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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, January 31, 1894, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1894-01-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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No. 2* 2:4'? A. M
No. 6i 7:00 A
No. 2:08 P. M.
No. 18* 8:1 S P,M
No. 22$ 7:30 P. M.
aDail except Monday.
*|ail except Sunday.
jOn Sunday only.
X)R. A. HARDEN,
I
PPM
sMeW Llln) fycVicw
Wednesday, January, 31 1894.
EAST
W E S
3:25 A.M
4:39 M.
•3T 11:55 P. M.
•$• 16:30 P, M.
12:25 P. M.
No. 1$
No. 3
No. 5
No. 21*
No. 15!l
v5i
C. W.
HEIDEMANN,
Agent.
QR. L. A. FRITSCHE,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON*.
Female Diseases a Specialty.
Office in W. Boesch's Now*Briok Block.
JSew Ulm, Mien
RESIDENT DENTIST.
Office, Cornor Minnesota and l3i K. Street
NEW ULM, MINN.
Teeth extracted without pain by the nse of
it lized air or nitrons oxide gas.
])R. L. G. BELL,
Resident Dentist.
Office in the Meridian Block.
KEW ULM, MINN.
Teeth extracted without pain by to*
atest approved methods.
_R. EMIL MUELLER
Veterinary S^eofi §. fleutist.
Calls either in the viity or country
promptly and satisfactory attended to.
Office in the Majoa?'ft JJiock, Second
Moor.
,$E W ULM MIITN.
J)R. A. KOEHML,
Veterinary Surgeon.
Having treated sick aaimals for years
I ean conscientiously recommend my
self to all who need the services of
competent Veterinary. Orders may bt%
left at Union Hotel or Olson's Drug
Store.
NEW ULM, MINN.
(/_."* E. BEHNKE, D. V. S.
tarn mm
HIRSCH,
DEHTIS
CSiea over Brown County Bank. Flos
barn to rear of the building, where
horses can be leu, fcr treats***
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office over Oisen's Drugstore.
Residence in Prof. Schallers house 20S
Jefferson Street.
STEW ULM. ynnns
M. D.
EYE-THROAT-NOSE
Office: Roems 314, 315, 316 Post office
Building.
Residence: §26 South 2nd Street.
MANKATO, MINN^.
In New Ulm first Friday of each month.
LIND HAGBERG,
Attorneys and Counselors at Law,
Attend to Suits in all the State and
U. S. Courts.
-pecial Attention Paid to Collections.
GERMAN AND SCANDINAVIAN LAN-
GUAGES SPOKEN.
NEW UL INN.
JOS. A. ECKSTEIN,
^ttoiti\ey & Counselor4
S
Titles examined and perfected
"Particular attention given to col
lections.
tgf-Ofnce over Brown Co. Bank.^gf
NEW UL INN
QitizensIJ&nb?
NEW ULM.
M. ullen, Prest. W. F. Seiter,Cashier
J. H. Vajen, V. P. W. E. Koch, Ass't.
,' Directors.
7. H. Vajen, Geo. Doehne, W. Boesch,
Crone, O. M. Olsen, Chas. Silverson,
M. Mullen.
The individual responsibility of the 27
'partners is $2,000,000.
Jos. Bobletcr
Pres.
Chas. Wagner,
Vice-Pres,
E.G. KOCH
Cashier
NEW UL, INN. -_-}
[f A I A BO,GOO.
Collections and all business pertain
•ng to banking promptly attended to.
,r* A. HEERS. f~~|
$1 Architect & Builder,
Plans and specifications
^Furnished and Contracts
iM Taken forall kind of build
ings. Office on Broadway.
Kf
DA GAM
A GIVES UP.1
Said the Insurgent Admiral Has-Snr
rendered to the United States
Commander.
C^F
Report Says He Opened Fire on the
American, Ships and Got the
Worst Oi It.
