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Warren sheaf. (Warren, Marshall County, Minn.) 1880-current, April 09, 1908, Image 1

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F.V.
1
A SUCCESSFUL
VALLEY FARMER
C. A. Tullar Writes of his -Exper
ience in Northwestern
Agriculturist.
Late in the evening of April 14,
1882, we stood on the place where our
farm is now located with nothing
about us but the unbroken prairie
extending in every direction as far
as the eye could reach. We felt
mighty lonesome we were in search
of a place for a home for the young
wife and two little boys we had left
way back in Wisconsin. But for
them we would have taken the next
train back home. We realized that
we were face to face with a big pro
position, but faith, hope and
ambition won out. We bought 320
acres on contract. In a few days a
box car arrived with all our posses
sions, and things began to move and
take shape. It would be too long
to tell of our trials and disappoint
ments success and failures, that
chased each other through the
changing seasons of the fleeting
years. Thousands have had the
same experiences, and all must have
them wno go in to develop a new
country.
From the summit of twenty-six
years of effort we view the results.
Had we known then what we know
now. they would have been greater.
On the other hand they could be
worse. Our first observation is that
we still hold the farm. This is in
teresting because we can count on
the thumbs of one hand all our first
neighbors: they have "cashed in"
and moved awav. We see the farm
now: it is not a trackless, wind
swept praire, but thousands of
planted trees afford protection to
i the home, the buildings and the live
stock adding a charm of beauty to
tttu prospect as well.
v?he acres have increased
thousand four hundred and
Commodious buildings, for
live stock, are conveniently
here, also dwelling house,
quarters, buildings for implements
and machinery, carpentry and
blacksmith shop, and grain houses,
including a grain elevator of 16.000
bu. capacity oDerated by gas engine
power. And the best water system
on any farm in the vallev. The
water is pumped by wind power into
a 240-bbl. elevated tank and piped
^underground to all the buildings.
from an artesian well 210 feet deeD.
This system cost the farm over four
thousand dollars, but it^is^worth it.
Some six or seven miles of woven
wire and other styles of wire fencing
to one
thirty,
all the
located
men's
surround large fields for pasture or
croD rotation.
In their season, beautiful luxur
iant crops of clover, timothy and
alfalfa may be seen growing, as well
as rich pastures of the clover and
other tame grasses.
But the best thing on the ranch is
the live stock, and it brings in the
most money with the least expense
of any line. There are fifty head of
high grade and pure bred French
drift horses, mares, colts and stal
lions. We frequently get from $300
IE^SOOO for teams and tor single in
iduals we have realized, on
ious sales, from $300 to $700 each,
have raised all our work horses
for years, and find ready sale for all
our surplus at remunerative prices.
We consider this a splendid locality
for the raisinJ of horses: and in
truth for all kinds of live stock. We
have twentv-seven head of Foiled
Durham?! and Shorthorn cattle.,
Nearlv one hundred pure bred
Shropshire ewes, ten brood sows,
twentv-seven fat hogs, and 175 Ply
mouth Rock chickens.
We have an abundance ot feed of
all kinds great stacks of timothy
and clover and orairie hay and
mountains of straw. 'Great Scott!''
there ife nothing like the Bed Biver
^Valley anywhere in the world for
opportunities.
What is opportunity? It is a
chances to do that which you know
how to do. And here it comes to
jour door, not "once," but many,
many times. She is as persistent
today as ever. Thousands of acres of
vacant lands, rich In fertility and
opportunity are waiting for sturdy
men to come and occupy them.
Many lines of agriculture have been
worked out to a successful issue, and
the newcomer is reasonably sure of
good results from the start. How-
ever, there are no snaps here, you
can't get something for nothing it
takes a hustler to get the goods.
Sitting with your feet on the fender
never drove a fence post: it takes a
sledge hammer'to do that.
The earlier one realizes that farm
ing is not like mining, the better it
will be for him and his farm. In
mining-you never out anything back
in farming you must if you feed
your farm it will feed you, starve it
and it will starve you. Feeding the
farm is the chief corner stone of all
successful agriculture.
When the Great Architect made
Minneosta, He did his best work, as
well as the last, right here in the
Bed Biver Valley. It was here He
put on the finishing touches the
healthiest climate, the richest soil,
the best water and the, grandest op
portunities for activity are here.
