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Willmar tribune. (Willmar, Minn.) 1895-1931, December 04, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081022/1912-12-04/ed-1/seq-2/

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INDICTMENT FOUND
AGAINST C. N. EMELIUS
Accused of Murder of Father-in
Law, C. A. Jacobson, in Maine,
August, 1911.
Litchfield Saturday Review: An in
dictment was found Tuesday by a
grand jury at Houlton, Maine, against
Chas. N. Emelius, a former resident
of Litchfield and son of the late Nels
T. Nelson of this city.
Emelius is charged with the mur
der of his father-in-law, C. Aug. Ja
cobson, at New Sweden, Maine, on
Aug. 11, 1911. Jacobson was found
dead in the orchard on his farm the
day following. The ease was first
thought to have been one of suicide.
Suspicions were then directed at Ed
gar, son of the deceased, who was ar
rested and then released for want of
evidence. Still later suspicion was
directed against Emelius, who was
arrested and taken to Houlton, the
county seat, to await the further ac
tion of the law. The indictment has
resulted and it is presumed the trial: peterson with a purse of $63
will follow at an early day. Indict
ments were also found against Mrs.
Mary Jacobson, the widow, and her
son Edgar Jacobson.
The outcome will be watched with
interest here where both the accused
and his parents were so well and so
favorably known.
BUSTER BROWN, the musical
comedy that has made itself the
most popular attraction on the road
in the hearts of the women and chil
dren, is again to be here at the op
era house Friday evening, Dee. 6, and
put new pranks in the minds of the
local Busters. It is seldom that
musical comedy improves with age,
but, in the case of Buster, the rule
is broken. This year the play is en
tirely new and has a semblance of a
plot. The scenery is modern and
massive in construction, the cos
tumes fresh and pretty, being worn
by a chorus of really beautiful young
girls. Buster, Mary Jane, and Tige
make up the trio of mischief-makers,
who play new jokes, sing new son£"=
and make new resolutions. The old
time characters, with the exception
of Grandma, are changed, for the
better, too. This season Buster is
played by Johnny McCabe, a dimin
utive chap, as much like Buster of the
cartoons as one could imagine. One
feels tempted to "just love him .o
death." Mary Jane, played by an
other little person, done by Babe
Hudson, is an ideal Mary Jane in siz,
and ability. Tige is only a dog, but
the most intelligent dog imaginable.
This difficult role is performed by l'J.
J. Murphy. Many new and novel
features have been added in the mus
ical line, among them being the
"Campbell Kids" by the Bustor
Brown Ponies.
35. Refreshments were served and
most enjoyable evening was spent.
New London Times.
JOHNNY McCABE AS BUSTER BROWN
At OPERA HOUSE FRIDAY, DEC. 6th With a Large Singing and Dancing Chorus
New London Items.
E. F. Fink is again located at
Mexia, Texas.
A baby girl was born to Mr. u..d
Mrs. C. E. Monson on Saturday.
Miss Lena Slattum has improved
rapidly following her operation ai.d
will be able to leave the hospital th
latter part of the week.
PRICES $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c AND 25c
Wm. F. Bruce, who v.-A* the New
London agricultural instructor last
year, but who is now at Dawson, ar
rived here yesterday and is a guest
at the M. F. Lundquist home.
Martin Shipstead and Torkel Tor
kelson of Qeorgeville returned from
Grand Rapids on Tuesday where
thev had been hunting deer for a few
days. They were very successful,
bringing home two deer, one bear and
the pelt of a wolf.
A large number of friends under
the leadership of Mrs. Peter Skog
lund and Mrs. Chas. Peter Skoglund
and Mrs. Chas. Mickelson, tendered
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Peterson a very
pleasant surprise on Tuesday eve
ning. Hon. Nels Quam, on behalf of
the joy makers, presented Mr. and
An Electric Line for Swift County.
