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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, October 22, 1896, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1896-10-22/ed-1/seq-7/

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BIG DAY AT CARTOfI
ILLINOIS DEMONSTRATION ONK OF
THE REMARKABLE DISPLAYS
OF THE CAMPAIGN.
STREETS FILLED WITH MEN.
JOINT I*\UAI>E OF THK VISITING
ILI US REVIEWED li V THK NOMI
NEE.
UOl.viXU BIG MAJORITY
For the Ropubltean Ticket by the
Priut'iiuil Speakers'' «»f the Dele
gations From Altgeld'H State.
C ANTON, 0., Oct. 21.— This was llli-
nois day at the home of the Republi
can candidate, but a number of other
visits of note were also made. All day
lung the streets have been filled with
marching clubs and the air with the
music of bands. The Illinois people
began arriving as early as 2:30 a. m.,
and they were still arriving at noon.
In the afternoon a parade was made
in which local bands and, local escorts
joined, the day being bright and pleas
ant. Maj. McKinley reviewed the pa
rade from the stand on the front of
his lawn and when it had passed the
marchers countered to mass around the
stand for the speech-making. Four
addresses were made on behalf of the
visitors. Gen. John McNulta spoke for
the city of Chicago; Hon. W. J. Cal
houn for the state of Illinois; Robert
C. Givens for the Republican clubs, and
P. J. Minter for the representatives of
the labor organizations of Chicago and
vicinity. The Black Hussars, who
brcug-ht with them their splendid black
mounts, including "Midnight," the fine
steed Maj. McKinley rode on the oc
casion of the opening of the World's
Fair, had previously called and listen
ed to a short informal address.
The Illinois people cave Maj. Mc-
Kinley a grand ovation when he ap
peared to address them and they ap
plauded every sentiment of his.speech.
Before the Illinois people reached the
house there had been a visit of the
people of Poland township, Trumbull
county, Ohio, where Maj. McKinley
spent many of his boyhood days, with
Judge Arrel, of Youngstown, his old
room-mate, as spokesman. There had
also been the Garfleld club, of the old
Nineteenth Ohio congressional dis-
trict, which Gen. Garfield represented
in congress. With this party came
Capt. Wm. Wallace, of Warren, presi
dent of the club; A. W. Jones, lieuten
ant-governor of Ohio; State Senator
James R. Garfield, son of the late presi
dent, and Congressman Stephen A.
Northway, who delivered the intro
ductory address. Senator Garfleld was
introduced by MaJ. McKinley. when he
had concluded his address and the sen
ator spoke briefly.
As the major was leaving the plat
form after speaking to the Illinois peo
ple, another delegation coming from
Green Springs, Ohio, and vicinity, ap
peared and an address was made to
them. An address was made in the
h<>use to a delegation of workingmen
from Chicago, and soon afterwards a
splendidly uniformed club, organized
as the East End McKinley Regiment,
of Cleveland, with officers mounted, ap
peared upon the lawn with F. G. Ho
gan as spokesman. This delegation
was composed of seven companies of
. sixty men each and presented a par
ticularly handsome appearance. Maj.
McKinley scarcely had time to get
dinner ere there was another delega
tion in his yard. This last one was the
McKinley marching club, of Massillon,
with torches and natty uniforms. They
were addressed by the major and then
Joined in the street parade.
In presenting the Illinois delegation
to Maj. McKinley, Mr. Oalhoun. who
made the principal address, said:
GREETING FROM ILLINOIS.
Maj. McKinley— ln behalf of these citizens
here assembled. I beg leave to say we come
from the great State of Illinois; from the
state that gave to the Union the immortal
Lincoln, the glory of whose life is ever
shining in the skies as a rainbow of hope
and promise to all those who love liberty and
their fellow men. We came from the state
that first gave to the service of the Union that
incomparable soldier, Gen. Grant, who, in
our country's greatest struggle for national
unity, led our armies to a glorious victory
and triumphant peace. We came from the
state whose history « is rich wlib glorious
memories of great men and great achieve
ments, in peace and war. We come from a
state with proud cities by lake and river,
with broad prairies of fertile fields and farms,
from a state rich in agricultural products,
with great manufacturing and mining in
dustries, and with commercial Interests that
reach every state in the Union, and extend
all around the world; from that state, the
life of whose people exhibits such a variety of
Industrial pursuits, such activity along so
many lines of social development as to typify,
in a large degree, that spirit of national in
dependence and advancement which the re
publican party has always sought to infuse
into the life of the whole nation.
The people of this country are divided into
two political parties. We are in the midst
of a great contest, wherein these parties are
struggling with each other for the control of
the destiny of this country. You have been
selected as the leader and standard-bearer of
one of these parties. Thoughtful, earnest and
patriotic men, irrespective of past political
affiliations regard the issues of this cam
paign as being so serious that their settlement
involves a crisis in our country's history. We
are confronted with dangers so grave, so far
reaching that no man can measure the evil
consequences that will follow, if our people
make a mistake.
In the past the State of Illinois has always
stood close to the Union, and her people have
made many a sacrifice to uphold and main
tain the honor and glory of our country. On
many a battlefield her sons have fought and
struggled, in many a grave they sleep who
died that their country might live.
