OCR Interpretation


New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, January 15, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1913-01-15/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

%k
P'
'K
K*l
{l
IS
if
Hew Ulm Review
Wednesday, Jaa. I
i* A. FRIT8CHK
PHYSICIAN tURCKON
Ottoa over Brown Co. Bank.
Uui, ,yV». 4:\'-: Mum.
BR. 0. J. 8EIFEUT
Pajrflielaa aid Sargeoa
Office in Ottoweyer Block
n$
Offloe 11
^op
0
Residence Wi
0. J. BEMEKE, M. D.
ae Ear, Jfcte and Throat.
OFFICE HOURS
Mllo 12 A. M. and 1 to 6 P. M.
Office In the Oken Blook.
J^aidonoa, 622Cental. Ne»Uiov Minn.
0OM8KN, DEMP8EY, MUBLLEB
ATTORNEY*A COUN
SELORS.
In nil SUM nnd U. S. eoartf
Xfljtf MINN.
LBBRT STKINHAUSeR.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Office over Review.
•pedal attention given to probating
••totes. Practices in all Courts
of the State and S. Court.
Ulm,
M. A. BIXOKAM. A. W. Braaaaai
Bingham Bros
DBAlJUMnt
0
•«i
ULM MINN.
first Congregational CtHjrcb
301 Suutn Minnesota Street
Bey. K. V. Wb«el«r, Pastor.
8UNDAY SERVICES
Bttadaj School with Men's Bible
Class..... 9:39A.M.
Morning Service 10:30 a. M.
SJfcfGbrWfaa Bcdiwvof. SK0 u.
Xtwistian Endeavor Meeting 63ttP M.
•venlng Service. ... 7:30 P.M.
Everybody Welcome.
William PfaeaderAgeocy
General Insurance
Jaeurance against fire, bail, tornado,
automobile, accident and death in
the best of companies.
Real estate bought and sold.
Legal documents exeonted, loans
negotiated, steamship tickets sold.
WANTED IDEAS
•or Four Books sent Free with list
Of Inventions wanted by manufacvur*
ers and promoters, also Prises offered
tor Invention*. Patents secured or
Fee. RETURNED.
Victor J. Evans 8 Co. wVSflfc?
£E? Your Backache
and Rheumatism
WITH
FOLEY KIDNEY PILLS
ftartttr!** drags on your vitality. Saps
goor strength. Weakens your endurance.
Hamper* you In yourwork.
W
Minn.
GULDEN ft EIPPERT
EXPEKKNCED PLUMBERS
All kinds of plumbing and fitting
-m first class Manner. Estimates
«raisbed All work guaranteed.
Before placing your work, it will be
*jr your interest to consult us.
414 Second North Str. Tel. t«C
CHAS
PLUMBBa*
We are prepared to do all kinds of
ph«nWo« In irsVclass nianner Do
not fall to call upon us wken plnmb
«n* aarf teas are required,
Minn, and Center Bis. _.
BaoMtnl New Dim
1
Besidesthat,itmeanasome
thug wrong with your
Honeys a wsslmirss, an
faanammation, a breaking
down, maybe,©*U*kid**y
tlasnse. Foley KdaayFUb
Js the true answer. They
wffl help yon QUICKLY,
kidneys, regulatethe action
of your Madder, and drrra
ad Rheumatism. They
rang* w/a« man of you.
Mo habit tannine drugs. Try
o. M. OLsnr.
.,/,„.
mm
of South Hh
on Visit to United States.
Yl*»
5«*jf
*-«»,,„V#* *$+"«
AMUNDSEN AT NEW YORK
Explorer Welcomed by Scandinavian*
Americans.
New York, Jan. 11.—Roald Amund
sen, discoverer of the South pole, ar
rived here on the liner St Paul for a
visit to this country. At Quarantine
Amundsen was welcomed by a com*
mlttee of Scandinavian-Americans.
Next Wednesday a reception in his
honor will be given at the'College of
the City of New York.
FRENCH KILL FIVE
Upon Trssssta Ram
VtiBjUBV.
afogador, Morocco. Jan. 11.—A
rrench.column commanded by Colonel
Amedee Oueydon de Dives fought a
battle with a Urge body of Moors,
whom they routed with a loss of 500
killed. Twelve French soldiers were
killed and sixty wounded.