All Sorts of Reports Received
Buenos Ayres—Something Evi
dently Happened,
S O E I N A S A E N E
A Sort of A Affairs at
a
at
LONDON, Jan. 31.—Dispatches re
ceived here from Rio de Janeiro say
that at 10 o'clock a. m., Admiral Da
Grama having opened fire upon one of
the American ships, a sharp engagement
followed, with the result that Admiral
Da Gama surrendered.
LONDON, Jan. 31.—The Rothschild
banking house has received a dispatch
from Rio de Janeiro saying that Ad
miral da Gama has surrendered.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.—It is under
stooi here, though official corroboration
cannot be secured, that firing has taken
place in Brazil between Admiral Ben
liam and the insurgents. Who first
fired cannot yet be learned. It is posi
tively known that the situation is seri
ous and even critical:
E E I E E S I
N
a an in is at on as
of a Gama'* S
LONDON, Jan. 31.—The Brazillian
minister here, upon being informed of
the contents of the dispatch received by
the Rothschilds' banking house and the
contents of the other dispatches, saying
that an engagement had taken place
between the United States \var vessels
and the insurgents and that Admiral
Da Gama had surrendered, said that he
had no doubt that the news was true.
The Brazilian minister added that Ad
miral De Mello now only had command
of the Republica, and that the final col
lapse of the revolt is only a question of
a few days.
W as a Source
Baron Rothschild upon being ques
tioned by the Associated Press represen
tative as to the source from which he
had received the dispatch announcing
the surrender of Admiral Da Gama,
said that the cable message came to him
from what he considered to be a most
reliable source and that he had no rea
son to doubt its accuracy.
In conclusion the Brazilian minister
said that from the source from which
the news was received from Rio re
garding the surrender of Admiral Da
Gama there cannot be the slightest
question of its truth, although no official
confirmation has reached him.
A high official of the British foreign
office who was questioned by the Asso
ciated Press representative as to the
accuracy of the dispatch received from
Rio Janeiro, and announcing the surren
der of Admiral da Gama, expressed the
opinion that it might be true that the
rebel admiral had surrendered to the
United States admiral, as it would be
the easiest way out of a great difficulty.
A E a on is a
In conclusion, the foreign official said
he did not see what the United States
admiral would do with AmiraldaGama
and the insurgents who surrendered with
him. Admiral Benham, he added, could
not very well surrender the in
surgents to President Peixoto,
who would undoubtedly shoot them,
and it was hardly probable that
the United States government would
care to assume the care of a mass of
Brazilian insurgents for an indefinite
period. Thus, according to the repre
sentative of the foretgn office, if it was
true that the insurgents had surrendered
to the United States admiral, t^e latter
would seem to have an elephant on his.
hands.
BUENOS AYRES, Jan. 31.—It is re
ported here that the situation of affairs
at Rio de Janeiro is most critical.
Heavy firing is reported, and it is said
that the United States war vessels have
been engaged with the result that Ad
miral Da Gama is said, by one report,
to have surrendered, and according to
another report to have withdrawn his
ships from the immediate neighborhood
of the city of Rio de Janeiro.
These sensational reports have not
been confirmed, but there seems to be
no doubt that serious events are happen
ing at Rio de Janeiro, and that the
American admiral has taken energetic
steps to protect American interests.
As this dispatch is being sent, a report
reaches here that Admiral da Gama is
a prisoner in the hands of President
Peixoto.
It is also rumored that the insurgent
man-of-war fired upon the American
fleet, and that the latter returned the
shots.
I E A N O A E A E
he a I at he A is of St.
a W Ge Satolli's a
ST. LOUIS, Jan. 31.—A St. Louis
priest, with a charge near the center of
the city, it is reported, has received a
letter from a friend at Rome confirming
the information that Archbishop Satolli
is to be relieved of his duties as apostolic
delegate, and to be appointed Archbishop
of Bologna, at the next consistory,
and adding that Archbishop Ireland is
to succeed Archbishop Satolli as apos
tolic delegate.