We come to you today representing every
walk of life; from the counting room, the
office, the factory, the railroad, the mine, the
shop and the field, we come animated by a
love of our country that is stronger than mere
pride of party; that reaches out beyond the
limits of our own state; that knows no sec
tion. North. South. East or West. We come
to express our good will fo- you personally
to express our confidence and faith in you as
a leader, and to give you the assurance that
the State of Illinois still stands, as she al
ways has stood in every crisis of our country's
history, for national honor, for the advance
ment and utilization of all the elements of
national life in our midst, for the protection
of our homes, our home interests and for the
largest share of prosperity that always comes
•with that protection. Illinois stands for all
the institutions of the government that our
fathers established. She stands for honest
money and the faithful performance of all
our contracts, public or private. The influ
ence of Illinois will be exerted to keep our
country abreast of all the great nations of
the earth: to keep her in the fall glare of the
light of civilization, and not to permit her to
fall back under the shadow of barbarism. We
neither favor nor reject any policy simply be
cause it is British, neither shall we go to
China for precedents in religion, in education
la commence, or monetary science.
Finglly. majur, we are here to assure you
that on the Od of nert November. Illinois will
Join with a niajertiy of her sister states, in a
bhout for McKinley and Hobart, for protection
and prosperity, and for honest money that
■will send a thrill of confidence and hope
through every part of our troubled country
that will dispel the clouds of distress that
now bang low aad heavy over the land and.
■wltU your elecitaa^ we shall hope for a. return
cf that prosperity that will bring light to
•very home and Joy. toevery heart.
""
THAI* WRBCKEftS' WORK.
Bi>8l«>- M»d Cap Derailed, But X*
One Killed.
SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 21.—Mis
creants wrecked a passenger train on
the Memphis route last nig-ht near
Jones Springs, placing an iron plate on
the rails at a curve. The track was
torn up for a considerable distance and
th* engine and baggage car were de
raile-1. Charles George, the flrernaa,
■*as badly hurt. The passengers • es
caped with a shaking up. Revenge is
- fc»lieved to have prompted the act.
■■ J|SiiffiKMßHM|pw|BjWKl . £2) |.llv
JK^^-r^i.^"' "• 'BSHL vpi^v fipci"
Blackwell's Genuine
Yon will find one coupon Inside each 2 ounce bag and two coupons Inside each 4 ounce bag.
Buy • bag, read the coupon and see how to get your share of J250.009 in presents. •
GLOVER LEAF CASE
R«« SENSATIONAL, CHAPTER
ADDED TO THE ALREADY FA
MOUS LITIGATION.
A BOYCOTT IS ALLEGED
BY CHICAGO-NEW YORK LINES TO
COERCE THE CLOVER
LEAF,
THE TARIFF ASSOCIATION CITED.
Joint Agreement Alleged to Be a
Conspiracy ami In Defiance of
tue , Commercial Law.
CLEVELAND, 0., Oct. 21.— A sensa
tional chapter has been added to the
already famous suit of the Continental
Trust company, of New York, against
the Toledo, St. Louis & Kansas City
Railroad company, better known as the
Clover Leaf. Attorney Clarence Brown,
for the receiver of the Clover Leaf,
filed a petition in the United States cir
cuit court today against the Lake
Shore, Nickel Plate and Michigan Cen
tral roads, as menmbers of the Joint
traffic association. The petition asks for
a restraining order, which was granted
by Judge Ricks today.
The Clover Leaf's receiver asserts
that the Joint Traffic association, com
prising all the trunk lines between New
York and Chicago, and deviating lines,
some thirty-eight in all, have been try
ing to compel the Clover Leaf to be
come a member of the association,
which that road refused to do, declin
ing to be bound by the regulations of
the Joint Traffic association. The asso
ciation, in order to bring the Clover
Leaf to time, then determined to sever
all passenger relations between its
roads and the Clover Leaf. The receiv
er's petition alleges that the association
threatened to sever all freight relations,
the real ground of complaint, according
to the petition, being that the Clover
Leaf is obtaining more than its share
of the east-bound traffic.
The receiver refused to divide this
traffic, and, as a result of this refusal,
all roads in the Joint Traffic associa
tion, and all connecting roads, served !
notice on the Clover Leaf that after j
Oct. 27, 1896, they would refuse to honor
all through tickets or baggage
issued by the Clover Leaf or by any
other company for the Clover Leaf, or
any tickets or checks which read "by
way of the Clover Leaf road." The re
sult of this would be, it is alleged, to
destroy all through passenger traffic of
the road.
In the petition the receiver attacks
the Joint Traffic association agreement,
on the ground that it is an unlawful
conspiracy and violation of the inter
state commerce law, and a combination
to destroy competitive traffic, and that
it is an attempt to give an unlawful
advantage to these roads to unlaw
fully discriminate, and that it is an
unlawful conspiracy at common law; j
it is in restraint of trade, and that it !
is in violation of an act of congress j
entitled the "anti-trust law, preventing
combinations for the puropse of control
ling trade."
The petition further charges the Joint
Traffic association and the other roads
with Instituting a boycott against the
Clover Leaf, which, the petition says,
Is precisely the same thing as a com
bination among employes of a railroad
for the purpose of preventing the oper
ation of the road, which has been held
to be a boycott. It is also charged that
the companies are in contempt of the
order of the court, which appointed the
receiver directing the operation of the
road. The final hearing of the case
was fixed for the first Tuesday in De
cember, with leave to different com
panies to move to dissolve the restrain
ing order at any time. The temporary
restraining order is now in effect and
the companies will not attempt to
put the agreement of the Joint Traffic
association in effect until the final
hearing. The same petition will, in all
probability, be filed against thirty
eight different railroads in the various
United States circuit court jurisdic
tions.
