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New Ulm review. (New Ulm, Brown County, Minn.) 1892-1961, July 04, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89081128/1917-07-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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13.
VOLUME XL.
~v
i±4^*4 qK&'
SYSTEM OFSCHOOL
AID CALLED WRONG
GOVERNOR BURNQUIST NAMES
COMMISSION TO REPORT A
BETTER PLAN.
EXECUTIVE SAYS THERE IS TOO
MUCH FAVORITISM AND RED
TAPE.
Governor J. A. A. Burnquist has de
cide that the entire system of giving
aid to public schools is out of tune, and
cic
ai
v{
needs a thoro overhauling, and has ap
pointed a commission to look into the
matter.
The Governor says in the first place
there is entirely too much red tape and
the system should reorganize so as to
eliminate politics and favoritism, and
give aid to rural schools and to new com
munities where it is most needed, rather
than to the older and wealthier communi
ties, where it is not needed. Governor
Burnquist Friday appointed a commission
composed of well known educators and
others who have had experience in school
affairs, to make a thoro study of the
situation and develop a plan to be- pre
sented at the next session of the legisla
ture.
The Commission.
Npeopl.em.fwelCoffman,
Th following men and women, most
of the known to the educational
the state, were appointed:
Dr D. dean of the college
of education, University of Minnesota
Dr. Samuel F. Kerfoot, president of
Hamline university Dr. Frank A. Weld,
president of the Moorhead Normal
school Mrs. Gertrude F. Skinner of
Austin, formerly superintendent of Mower
county schools Mrs. H. H. Witherstine,
member of the board of education at
Rochester J. F. Vaughn, superintendent
of schools, Chisholm George Franklin,
superintendent of schools, Deer River
ArP»
St-J
superintendent of the Jackson
Jf sidum^L-hools E. G. Hall, president of
the s\mk federation of labor Senators
P. Sv"lllcGsrry of Walker and Ole
/us ^ageng of Dalton Representative James
-«*W^,/E. Madison, Maple Lake J. F. Jacobson
of Madison W. H. Putnam, Red Wing,
and W. F. Schilling, Northfield. The
latter and Ole Sageng represent the
farmers of the state on the commission.'
The governor says that under the
present sustem there is too much red
y^ape, too many petty requirements
J% upon which school boards must act,
too much opportunity for political man
ipulation of funds, and too little pro
vision for taking care of needy com
munities.
Too Much Red Tape.
The governor's statement follows in
part:
"Every one who has given this mat
ter serious consideration recognizes the
lack of scientific management in the
present distribution of state aid. There
is too much red tape in connection
with it. There are too many petty
requirements upon which schcol boards
must act. There is too much op
portunity for political manipulation
of funds and too little provision for
taking care of needy communities. More
attention should be paid to rural schools,
especially to those located new dis
tricts. Biennial struggles of the legis
lature over state aid appropriations show
the lack of definiteness and permanency
in our present methods.
"The school districts and the school
boards of the state should know what
to expect from year to year, and not
be subject to continual changes or to
the deprivation of aid through failure
to put in some new device or through
technicalities of one kind or another.
The whole matter should be removed
from the realm of politics and the
possibility of political machination.
Can Pay Obligations.
"Much has been said of late as to
the deficits in the payment of aid,
and the veto of a portion thereof, al
though as it now stands the appro
ve priations for school aid for the next
two years are about $1,500,000 more
than ever before, and it is still pos
sible for the state high schcol board
and the superintendent of education,
under the decision of the attorney
general, to pay all so-called past mor
al obligations if said board and officials
should think it advisable to do so.
"If that ^ere done, the amount of
future appropriations could be put up
to the next legislature, together with
kWh recommendations for changes as
xe commission may propose. Under
any circumstances, before additional
appropriations are made, the changes
which are necessary to render the aid
system more efficient and effective
should be adopted."
EUGENE DEBS IS BARRED
FROM PUBLIC SPEAKING
St. Peter's Chautauqua opened Sun
day, July 1, and will continue until next
Sunday, July 8. An excellent program
has been arranged and is being carried
out, with a large attendance. Eugene
V. Debs, who had been secured to de
liver one of the lectures, has been for
bidden by the Minnesota Safety com
mission to deliver a public lecture in
this state. The St. Peter committee
was notified to that effect late last week.