The Electric Short Line Company
of Mineapolis have men in this sec
tion of the state surveying an elec
tric line which will run from Clara
City to Browns Valley. If the line is
built it will in all probability pass
through the townships of Swenoda,
Marysland and Tara in this county.
It would cross the Watertown branen
of the Great Northern between Dan
vers and Holloway.
During the past week meetings
have been held at Danvers, Swenoda
and Hagen for the purpose of inter
esting the farmers in the proposition
with a view to getting them to sub
scribe for stock. We understand that
these meetings were well attended
and that the farmers were enthuias
tic over -the proposition and that a
larare number have already promised
to buy stock.
This company, of which Erie Luce
is president, are now building an
electric line from Minneapolis to
Watertown, S. D. The Browns Val
lev line will branch off this line at
Clara City.—Benson Monitor.
Clarence Cramer of Breckenridge
spent Thanksgiving at his home here.
Mrs. W. A. Jorgenson and little
daughter returned home Monday,
from their visit with Darwin
tives.
Kandiyohi County Bank
ORGANIZED 1879
CAPITAL $100,000.00
ANDREW LARSON, President L. 0. THORPE, Cashier
J. 0. ESTREM, Vic. President
F. A. LARSON, Asst. Cashier L. A. VIK, Asst. Cashier
rela-
Mr. and Mrs. John Severeide, on
their return from, a visit at Benson,
to their home at New London, spent
Friday and part of Saturday at the
home of Mrs. Charlie Olson.
Your income should stop today, yet
your expenses will keep right on.
Better save while the dollars
come regularly. Into every life
comesatimewhenREADY MONEY
would be welcome. Tis a fund you
yourself can create—throughaSAV
INGS account with the
I
PROSPECTS GOOD FOR A BIG COUNTY
SEAT FIGHT IN STEARNS COUNTY
Paynesville Press: The County
Commissioners are planning to build
a new court house in St. Cloud and
as a result the people of Albany have
started a boom for the removal of the
county seat to their city. Sauk Cen
tre, Holdingford, Melrose, Free
and Brooten are all joining forces in
the fight for Albany. If Albany
means business and will give us the
electric line by the way of Roscoe
and St. Martin, Paynesville will be a
willing and an enthusiastic backer of
Albany.
Sauk Centre Herald: "Resolved:
That the members of the Commercial
Club of Sauk Centre are in favor of
the proposed change of the county
seat of Stearns county from St.
Cloud to Albany."
The above resolution was adopted
bv an unanimous rising vote at a well
attended special meeting of the Com
mercial Club Wednesday night. A
committee consisting of Dr. J. A. Du
Bois, Hon. F. E. Minette, G. Hillerud,
A. M. Welles and H. G. Borgmann,
was appointed to visit Albany today
and co-operate with the citizens of
Albany in their efforts to secure the
county seat. Two meetings are to be
held there today, one at 2 p. m. and
the other at 8 p. m. The committee
went to Albany in force and was
backed up by a number of other live
wire business men of Sauk Centre.
The action of Albany citizens in
trying for the county seat was pre
cipitated by the action of the county
commissioners at a recent meeting in
voting to ask the Minnesota legisla
ture at its next session to pass a
special act authorizing the commis
sioners to call a special election to
vote on the proposition to issue bonds
in the amount of $300,000 to defn*
the expense of building a new court
house.
Last Saturday evening a delega
tion of Albany citizens visited Sauk
Centre and solicited the support of
this city. The project was talked
over extensively with the result that
a special meeting of the Commercial
Club was called and the resolution
above was passed and the committee
appointed.
The Commercial Club of Albany
has taken hold of the matter with
energy and is doing some tall hust
ling in behalf of the project. Albany
offers a fine site and a bonus of fifty
thousand dollars for the court house.
St. Cloud has had the county seat
ever since the organization of the
county in the early days. Stearns
county is a large county and as St.
Cloud is situated at the extreme east
ern end thereof, Sauk Centre and
several other cities and villages are
much inconvenienced in going there
to transact county business. Albany
is just twentyone miles east of Sauk
Centre and exactly half way to St.