ACTION AT TOLEDO.
Taken to Bring the Tariff Associa
tion Into Court.
TOLEDO, 0., Oct. 21.— Th^s morning
on application of Clarence Brown, of
this city, attorney of the Clover Leaf
railroad, Judge Ricks, In the United
States circuit court at Cleveland, issued
a restraining order directed against the
Lake Shore, Nickel Plate and Michigan
to restrain those roads from putting
into force the boycott of the passenger
business, which is alleged by Receiver
Pierce, of the Clover Leaf. This will
bring the matter of the legality of the
Joint Traffic association before the
United States court, and the result will
be closely watched J>y all railway men
Our Best Argument — —
and one which strikes home every time and adds to
our army of patrons is
.«* ~ Ol ATI The STAR
® ® O-L A I L sir ukee
VAL BLATZ BREWING CO., * t3elft P" l^. Qo»Hty and Age, ia^batained
aL Paul Br«ii<-ii m thls 6uaoUß B » er > oonvincea yon with inre
t»*er l*w, foot «f i«te St. sistlble force and urges you to. <*j|i for BLATZ
Tel«»lio»e 1414. and see that "BLATZ" is on the cork.
THE SAINT PAUL GLOBE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1896.
BATTLE "WITH "SHINERS.''
Two Killed and Five Captured by
Revenue Officers.
WHITESBURG, Ky., Oct. 21.—Ad
vices from Upper Elkhorn creek, Pike
county, near the Letcher county line
tell of a battle between four United
States deputy marshals, headed by
"Kid" Greer, and moonshiners. When
the officers were near the still camp in
the Cumberland mountains, they were
fired upon by the "shiners." The of
ficers returned the fire and for half an
hour the battle continued. John Young,
a moonshiner, was mortally wounded,
being pierced by three balls, and an
other "shiner," whose name cannot be
learned, was probably fatally wounded.
The officers succeeded in cutting up
and destroying four stills and captur
ing five moonshiners, who were taken
to Jackson for trial.
—^•*— 1
SECRET SESSIONS
Sprung as a Surprise by the Street
Car Men.
ST. LOUIS, Oct. 21.— Today's session
of the American Street Railway asso
ciation convention was executive, but
it was given out that nothing was done
besides the reading and discussion of
papers. It was said in some quarters
that this movement was in consequence
of a desire to discuss matters concern
ing the relation of the street railway
corporations to the general public in a
manner of which the public need not be
enlightened. On the other hand, some
of the members assert that the action
is solely the result of the conservatism
shared by all business concerns, and
the natural aversion they have to see
ing publicity given to business affairs.
The action taken was somewhat of a
surprise to many, as it was generally
understood that all sessions were to be
open, except a portion of that of Thurs
day.
— ,
IS IT CURABLE f
A Question Often Asked by Those
Afflicted With Piles.
Is a strained joint curable? Is local
inflammation curable? Of course if
properly treated. So is piles.
People often become afflicted with
piles and ask some old "chronic" who
has always persisted in the wrong
treatment and naturally he discourages
them by telling them that their case
is hopeless.
They in turn discourage others, and
thus a disease that can in every case
be cured by careful and skillful hand
ling is allowed to sap the energy of
thousands who might free themselves
of the trouble in a few days.
Pyramid Pile Cure will cure the most
aggravated case of hemorrhoids in an
astonishingly short time. It relieves the
congested parts, reduces the tumors in
stantly no matter how large, allays
the inflammation and stops the aching
or itching at once.
Thousands who had resorted to ex
pensive surgical treatment have been
cured by the Pyramid Pile Cure— in a
number of instances persons who had
spent months in a hospital under a pile
specialist.
It is a remedy that none need fear
to apply even to the most aggravated,
swollen and inflamed hemorrhoidal
tumors.
If you are afflicted with this stub
born disease you can master it and
master it quickly.
This remedy is no longer an experi
ment, but a medical certainty. It is
manufactured by the Pyramid Drug
Co.. of Albion, Mich.
Druggists sell it at 50 cents per box.
It is becoming the most popular pile
cure this country has ever known and
druggists everywhere are ordering it
for their customers.
— m
DILITH'S NEW BISHOP.
Dr. John Morrison, of New York.
Chosen for the Diocese.
NEW YORK. Oct. 21.— The house of
bishops of the Protestant Episcopal
Church of America, today elected the
Rev. John D. Morrison, D. D., LL. D..
to the recently created bishopric of
Duluth. Dr. Morrison, who is at pres
ent rector of St. John's church of Og
densburg, N. V.. and archdeacon of
Ogdensburg, is about fifty years old.
He was born in Canada, was gradu
ated from McGill university, in Mon
treal, and received the degree of D. D.,
in the Union college in this state. Dr.
Morrison's first charge in this country
was the rectorship of Christ church in
Herkimer, N. Y. He remained there
six years and was then transferred to
Ogdensburg.
m ,
OASTORIA.
ii«il« /njf //(*. „ — li«
of TOppefc
•»_
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY.