Mr. Debs was to have delivered the
Fourth of July address on the Chautau
qua program. St. Peter people,
who had anticipated hearing a patriotic
address by Mr. Debs feel that the Safety
commission has convicted him with
out a trial.
The commission offered to send C. W.
Ames, a member of that body to take
the place of Debs on the program, but
the offer was declined without even
thanks. In fact the offer was con
sidered, according to the St. Peter
papers, somewhat presumptuous on the
part of the commission.
COMPANY A LIKELY
(TO GO TO LUYERNE
CAPTAIN KLAUSE SUMMONED TO
ST. PAUL FOR A MILITARY
CONFERENCE
NEW ULM ORGANIZATION WILL
PROBABLY LEAVE HERE IN
A WEEK
New Uhn stands to lose Company A,
with probably no further delay. The
company, at least the title, company
paraphernalia, etc., will likely be trans
ferred to Luverne within a few days.
Captain Adolph Klause received a mes
sage Monday summoning him to St.
Paul for a conference with the state
military board, with reference to the
situation in this city. He left for the
capital yesterday morning, and it is
felt here that the transfer will be ordered
before his return.
Over Eighty Members
"With the recruits that we have now
sworn and examined and those to be
examined within the next few days,
there are new up\naid of eighty members
of the company," said Captain Klause
Monday. "We have been handicapped
in many ways, or the company would
have been filled to war strength long ago.
We have a fine start, but there are not
enoughto suitthe military authorities and
I supposeNewUlm will lose the company
Our men that we have will be held as
reserves and I suppose will be used to
fill up other companies. Of course I
do not know just wrat the outcome will
be until I have met the military board
St. Paul tomorrow."
Criticise Colonel Mollison
Seme military men here are of the
opinion that the alleged hatred of
Colonel Molhscn toward New Ulm has
had much to do with the situation.
"Colonel Mollison has never lost a
chance to gwe New Ulm a dirty deal
since Colonel Buschers was elected
head of the Second regiment, outvoting
the clique headed by Mollison," said
one former member of the company.
"New Ulm men were onto the colonel
years ago, and he knows what the ma
jority of these who know him think of
him, and he now lias an opportunity
to show his smallness, and it is too much
for him to pass up. Hence this city
loses Company A."
Governor Is Also Blamed
"Governor Burnquist promised the
company to Luverne weeks or even
months ago," declared another military
man, and he has to make good. Since
Captain Klause has recovered sufficient
ly to be able to get out after recruits
the company has been growing as rapidly
as could be expected under the circum
stances. There is scarcely a company
in the regiment that is making a better
showing than Company A at the present
time. Of course the dissension among
the officers in the company has had
much to do with the slowness in re
cruiting, However, except for the
premises that have been made to
Luverne Company A would have reached
the maximum strength as soon as many
of the other companies in the Second
regiment."
Before leaving for St. Paul yesterday
Captain Klause said the present mem
bers of the cempany here would probably
be retained as reserves and used to
fill up other companies in the regiment.
They will prcbably be divided between
Mankato and St. Peter.
ARTILLERY PLANS
STILL UNDER WAY
POSITIVELY ASSERTED THAT
SECOND MILITARY UNIT
IS FORMING
STATEMENT OF COLONEL MUR
PHY NOT CONSIDERED OF
IMPORTANCE
There will be an Artillery company
in New-Ulm. This statement has been
made positive by the men behind -the
project, and they mean exactly what
they say. Colonel Murphy, who is to
be command of the new artillery re\
giment, National Guard, when he passed
thru the city a few days ago, left word
that he would not permit the organiza
tion of a unit for the regiment here,
hence there would be no artillery com
pany in New Ulm.
Artillery Growing
"Colonel Murphy is a fine fellow and
a good soldier, one of the very best in
the Minnesota National Guard, but
there are some things a little beyond
him," said L. G. Vogel. "We are or
ganizing an artillery company at the
present time. We have nearly ninety
men who have signed up. We are not
pushing the matter now and will not
until Company A has been recruited to
its necessary strength, simply taking
those young men who offer themselves
to our cempany. We would not, under
any circumstances, do anything to re
tard recruiting of Company A, but as
soon as that organization has been com
pleted we shall go ahead with the or
ganization of the new unit. It may not
be a part of the National Guard of this
state, but I guess if we offer the govern
ment an artillery company composed
of the very best young men in the city
of New Ulm'it won't be turned down
very hard.