In coming here we -did not leave
civilization behind us, we brought it
along, it is here now and always will
be. The church and the school were
the first institutions established, and
our children grew up hand in hand
with Christianity, education and
work, first in the country school,
then the Warren State High School,
one of the best in the state then
the State Univeristy or one of the
colleges.
We not only have our farm home,
but we have a home in town. The
house has all modern improvements
electric lights, hot and cold water,
bath rooms, hot water heating plant,
and telephone. We built our own
telephone line to the farm: it is
seven miles long. It saves travel
and is a great convenience.
In order to make a concise state
ment of what we have accomplished
since we located on our farm we add
this inventory taken on the first day
of the new year. 1908. We always
take an inventory the first of each
year.
We are aware that it is more or less
irritating to one's sensitiveness, also
exceedingly vulgar, to reduce accom
plishments to a dollar basis: but in
this commercial age about every
thing is measured by the "almighty
dollar." and as,a people we (jan't
understand "success* measured by
any other standard. It is a serious
condition, one to be regretted.
Inventory C. A. T. farm
for Jan. '08.
Market value on that day.
50 head horses, mares, stal
lions and colts, (20 regis
tered) $8,535.00
27 head Poland Durhams
and Shorthorns 710.00
38 Hogs 375.00
80 Pure bred Shropshire ewes 400.00
175 Plymouth Rocks 50 00
Farm implements,machinery
and 25 H. P. thresher... 5,500.00
1700 bushels spring wheat
grade 1 1,700.00
1278 bu. Durum, at 85c.".... 1,046.00
925 bu. Barley, at 85c 740.00
3200 bu. Oats, at 42c. 1.3*4.00
250 bu. Timothv seed, $1.75 437.00
3 bu. Glover seed, raised
on the farm 20.00
1430 acres in farm, at $35 per
acre 50.050.00
Total inventory...' $70,907.50
Less original investment,
fiist year 9,344.65
Result accomplished $61,562.85
R. C. Math wig: The Sheaf's sug
gestion last week of a motto or
slogan for Warren is excellent and
ought-to be adopted. "Warren will
win" seems to me verv appropriate.
Such a slogan will do lots of good in
campaign for development.
DR.* 'N SLOUGH NEAB OSLO.
A movement's on- foot to drain
the large slough north of town near
the Shepard farm. Complaints have
been entered that this- slough not
only rendered a large tract of land
practically worthless, but much sick
ness has been caused from the same.
A petition has been circulated get
ting signers and the amount each
were willing t" appropriate for the
cause and from all appearances the
work will be carried out this
summer.Oslo Tribune
NORTH STAB BUYS
BUSINESS SCHOOL.
At a meeting of the Board of
Directors of North Star College held
yesterday afternoon, it was decided
to purchase the good will and equip
ment of the Warren Business School,
according to terms contained in a
proposition made by Prof. J. H.
Kaiser, the principal and owner of
said school, the transfer to be made
at the end of the present term. The
incorporation of this reputable and
successful school into North Star
College will give said institution a
strong' commercial department from
the start and insure a large attend
ance of students when the doors of
the college swing open for the first
time next fall. At the meeting of
the directors yesteray it was decided,
also, to issue a call to Prof. Lund
quist, at present musical director of
Weldon College, Kansas, to come
here to take charge of the depart
ment of music of North Star
College. Bev. O. Chelgren was
also authorized to look up a suitable
man for principal, and one. for the
commercial department.
I will trade farms in Swift or
Jackson Counties, Minnesota, for a
good hardware or merchandise busi
ness. Land at actual cash value.
Address Box 18. Danvers. Minn.
a MARCH
1.
I
MEXICAN SERENADE
MEDLEY OVERTURE
2. VIOLIN SOLO AIR
fa INTERMEZZO
3.
OVERTURE
4. READING
o.
CONCERT WALTZ
6.
cw*ktn
Tha outlook for the creamery busi
ness is very good this year. Feed is
fairly plentiful and as clover fields
are getting numerous and people are
more inclined to raise feed crops
them is little danger of another set
back by feed shortage. With ordin
ary good grain crops and the profit
from dairying and poultry this seoj
tlon of the Red Biver Valley will be
prosperous In a few years.Hendrum
Review.
SOPRANO SOLO
WARREN, MARSHALL COUNTY, MINNESOTA, APRIL 9 1908.
BAND CONCERT
BY THE
WARREN CITY BAND
FRIDAY EVENING.
APRIL
MEDLEY OVERTURE REMICKS HITS
TWENTY-FIFTH WED-"
DING ANNIVEBSABY.
a Mr. $nd Mrs. Nick Schantzen were
pleasanty surprised at their home
near Radium last Saturday evening.