The Corner-Stone of the First Build
ing Laid.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 21.— ■ The cere
monies attending the laying of the cor
ner stone of the Hall of History, the
first to be erected of the group of build-
to comprise the American Uni
versity, was laid this afternoon in the
presence of a large and distinguished
gathering. The grand lodge of Masons
of the District of Columbia, assisted
by the several eommandertes of
Knights Templar took a prominent
' part In the ceremonies, which were
elaborate and impressive.
WtNTS K«Y BE LEFT
At tlie followiuK lucalium for Inser
tion in the Dullj autl s U n,la> Globe,
mt the Bume ratea" aa'nre clinrced by
the main office. „ . <JK .
Hamline Pharmacy. ,<~. . s * Drug Store
750 SNELLIiftO -JVENUE.
UAYTON'H BLUFF.
Sever Westby .' ... Drug Store
_^ 679 EAST THIRD STREET.
LO WEls~ TOWnT
William K. Collier , Drug Store
SEVENTH AND SXBLEY.
Joseph Argay :..-....}?. Drug Store
COR. GROVE AND JACKSON STREETS.
M. D. Merrill... .'. ......News Stand
442 BROADWAY.
MERKIAM FARIC
A. L. Woolsey I. Drug Store
ST. ANTHONY AND PRIOR AVENUES.
ST. ANTttONY HILL.
Emil Bull ....: Druggist
GRAND AY. AND ST. ALBANS.
W. A. Frost & Co Drue Store
SELBY AND WESTERN AVENUE 3.
Straight Bros Drug Store
RONDO AND GROTTO STREETS.
A. A. Campbell Drug Store
235 RONDO STREET.
A. T. Guernsey Drug Store
171 DALE STTfSET.
Bracketfs Pharmacy
VICTORIA AND SKLBY AVENUES. '
WEST SIDE.
■ r,«r, Tne Eell P* e Dru * Store.
S. ROBERT AND FAIRFIELD \ VENUE.
George Marti Drug Store
S. WABASHA AND FAIRFIELD AVENUB.
r.oT,*£° ncor( * streflt Prescription Store.
CORNER STATE AND CONCORD STREETS.
T nr3? n • Dm« Store
COR. S. WABASHA AND ISABEL.
UPPER TOWN.
S. H. Reeves Drus Store
MOORE BLOCK. SEVEN CORNERS.
c< T. Heller Colonnade Drug Store
_ ST. PETER AND TENTH STREETS.
J - Drug Store
_ „ 29 EAST SEVENTH STREET.
P. M. Crudden Confectioner
_ 496 RICE STREST.
W. E. Lowe DrUR Store
ROBERT AND TWELFTH 'STREETS
R. T. Wincott & Co Drue store
CORNER RICE AND TGLEHART.
ARLINGTON HILLS.
C. R. Marelius Drug Store
CORNER BEDFORD- AND DECATTJR
A. & G. A. Schumacher. „. Drue Store
954 PAYNE <CvENUE
WEST SEVENTH STREET.
A. & G. A. Schumacher Dru* Store
499 WEST SEVENTH STREET:
J. J. Mullen JL. Drue Store
COR. JAMES AND WEST SEVENTH.
UNION PARK.
C. A. Monchow Cigars and Tobacco
AND PRI^AVgNDgg^
SITUATIONS OFFERED— MALE.
BUTCHER— Wanted, goo<J butcher and sau
sage maker; no one but sober single man
need apply. Cavaaaugfe Bros., Hastings,
Minn.
TH f ERS> LIFE ASSOCIATION, as
sets 1650,000; largest, strongest and best
Minnesota Life Company, wants a few more
agents. Every assistance given. Expenses
of good men guaranteed. Address Dou=!as
Putnam, Secretary, St. Paul. Minn.
TAILORS wanted at once. Call at 159 West
Fifth st., city.
WANTED— An active man at $12.00 weekly
and expenses; no fortune hunter wanted
will guarantee permanent position if right.
If interested address quickly "Manufac
turer," P. Q. Box 5,308, Boston. Mass.
WANTED— Men and boys to learn the barber
trade; can complete in two months and have
situation guaranteed; tools given each stu
dent free; wages Saturdays; catalogue free.
Moler Barber College, 223 Washington ay.
south, Minneapolis.
WANTED— Salesmen in every district- new
season; samples free; salary or commission
expenses from start Luke Bros. Co., Chicago!
WANTED— If you are a Catholic, unemployed
and will work for $18 per week, write Mac-
Connell Bros., 11 Franklin st, Boston, Mass.
TAILOR-Wanted. tailor for Tepalring a^d
WANTED-Traveling salesmen for clears
old reliable house; experience unnecessary
«**f a inducements to customers ; $75 to
Jl5O per month and expenses. Chas. C
Bishop & Co.. St. Louis.
WANTED-For U. S. army, able-bodied, un
married men, between ages of 21 and 30
citizens of the United States, of good char
acter and temperate habits, who can speak
read and write English. For information ap
ply to Recruiting Officer, Sohutte Building
East Seventh and Jacksoa sts., St Paul
Minn. '
J 75 TO 1150 SALARY and expenses to salos
men for cigars; experience unnecessary
cigar selling machines to customers. W L
Klin-e & Co.. St Louis.