The Moors attacked the French
twenty miles east of Mogador, where
they were guarding the lines of com
munlcation in Southern Morocco.
SHIPS BOILERS EXPLODE
Ten Are Dead and Sixteen Serioualy
Injured.
Mobile, Ala., Jan. 11.—Ten persons
were killed and sixteen were serious
ly injured when the river steamer
James T. Staples was wrecked by an
explosion of its boilers near Bladon
Springs, Ala. Thomas Bartee, captain
of the steamer, is among Che dead.
The Injured were scalded, burned
or struck* by falling wreckage. The
steamer sank within a few minutes.
GRAIN AND PROVISION PRICES
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Dnluth, Jan. 13.—Wheat—To arrive
and on track—No. 1 hard, 86%c No.
1 Northern, 86%c No. 2 Northern,
83%c May, 88Vfec July, 89%c. Flax
—On track and to arrive, $1.24*4
Jan.. 11.24% May, $1.27%.
South St Paul Live Stock.
South St Paul, Jan. 3.—Cattle
Steers, $5.75@9.00 cowd and heifers,
S4.C0@7.00 calves, |4.noa)».25 feed
ers, S4.00@7.00. Hog3—S7.05@7.20.
Sheep—Lambs, S4.25@S.25 wethers,
t3.75®5.00 ewes, *2.00©4.50.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, Jan. 13.—Wheat May,
»3%c July, 90%c. Corn—May, 50%c
July, 61%@5l%c. oats—May, 34c
July, 34c. Pork—Jan., $17.80 May,leave
118.20. Butter Creameries, 24@
33Hc. Eggs—l»Vi@26c. Poultry—
Turkeys, 15@21c chickens, 13%c
springs, 12c
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Jan. 13.—Cattle—Beeves,
|S.90@'9.40 Texas steers, $4.70@5.85
Western steers, ?5.70@7.40 stockers
and feeders, $4.40(3)7.65 cows and
heifers, $2.80@7.60 calves, $6.75®10.
75. Hogs—Light, $7.15@7.42% mixed,
$7.15@7.40 heavy, S7.05g7.42%
rough, S7.00@7.1S pigs. $5.75©7.35.
Sheep—Native, $4.65@6.'.5 yearlings,
$6.3O@8^0 lambs, $6.75@».20.
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis, Jan. 13.—Wheat—May,
88c July, 89*4c. Cash close on track:
No. 1 hard. 87%c No. 1 Northern,
85%@87c to arrive, 86%c No. 2
Northern, 83%@85c No. 3 Northern,
81*4©83c No. 3 yellow corn, 43®
«%c No. 4 corn, 40@42c No. 3
white oats, 30%@31c to arrive, 31c
No. 3 oats, 28%@29Mc barley, 45©
S3c flax, $1.25% to arrive, $1.25%.
.»,tt»rn i.
SSS
a a dhat •fa%a^aatauaH laataah,w«aAa\ 4\a%
•NfS O cSPvtta Imt. dp O
Minnesota Readers.
SEMITE COMBINE DEFEATEO
INAUGURATEJTTHIRD TIME
Adolph 0. Eberhart Sworn in as Gov*
ernor of Minnesota.
Before a joint session of the legisla
ture Adolph O. Eberhart Was inau
gurated governor of Minnesota* f# the
third time.
Galleries and floor were crowded.
Several women were present, includ
ing Mrs. Eberhart Liberal applause
greeted the governor as he read por
tions of his message, especially thos«,
relating to tbe protection of women
and children, reapportionment, good
roads and other popular recommenda
tions. Women present made a demon
stration in favor of suffrage.
In the senate Ole Sageng of Otter
Tall county presented a bill providing
for a constitutional amendment giving
the right of suffrage to Minnesota
women. The bill was tbe first that
passed over the clerk's desk.
The initiative, referendum and re
call were also among the measures
referred to.committees.
IBOD TH
E tm^m£&**QB£
Ml*
Attempt to Take Power of Naming
.Committees From Lieutenant
,. Gevernor Pails.
Both branches of the state legisla
ture opened their 1913 sessions in the
capitol at St Paul.
