OCR Interpretation


New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, January 29, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1913-01-29/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

mmm KMMHpi
$/
1
a
1
4
1
S
3
aw
tf
3D
*8,
3
3
-*W
r.i
e*
a*
«l
IK
2
Ir
tl
S
1
8
ALBERT STEINHAUSBR.
A O N E A A W
Office over Review.
Special attention given to probating
JBW ULM MINN
-first Congregational Church
301 Souin Minnesota Street
Rev. E F. Whc«l«r, Pastor.
SUNDAY SERVICES
Sunday School with Men's Brble
Glass 9:30 A.M.
Morning Service ..103QA.U,
Junior Christian Esdeavor 2:00 M.
Christian Endeavor Meeting 6:30 p. M.
Kvening Servioe. 7:30 p. M.
Everybody Welcome.
William Pfaender Agency
General Insurance
Insurance against fire, bail, tornado,
automobile, accident and death in
the best of companies.
Heal estate bought and sold.
Legal documents executed, loans
negotiated, steamship tickets sold.
WANTEO IDEAS
•nr Four Books sent Free with list
•f Inventions wanted by manufacvur
era and promoters, also Prizes offered
for Invention*. Patents secured or
Fee ^RETURNED.
VictorJ. Evans 8 Co. WS-'M!
Your Backache
and Rheumatism
FOLEY KIDNEY PILLS
drags on yonr vitality. Saps
t1tng*ft- Wsafceaa yoar endurance.
Hampers you la your work.
wftiiM* MM
New Ulm Review!
Wednesday, Jan. 29, INS
A..PMTSCHK
PHYSICIAN A 8URCKON
Office over Brown Co. Bank.
Maw,
ULM, MINN.
DR. O. J. SEIFETtT
Physician and Surgeon
Office io Oitomeyer Block
Office 11
Residence 17J-
Phones
fy P. BEINEKE, M. D.
Specialist io TXiseases
of the
Eye Ear. Ncae and Throat.
OFFICE HOURS
Io 12 A. M. and 1 lo 6 P. M.
Office in the Olaen Block
Realdence, 622 Center. NewUim, Minn.
JJoMSEN, DEMPSEY, & MUELLER
ATTORNEYS & COUN
SELORS.
fractions in all State and U. 8. court*
rfBW UC4I, MINN.
Estates. Practices in all Courto
of the State and S. Court.
Ulm, .-• Minn.
GULDEN & HIPPEBT
BXPERKNCED PLUMBERS
All kinds of plumbing and fitting
first class Manner. Estimates
famished All work guaranteed.
Before placing your work, it will be
for yonr interest to consult as.
414 Second North Str. Tel. 24C
CHAS. EMMERICH
PLUMBER
•TEAM Aft
HOlJ5AI.E
A 0
OAS FITTINC
We are prepared to io all kinds of
plumbing in a ftrst-olasa manner Do
aot fail to call upon us when plumb
ers' services are required.
Minn, and Center Sis. ..
Phone 281 New Ulm
M, A. BINGHAM. A. W. BINOHAM
Bingham Bros
DBAI.BRS IN
Coal Grain.
Beside*that,itmean*some
thing wrong with -your
Hdneys -a wsaknisa, an
t&tfanunetloot a Asaaking
down, may be, of thekidney
tisanes. Foley Kkbeypifle
ia the true answer. Thar
wffl help you QUICKLY,
strengthen and heal your
Udaeya, regulate the action
of jrour bladder, and drive
ana Rheomatism. They
itraagt wen man of you.
Ho habit forming drags. Try them.
O. M. OLSEK.
LE BARO
N & COLT
Federal Judge Become* Sen-
ator From Rhode Island.
Judge Celt Chosen Senator Prom
Rhode Island.
Providence, R. I., Jan. 23.—Judge
Le Baron Bradford Colt of the United
States circuit court of appeals, Repub
lican,, was elected to the United States
senate by the legislature. He will
succeed George Peabody Wetwore.
Only one ballot was taken.
SAYS PROGRESSIVES
ARE HERE TO STAY
Roosevelt Sends Message to
Sf. Pari Conference.