SITUATIONS OFFERED— FEMALE.
HOUSEWORK-WantedTgirl for light ho^Tse^
S, or , k L, references must be S iy en. Apply at
Flat No. 2, The Virginia, Central Park.
HOUSEWORK-Wanted, a competent girl I
for general housework; good wages for one
who understands plain cooking. Call at 349
North Washington, '-apposite Rice park.
HOUSEWORK-Wanted. a glrf for general
housework in a small family of three adults
Inquire at 23 College ay. east. auulls -
NURSE— Wanted, a nurse girl. Apply 706
SE £i O £ Tr> i, GI * RL ~ A Col »P et «nt second girl at
oul OOOK St, t |
WAITRESS-Wanted.-fcrlgfit, intelligent wait
ress for restaurant" one fwho is capable "of
making change cofrectfy and willing to
Ln a m c Clt l\ Ca " f ,°r ßw ¥ 239 Hotel Metro
politan, between 9\nd 10 a. m., for three
WAITRESSES-Wantei Jtwo iSol walT
resses at the Buckingham, corner Smith
ay. and Ninth st.
FINANCIAL.
$50 TO $500 short-time loans procured on per
sonal property. Ohio Investment Company
seventh floor. Globe building.
AT LYTLE'S DIAMOND PARLORS, 411 RobT
crt St., Room I— Money to loan on diamonds
watches, typewriters, furs, time checks etc
Diamonds and watches for sale at retail, 25
to 50 per cent discount. Lytle's, onnosita
the Ryan Hotel.
MONEY TO LOAN— On furniture^ pianos
etc., to remain with tha owner: also on
watches, diamonds^ seal cloaks, etc.; loans
can be repaid by Installments; business
strictly private. Room 7, First National
Bank Building, corner Fourth and Jackson-
Minnesota Mortgage Loan Co.
HORSES AND CARRIAGES.
BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN'S HOARSE
auction and commission stables at Midway,
Minnesota Transfer, St. Paul, Minn.; tha
largest horse dealers in the Northwest.
MEDICAL.
A SEA SALT OR TUB BATH $1; also give
massage treatments. Mme. Lauretta, for
merly of Minneapolis. 112 West Seventh st.
second floor.
MRS. DR. FREMONT, 303 Jackson st?
newly furnished bath parlors; medicated
electro- vapor and massage baths.
BATHS, all kinds, massage, magnetic and
electric treatments. 452 St Peter st.; warm
rooms ; expert attendants.
BUSINESS PERSONALS^
FURS reshaped, repaired, cleaned. Our capes,
and collarettes excel Eastern-made goods and
cost less. J. C. Smolensky. 24 W, Sixth st.
DTE WORKS.
■■ v . i
KAHLERT * MlNTEL— Minnesota. Steam
Dye Work*. 244 K«Bt Seitepth at.
I>ENTI*TS.
G. O. LAWTON Deatia*, has removed to
Newspaper Raw. cer.^4tH asd Minnesota ats.
BOARD OFFERED.
BOARD — For rent, two nice furnished rooms;
hot water, heat, gas and bath; flrst-ciaas
place, with board. Address X 8, Globe.
BOARD AND ROOM— Twenty-three steam
heated rooms at the Buckingham; excellent
cafe.
BOARD AND ROOM— One apartment of six
rooms, suitable for young men. Apply
Flat 43, Buckingham.
BOARD WANTED.
BOARD— For rent, two nice warm front
rooms; atoo flrst-cJass table board; pri
vate family. 15 Til ton st.
SITUATIONS WANTKD-MALK.
A YOUNG MAN who attends night «chool
wishes place to work for board and room
in dayUme. Address 8. Anderson, general
delivery. 8t Panl.
COACHMAN— A young and sober man seek*
a position to drive or care of horse* ; also
any other kind of work which is offered
him; well acq sainted In the city;" good
city references. Address N. V., 41S Roaabel
_j»tregt.
CLERK— Position wanted by a young man as
clerk or office assistant; best of references
_j^n JL _Addreaß H 28, Qlobo.
COOK— AII-around meat and pastry cook
wants situation in hotel or restaurant, city
or country; good references. Address Jim
Delaney^23l East University ay., St. Paul.
CLERK— A good honest boy of eighteen
would like to get work in some store; has
reference*. 874 Duke st.
COOK— Experienced hotel co^ok desires sltua
tion; first-class references. Address H. 8..
175 East Fourteenth st.
DRUGGIST— Registered Scandinavian drug
gist desires situation in city or country;
eight years' experience; married and strict
ly temperate; wages reasonable; must have
work. Address V 7, Globe.
ELEVATOR BOY— Situation wanted by a
young man of eighteen as elevator or office
boy; can furnish best of reference. Ad
dresser call 151 East Third st.
ELEVATOR ~BOY— Situation wanted by a
boy of 18 as elevator bey; has had two
years' experience. Address F. L., 682 Pine
St., city.
ENGINEER^-A man who is a practical en
gineer would like to take care of a steam
heating Dlant or a couple of furnaces; is
well recommended. -Addres P. H., 128 East
Cook st.
ENGlNEEß— Stationary engineer wants to run
steam heat plant, firing, or anything. M.
Airlrod. 121 Sherburne ay.