Nominated as the Henry Clay of
Minnesota, Representative Henuy
Rines of Mora was elected speaker of
the house by a vote of 101 to 19
forMINISTER
Frank E. MInnette of Sauk, Center,
the Democratic nominee, it was a
strict party vote, with the exception
that the candidates for speaker voted
for each other, and Lewis W. Vasaly,
Democrat, voted for Mr. Rines. Every
member was present „.
In the senate Lieutenant Governor
Burnquist took the oath of office and
the body got immediately down to
business.
Senator Duxbury of Houston coun
ty and Senator Sullivan of Washing
ton county began a fight on the door
of tbe senate to deprive Lieutenant
Governor J. A. A. Bunuruist, the pre
siding officer, of tbe power of making
committee appointments. The
sena-of
tors introduced a resolution to deprive
Lieutenant Governor Burnquist of bis
authority to name committees and
putting all such power in the hands
of the senate. The resolution was de
feated—43 to 16.
Elective officers of the senate are:
Secretary, G. W. Peachey first as
sistant secretary, E. B. Shanks sec
ond assistant secretary, Henry Burk
hard sergeaut-at-arms. James H. Ege
assistant sergeant-at-arms, R. A.
Chrlstensen chaplain. Rav. A. D.
Stowe enrolling clerk, N. C. Koel
engrossing clerk, Harry Nordfaoim.
Elective officers of the boost are:
Oscar Arneaon, chief c|erk G. O.house
Hage, first assistant clerk Crawford
Sheldon, enrolling clerk Carl Ras-ing
mussen, engrossing clerk 8. A. Si-day
monson, sergeant-at-arms W/J. Pom*
plum, assistant sergeait«t-arms W.
P. Kelley. postmaster 6.
(Vi
Randall,
assistant postmaster Rev Q. W. LuU,
chaplain.
Senator Moonan presented a bill
providing for a vote in 1914 on
thethat
question of holding a convention to
revise the constitution.
DIVES UNDER CAR TO DEATH
8ensationa| Suicide of Corporal Near
Fort Sneliing.
As Motorman Eldon Froling of
St. Paul was running a Snelling
Mlnnehaha car at a moderate rate of
speed toward the Fort Sneliing bridge
a soldier from the fort was walking
toward the car. When the car came
abreast of the man he suddenly turned
and dived directly under the wheels.
He was killed instantly. His neck
was broken and one arm was cut off.
The soldier was Corporal Anthony
Blackestrom, Company H, Ninth in
fantry.
Corporal Blackestrom, according to
several soldiers, had overstayed a
of absence and had been
searched for throughout St. Paul for
several days by officers and soldiers
from the post
TWO KILLED BY A TRAIN
Woodsman and Former Brakeman
Meet Death.
The frozen bodies of two men were
found lying eight miles apart along
side the Duluth and Northern Minne
sota railroad tracks.
One was identified a3 Sam Urbon,
woodsman, aged thirty-two. The other
was that of Ed Gallagher, thirty-two
years old, single, formerly a brakeman
on the Duluth and Northern Minne
sota railroad.
Marks on the bodies showed the
then had been struck by a train.
St Paul Warehouse Burns.
Fire at St Paul believed to
have started from a plumber's lamp
in the basement gutted half of the
old warehouse of the Chicago Great
Western railroad and caused a loss
of $50,000 before It was gotten undW
control
tien at at Paul
All Minnesota paid honor to Gov
ernor Eberhart when the first in
augural reception given in twenty
years was held at the capitol at
St. Panl. The reception brought out a
gathering that has not been equaled
in representative citizenship of the
state since Governor Merrlsm years
ago, was feted In the old capitol.
St. Paul was represented at the in
augural by hundreds. Scores came
from Minneapolis. Delegations from
various places over the state empha
sized the public nature of the recep
tion.
There were 6,500 present at the re
ception, It was estimated. Practically
all of the thousands present passed
by the receiving line to congratulate
the governor and Mrs. Eberhart—to
acknowledge formally the re-election
of the state's chief executive.
ENDS HIS LIFE
Former St Paul Paator Kills Self at
Cincinnati.
Enough commercial cyanide to kill
1,000 persons—the photograph of a
beautiful young woman, on the back
of which was scribbled "Auf Wieder
sehn," and a closely written letter
comprising thirty-one pages dealing
with the incidents of a life of ro
mance and adventure are the evl
der es of suicide discovered in the
room of Rev. August E. F. Schade,
former St Paul minister, whose body
is lying in the county morgue at Cin
cinnati.