It being the event of their 25th wed
ding anniversary
i
ioth. 1908
A.T THIS
WARR EN OPERA HOU SE
Program
their friends
thought they would go and help
them celebrate. So^loading them
sevles with tin horns, cow bells, etc.,
they started for the^'charivari.''
As it was rather late when they
arrived they found that Mr. and
Mrs. Schantzen had already retired
for the night. So of course a little
extra noise had to be made to
awaken them. With a startled "Vos
is loose?" Mr. Schantzen made his
appearance at the door.: "But as the
charming sounds of the cow bells
continued he quickly wakened suffi
ciently to understand matters and to
invite the crowd in. It is needless to
say they did not wait for a second
invitation. Music and card playing
were the pricipal amusements until
about midnight, when a very dainty
lunch Was served.
About two o'clock the crowd began
to leave, each one thinking he had
spent a very delightful evening and
wishing that Mr. and Mrs. Schant
zen would spend their fiftieth wed
ding anniversary as happily as they
did this.
Bead the Sheaf.
fef
PROMOTOR HOLMES
CHIQUITA TRAUBERT
THE TIME, PLACE, AND GIRL HOWARD
ARIE, THEME PAR MERCADANTE DANCLA
PROF. TREMBLY
IOLA JOHNSON
OPERATIC GEMS DALBEY
Aux ITALIENS LYTTON
MISS JOHNSON
I I FIORE A ITALIA STEFANO
THERE LET ME REST GREENE
(With Violin Obligato)
Miss NELLIE CROSS
THE GREAT DIVIDE
LAMPE
MAURICE
PIONEER WOMAN
PASSED AWAY.
Mrs. Erick G. Anderson, of
Wanger, passed away 'peacefully, as
if in sleep, at her home in said town
on Saturday morning, April 4, at
the advanced age of 83 years.
Deceased was born in Sweden,
where she also was married, her first
husband being named Lundouist.
He died in 1867. Some time after
she married the husband who now
survives her.' With the rest of the
family she came to America in 1881,4roads had just begun breaking
living five years at Joliet, 111, .'remov-
ing to Marshall County, Minnesota
in 1886. Besides the husbandr*"de
ceased is mourned by her two sons,
Charles E. Lundouist. of Warren,
and^ohn AT*Lundauist of Wanger,
and three daughters, who still reside
in Sweden, also hymany other_rela
Sives and Wtenrtsl/g^ "TTTL,'
^Stie^as^aVoman of^ fine intelli
gence, piety, sympathy and devotion
to her family. Always blessed
with good health, she has continued
to enjoy the society* of~her friends
and children, 'yet'^she realized for
several year that her active life
was
over and she awaited~with~resigna
tion the Divine call from death unto
^^^ss^mssts
life.^ __
*"TEe~luneral was25ield from j, the
home on Wednesday^afternoon this
week and was conducted by Rev. C.
Wahlin, of.Vega.^Mr. and .Mrs.
to Lundouist, of^this city, went up
The"
attend the same and all th~e~"bther
relatives, neighbors and friends who
could come were there to pay"
Jast respect to* her memory,
Misses Fluke. Trost. Englund,
Weld and Miller have tendered their
resignations as teachers in the War
ren schools for next vear. and their
resignations have beeu accepted by
the Board of Education. Miss
Emogene Cumrainers. of Spring
Valley, Minn., has been offered the
position of science teacher for next
year, and the board has good hopes
that she will accept.
CARD OF THANKS.
Mr. and Mrs. Ole Oune. of West
Valley, desire through the Sheaf to
thank the nurses of the Warren hos
pital, and all persons who have con
tributed to the care and maintenance
of their son Carl, who has been a
patient at said institution since last
November. NOTICE TO HOLDERS OF
ORDERS CITY OF WARREN.
All registered city orders from
Nos. 4501 and upwards will be paid
on presentation. Interest will be
stopped from this date. Warren,
Minn.. Apr. 9. 1908.
Louis M. Olson.
City Treasurer.
BORSES FOR SALE.
Twenty good farm horses, among
them three or four well matched
pairs, for sale. John Wolberg,
3t. -'f Alvarado,
Minn.
FOR SALE.
My house and lot in the city of
Warren. Alfred Carlson.