Cloud. It is near the centre of the
county from north to south. Albany
has two railroads, the Great North
ern and the Soo. The latter runs
from Brooten to Duluth and thus
gives an outlet from the southwest
ern part of the country to the propos
ed new county seat. Albany is onb
about two-thirds as far from Paynes
ville as is St. Cloud, while it is
much nearer to Melrose, Freeport and
Avon than is St. Cloud.
It has been known for several days
that Albany was after the county
seat but until Tuesday of this week
the St. Cloud papers have studiously
ignored the fact. However, on that
day, the countv seat dailies published
brief accounts of the move, one ridi
culing it and stating in substance
that the St. Cloud "politicians" were
not afraid that anything would be
done and that they were laughing and
considering it a good joke.
In the past, attemnts have been
made either to remove the county
seat from St. Cloud to some other
town or divide the county. The divi
sion proposition is an old one and
proposes the separation of the three
western tiers of townships of Steam?
and the addition of the south tiers
of townships from Todd county to
form a new county to be known as
"Franklin" with Sauk Centre as the
county seat.
I
Holdingford Advertiser: A big
gathering is being held, in Albany
this afternoon and tonight to discus*
the possibility of removing the coun-
ty seat from St. Cloud to that place.
The proposition for the erection of
an expensive court house has started
the agitation and it is meeting with
support in many quarters.
The inaccessibility of the present
county seat for the larger part of
the county's population and area is
the cause of considerable dissatis
faction. Also the tendency to "hog"
the profits from the county's busi
ness inclines a good many voters to
wards the plan of pulling the plum
tree up by the roots and transplant
ing it where it will have more light
and air.
Albany is the most centrallv lo
cated village in the county and has
the best railroad connections. It is
also proposed to build an electric
line to Richmond and Paynesville
should the county seat be moved.
I
Kimball Kodak: Since the talk of
a new court house for Stearns county
has been started the citizens of Al
bany have made big preparations for
a mass meeting to be held in that city
this week when the initial steps will
be taken towards an attempt to wrest
the county seat from St. Cloud. It is
claimed that a site has already been
offered and an effort will be made to
raise between $50,000 and $100,000.
Albany has an enterprising bunch of
citizens and we wouldn't be a bit
surprised to see them "start some
thii.g"
Dobbyns' Lose Child.,
Kenneth, the second son of Mr.
and Mrs. F,. W. Dobbyn, formerly of
this city, but now of Little Falls,
Minn., died at the home of his par
ents in that citTr. last Sunday of
blood poisoning. It seems that some
time ago he injured one of his knees
but nothing serious threatened until
some three or four days before his
demise when it was discovered blood
poisoning had set in resulting in his
death. The funeral took place at
Little Falls Tuesday. Friends of the
bereaved parents and family here ex
tend to Mr. and Mrs. Dobbyn their
heartfelt sympathy, and deepest re
grets.—Madison Independent Press.
Matthews Will Contest.
M. E. Matthews of Marshall has
taken steps to contest the election of
Judge I. M. Olson to succeed himself
as district judge. A petition for a
recount is to be held at once. Judge
Olsen's majoritv is 104. Lyon coun
ty gave Matthews a mapority of ove»*
800, and he carried Lincoln by a
small vote, but Redwood, Brown and
Nicollet-counties went for Judge Ol
son.—Montevideo Commercial.
Mrs. Andrew Patchell and little
son Everett, spent Friday in St. Paul.
EDNE8DAY, DECEMBER 4,1012
Conservation Congress Farmers'
.-* Language and Education.
By Prof. J. N. Lento.