Have Mistaken Idea
"There seems to be a di^positio^ ©jr
a feeling, on the part of seme of the
citizens, especially those who are in
terested in recruiting Cempany A, that
the organization of an artillery unit is in
opposition to their plans, or a move to
retard the growth of the older company,
but this is not true.
"We are all proud of Company A,
proud that this city is the home of the
oldest military organization in the state,
and would do all in our power to boost
it along. In these times, however,
when there is so much for all to do, and
so many are anxious to do their part,
it does seem to me that the
organization of a second company in
New Ulm is only showing our
loyalty. There are a lot of young
men in this city who do not want to
belong to the older organization, but
•who would be glad to join another com
pany, and are especially desirous of
getting into the artillery branch of the
service."
Will Make An Offer
Capt. B. Groebner and other local
military men voice tre same sentiments
as those of Mr. Vogel.
"We will have an artillery company
arid, will offer it either to the state or
to the federal government," said Captain
Groebner. "If trey don't want it all
they will have to do will be to refuse
our offer."
INVESTIGATING PEARL
BUTTON FACTORY PLAN
A committee of the Commercial club
met with J. S. Heyman, president of
the Empire City Pearl Button company
of Atlantic City, N. J., Monday evening,
when the proposition to build a
blank button factory in this city
was discussed at some length, after
which it was decided that the com
mittee should visit the Empire City
company's factory at Wabasha. The
committee will go to Wabasha Thursday.
The object is to make a thoro investiga
tion before any definite action is taken
relative to the proposition. Among
those who will go are the following:
Wd. Eibner, J. A. Ochs, Ferdinand
Crone, L. B. Krook, G. A. Ottomeyer.
HEATING COMPANY READY
TO AWARD NEW CONTRACT
The city council and the directors of
the New Ulm Heating company have
approved the plans for the extension of
the plant on Minnesota street. Bids for
its construction will be opened July 16.
If the contract is then let as is now ex
pected the heat will be turned on the
additional territory by November 1.
The buildings to be heated are* in
the block south of Center street, and the
one between Nogb^ Second and North
NEV ULM, BROWN COUNTY, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1917.
FARMERS' LEAGUE
HAKES AGREEMENT
f. W. W. AND NON-PARTISAN
ORGANIZATION ENTER INTO
PACT
INDUSTRIAL WORKERS OFFER
TO SUPPLY LABOR DURING
HARVEST
The following special dispatch has
been received by the Duluth Herald
and se\eral other state papers from
Fargo:
For the purpose of ratifying or re
jecting an agreement which is said to
have been made with the agricultural
workers' union, said to be I. W- W., A.
C. Townley, president of the Non
partisan league, has called a state
convention to be held at Minot July 11.
If the reputed agreement, is ratified
Nonpartisan league farmers, it is said,
will hire only I. W. W. The union also
guarantees to protect the farmers of
North Dakota from all trouble over
strikes, and there will be no quarreling
over wages or disputes. The three
other conventions to ratify or reject the
action of the Minot conference" have
been called: Valley City, July 12 Bis
marck, July 13, and Devils Lake, July
14. The agreement for I. W. W. was
made between three representatives of
the league and three members of the
union, whomet recently at Kansas City.
"Entitled To $11.45 Daily."
That the I. W. W. are entitled to
$11*45 a day, is the theory the Indus
trial Worker, the official publication,
is spreading among the workers. The
wage feature in connection with the
conference held in Kansas City has not
been made public, but already large
numbers are beginning to appear in the
state, notably in the. Front street dis
trict of Fargo.
^LJjhe meeting held in,Kansas City*
'ishe men agreed to make a demand of
$4 a day for harvest work and $60 a
month lor straight farm work. What
the outcome was has been kept secret.
FLAG POLES RAISED ON
PUBLIC SCHOOL GROUNDS
JHandsome steel flag poles have been
raised at three of the public school
buildings during the past week. A fine
sixty-foot staff was erected at the High
School building Wednesday afternoon.
It stands on the south side of the building.
Forty-foot poles were also raised
Thursday at the Lincoln and the East
Side schools. The buildings are now
pretty -well supplied with flag-staffs and
when school opens in August Old Glory
will be seen floating frcm all the schools
in the city.