EMPLOYMENT— Wanted, by young man 23
years old. situation of any kind; wages no
object; references furnished. Address W.,
493 St. Peter at
EMPLOYMENT— Boy seventeen years of age
would like position of any kind; few years'
experience in business; can furnish good
reference. Address H. A., 117 West Winl
fred St., West St. Paul.
EMPLOYMENT— Boy -.seventeen years of age
would like position of any kind. Address
E. T,, 419 Winslow, West St. Paul.
JANITOR— An experienced man wishes to
get one or two furnaces to care for, or fir
ing in some steam plant. Call or address
SOO Jackson St., city.
EMPLOYMENT— Young man of eighteen de
sires a position outside of school hours
whereby he can get business practice; can
furnish good references. Address Wm. L.,
St. Paul Business College, East Sixth st.
EMPLOYMENT— A boy of sixteen would like
work of any kind for Saturdays. O 4, Globe.
FARM HAND— Situation wanted by compe
tent farm hand; twenty-one years' experi
ence handling stock, Is now open for an en
gagement; none but a business farmer need
apply. T. H., 594 Ohio st., city.
OFFICE WORK— Wanted, by intelligent
young man, who can make himself useful,
situation In .law office where he can study
law; good penman and willing to work. E.
J. Q.. 54 Globe.
OFFICE WORK— A boy of 16 would like
situation in office; has had experience.
Address J. H. R., 668 Randolph st., city.
SALESMAN — Young man of experience wishes
situation as salesman; can furnish best of
references as to ability, etc. Address V 8,
Globe.
PHARMAClST— Registered, wishes position,
city or ccuntry; thoroughly experienced,
sober, competent manager; references from
first-class firms. Drugs, 103 West Tenth
street.
VIOLINIST— OId, experienced violinist wants
position with orchestra. Address J. Z. J.,
IS2 East Tenth st.
SITUATIONS WANTED— FEMALE.
APPRENTICE— A young lady desires a situa
tion to learn the art of dressmaking. Ad
dress 51 West Winifred st.
CHAMBER WORK— Wanted, by a young
lady, a place to do chamber work; I am neat
and willing and can give reference. Ad
dress M. T., 730 Minnehaha St.. city.
CHAMBER work wanted; experienced. Call
at 26% West Seventh St., Room 10, third
floor.
DAY WORK of any kind wanted. Call at 26%
We3t Seventh St., Room 10, third floor.
DISHWASHER— Woman would like work in
hotel washing dishes. Apply 420 Franklin st.
DRESSMAKING AND FITTING SCHOOL— AH
kinds of sewing, dress cutting and fitting,
guaranteed. Call and be convinced, at 126
West Seventh st.. room 1.
COOK AND SECOND WORK— Two girls
want work, one as cook and other to do
second work. V 100, Globe.
HOUSEWORK— GirI wants general house
work; references given. Address X 9, Globe.
DRESSMAKING— An experienced dressmaker
would like a few engagements to sew in
families. 293 West Seventh St., room 6.
HOUSEWORK— Wanted, a place to do light
housework or nurse. Call or address 310
Victoria st. south.
HOUSEWORK— A girl would like to do gen
eral housework; must come home. Call at
463 St. Peter St., third floor.
HOUSEWORK — Young Scandinavian girl
wants place to do general housework. Ad
dress 624 Sims st.
EMPLOYMENT— Scandinavian widow wishes
any kind of work by the day, in restaurant
or hotel, or repairing. Please call or ad
dress 643% Canada St.. room 8.
HOUSEWORK— Situation wanted by German
woman thirty-five, to do housework; no ob
jection to country. 14 East Seventh st.
HOUSEWORK— A girl would like a place for
general housework. 213 West Seventh st
HOUSEWORK— A neat German girl wishes
a situation in small family. 679 Lafay
ette ay.
HOUSEWORK— Wanted— A young girl would
like to have a place to do light housework.
Call or address 310 Victoria st. south.
STENOGRAPHER— Competent lady sten
ographer and typewritist wishes a position;
can furnish machine; willing to work for
moderate salary. Would leave the city. Ad
dress Stenographer, 46 Germanla Life build
ing.
SALESLADY — A young lady desires position
in some music house as saleslady; can read
music; references given. 469 Seiby ay.
NURSE— Nurse, experienced in~ confinement
cases or any kind of sickness; will do
light housework; can give best of refer
ences. Call or address 126 West Seventh st.,
room 1.
i STENOGRAPHER— Wanted, by a young lady,
! position as stenographer and typewriter; is
a good grammarian. Address C 6, Globe.
STENOGRAPHER — Ten years' experience in
general office- work; references. Address
Stenographer, 396 Sherburne ay.
STENOGRAPHER— A young lady wishes a
position as stenographer and general office
work; will work for reasonable salary. Call
or address 623 Ashland ay., city.
SECOND WORK— A competent second girl
would like a situation in a private family.
Address 353 Fort st. _^
LADIES can find good help; girls beat places,
highest wages. Mrs. Merryweather, 543
Wabasha st.
LAUNDRESS— A lady wants a place as laun
dress by day or month. 316 Harrison ay.
LAUNDRESS — A good laundress wants work
by the day washing, ironing or houseclean
ing. Call or address 303 Marshall ay.
MANAGER— Wanted, by a first-class dress
maker, position in shop as manager, cutter
and fitter, or forelady; wages, $1.50 per day.
