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The Bemidji pioneer. (Bemidji, Beltrami County, Minn.) 1896-1917, April 10, 1902, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059048/1902-04-10/ed-1/seq-3/

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Bemidji Hotel...
RATES, $1 IS NEWLY
-9
PER DAY FURNISHED
Open Day ami Night.
Anton Aller, Prop.
A,-E.'Henderson*
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office over
Mayo'8 Drug Store,
BEMIDJI, MINN.
C. Adamson,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office upstairp next door
east of City Drug Store,
BKMIDJI. MINN.
HvpSehmidt
PROPRIETOR OF
CITY MEAT MARKET
DEALER I N ALL KINDS OF
Fresh andSaltMeats
All kinds of Sausage
constantly on hand.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES.
HERBERT J. LOUD,
ATTORNEY-AT-L AW.
MILES'
BUILDING.
BEMIDJI, MINN.
For Farm Lands,
Timber Lands and
Meadow Lands
CALL ON-
T. JiMary,.....MINN.
SOLICITED'
BEMIDJI.
1
BEMIDJI,
200,000 acres to pick from^in
Hubbard, Beltrami, Itasca and
Cass counties.
Inquire at the Pioneer office.
J. R. RICHARD
MANUFACTURER OF
FINE BRIC
ORDERS-
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
MINN.
F. A. Btfown,
Commissioner
United States
Final Proof and Contest.
Blackduck, Minn.
LESLIE H. BAILEY,
ATTORNEY-ATLAW.
MILES
BUILDING.
BEMIDJI.
MINN.
DOBAN & CO.
THE OLDEST FIRM OF
BANKER& AND BROKERS
IN THE NORTHWEST.
Dealers in Bonds, Stock. Grain & Provisions.
Members Chicago Board of Trade.
Private Wires to All Leading Markets.
QgBMAMA LfWB lUSE RANBB BUTUHHG.
Cor 4th and Minnesota Sts.. ST. PAULMlatt
5
ctive Page
yyy^in^t^
This signature la on every box of the geatne
Laxative BroflKHQaioifle ^"leu
the wwiedy that core* a 8 **T
eawre-reums'iw vc u
1
1
timber is cut, even the stumps
are grubbed out, and the road
graded till it would be an honor
to many of our cities. Then what
is called the rut-cutter is. drawn
over the road by six or eight
horses, cutting two ruts six or
eight feet apart. These ruts are
partly filled with water, this be
ing done by a number of horses
drawing a large tank over the
road, the water running from it
into the^e ruts partly filling
them, and when this freezes
there are two troughs of ice for
the runners of the mighty sleds
to run in. Imagine a sleigh with
runners eight feet apart and
bonks sixteen feet wide. These
sleds, without a stick of timber
on will weigh from sixty to sixty
five hundred pounds When
loaded they contain anywhere
from five to twenty thousand feet
of logs, drawn by two or four
horses.
The logs are landed on some
river and when spring comes,
and usually before, ail the ice is
out of the river the men com
mence floating the logs down
(this is called the drive) to some
all these men. These
S
in the lumber camp from, say
November 1st to April 1st.
Wherever logging is in pro
gress, there you will find a largo
number of saloons in the nearest
town. In Bemidjia town of
only 3000 peoplethere are
forty saloons. In Farley, a small
town just started, there are al
ready nine saloons and others
going in. Blackduck is the same,
and so on throughout the country.
And this is the only home the
Lumber Jack, as he is called, has
when he comes out to any of
these towns. Invariably every
hotel has a bar. It is a deplor
able sight to see these men when
they reach town. Every saloon
has a gambling den, and many
keep lewd women. Sunday, us
well as every other day, these
places of vice are open, with en
trancing music to draw the
men in.
Preaching in the Camps
Dear reader, the Church and
the Christian people are to a
large extent to blame for this
condition of affairs. There is no
home except the saloon and other
places of vice prepared for these
men. Years have gone by and
THE PIONEER
F. B. HIGGINS IN THE EVANGELIST, NEW YORK.
men,,
or at
Minnesota is especially rich in saw mill probably fifty or perhaps very few ministers have ever Dear reader, you may ask, how
timber iron and farmlands, over a thousand miles, where gone out of their churches to do these men receive the gospel?