BURGLAR PLEADS GUILTY
James Butler, who was arrested at
Sleepy Eye during the latter part of May,
charged with 'burglary, having been
accused of breaking into a dwelling house,
was on Monday sentenced to one year's
imprisonment in the state prison at
Stillwater. Butler is said to have gained
only a pair of shoes and a wornout
overcoat for his trouble. Saturday he
expressed a desire to waive grand jury
proceedings and change his plea from not
guilty to guilty. Monday afternoon he
was taken before Judge I. M. Olsen in
chambers, where he plead guilty to
burglary in the third degree. He was
then sentenced.
KLOSSNER SOON TO HAVE
AN UP-TO-DATE CREAMERY
A meeting will be held at Klossner
Thursday, July- 5, for the purpose of
organizing a creamery association to
build one of the most modern and up
to-date creameries in this part of tre
state. The association is to be made up
of former members of the now defunct
Lafayette & Bernadotte association, the
one formerly at St. George, and a num
ber of others, which owing to poor
location or for one reason or another have
been forced out of business.
Klossner is^ believed to be an ideal
location for the new creamery, being
centrally located for those who are
interested in the enterprise.^ ^,*g.
It is intended to complete the organiza
tion Thursday and-begin the erection of
the plant at the very earliest possible
moment. 7
v1s
Eighty men have already signed up
to become members of the New Ulm
company of artillery.
APPOINTMENTS ARE MADE
FOR EXEMPTION BOARDS
President Woodrow Wilson, upon the
recommendation of Governor J. A. A.
Burnquist, has appointed the Minnesota
exemption boards. A board for each
county in the state has been selected,
whose duty it will be to decide the ex
emptions from military duty, of those
who are drawn by reason of the con
scription law. The members of the
board for Brown county are as follows:
Sheriff W. J. Julius, Auditor L. G.
Vogel and Dr. G. B. Weiser.
Dates for action on the exemption
claims have not yet been set, the board
waiting until instructions have been
received from Washington. When defi
nite word has been received a date will
be made upon which those claiming ex
emptions will appear before the board
and their claims will be acted upon.
No more last hour candidates for school
district offices. Under the new law,
passed by the last legislature all candi
dates must have filed at least twelve
and not more than thirty days before
the election.
EQUITY PICNIC IS
SUCCESSFUL EYENT
HUNDREDS ATTEND AFFAIR
HENLE'S GROVE,
SUNDAY
More than five hundred people at
tended the picnic given by the Society
of Equity, in Anton Henle's grove,
eight miles west of this city, in Milford
township, last Sunday. Farmers in
terested in the movement, and their
faijailies began gathering^ at the grb*e
by 11 o'clock in the forenoon, and when
the exercises began early after the noon
hour the crowd was so large the managers
of the affair had their hands full in hand
ling it. A basket lunch was spread on
the tables in the grove and everyone
enjoyed themselves to the limit.
Speeches And Music
Following the dinner the farmers and
their wives gathered before the speakers'
stand to listen to the speeches and the
music, while the young people danced
in the pavilion. Two bands, the Mil
ford and the Home Boosters' furnished
music for the gathering during the day,
and in the evening the Sigel orchestra
furnished music for the dance, which
continued until late at night.
Louis Spellbrink presided at the
meeting. After extending a hearty
welcome to the visitors and delivering
a short talk on the object and accom
plishments of the society, he introduced
Col. A. R. Wilkinson of Lake Elmo,
who gave a comprehensive discussion
of the benefits of co-operation among
the farmers. Colonel Wilkinson's
address and his points were heartily
applauded by his hearers. Colonel
Wilkinson is an able speaker.
Gives History Of Society
The second speaker on the program
was F. M. Sharp of St. Paul, one of the
founders of the organization, whose
address was also closely followed by an
intensely interested audience. Mr.
Sharp gave a comprehensive history of
the inception of the society, its growth
and of the affective work it is doing for
its members.
One Non-Partisan Speaker
L. M. Samuelson of Lafayette, a
member of the executive committee of
the Farmers' Non-Partisan league, ad
dressed the audience on the work that
is being done by the organization.
Many of the farmers throout the
northwest are members of both organiz
ations, and. both are growing rapidly in
this vicinity, especially in Brown and
Nicollet counties.