"The Second Minnesota Conserva
tion and Agricultural Development
Congress' carried out its long pro
gram and is now history, open for
free comment and criticism. It em
phasizes how fortunate Minnesota is
in its possession of great rivers,
dense forests, innumerable lakes, in
exhaustible mineral resources and
vast fertile prairies. It invites skill
ed* and unskilled labor of every kind,
from every country and of every
language and culture. But a state
does not consist in these material
advantages, for everywhere nature is
generous in extending tempting offers
to the hand and brain of man to earn
bread by the sweat of his brow. A
state is rather an institution com
posed of civilized human beings, and
this civilization is of all degrees from
barbarian to that of the highest cul
tural nationalities, neither Indian,
Negroes or Chinamen, nor Slav, Ro
mance or Teuton will raise with a
mixed population of good farmers
will be above one of all poor farmers
or below a community of all good
farmers. A farming state with the
most good farmers is the most for
tunate. Good farmers is what the
Congress is after.
It is universally conceded that the
nations with the least illiteracy and
best systems of popular education,
both practical and scientific, the
world ever witnessed, are the Danes,
Swedes, Norwegians and Germans.
They are America's best farmers and
Minnesota and the northwest are for
tunate indeed in being settled by
these people. An American remark
ed to me at the Congress, we do not
give these people half the credit due
them. They complain not of, this
praise being withheld, but what they
do lament is, that their children, in
spite of their efforts to the contrary,
are turning against their home lan
guage, culture, habits, custom and
life, and hence from the farms. And
why is this? Mainly because the coun
try school and teacher have no due
appreciation of the German and
Scandinacian home life. The school
and teacher instead of adjusting
themselves to local conditions, too
{often labor to bend pupils to their
ideals, and the work of both home
and school is largely, because of thi-j,
a failure. The conservation of the
All winter long—on the Zero days .and the
windy, blustering days—the Perfection Smoke
less Ofl Heater gives them real solid comfort.
It saves them many a cold and sickness for it easily
warms the rooms not reached by the ordinary heat.
The Perfection Heater is made with nickel trim
mings (plain steel or enameled turquoise-blue drums).
Ornamental. Inexpensive. Lasts for years. Easily
moved from place to place.
state's soil, mineral, timber and wat
er power is needed, but also all the
culture it possesses. School districts
of French children should not be
treated as Germans, nor districts of
Scandinavians as New Englanders.
Children of German and Scandinav
ian farmers, who have been hasty in
selling their birth-right in becoming
over-Americanized, have deserted the
farms more than children who hon
ored their parents' language and cul
ture, and were thus bound closer CJ
the home and farm. In every Ger
man and Scandinavian school dis
trict the mother-tongue should bv
taught as the law allows, one full
hour every day. half an hour in tha
forenoon and half an hour in the af
ternoon, if for no other purpose than
to attach the children more to their
parents and to their home and neigh
borhood life, and thus to the old
homestead. The efficient teachers of
the mother-tongue and its literature
in the rural district school is one of
the best ways to keep the boys and
girls on the farm. When they think
themselves above the language and
life of the settlement, they will be
on the move. Learning the real worth
of the language and life of their par
ents, will help them to stay at home
and to appreciate more their lot.
The Congress said much about
consolidated schools, keeping the boy
and girl on the farm, relation of edu
cation to life, why counties decreas
ed in population and why it is more
difficult to secure good farmers as
settlers. An important element in
these problems was not touched upon
—the utter failure of the country
At DmmUn Eiawftw
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
.* (An fcsfoas Corsucsllaa)
Brings
Solid
Comfort
to Old
People
VOtl.No.
CHttSE- TAKfcU OH SV)fc
TE.\jfcPY\0nt AS IT fAl&HT.
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T0 LOST N TRANSIT.
coigyrqagiS
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THEY SAY THA ST.LOUIS*
BENTON KOOCHICHfNGr ITASCA
WE GlftNT rr MIGHT MAKI
HERMftEKER,.
IT ISBEJNGcDOrfETOO
WHILE. THE MARSH/VU
1XOM VUS SCOTT AND-ROCK
Hl^lSEL? TO SLEEP
W E MATED
TO SEE. (,„Jj
GAVE HER, A O W I
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WAY SHE. WD STIGKOTTER
TAAL AND TRAVERSE
DAKOTA WAS SIN O THE
"POPE.