1 mol.pd. -s-v
AGENTS WANTED.16x20crayon
portraits 40 cents, frames 10 cents
and up, sheet pictures- one cent
eia|h. You can ^make 400' per cent
profit or 36.O0 per week. Catalogue
and. samples free. Frank W.
Williams Company. 1208 W. Taylor
St., Chicago, 111.,
Was a
their
The
floral offerings" werelllmany and
beautiful. Tendarly she was laid to
rest in the silent grave there .to rest
till the day of the resurrection.
"And Death is beautiful as feet of
friend
Coming with welcome at our jour-
ney'send."
Tour banker may seem like a cold
blooded proposition at times, re
marks And exchange. He may seem
to 1MS alt interest and discouW and
exchange. You may get the notion
he is a Shylock and would grind you
for your last cent. Such is not the
case, but that is all in the manner
and surface looks. Your banker,
next to vour family physician, is the
man who pulls you out of trouble.
He has a heart as big as an ox. and
when he finds you are honest and
deserving, he will go to the limit
and take great chances to help you
over the rough places. He gets that
"bank-look" fighting off crooks and
people who try to work him for a
sucker.Ex.
NUMBER 1 8
WARREN'S FIRST
MARKET DAY
Big Success and Drew
Large Crowd of
People.1
Fine weather favored Warren's
first market day. Although the
up
and consequently were not the very
best, there was a large attendance of
farmers, many having come twenty
miles and more. Considerable stock,
both horses and cattle, had been
brought in and was* sold at auction
bringing very good prices. W. H.
Dixon cried the sales. Samples of
grain, potatoes, poultry, eggs. etc.
etc.. were also exhibited and result
ed in many sales. A great feature
of the day was the extraordinary
bargains offered to the farmers by
the Warren merchants, and conse
quently the stores were thronged by
eager customers. Although extra
clerks had been employed for the day
it was impossible to serve fully all
who wanted to buy.
Supt. W. A. Robertson, of the
State Experiment Farm, had been
invited to be present. He delivered
a stirring address to the people at
the opera house, dwelling specially
on the importance of co-operation
among farmers.
An excellent lunch was served the
farmers at the noon hour in the city
hall.
At short intervals during the day
musical selections were rendered by
the Warren City Band. With muisc
in the air and everybody feeling
jolly, there was a sort of Fourth of
July spirit prevailing all day.
WABREN WILL WIN.
Quite a few citizens have expressed
themselves pleased with the Sheaf's
suggestion of "Warren Will Win" as
an appropriate slogan for this city.
The commercial club is no doubt the
proper body to decide what it shall
be, and if it should decide on this
motto, well and good. The city
ought to have some rallying cry to
stir its citizens to greater activity iD
promoting the city's growth and
development. If we let these words,
"Warren Will Win" stand constantly
before us. thev will sour us to do
our best, and will make defeat im
possible. Let the children take UD
the cry. the young people, maids and
matrons, the business men. and the,
gray haired men and women. In fact
let it be echoed and re-echoed in
every nook and corner in the citv,
and the effect will be simply magical.
"Warren Will Win."
A. J. Bystrom, of the high school
faculty, will go to St. Cloud Friday
to take part in the concert to be
given before members of the North
western Educational association in
that citv Friday evening. Mr. By
strom has decided to return to Alex
andria next year, which will be good
news to his mauv friends.Alexan
dria Post News.
Ole O. Holson, of Alvarado. was
in the city this week, soliciting sub
criptions for the payment of medical
care and attendance for Clara Lind
brg, the 12 year old daughter of Ole
Lindberg. of that place, who was
accidentlv shot in the back bv a
playmate on March 29. Clara had
gone to a neighbor's to play with
their girl, who is 8 or 9 years old.
There was a loaded gun upstair
where the children were playing ail
bv themselves The smaller one had
taken the gun and in handling it it
was discharged with the result as
above stated. The injured girl was
taken to the Warren hospital. Her
spinal chord is injured. resulting
in partial paralysis of the body. Her
recovery is said to be very doubtful.
FOR SALE.80 acres of land. 40
acres broken and a house on it. eight
miles west from Warren, near station
and school, in sec. 3. town 154, range
49. For further information write
to Arnt J. Olson,
Redvers. Sask., Can.
TO FARMERS.
I have the agency for the Marshall
Co. Skandinaviske Farmers' Mutual
Insurnce Co., for the towns of
McCrea, Comstock and Viking. See *w
me about renewals ,and new in- ^ff^
suranee. *f O. L. Skonovd. ^s$$
Badium, Minn.
ft pS*.

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