"There is much intrinsic probability
in the report," said Father Head, a
prominent local priest, when told of the
letter.
,4Itis
known that Archbishop
Satolli was appointed delegate at the
direct instance of Archbishop Ireland,
that much of the work done by the dele
gate was mapped out for him .by the
archbishop of St. Paul, and that the two
dignithries were always working to
gether. When these things are taken
into consideration there seems to be no
reason why Archbishop Ireland should
not succeed to the duties of the office he
understands so 3$r
-•'{fishier \i- \r,ti'
N O I I N E N E
Sai to a a by
S me Doubter*
MILWAUKEE, Jan. 31.—An experiment
to show that hypnotic influence can be
transmitted for any distance over the
telephone was apparently successfully
carried out here. Professor Gregori
witoh, telephoning from Chicago, suc
ceeded in completely controlling four
subjects to the satisfaction of the hun
dreds gathered to witness the expert*
ment. Some doubt, however, arises as
to the test being a genuine one, as the
subjects were brought to the cafe, where
the test took place, by a special
friend of Gregoriwitch, who jealously
kept guard over them until after the ex
periment. Each of the subjects, after
having been placed under the control of
the hypnotist, remained under the in
fluence exactly seven minutes. The
subjects afterwards stated that influence
of the professor came through the re
ceiver of the telephone into the hand.
The sensation was described to be sim
ilar to a cool puff of wind.
TO E I S E S E E S
a in W in a go a
Cases S to Congress
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. Secretary
Smith has transmitted to congress the
papers in the Crow Creek and Winne
bago reservation damaae cases in South
Dakota. There are "bills pending in
beth branches of congress designing to
appropriate enough money to reimburse
the value of the improvements to set
tlers who went on to these reservations
in 1885 and were subsequently
compelled to remove by order of the
president. Their claims have been made
the subject of investigation by Special
Agent Pease, of the department, 944'
cases.aggregating about $116,000 having
been adjudicated. The secretary rec
ommends the appropriation of the
amount, together with $3,000 to cover
cases not yet finally settled. The com
mittee on Indian affairs of the senate has
already passed favorably on the matter
and like action is expected of the same
committee of the house.
A S A N E W I A
he Lates a in he A to
Case at a
JANESVILLE, Wis., Jan. 31.—A mo-
tion will be made for a new trial for
Matthew Ashton, who was found guilty
Saturday evening of the murder of
Mrs. Daniel Stone. A petition is being
circulated about the streets asking the
judge to grant a new trial.
The application is receiving
many signatures. The Stone will
contest in the probate court was con
tinued until Feb. 6. By the terms of
the will Ashton is the chief beneficiary
to an estate worth $250,000. Four other
heirs contest the testament on the
ground that Ashton used undue influ
ence and fraud with old man stone, who
was blind.
A A O E N
I a E to as S
to an A a as Blizzard
HELENA, Ark., Jan. 31.—A family of
immigrants on their way to Texas, con
sisting of two children" and father and
mother, were traveling in a canvas cov
ered wagon and were caught in a recent
blizzard while several miles from Clar
endon, and were found by passers by.
A boy about 14 years old and a little
girl were frozen todeath, and the father
and mother so badly frozen they will
probably die.
O O A N S A
A N it a O a a on a I
Illinois
SHELBYVILLE, Ills., Jan. 31.—A move
ment has been set on foot here looking
to the organization of the Poor Man's
party, and quite a large number of Re
publicans and Democrats have pledged
themselves to work and vote with the
new party. No man whose possessions
are valued at $1,500 is to be nominated
or receive support. The movement is
attracting considerable attention.
W at in he N
MINNEAPOLIS, Jan. 31.—The North
western Miller reports the stocks of
wheat in private elevators of Minne
apolis at 1,000,000 bushels, a decrease
over last Monday of 26,000 bushels. This
makes the stock of Minneapolis, Superior
and Duluth, 24,036,826 bushels, an in
crease of 171,520 bushels. The Mar
ket Record estimates the country
elevators of Minnesota and the two
Dakotas at 6,185,000 bushels, or 150,000
bushels less than a week ago. The
aggregate Northwestern Btock is thus
made 30,221,826 bushels, an increase of
21,519 over a week ago.