WE THINK IT TODD.
THAT W AND
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KAHBITOHI?
wEDOTjGETHtc^ES
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4
OH CUT IT OUT
1
**S»T ONE MORE..
AH0M6S1GK CASS
MCLEOD NOISE..
schools to appreciate and develop the
language and culture of the emigrant.
There are two classes of German
and Scandinavian farmers, whether
you consider the parents or children.
The one Neglects, forgets and despis
es the language, culture and customs
of the fatherland, the other learns,
retains and honors them. The latter
are more apt to remain on the farm,
and is less attracted by the strange
life of the city.
9SI
The Congress was right in holding
that if there is a change, it must be
brought about by education,* and I
would say, not by the education 01
the university or high school or even
the graded school,* but b-- the educa
tion of the rural school, for it was
the country school that educated the
boys and girls away from the farm.
The utter lack of appreciation of the
language, culture and habits of the
foreign settlers on the part of the
country teacher is mainly to blame.
Teachers who do not know the langu
age and good traits, as well as the
weaknesses, of a nationality are not
prepared to teach it, much less are
teachers who show their disrespect
of all foreigners by making them feel
ashamed of their mother-tongue and
its treasures. Many country teach
ers are like a teacher of English in
a night school for foreigners of a city
I knew, who never had a good word
about the foreigner, but on every oc
casion depreciated his language and
people. The right thing for the couii
try teacher to do is to stud^ to make
the foreign child respect his langu
age, fatherland and parents, regard
less of what they may be. Then the
child will be respected.
S S
Farmers by reason of their occu
pation are conservative. We wish
they were more so. Scandinavians
and Germans by reason of their cul
tural development are also conserva
tive. This great noise therefor-3
throughout the land about conserva
tion appeals to both. They have
some reason to hope that it may help
them to conserve to their schools and
homes a few things they nrize most
highly, although some people pro
claim they are worse than useless,
that they are even unpatriotic. One
of these few things is, as I said, more
respect for the conservation of the
farmers language, nationality and
ideals. States are realizing that
they cannot attract and hold settlers
with promises of liberty, privilege and
opportunity only on advertisement
literature, but not guaranteed by the
laws of the state. Hence states, like
Nebraska and California, are chang
ing their school laws more in accord
with the exemplary law of Indiana,
which says that whenever the parent
or guardians of twenty-five children
desire a language taught in any
**®£rfH1|1H$W"
HE DRINKER/\ DRW
HE BRAN
THE BUNKER A BUM
HE. BUNK
THE EATER HE ATE
THE CHEATERHECHATE
Ao Hf WINKEKABUMD
PiG&ER ,WANK
HE STRIKER. FO
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THfc SITTER HE SAT
THE QUITTER HE QUAf
AM&THE HIKER Tol*AY
.-- M0NDHEHUCK.
HO 15 LUClDATE.?
Mi
school a teacher must be furnished.
The bill now before the legislature of
Nebraska declares, "the object of the
proposed law is threefold: (1) To
broaden the scope of the schools
(2) To bring the schools closer to
the" neople and thus create greater
interest in the schools on the part of
the parents (3) To promote a better
attendance in the grade and country
schools and thus secure a better ed
ucation for the children, which will
make for better citizenship." Ne
braska has 65,500 foreign-born Ger
mans, 36,700 Scandinavians and 416
Bohemians and all three nationalities
push the bill.