Dr. Schade was seventy-two years
age. His death, according to the
officials at Cincinnati, is one of the
most remarkable cases on record
there, in that the circumstances are
mysterious, tragic and interesting.
PERISH IN BURNING HOME
Woman and Her invalid Mother Leas
Their Lives.
Miss K. B. Barentxen, aged fifty-six,
and her Invalid mother, Mrs. Chestine
Mi Barentxen, aged eighty-three, lost
their lives in a fire which destroyed
the home of James N. Hoffman in
Bongo, a town westof Pino River. The
with its contents was destroyed.
Mr. Hoffman left is the early morn
and whea ha returned late in this
found the house burned and fallen
in and the women missing. Coroner
Kiskella of Cass Lake was summoned
and visited the scene, but found only
fragments of bones and a small piece
of human flesh in the wreckage In the
oallar.
MINNEAPOLIS FLOUR OUTPUT
Mills Set New High Mark for the Year
1912.
Running ahead of the most sanguine
estimates made by the millers the Min
neapolis flour output for 1912 reached
the total of 17,031,935 barrels. The
Northwestern Miller has finished Its
annual compilation and its summary
carries the authoritative figures. The
production was not only far in excess
of the 15,795,470 barrels in 1911, but
it is nearly a million barrels greater
than the production of tbe great mill*
lng year of 1902, when, in the calendar
year, 16,260,105 barrels were turned
out and which was the Minneapolis
record until 1912.
ADMINISTRATOR TO PRISON
Fergus Falls Man, Short in Accounts,
Given Indeterminate Sentence.
John Peterson,, the professional
administrator, who was short in bis
accounts with several estates, asked
he be allowed to plead guilty
in the district court at Fergus
Falls. The court sentenced him to
Stillwater for an indeterminate period.
Mr. Peterson dealt in wheat and
stocks and mixed trust funds with his
own. He was a man of considerable
means and turned over all of. his
property to his bondsmen some time
ago.
Boy Kills Brother in Play.
John Hruska, Jr., twelve years old,
son of John Hruska, a prominent
Steele county farmer, was shot and
killed by his little brother, nine
years of age. The boys were playing
warfare and secured an old army rifle,
supposedly useless. They loaded the
weapon and it is thought that the
child pulled the trigger with the gun
pointed at his brother.
Two Railroad Men Killed.
Martin J. Booze, switchman, was
killed and Solm Stonniker, trainman,
sustained injuries which caused his
death two hours later, when they were
crushed between freight cars in the
Shoreham yards of the Soo Line at
Minneapolis. Mistaken signals on the
part of the switching crew are be
lieved to have caused the accident
Great Lakes Veteran Dies.
Captain Alex R. Sinclair, well
known veteran of the Great Lakes,
who for a number of years has been
a vessel broker in Duluth, died at
Port Huron, Mich. Previous to his
taking up vessel brokerage Captain
Sinclair commanded boats on I~.:e
Superior.
Slept Fifteen Year* in Coffin.
Anton Geller, ninety-three years of
age, who has lived as a hermit
near Fracee for over thirty years.
Is dead. Geller, who came from
Buffalo, N. Y„ purchased his coffin fif
teen years ago and has used it for a
couch ever since.
sss
MT THE
NEW
ANGELINA
COMPAS S
The Flour noted for its Uniformity,
Strength and Purity.
^w:iw^y^^.s1.y^
"'fer
^ver Sac Guaranteed. J.% 'r?
New Ulm Roller Mill Co.
FURNITURE
Our Line of Home Furnishings
is new and complete.
J. Forster
Carpets Ross Linoleum Wall Paper
II. Henningsen
Insurance, Real Estate,
Loans and Bonds
BOTH PHONES, No. 101 Residence Phono, No. 10*
NEW ULM, MINN.
JO WOR IN TH
E W CITY.
ULM PUBLISHING CO.
DanielWebsterFlour
None Better at Any Price
Get a Sack and convince
yourself
Every sack sold under an
iron-clad guarantee
EAGLE ROLLED MILL COMPANY
.'•S*
I

xml | txt