During the winter just closed it they are manufactured into lum- reach these men. Even the Sal- In my seven winters' work I &
is estimated that over 2,000,000,- ber. vation Army and Mission Halls have never received anything but AldSKail MlfMlO P8PCP
000 feet of timber has been cut For the past several years I have not gone to the camps, when the greatest of kindness, and the
in this state and all in six have been in the habit of visiting they could find these men in most profound respect is paid to
months, from October to March, several of these camps and con- their right mind. anyone who will carry the gospel
Logging in these days is al- ducting religious services, until Months pass by every year, to them. Let it be announced
most a science, especially when today Heel as much at home in and many of these men do not that there will be a sermon
we remember that a crew of say the camps preaching as when even get a letter or a paper to preached in md every
seventy-five men, in the short before my people on Sunday. My
space of six months, will cut and seven years work has given me a
haul out of the forest over 7,000- large acquaintance among these
000 feet of timber. men, until today there comes the
To the observer, unless famil- cry from every quarter, ''Come
iar with this work, the operations and preach to us," "Send us
are astonishing. A crew of men reading matter," etc.
will, in October or the first of Living in Bemidji I am in one
November, penetrate the forest of the greatest lumbering dis-
with their axes and saws, and tricts of northern Minnesota,
near .the center of the pine they All around us there are many
intend to cut, and if possible on camps and thousands of men.
the bank of some lake or river, Because of my church work I
build camps. These camps con- can only visit a few of these
sist of kitchen, dining room, camps, but I pray that God will
bunk room, blacksmith shop, lead me entirely into this field,
barn and other buildings. These Here in Minnesota alone there
buildings are all made of logs, are, this winter, over twenty
and are very warm and comfort- thousand men in these camps,
able. and so far as I know there are
The buildings being finished, no churches or ministers taking
roads are cut, and what are call- up the work of preaching to
ed tote-teams are kept
bus,y
9
1 1
1
winter hauling provisions to the least a large majority of them, they come down in the spring night, and always talcing up col-
men and horses at camp. Mak- are without homes. In the sum- that they feel that nobody cares lection-never coming back or
ittg roads on which logs are haul- mer they find work on the Dako- for them, and at once go to the sending them any reading matter
Pd to the landing, which is gen- ta prairies or on the railroad. In saloon where they are made wol- or visiting their sick, until the
eraliy on some river, is a very the fall they drift back to the come as long as their money men are now so thoroughly dls-
important operation. All the woods where they are at home lasts? But once that is
gone. gustedfothat oftent
1 Riki
BL .^fll "*!W
read. Is it any wonder when
many of thom are thrown into
jail, or givon notice to get out of
and realize this vast field of
labor which so few seem to care
about! We are sending out
thousands of dollars for foreign
missions, and may God bless the
work, but right here at home we
have this mighty field where
men are willing to hear the gos
pel, and there is no one to carry
it to them,
wn( re
town. How my heart aches as I in order to find them in their
see this terriblo state of affairs, sober sonsos, with lt of time
I
(f
man will hurry and take care of
his horses, or other work, that
he may be present, and through
the entire service silence and at
tention reign supreme.
If these men have confidence
in you, they will do anything for
yougive up their bunk, sleep
on tho floor, tako you through
the woods, in fact, spend their
last dollar to show you that they
appreciate you. Often because
of their generous hearts, they
are imposed upon. A cripple, or
some man who lias boon sick, or
somo person selling chances on
some article, finds his way to
these men. Then tho sisters of
the hospital are begging, and
somotimos somo minister will
start around those camps,
preaching in one camp one night
and in another camp the next
when visit
camp th firs tune iI is notha
ing now to hear some one say,
"Well, 1 wonder how much that
SkyBilotis after," etc. While
visiting these camps I have al
ways refused to take up collec
tion for fear I might bo classed
with tho Others who have, and
by doing so, hurt my influence.
When I first visit the camp, I toll
the boys I am not after their
money that I am coming five or
six times during the Winter to
preach to thom and furnish thorn
with reading matter, and visit
their sick, bury their dead, etc.,
and the result is, wo get acquaint
ed during tho winter months and
never have I done this but what,
in the spring, the last time I vis
it tho camp, the boys remember
mo with a liberal collection
anywhere from ten to fifty dol
lars in each camp.