St. Paul, Jan. 25.—A stirring mes
sage from Theodore Roosevelt, a spirit
ed address by former Senator Albert
J. Beveridge of Indiana, an appeal to
the suffragists by Mrs. Maude Howe
Elliott, daughter of Julia Ward Howe,
and the presence or members of tbe
new party from the Northwest and
from the nation at large, made the
conference of Northwestern Progres
sives a notable affair.
Three hundred Bull Moosers attend
ed the sessions, fully naif of whom
were from towns outside of the Twin
Cities. Men high in tbe national or
ganization were here from Minnesota,
North and South Dakota, Wisconsin,
Iowa, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio.
Colonel Roosevelt expressed his sor
row that he could not personally at
tend and dwelt at length on tbe neces
sity of the Progressives remaining a
party apart. He declared that the
new party has nothing in common
with the Republican party and assert
ed that tbe Democratic policy of tariff
for revenue only is just as dangerous
as the P»yne*Aklrif*b tariff.
GRAIN AN0 PROVISION PRICES
Ouluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Jan. 27.—Wheat—To arrive
and on track—No. 1 hard, 86%c No.
1 Northern, 85^c No. 2 Northern,
83%c May, 87%@87%c July, 89c.
Flax—On track and to arrive, $1.30
Jan., $1.30i4 May, $1.32%.
South St. Paul Live Stock.
South, St. Paul, Jan. 27.—Cattle
Steers. $5.75@9.00 cows and heifers,
$4.00@7.00 calves. $4.25@9.50 feed
ers, $4.00@7.10. Hogs—$7.10@7.22%.
Sheep—Lambs, $4.50@8.25 wethers,
S4.00@5.50 ewes, $2.25®5.00.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, Jan. 27.—Wheat May,
92%@92%c July, 90@90%c Sept.,
88%c. Corn—May, 5l%c July, 52ftc
Sept, 63%c. Oats—May, 33%c July,
33%c Sept, 33%@33%c. Pork—May,
$19.10. Butter Creameries, 24®
33%c. Eggs—16%@22J4c. Poultry
Turkeys, 22c chickens, 14c.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Jan. 27.—Cattle—Beeves.
$6.00®9.00 Texas steers, $4.70@5.60
Western steers, $5.50@7.20 stockers
and feeders, $4.90@7.50 cows and
heifers, $2.70@7.20 calves, $7.00@11.
00. Hogs—Light, $7.30@7.57% mixed,
$7.3007.60 heavy, $7.10@7.60 rough.
$7.10@7.2O pigs, $5.75@7.35. Sheep
Native, $4.75@6.25 yearlings, $6.40@
8.00 lambs, |6.75@9.0O.
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis,.Jan. 27.—Wheat—May,
87%c July, S8%@S9c Cash close on
track: No. 1 hard, 87%c No. 1 North
ern. 85%@86%c to arrive, 85%@
86%c No. 2 Northern, 83%@84%c
No. 3 Northern, 81%@82%c No. 3
yellow corn. 43%@44c No. 4 corn, 41
@42c No. 3 white oats, 31©31%c to
arrive. 30%c No. 3 oats. 28tt@29%c
barley, 44@59c flax, $1.31 to arrive,
$1.31.
Hews of Especial interest to
WHILE EN ROUTE TO ASYLUM
Mankato Man Who Had Threatened
Governor Kills Policeman and
Ends His Own Life.
Because he had threatened to kill
Governor Ebernart, Alex Shutte, thirty
years old, former rural mail carrier of
Mankato, was sent to a private asy
lum at Milwaukee. While on the
train, passing through West Allis.
near Milwaukee, he shot and killed
his attendant, Joseph Budde. a police
man of Mankato, and then committed
suicide.
Shutte had told Budde that he pur
posed to kill the governor and Budde
had promptly reported the threat to
the police. Arrangements were made
to have Shutte taken to the asylum.
Budde was selected to make the trip.
He was told by Shutte's sister, it is
said, that Shutte was armed, but he
did not go to the trouble of searching
his prisoner.
Shutte's enmity toward Governor
Eberhart is supposed to have been
due to an imaginary grievance he
felt because of an accident to his
father in the "homecoming" parade
given for Governor Eberhart.