A a an E S
LONDON, Jan. 31.—G. Kynoch & Co.,
manufacturers of ammunition, who own
the Lion works at Birmingham, and
London offices at 45 Hedon street, have
arranged an 8-hour schedule by which
the pay for piece work is unchanged,
and the day workers' pay raised so that
they will earn the same wages as here
tofore.
Use Count a it
HILLS, Minn., Jan. 31. Colby &
Mehl have purchased a site and will
commence the erection of a marble
works plant at once. The new estab
lishment will be known as the Rock
County Marble works, arid will use
chiefly Rock county quartzite.
a E on of Charle I
LONDON, Jan. 31.—The Jacobites held
a memorial service at midnight in order
to commemorate the anniversary of the
execution of Charles I, who was be
headed in 1649. They also decorated
the statue of Charles I, at Charing
Cross.
re Chie in
LA CROSSE, Wis., Jan. 31.—Edward
A. Barry, chief of the fire department,
is at the hospital, with small chance of
living until morning. He had influenza
followed by acute pneumonia. An ab
«cess formed in the throat and blood
poisoning resulted.
a A a in
PARIS, Jan. 31.—The Figaro pub
lishes an interview with Dr. Herz at
Bournemouth in which he says that un
less his extradition can be arranged by
Thursday, he will publish all the docu
ments in his possession.
a Crosse S a is A it
LA CROSSE, Wis., Jan. 81.—Three
saloonkeepers, arrested a few days ago
on the charge of selling liquor on Sun
day, were given a jury trial and'acquit*
ted. Mayor Powell caused their arrests.
HAD N
O STANDING.
Judge Cox Denies the Petition of the
Knurhts of Labor For an
Injunction
Restraining Secretary Carlisle From
Issuing Bonds—Had No Stand
ing in Court.
New York Bankers Have Decided Not
,, To Let the Bonds Offered Go
Begging.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.—Judge Cox
has denied the application of the
Knights of Labor for an injunction to
restrain Secretary Carlisle from issuing
bonds. The principal ground of his de
cision was that the applicants had no
proper standing in court.
Judge Cox reviewed the laws bearing
on the question and declared that it was
unnecessary to enter into a discussion
of the rights of the secretary to make
the issue. The secretary, he said, had
legal' authority to redeem notes wh*n
presented, and to issue and call the
bonds when necessary
General Secretary Maguire of the
Knights will appeal from the decision
to the district court of appeals, and
from there eventually the case may go
to the supreme court of the United
States.
I S A E N POLICY
N a id N to
in
N E W YORK, Jan. 31.—Several of the
bank officials who attended the confer
ence with the secretary of the treasury
have arrived at the conclusion that it
will be mistaken policy to allow the gov
ernment bond issue to fail because of in
activity or lack of support on the part i.f
financiers of this city. They have also
been influenced to this conclusion
by fears that if the issue
should not be successful, Secretary
Carlisle would endeavor to secure the
passage of a bill authorizing the coinage
of the seignorage of silver bullion now
in the treasury. A further considera
tion was the possibility of the reflection
upon the credit of the government by
the failure to sell the bonds. Under
these ^circumstances President King oF
the Union Trust company has under
taken the formation of a syndicate to
bid for the entire issue at the upset
price.
The banking syndicate formed to sub
scribe to the government loan have al
ready agreed to take §25,000,000.
on S
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. Secretary
Carlisle has received dispatches from
New York saying $20,000,000 of the 5
per cent bonds had been subscribed for.
The secretary is now confident that the
whole issue of $50,000,000 will be sub
scribed for at 117.25 or higher.
O N E S S I O N A
In he
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.—The call of
committees for reports was dispensed
with, and the house went immediately
into the committee of the whole and the
tariff debate was resumed.
