to reveiew by the stockholders at
any regular or special meeting called
for that purpose A special meeting «_*__ •M«.» #n.i—•
for reviewing and acting on any act of S S S
£Thereon.
the Board of Directors may be called by
the president at any time upon ten days
written notice at the written request
of any stockholders or stockholders re
presenting thirty per cent of the com
mon stock.
Article VI.
The highest amount of indebtedness
or liability to which this corporation
shall at any time be subject shall be
the sum of One Hundred Thousand
($100,000 00) Dollars,
*P
W 1
BUNKER, HILL
dm
THE
BURNING- DE£K
Hl5 BAGGA&L CHECKED TO
E N S O N
Mow DO'NTYOU SEE W
W E E O
HIS NAME. WAS OLE JLN5DM
A SPECIAL PROM A I
BAVLTCOUMTY IMFORMSTMF
INCUBATOR THA A A
AMD A FARMER BL ON FLEC
TION AJMDTHE BARBER W I
NOW WINNEBAGO ONIONS
TWV\ N0\N OY* VJt V.OOV^^O&U* 5
TWfc.*M&BfcVL GfcADV/Wiy VftsmGr
VNWAT S CxIVEN THAT N A W
S?K\ NC*ttALT"? U\/ IN & CONTltM
VOUSLy ONTRQTTANffc.
WE ALL ADMIT THAT IT
WAS TWOMAS EDISON O
GrAVE_A/ENT TO INVEjsmoK
BUT WHO PUT THE BREW
ENKlDGcE:?
WE- CAN'T SAY fcgTNtffc HAMC
^MUNCU THAT n\SNAS
SJVAE-
Gtff
VJHO PUT THH
FUR ON FVR^STAUS?,
$r
JULIUS A SCHMAHL,
Secretary of State.
52120
State of Minnesota, {mm
County of Kandiyohi. t~*
Filed for record the 25th day of Oc
tober A D. 1912 at 10 30 o'clock a. m.,
and recorded in Book S of Miscel., on
pages 14-15
OLOF DALE,
Register of Deeds.
By E. V. NICKELSON.
Deputy.
(First publication Nov. 6-4t)
C***1*
and for Hearinf-f
Estate of Nels Trulson.
State of Minnesota, County of Kandi
yohi, In Probate Court.
In the Matter of the Estate of Nels
Trulson, Decedent.
Letters of Administration this day
having been granted to N. O. Nelson, of
said County,
It Is Ordered, that the time within
which all creditors of the above named
decedent may present claims against
his estate in this court, be, and the same
hereby is, limited to six months from
and after the date hereof and that
Monday the 12th day of May. 1913, at
2 o'clock p. m., in the Probate Court
Rooms at the Court House at Willmar
in said County, be, and the same hereby
is fixed and appointed as the time and
place for hearing upon and the exam
ination, adjustment and allowance of
such claims as shall be presented with
in the time aforesaid.
Let notice hereof be given by the pub
lication of this order in the Willmar
Tribune as provided by law.
Dated November 1st, 1912.
(SEAL) T. O GILBERT.-
Judge of Probate.
R. W. STANFORD,
Attorney, Willmar. Minn
We believe that our 30 years of
business among: you (the people of Kandiyohi
County) warrants in claiming-that we can offer yon an abso
lutely safe storehouse for your money. Cheeks on us are
accepted in payment of bills at par in any part of Minnesota.
Ninety per cent of'the successful business men are Bank
Depositors. What better time than now to open a Check
Account with us? We have unexcelled facilities for trans
acting all branches of banking.
Our Officers will be glad to extend to you every courtesy
consistent with sound banking. We will keep your valuables
in ourfire-proofvault free of charge. We shall be pleased
to have you call on us.
BANKuOFJ WILLMAR
S«ra4«s aai Ua«lvi««4 Prwtto. $120,000.00
C.iIB.
Yfee*Pnt.
1L "H. 8WBNSOH.
^^•1 AM't~
O. HANDY.
CaeMcr

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