MUST SHOW ALL ACCOUNTS
Minnesota Departments MayBe Care
fully Audited.
State administrative departments
will be called upon by the lower house
of the legislature to exhibit the dispo
sition made of tbe money given them
by the legislature in 1911. This re
quest will be introduced, it is
planned, in the house aa coming from
tbe committee on accounts and ex
penditures.
Abolition of seven state depart
ments and their centralization under
one executive head in a department
of public domain is proposed in a bill
introduced in the house by Represen
tative Thomas Kneeland of Minne
apolis.
The Kneeland bill abolishes the
drainage commission, the timber com
mission, the forestry board, the state
game and fish commission, the board
of immigration and the offices of sur
veyors general of logs and lumber. It
creates a department of public do
main to be in charge of a "commis
sioner of the public domain appoint
ed by the governor and. Whose ap
pointment must be ratified by the
senate.
FARMS INCREASE IN VALUE
Minnesota Immigration Commissioner
Compiles Statistics.
Minnesota, farmers have Increased
their wealth during the last thirty
years by $1,237,692,873. according to
figures compiled by H. J. Maxtield,
state immigration commissioner.
The total value of farm lands with
improvements, machinery, live stock,
etc., was placed at $1^76,411,787 ill
the latest reports, while in 1880 the
total value was $238,718,864. This
makes an average annual increase of
$441,256,429.
The largest portion of these values
is in land, the figures being $1,262.
411,426 now, as against $193,724,260
in 1880, a gain of $1,068,717,166, and
an annual increase of $30,657,238.
Live stock
valuest ipresen0
188 were
$31,f
904,821, as agains values oi
$161,641,146, a gain of $129,736,325.
NELSON GETS EVERY VOTE
Minnesota Senator Chosen for a Fourth
Term.
Obeying the mandate of the people
of Minnesota expressed at the No-where
vember election 178 members of the
state legislature cast their votes
for Knute Nelson to succeed himself
for a fourth term in the United States
senate, beginning March 4. Demo
crats, Prohibitionists and independ-|
ents joined with the Republicans and
not a vote was cast in opposition to,
the senior senator. Two senators and
three bouse members were absent.
A bill to wipe out the state board of
visitors was introduced in the senate
by Senator S. D. Works of Mankato.
The bill repeals the 1907 law creating
the board, which recently criticised
conditions in many state institutions
and was in turn criticised by the
board of control.
WIDOW DEMANDS A MILLION
Fraud Alleged in Suit Involving 4,800
Acres of Land.
More than 4,800 acres of timber and
mineral lands in Lake and St. Louis
counties, this state, are in litigation
in the Stephens iron land case, which
has been brought into district court
at Duluth by Mrs. Clarinda Stephens,
widow of Henry Stephens, a former
wealthy Detroit {Mich.) man.
She is suing the heirs of her son,
Henry Stephens, Jr., claiming that
she was defrauded out of ber share
of a one-third interest in the Minne
sota holdings of the Stephens estate,
valued at $3,000,000. Mrs. Stephens
also asks that certain deeds she gave
her son. who diwi Anril 10, 1911, be
set aside.
1
ASKS FOR CAMPAIGN PROBE
Minnesota Progressive Republican
League Takes Action.
The Minnesota Progressive Repub*
llcan league, at its conference in the
old capitol at St. Paul, decided
to instigate a probe into the way the
last campaign was conducted by ask
ing the legislature to investigate con
tributions and the activity of federal
and state employes before the elec
tion. The executive committee was
instructed to appear before the legis
lature and introduce the request for
the probe. The request was couched
in a resolution offered by James A.
Peterson, candidate for the nomina
tion against Senator Nelson in the last
campaigm
The conference wound up its busi
ness with the adoption of the report of
the committee on resolutions and' nomi
nations. The result of the election is
as follows:
George S. Loftus, St. Paul, presi
dent Benjamin Drake, Minneapolis,
secretary C. Harold Richter, St. Paul,
treasurer. Governing board: Thomas
Praser, Rochester Olaf L. Bruce, Min
neapolis C. Harold Richter, St. Paul
D. C. Grannls, South St. Paul James
A. Reagan, St. Paul.
COVERS SEVERAL SUBJECTS
Minnesota Legislature Receives Spe
cial Message.