Mr. Covert of New York, who was
speaking when the house took a recess,
was given unanimous consent to com
plete his speech. He continued his at
tack upon the bill, which he insisted
was a sectional measure, whose burdens
would fall on the East and the North.
"When the South was threatened
with a'force bill," he concluded, "we of
the North stood shoulder to shoulder
with the South against that bill, because
we believed its operations would be sec
tional. I ask you of the South now to
join with us in denouncing this measure,
which is sectional."
Mr. Cox (Dem.,Tenn.) followed in
support of the income tax, and argued
that if it did not bear more heavily on
the East and North than the South it
was because the protective system dic
tated by the North and East had con
centrated the wealth of the country in
those sections.
Mr. W. A. Stone (Rep., Pa.) opposed
the income tax in a brief but vigorous
speech.
he Senate
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31. Senator
Washburn of Minnesota presented a pe
tition of 6,000 citizens of St. Louis
county, Minnesota, protesting against
putting iron ore on the free list.
The resolution of Senator Stewart of
Nevada, declaring the proposed issue of
bonds to be without authority of law,
was taken up, and Mr. Stewart ad
dressed the senate in its favor.
Senator Sherman followed Mr. Stew
art and criticised severely the attacks
upon the credit of the nation in the res
olution proposed by Senator Stewart and
in Senator Allen's speech. He main
tained that the secretary had full au
thority to issue the bonds.
At the conclusion of Senator Sher
man's remarks, Senator Quay of Penn
sylvania and Senator Dubois of Idaho
introduced resolutions which kept up
the discussion, Senators Sherman and
Teller taking the leading part. The
resolutions went over without action,
and the election bill was taken up, and
it was agreed that at 4 p. m. next Tues
day a final vote on its passage be taken.
A W A I I A N I N E S I A I O N
S a it W I
W in a a
WASHINGTON, Jan. 31.—Members of
the senate committee which is investi
gating the diplomatic relations of the
government with the Hawaiian govern
ment, express the opinion that the in
vestigation will be concluded within the
next 10 days or two weeks. The wit
nesses yet to be examined are mainly
persons who have at various times vis
Hied the islands.
us Spirits.
DUBUQUE, la., Jan. 31.—There was a
lively row among Spiritualists of this
city, of which two societies exist, by
the invasion of those belonging to Lib
erty Hall, to the people of Unity HalL
Medium Hopkins of Chicago was re
fused permission for tests and the lights
had to be put out to stop the row.
'j^%\%.
he Trmve A
BREMEN, Jan. 31.—The North Ger
man Lloyd steamer Trave, which sailed
from this port for New York, is ashore
at Bremerhaven.
I a it a S in of in
so a A re In'a Quandary
ST. PAUL, Jan. 31.—The decision of
the supreme court declaring the insan
ity law of 1893 unconstitutional, has
aroused the. state board of trustees of
hospitals for thainsane to the necessity
of taking some immediate action in- the
matter. Accordingly the board is in
session here to discuss the situation and
decide what shall be done to protect the
superintendents of asylums,
he decision of the supreme' court
places the superintendents of asylums in
somewhat of a predicament. If all the
patients committed under the law
of 1893, which came into effect
in May last, were illegally
committed, the question arises: Are
not the superintendents obliged to re
lease them if they wish to avoid false
imprisonment? For instance, if a patient
obtain his release from the asylum
under habeas corpus proceedings could
he not afterwards sue for false impris
onment? The fact that the patient was
in fact insane would in no wise relieve
the authorities of responsibility in the
matter. The problem is a difficult one,
and the solutionof it is likely to be at
tended with interest. Governor Nelson
will probably be counseled, and the
opinion of the attorney general re
quested.