Again, we must romember the
logging camps are the places
must meA these men
during the winter to think aboul
their misspent lives. Often havt
I, as I held a meeting, seen men
with tears running down their
cheeks, and after the meeting,
as I visited with them, have
heard them say, "You told the
truth," and I thank God many
have turned to him and are to
day leading abetter life.
ADVERTISERS GET THEIR
MONEY'S WORTH ALWAYS
Latest Styles and Best Finish
at Low Prices.
Send in your Kodak negatives
for developing and finishing.
Kodaks and Supplies always on
hand. Views of lumber camps and
surroundings for sale.
Gallfry on. Third St., Bemidj
FREE for Three Months,
"NEWS FROM ALASKA" a Monthly paper
devoted to the interests of those deefrinir^to
purchase "ground floor" 0010 STOCK* in
companies who are auccessfully operating in
the
Civpo Nome Gold Fields Alaska.
4
Write for Copy No
have made
giving full
about Cope
telling how men
In a year ami
inform a ti on
Nome illustrat
ed with handsome half tone pictures, or en
close two two cent stamps and receive copy
orofacial map of Alaska in colors also latest
map of the Cape Nome Oold Fields,
Address
0, C, LEWIS, Gen. Agent,
DRAWER No. 1562. MILWAUKEE, WIS
ME YOU SICK
IF SO, FOR WHAT REASON?
MEDERINE
Has cured and is still curing thousands
afflicted with Blood Diseases, Catarrh
Troubles, all kinds of Rheumatism and
Gout.
No Physician Can Do More
No Druggist Should Guarantee Less
A Doctor SnrprisodScrofula Cured
Hamilton, Ohio, Dec 3, 1900.
MEDERINE REMEDY CO.,
West Superior. Wis.
Dear Doctors-I now write for four
bottles of your MEDERINE for which
find P. O. money order for $7.50. My
Scrofula Disease is giving away fast
under the treatment of first bottle. I
am satisfied that it is the treatment my
system needs. My doctor surprised
at the result. (%nec0is
HE! ROUERT E RMANN.
The MEDERINE REMEDY CO. will
pay $100 for any case of the above blood
trouble that MEDERINE cannot cure.
For Sal* 00 Our (luarantec by
F. A. MAYO
Mv.ni HIM- IH 1M. on! roiimdy llmtciirBmlekHtom
IIC-IIM mill Morning CmiuhhiK and Voiuliliia HpolU.
riiiiiuli of Mir. Head. Thin.it inn! Htimiauli la tho
i-iiiiM.'. I 1.1,1 buttlua ili.i". 1 In- ink. Wrllii Mi-il
prlliiT JiiiiVnui of"itouTtli. II. IMIIIHIIIN ovorythliitf.
MKDKItlNK lUMKliv
Co.<p>Kodofu.l
WI.HI Hlll'SUlOit Wit*
Dyspepsia Cure
Digests what youcat*
This preparation contains all of the
dlKcotants and digests all klno ~J
food. It gives Instant relief and never
falls to cure. It allows you to eat all
the food you want. The most sensitive
stomachs can take It. By Its use many
thousands of dyspeptics have been
cured after everytht: 1 else failed. It
prevents formation of gas on the stem*
ach, relieving all distress after eating.
Dieting unnecessary. Pleasant to take.
I can't help
but do you good
Prepared only by E. O. DKWiTTAOo..Ohlca(w
'i.'lio It. bottle contulu* 2V4 Units the Wc. Uu.
W. HAHT1NOS.
I l.hlflfllt.
.^HKI.OON.
Vil'f-I'ICM,.
A. P. WII1TR
I 'li- hi'
F. 9, KKNNKUY.
AMHt. Cllull
NO. f5S2
First National Bank
P.i'iniiiji, Minnesota.
IENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
'v/fi'v Ancoimnoriiition Onrmltan1 with Con.
MI vnii vt. liunkuiw will lie ran led.
II an hum Solicited Fire hiMumnci
E. H. Smith, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office two doors oolow
City Drug Store.
TelephoneOffice, 73 residence, 132.
HEyrnji. MINN.
D. H. FISK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Office over First National Bank,
DKMIDJI. MINN.
Now is the time to subscribe
for the PIONEER, the leading paper
of Beltrami connfcv.

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