Governor Adolph O. Eberhart, in a
special message read to the state
legislature, urged early consideration
of several projects for which appro
priations are asked, including tbe mat
ter of having the state represented at
the Panama-Pacific exposition in San
Francisco in 1915. The amount asked
for, this project is $150,000 and the
governor says be does not consider
this excessive. For the trip of sur
viving Minnesota participants in the
battle of Gettysburg to tbe semi-cen
tennial celebration on the battlefield
next summer an appropriation of $30,
000 is urged and action is also urged
towards having the state represented
at the centennial celebration of Per
ry's victory on Lake Erie in 1813. Oth
er items are $5,000 for the state hu
mane society, $2,996 to reimburse the
state Bed Cross society for expenses
during the forest fires at Beaudette
and Spooner in 1910 and $3,000 for
continuing the geological survey of
the state in co-operation with the for1
eral government
STATE BUSINESS METHODS
Minnesota Public Examiner Will Sug
gest Improvements.
Public Examiner Frits promised the
house committee on public accounts
and expenditures of the legislature
to report in writing to the committee
his suggestions for bettering the busi
ness methods of the state.
Mr. Fritz Was put up against the
guns in an endeavor to get' him to
criticise some of the state depart'
ments. He told the committee his ex
amination was a bookkeeping examina
tion only and he had no authority to
make investigation and if the books
were regular he did not go behind tbe
returns.
The bill providing for a department
for the deaf, dumb and blind, under
jurisdiction of tbe state labor commis
sioner, will be reported out next week,
after a little further investigation as
to tbe salary that should be paid the
man in charge. This was decided by
the senate committee which had the
bill in charge.
STATE HAS LOST MILLIONS
a of
Makes
Minnesota Attorney General
Startling Statement.
Seven million dollars' worth of state
land was permitted to slip from the
Minnesota in the late eighties
a a
nineties. This was a
startling statement made by Attorney
General Smith to the house committee
on public accounts and expenditures.
Mr. Smith was 'explaining to the
committee the business of his office
and the way he was conducting its
litigation. He has had 123 cases
persons squatted on lands be
longing to the state and claim it as
their own. Less than 100 can now
be successfully litigated. Big losses
were in timber and mineral lands. A
little care would have saved some
rich mines to the state.
RICH ORE FIND ON RANGE
Virginia Syndicate Will Sink Shaft at
Once and Operate.
What is believed to be one of the
most valuable iron ore finds on the
Mesabi range has been made by Vir
ginia men on a forty one mile north
of Virginia and only one forty re
mived from the producing Sliver mine.
The syndicate which has the lease
from the fee owners is comprised of
Harry Osterberg, H. O. Jo&nson, Wal
ter J. Markham and Benjamin F.
Smith, all well known Virginia men.
They have made a disposition of the
property for operating, purposes to M.
E. Richards and associates, who will
at once sink a shaft and operate tbe
mine as an underground proposition.
Die* at Age of 104 Veers.
Mrs. Francois La Bore, probably
the oldest person in- Minnesota, Is
dead at White Bear at the age or 104
•ears. With tbe exception of two
years she had been a continuous resi
dent of Ramsey county since 1849.
Mrs. La Bore is survived by three
sons, three daughters, eighty-five
grandchildren, about thirty great
grandchildren and fifteen great great
grandchildren.
tm, li ^itf
BOTH PHONES, No. 102
*r THB
ANGELINA
and
COMPAS S
The Flour noted for its Uniformity,
Strength and Purity.
Every Sack Guaranteed.
New Ulm Roller Mill Co.
FURNITURE
Our Line of Home Furnishings
is new and complete.
J. Forster
Carpets Rugs Linoleum Wall Paper
N. He nine sen
Insurance, Real Estate,
Loans and Bonds
NEW ULM, MINN.
JO WOK ~fj\ IN TB
E CITY.
NEW ULM
Residenoe Phone, No. 106
PUBLISHING CO.
DanielWebster Flour
None Better at Any Price
Get a Sack and convince
yourself
Every sack sold under an
iron-clad guarantee
EAGLE ROLLER MILL COMPANY

xml | txt