Those in charge of Sunday's picnic
are well pleased with their efforts, while
the large number present left the
grounds feeling that the day had been
spent in a profitable manner.
M. E. SUNDAY SCHOOL TO
HOLD PICNIC IN MILFORD
The Methodist Sunday school chil
dren, their parents and reachers will
celebrate the Fourth today, with a
picnic Milford township, six miles
west of the city. Those attending will
be taken to the grounds in automobiles.
There will be a basket picnic and the
day will 6e spjent in sppi%and games.
HISTORICAL"1 NUMBER 27
SOCIETY
IN
MILFORD,
FARMERS LISTEN TO INTER
ESTING SPEECHES ABOUT
CO-OPERATION
ILL-TREATMENT- IN
EXTREME IS FOUND
WOMAN SLOWLY STARVING WAS
DISCOVERED MIDST FILTH
AND VERMIN
CITIZENS BECOME INTEREST
ED AND CALL ON COUNTY.
OFFICIALS
An aggravated case of ill-treatment,
abuse and slow starvation came to
light in the south part of the city one
day last week. It was brought to the
attention of the police and county
officials, and possibly a woman's life was-,
saved. Wednesday evening two ladies,
called at the home of A. A. Schlump
berger and said that a woman living in
the home of a man named Bauer was
being shamefully ill-treated that the
won an, who is a sister of Bauer, and%
who was ill had been kept for a year or
more in the attic of the home, amid
the filthiest possible surroundings, was
not allowed to change her clothing in
fact had none to change and was practi-»
cally kept alive on bread and water..
Citizens Investigate
Mr. Schlumpberger communicatedT
his information the next day to N
Henningsen, who summoned Acting
Chief of Police Alvin Harmening. The
latter with Messrs. Henningsen
Schlumpberger and Adolph Meile, went
to the Bauer home to make an investi
gation. There, they said, they found
that the story had not been overdrawn.
The woman was found huddled in a^
corner of the attic, lying on a bundle of£
rags, and with the air so foul that it*
was almost impossible to breathe. Mr.,
Henningsen summoned County At-»
torney Adolph Frederickson. The*,
latter called County Physician J. H.
Vogel who had the woman sent to a
hospital where she is beeing cared for
in a proper manner, and is said to bet
lmjproVing rapidly.
Law Does Not Provide
It is presumed that by the time the
woman is able to leave the hospital
some provision will be made so that she
will not be compelled to return to. her
former intolerable surroundings.
GROCERY CO. HOLDS
ITS ANNUAL MEETING
The .stockholders of the New Ulm
Grocery company held the annual
meeting of that company at its offices
in this city last Saturday afternoon,
when the old directors and officers
were re-elected. The following
are the officers of the company: Presi
dent, James A. Nichols, Willmar vice
president, J. H. Meister, Willmar
secretary, H. W. Bockus, Frazee
treasurer, R. M. Hicks, New Ulm. The
Messrs. Nichols and Bockus were here
for the meeting.
The company opened its wholesale
grocery business in this city eight months
ago, and the officers express themselves
well pleased with the patronage so far
extended in this territory.
Work on the company's new building
is progressing rapidly at the present
time,, altho the movement was retarded
early in the season, owing to the ina
ability of the contractors to secure
material as rapidly as needed.
RED CROSS MEMBERS ARE
BUSY FOR THE SOLDIERS
New Ulm Red Cross women are busy^
preparing material to be sent to the boys
at the front, and in hospitals either in
this country or- in Europe. Two
rooms that have been assigned to them
in the Armory are busy places every
afternoon. *r Committees representing
the various clubs and societies are at the
rooms each day to give out material to
•those who call and wish do work for the
society at their homes. -.^—^
Just as predicted the city water supply
is running low, and New Ulm citizens
are warned to 'go slow on the consump
tion. With the addition of the new well
Vhich is now being sunk, the situation
will be relieved. Matt Holland, the
contractor, is pushing the work on the
fourth well, and the people will not be
inconvenienced very long, it is hoped.
&&
•^S^i^
County Attorney Frederickson says
there is no law under which Bauer and
his wife may be prosecuted. Had the
woman been a minor the case would
have been clear, but the legislature
evidently considers that an adult is
usually able to take care of himself or
herself, In this and similar occasional
cases such does not seem to work out.
^1
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