Call or address 356 Jenks st. Dressmaker.
SEWING — An experienced dressmaker would
like a few engagements to sew in families;
terms, $1 per day. Address 509 Wabasha st.
NURSE — A competent and reliable nurse,
with. large experience in the sick room,
may be secured at 844 Payne ay. ; price, $8
per week. Mm, H. Freburg.
WILL learn French cutting, cut and fit
entirely seamless waist for |2; this week
only. 240 Carroll at.
WASHING — Woman wants washing or any
kind of work. 26* Beimont at. Weat Side.
WASHING— A woman would like to take in
washing. Call or addreae 254 East Fourth st.
WASHING— Wanted, by 'a first-class laun
dress, washing aad ironing; will go out or
take home. Call or address 96 Valley at.
TO EXCHANGE.
NEW GOODS tor ««cond-h*»d. Iran Fur
niture acd Exchange Co., 142 and 144? East
Savowth TL N. Ca-fdaga, ProprUtor.
W'AKTBD TO BUY.
RANGE— SmaII hard coal, water front steel
range, without reservoir; each; must hm
cheap and In good repair. Address B 1,
Glob*.
AUCTION 9ALB9.
Kirauagh * Co., Auctioneer!.
IMPORTANT SALE of antique household
goods at auction. We will Mil at public
auction at stores Nos. 419 and 431 Jackson st.
between Sixth and Seventh «ts. (old Pal
ace stand), on Thursday, Oct. 22, at 10 a.
m., and continuing until all is sold, the
outfit of a South*™ aristocratic family,
that has been in storage in thin city for the
Past seven years, and is now being sold
by order of the court. The goods consist
of one solid mahogany bedroom suit, one
walnut bedroom suit, one walnut side
board, one extension table and set of chairs,
one solid mahogany single bed, one maple
bedroom suit, springs and several hair
mattresses, several fine solid mahogany
and rosewood ohairg, sofas and tables, a
splendid lot of antique and other china.
a fine lot of bric-a-brac, table linen, a fine
lot of laces and fancy goods, pillows, bead
work and fine tapestries, paintings, steel en
gravings and oil paintings, Wilton carpets,
rugs, books, etc., and all such goods that
go to make up an old-time house outfit.
We cannot, for want of space, fully de
scribe the above goods and the vast amount
not mentioned in this advertisement, but
it is enough to say that a liner collection
of antique mahogany, rosewood and walnut
furniture, china and bric-a-brac, pictures,
etc., has never been offered at auction in
St. Paul. So if you are In search of a nice
antique, hand-carved chair, sofa, table or
bedroom suit, do not fall to attend this
sale, as it is the chance of a life time.
KAVANAOH k CO., Auctioneers.
187 and 189 East Sixth St.
A. G. Johnson, Auctioneer.
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AT AUCTION—
I will sell at public auction In the sales
room, Nos. 238 and 240 East Seventh St.,
on Saturday, Oct. 24, at 10 a. m., a large
consignment of household goods, consisting
of parlor suits, odd pieces of parlor goods,
sofas, couches, hall trees, extension tables,
dining room chairs, wardrobes, folding
beds, bureaus, commodes, springs, mat
tresses, quilts, pillows, cooking range (six
hole) and two very fine square heating
stoves; also a big lot of dishes, glassware,
cooking utensils, carpets, etc. A. G.
Johnson, Auctioneer. N. B.— No wait; goods
offered as soon as called for.
FOR RENT,
Hosiei,
J. W. SHEPARB. 94 EAST FOURTH ST.,
RENTS HOUSES, STORES. OFFICES
STEAM-HEATED APARTMENTB; COL
LECTS RENTS; ACTS AS OWNERS' AQT.
Rooms,
IGLEHART BT., 83— Four fine rooms, first
floor, for rent; modern improvements; cou
ple without children preferred; $16 per
month.
EIGHTH ST., 189% EAST— Abbey's Hotel-
Two connecting steam-heated unfurnished
rooms for rent.
UTOPIA-490 ST. PETER — Steam-heated
rooms, with or without board; transients
accommodated.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE.
IF YOU ARE interested in the Chicago Board
of Trade, correspond with a reliable firm.
Wheat, Oats and Provisions are selling be
low actual value tad prices will advance.
Europe must have our wheat, and the pres
ent large exports vouch for it. Our offices
are nearest to the pits. Send for our book
on margin trading. H. H. Baumann & Co.,
85 Board of Trade, Chicago. ,
WITH ABOUT $500 and services you can have
interest in light manufacturing business- ex
perience not required; will guarantee ' you
1125 monthly. 615 Mississippi st.
WANTED— Young man having command of
$4,000 to $6,000, In an established profitable
business; can have control of financial man
agement. Address Z 8, Globe.
?85 AVERAGE weekly net income with $250
invested; safe, conservative; prospectus
proofs, tree. F. Daly, 1293 Broadway, N. V.'
CLAIRVOYANT.
RETURNED— MAE ROMAINB, Clairvoyant,
business and developing medium. Correct
advice on business changes, love, marriage
separations, law suits, etc.; reunites the
separated, causes speedy and happy mar
riages, removes evil influences, family
troubles and jealousy." Those wishing cor
rect and reliable advice should not fail to
call. Letters with stamp answered. Hours
9 to 9 daily and Sunday. Parlors 21 East
College ay.