A N A I A N I I A I O N
he us Policy A or
Year A a a
MONTREAL, Jan. 31.—Three or four
years ago Sir John Carlin, then minister
of agriculture, announced that the gov
ernment had determined to adopt a vig
orous immigration policy by granting a
bonus to the heads of families settling in
the Northwest, and $5 each to all other
adult members of the family. The gov
ernment press thereupon indulged in a
flourish of trumpets, and at last they
had a "vigorous immigration pol
icy. It is now officially announced
that the policy has been a failure and
will be abandoned on March 1 next.
One of Mr. Van Home's associates states
that the president of the Canadian Pa
cific railway is disgusted with the utter
failure of the government's immigration
policy. The road has protested against
the cancellation of an agreement with
an immigration agency composed of
Canadian Pacific railway men.
SAY S O N I E
Dr. Use S me E a
a a
WASHINGTON, Jan. 51.—Dr. S. W
Bowen of the New York World was be
fore the senate Hawaiian investigating
committee. Dr. Bowen is the man who
arrived in Honolulu the day after Com
missioner Blount landed, in company
with Harold M. Sewall. Mr.
Bloimt represents that Dr. Bowen
and Mr. Sewall attempted to arrange
a settlement between Queen Liliuoka
lani and President Dole, whereby the
former was to abdicate the throne for a
consideration of $20,000 a year.
Dr. Bowen denied, explicitly, that he
in any way represented the government
of the United States, and said Mr.
Blount had been guilty of willful mis
representation.
W I S O N S I N O I N
Six in id or at a Confer
of he a in Circuit.
MILWAUKEE, Jan. 31.—Six cities were
represented and six races were provided
for at the meeting of the Wisconsin
Racing circuit. The dates for the
spring meetings were fixed as follows:
Freeport, Ills., June 12 to 15 Janesville,
Wis., June 19 to 22 Milwaukee, June
25 to 29 Oshkosh, July 3 to 6 Fond du
Lac, July 10 to 13 Waukesha, July 17
to 20. The amount of purses to be hung
up for these races is $50,000. The fall
meeting in Milwaukee will be held
Aug. 4 to 17. The following purses will
be offered: 2:18 pace, $1,000, 2:19 trot,
$1,000 2-year-old 3-minute, $300 3-year
old, 2:40, $500 4-year-old, 2:27, $500.
A E A A N S A E
A a a of 9 7 5 0 0 A
re W as I he Safe.
ELLAVILLE, Ga., Jan. 31.— Cracksmen
blew open the safe of the Planters' bank
and took $7,500, it being all there was in
the safe.
in he S a
CHICAGO, Jan. 30.—Dr. Charles Per
kins, for whom Judge Wing had caused
a subpoena to be issued, took the stand
in the Coughlin case. He was wanted
to explain a statement from Dr. James
Bell, one of Monday's defense witnesses,
to the effect that Drs. Egbert and Per
kins were present at the autopsy of Dr.
Cronin's body and had expressed to him
considerable doubt as to the cause of
death. The physician insisted that he
had said nothing of the kind. Dr. Bell
then resumed the stand for cross exam
ination.
at N A in
ST. PAUL, Jan. 31.—The following
Great Northern appointments have been
announced: J. R. Van Cleve as super
intendentjof the Cascade division, head
quarters at Leavenworth, Wash., vice
A. J. McCabe, resigned W.W. Currier
as acting superintendent of the Montana
Central and operated lines, headquarters
at Great Falls, vice C. H, Jenks, re
signed W. E. Tew as assistant superin
tendent of the Cascade division, head
quarters at Leavenworth, Wash.
I do notEatPastry
How often you hear this
expression, and the ex
planation that usually
follows: I am troubled
with dyspepsia." The
explanation is not far to
seek. In the past'..Jjxai
hasbeen used as the prin
cipal shortening in all
pastry, the result—dys
pepsia. The__dyspeptic
need no ..longer be
troubled, providing
COTTOLENE
is substituted for lard in
thepreparation ofall food.
It is composed strictly of
highly refined vegetable
oil and beef suet. When
used as a shortening, it
produces wholesome and
healthful pastry. Physi
cians and expert cooks
everywhere indorse it.
