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Red Lake news. (Red Lake, Minn.) 1912-1921, March 01, 1920, Image 4

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059061/1920-03-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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FIRST NATIONAL BANK
of Bemidji, Minn.
g&W
Capital and Surplus
$60,00000
United States Postal and Indian
Fund Depository
We Will Welcome Your Banking Busi
ness and Shall Be Pleased to Have
You Call on Us for Informa
tion Concerning Same
YOUR ENTIRE REQUIRE-
MENTS IN BUILDING
MATERIALS
Can Be Filled
at Our Yard
JLUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, SASH,
DOORS, MILLWORK
LIME v
CEMENT
JPLASTER-
DRAIN TILE
BRICK
WALL BOARD
BUILDING PAPER
We Ship Promptly
St Hilaire Retail Lumber Co.
Telephone 100 Bemidji, Minn.
Office near Red Lake Depot
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TOWNSITES
REDBY, PUPOSKY
WERNER
ON
MINNEAPOLIS, RED LAKE
& MANITOBA RAILWAY
For Information Write
RED LAKE TOWNSITE
7
WMWWj
A. L. Molander, Treas. BEMIDJI, MINN.
WWMJWWI
DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR
(Continued from First Page)
school-trained Indian compares favorably with the
average white student whose home surroundings as
a rule are generally to his advantage.
The Indian's progress is too frequently measured
by his garb. We want the Indian to cut his hair
and wear citizens clothes. We urge him to live in
a white man's house, but if he does not entirely
and promptly respond in all of these respects it is
not proven that he is not a progressive man. Some
times young men returning from our schools to
the reservations resume certain outward forms of
tribal fashion as a matter of expediency or social
deference to their elders but their activities show
what they are their farming, their stock raising,
the homes they build and the way they furnish
^them, and their desire to have their children go to
school, are the best evidences of their progress
Recent careful investigation shows that the pro
duct of the Indian schools is so generally successful
and of good standing, that the conclusions is over
whelmingly against any adverse criticism of the
government's system of Indian education.
The war service of 10,000 young Indians brought
them distinct educational value a better use of
English, greater self-confidence, respect for au
thority, and disciplined industry that will add
strength and character to their citizenship.
The social and domestic life of the Indians is
steadily improving. Marriage by tribal custom is
notably giving way to legal rites. At present there
is hardly more than one-fourth the drunkenness
among Indians that prevailed ten years ago. The
missionary workers have been a powerful aid. Their
number among the Indians has doubled since 1900,
with a corresponding increase of churches and
church attendants.^
,m
The Indian's industrial progress is especially
noteworthy. Their individual funds on deposit
have increased in the last eight years excess
of $20,000,000. During that period they have
expended for homes, barns and modern farm imple
ments $18,000,000 and have added $13,000,000 to
their capital in live stock. The Indian's transforma
tion from a game hunter and wanderer to a settled
land-holder and home-builder is everywhere evident.
Nearly 37,000 Indian farmers are cultivating al
most a million acres, 47,000 are engaged in stock
raising and their live stock is worth close to $38,-
000,000. Their last year's income from the sale
of crops and live stock was approximately $14,-
000,000. The Indians are dependable wage
workers. Their annual earnings in public and
private service exceed $3,000,000. Their number
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JEF E Cl" I VH AGfc
WHEN YOU BUY
DRY GOODS AND GROCERIES
YOU WANT THE
BE^T QUALITY at the RIGHT PRICES
I We are prepared to give you this kind of service
COME IN AND SEE US
FAIRBANKS CO.,
RED LAKE, REDBY and PONEMAH
receiving rations and supplies not paid for in labor
has decreased one-half in the last seven years.
There are not many defenders of the earlier pro
cesses of treaty making and treaty breaking, but
the constructive plan, followed now for nearly
a third of a century, of allotting the Indians' land
in severalty, of conducting hospitals and schools
for physical and mental betterment, and providing
them guidance in the productive use of the soil and
its related industries, if not a perfect one, is the
best plan yet devised for a dependent people and
is amply justified by results.
Sincerely yours,
CATO SELLS,
Commissioner.
BIRTHS AND DEATHS
Born to Mr. and Mrs. William Sumner, March
7, a baby girl. Her name is Adele.
A daughter was born to Mr and Mrs. Dan
Perkins of Ponemah on February 17. Her name
is Alma.
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Carl are the parents of a
son bom March 28. They have named him Alvie
John.
A son, Eugene Kingbird, arrived at the home of
Way-zee and O-ke-zhe-no-din-oke of Ponemah on
March 27.
Elsie Sullivan, wife of James Sullivan, died at
Ponemah on the 11th of March.
Baby Anderson, infant son of Mr and Mrs.
Henry Anderson, passed away on the 14th. He
was but five days old.
Robert Burns, son of Alvie Burns, passed away
on the 17th of March.
Jerome William, infant son of Mr. and Mrs.
Blake Rosebear, died the 1st of March.
Bessie Sunrise Wind, daughter of Nodin, Jr.,
passed away on the 2nd at the age of nine years.
Walter Hardy, son of Mo-ne-do-ke-zis-oonce, died
on the 6th.
Harold Kingbird died March 7, he was the infant
son of Ah-zhe-day-gahn.
Tay-bus-aush-eke, age 77, passed away at the
Agency hospital on the 7th. She had suffered a
fractured hip.
Charles Wind, infant son of Nodin, Jr., died on
the 8th.
James M. Pierre, three-year-old son of Mr. and
Mrs. Peter Pierre, died March 19.
O-gub-ake passed away at the age of 80 years.
She is survived by one grand daughter, Mrs. Gilbert
Lussier, and several great grandchildren.
Jennie Bellanger, who has been ill for two or
three years with tuberculosis, died on the 30th
of March.
Kay-gway-tah-be-tung died on the 30th He is
survived by his wife, Ah-ne-me-ke-wub-eke.
MERCHANTS

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