The Nebraska Supreme Court re
port, volume 31, page 55, gives a de
cision of special value to -our con
servation. It reads: "The parent has
a right to make a reasonable selec
tion of the studies he desires his child
to pursue from the course nrescribed
by the district board, and this selec
tion must be respected by the trus
tees, as the right of the parent in this
regard is superior to that of the trus
tees and the teacher." The school
board of any town or country dis
trict can introduce a modern langu
age into its school and neither the
county superintendent, nor the coun
ty nor the state has a voice in the
matter. This is general all over our
country. It rests with the local
school board entirely, and why? Be
cause it can best learn the wishes of
the parents of the locality. But, alas!
parents are so indifferent in making
their wishes known in regard to the
education of their children, espec
ially parents in the country and hence
they drift from the farm home.
lis
The silver medal contest in Norse
of the south, north and central high
sehools of Minneapolis last Friday
$0^0£&£^M?&
HEY V^NT WTO A
SWELL CAFE'
H4NK
BEMSOH
AND
"DOC. W I
LtY,GSAY
THE ORCHESTRA A PIECE KD,
PLAY
WAY THRU ON TO THE. CO#
Doc.WiLEY CALLED R7t GHB-
BAQE. SLAW
AND ON A SI I_L bEGcAN nr
QNAw
DVT HE D"R0?PFJ) HS JAW
WHEN, LO:, HE SAW
THAT BTLMZONATE &SO&*
Ar3ADP]ILtNUJTBE.
IN SWEDEN HE: LIVtl!
AT GcAPLE, AND NOvV
HE HAS MOVED OUT TO
DEVILS U\KE.
A LOVE pOEf^lBV
PAT THE_POET£R.
0UMGALEX HP SET
HIMSELF OUT OAIF
Ni&HT
To COURT A YOUNG- MAIDIN
HIS HEARTSDEUfiHf.
AND ME POPPED THEQuty
TIOM
WITHA
THO,AL,HE
Mis
MIGHT
TO SWEET T?/A
WAS CROSS-
£YED,W/THAWARTO/\i
HIS IN05F
SHE D'DNOT-RE?U5E HIM.
AS ONE MIGHT SUPPOSE
THP, WERE. WEP AND
LIVED HAPPY AS EVERY
ONE KNOWS
ALEXANDRIA.
WHO PUT THE MUFFIN
MUFFLER.
evening was a brilliant success. Sev
en took part, all American-born. Both
old and young were happv. Why not
more German and Scandinavian lit
erary exercises in all our public
schools since they are being opened
for such purposes. The young peo
ple of the cities begin to be proud of
their Swedish and Norwegian. When
Scandinavians come to the metrop
olis of Scandinavian culture in Am
erica, I mean here to Minneapolis,
thev need not be ashamed to speak
their mother-tongue in their own pure
dialect. The dialect is more human
and interesting than the book langu
age. We hone in January, 1913,
many sehools in town and country
will introduce Scandinavian and thus
help to hold parents and children to
gether.
Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 25, 1912.
Waking Up at Konte.
Montevideo Leader: We believe
there are enough levelheaded voters
in Montevideo to give a good working:
majority for "No License," and that
there is a strong and growing con
viction that saloons are not neces
sary to the prosperity of our town
for to the support of its government.
In fact we believe that almost every
line of legitimate business here would
be benefited if there were no sal
oons and no places where intoxicat
ing beverages are sold. It is a mat
ter for our people to decide and it
should be decided in a lawful and
honorable way and now is the time
to give our attention to this most im
portant matter.
A new lot of latest mounts sad flmsst
llnisltsa pnotagrapiis at the lowset pries*
ftt tns BAKX.Tm STUDIO. Ooa» ««ri»v
Christmas will soon no box*. Tbo rash
oommonoos now. All want fhoir pict
ures taken bsforo Ohrlstmaa^-A«r.
Gray Stationary Engine
We sell them because
after a careful investi
gation of many makes
of engine we came to
the conclusion that
therearefewequaland
none better on the
market than the Gray.
There are reasons why
the Gray Engina isthe
besttobuy for farmers
only makes it possible
the engine at the least price and best efficiency.
Before Baying an Engine come and get a Gray catalog
and investigate this engine. Ct will save yon money, time
and worry. .^.^ &
HEDIN & JOHNSON
UNITY SHOP WILUMR, MIMN.
1
4
It
as.
I

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