Send three cents in stamps to N K.
Fairbank & Co., Chicago,for handsome
Cottolene Cook Book, containing six
hundred recipes.
Cottolene is sold in three and five pound
pails, by all grocers.
P*
flade only by
N. K. FAIRBANK & CO.,
CHICAGO.
i=!&i!L..c'
to Over
PITTSBURG, Jan. 31.—Reports from
all points in the Mansfield coal region to
Sheriff Richards up to 1 p. m. showed
no further trouble, and the sheriff is
confident that it is over. A large num
ber of persons reported to him, but he
informed them no more deputies were
needed.
in at a
CHICAGO, Jan. 31.—Governor McKin
ley has arrived in Chicago to attend the
banquet of the Ohio Society. The gov
ernor was escorted to the Grand Pacific
hotel, where he was greeted by an en
thusiastic crowd. He declined to be in
terviewed upon political subjects, say
ing that free traders should do the talk
ing at present.
A Snot
LA CROSSE. Wis., Jan. 31.—Daniel
McDonald son, aged 12, while hunting
rabbits, was accidentally shot from!
pastorearned in his pocket His condi
tion is serious.
?«£Sf 4 a v, ~.
HABTLAND, Wis., Jan. 8l.-John
weaver was burned to death in his own
home in thejiilage of Morton, while
trying, to extinguish ablaze caused, it is
*. -«. .-r- A. i^- supposed, by an overturned lamn. s^Tf
Millinery
The ladies of New Ulm should
boar in mind that wc load in
niiilinery goods of all kinds.
HATS and BONNETS.
VELVETS and SILKS.
FEATHERS and FLOWERS.
A complete line of each always kept
on hand. Also fancy work, stamped pat
terns and ribbons. In embroidery work
and fine yarns we carry a particularly
fine line. MIIS. SARAH E E LE
S*tuebe's
MEAT MARKET
The best place in the city for fresh
meats, sausages, hams, lards and the like.
We make it a point to satisfy the public.
Highest Price always paid for Hides and
Live Stock. Hog day, every Monday at
the depet stwck yards.
a
Br«'»
Treilment
is sold under positive written guarantee, by author
wed agents only, to cure Weak Memory: Lees of
Brain and Nerve Power Lost Manhood Quickness:
Night Losses Evil Dreams Lack of Confidence:
Nervousness Lassitude all Drains Loss of Power
of the Generative Organs in either sex, caused far
over-exertion Youthful Errors, or Excessive Use of
Tobacco, Opium or Liquor, which soon lead to
Misery, Consumption, Insanity and Death. mail.
»1 a box 6 for I6_witn written guarantee to cure or
refund money. WEST'S COUGH SYBUP. A certain
cure for Coughs. Colds, Asthma, Bronchitis, Croup,
Whooping Cough Sore Throat. Pleasant to take!
Small sice discontinued old, 50c. size, now 96c: old
Slelxe.nowsoc GUARANTEES issued S by
O. M. Olsen Druggist, New Ulm,
DAKOTA HOUSE LIVERY.
Fine Turnouts
Good Horses
Best Accomodation.
Special effort made to please the pub
lic. Price reasonable. Boarding Sta
ble in connection with livery.
A. W I E S N E
Insifr&iice
9eal£$t&tt.
Policies written in the best of Compa
nies against
Fire
Hail and
Tornadoes.
Rjal Estite Bva^'it and Sold,
ty business transacted for others.
uiinii!!
Rsal
Keeps the Bpst LIQUORS and the
best CIGARS in the City. Go to
Brust's Headquarter's for fine
drinks. He always makes it a
point to keep a respectable and
inviting place.
BLACKSMITH I NG.
HPBSESHOElJMjy
We guarantee to do both in satisfaet
ory manner. If you have a lame or in
terfering horse give us a calL Exper-i
lenced workmanship is what we claim to
be able to give you.
SlEBE__UN___
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