RELIABLE CLAIRVOYANT— Madame Teits
worth; thirty years' experience. 13 Eighth st.
liOST AND FOUND.
BULLDOG LOST— Lost, a white bulldog pup
six months old, with a yellow tip on his
right aar. Finder will please return same
to 386 Livingston ay. and receive reward.
PURSE LOST— Lost, small purse containing
$5 and small change. Please return to Room
1, Forpaugh Block, Seven Corners, and get
reward.
FEATHER BOA LOST— Lost, a black ostrich
feather boa, Saturday afternoon. Finder
please return to 109 Summit ay. and receive
reward;
SPECTACLES LOST— Pair of spectacles lost,
gold mounted, chased. Return to Mrs
Wlndslow, Old Grand block.
HORSE FOUND— Found, dark roan mare
pony; about ten years old. Owner can have
same by calling at 266 East Page St., city.
INSTRUCTION.
PROF. J. REMER'S DANCING ACADEMY
Oxford hall, Tenth and St. Peter sts. Class
meets Monday and Friday evenings; omca
hours, 3 to 8.
FOR SALE.
PRINTING PLANT— For sale, printing plant,
at your own price. Address V 12, Globe.
BLOWER— For sale, one No. 3 Sturtevant
blower, in good order. W 5. Qlobe.
ASSESSMENT FOR SLOPES ON^VICTORIA
STREET, FROM HATCH STREET TO
FRONT SREET.
Office of the Commissioner of Public Works
City of St. Paul, Minn., Oct. 21st, 1896.
The Commissioner of Public Works in and
for the corporation of the City of St. Paul
Minnesota, will, at his office in said city at
2 p. m., on the 9th day of November, A.
D. 1896, make an assessment of benefits,
damages, costs and expenses arising from
condemning and Wcing an easement in the
land abutting on Tictoria street, from Hatch
street to Front street, in said city, neces
sary to construct the slopes for cuts and
fills in grading said Victoria street, from
Hatch street to Front street, to the estab
lished grade thereof, as shown by the profile
of said grade on file in the office of the
Register of Deeds in and for Ramsey coun
: ty, and in the office of the City Engineer
said slopes to extend 1% feet on said land
for every foot of cut or fill, as Indicated on
the plan of said slopes on file in the of
fice of said Commissioner, in said city, on
the property benefited or damaged thereby.
All persons interested are hereby notified
to be present at said time and place of mak
ing said assessment, and will be heard.
JOHN COPELAND,
Commissioner.
Official: JOHN C. MUELLER,
Clerk Commissioner of Public Works
Oct. 22.
CONTRACT WORK— IMPROVING, ETC?
IGLEHART STREET.
Office of the Commisioner of Public Works
City of St Paul, Minn., Oct. 15, 1894. '
Sealed bids will be received by the Com
missioner of Public Works In and for the
corporation of the City of St. Paul, Minne
sota, at his office in said city, until 2 p. m.
on the 26th day of October, A. D. 1896, for
improving and ornamenting Iglehart street
between Cleveland avenue and Wheeler ave
nue, in said city, according to plans and
specifications on file in the office of said
Commissioner.
A bond with at least two (2) sureties In a
sum of at least twenty (20) per cent, or
a certified check on a bank of St. Panl
in a sum of at least ten (10) per cent of the
gross amount bid must accompany each bid.
Said check shall be made payable to the
Clerk of said Commissioner.
The said Commissioner reserves the right
to reject any and all bids. ,
Official: JOHN COPELAND
JOHN C. MUELLER, Commissioner.
Clerk Commissioner of "Public Works.
Oct. 18-25.
oo;y i KAtl WORK— SEWER ON IOLEHAKT
STREET.
Office of the Commissioner of Public WorVs
City of St. Paul. Minn., Oct. 12. 189«!
Sealed bids will be received by the Commis
sioner of Public Works in and for the corpora
tion of the city of St. Paul, Minnesota, at his
office in said city, until 2 p. m. on the 22d
day of October, A. D. j§9B, for the construc
tion of a sewer on Iglehart street, from Fair
view avenue to Wheeler avenue, in said city
according to plans and specifications on file
in the office of saW Commissioner.
A bond with at least two (2) sureties, In a
sum of at least twenty (20) per cent, or a
certified check on a bank of St Paul In a
sum of at least ten (10) per cent of the gro*a
amount bid must accompany each bid. Said
check »b*H be made payable to the Clerk of
said Commissioner.
The said Commissioner reserves the right
to reject any and all bldfs.
JOHN COPLAND,
Official: Coaamissfconer.
JOHN C. MUELLER,
> Cfcrk CommMoaw of Public Works.
Oct. 13-21.
TRAVELERS' GUIDE.
Jrain* I.eav« and Arrive HU Paul
mtJMmm
Un ton D» P ot, Slblsy St.
)SSkt EA ST THIRD STREET.
HV, toa St « tlo u- »t. Paul.
-«— »- Milwaukee Depot. Mlnnannml.
Dining and Pullman Can on — BT* P\ri — "
Winnipeg and Coast Traiiis._ Leave. Arrive
Pacific Mall (dally) : Fargo, Bize- ~
man, Butte, Helena. Missoula,
Spokane, Tacoma, Seattle and '
Portland o.ir nm r .-- „_
Dakota Expre»»/dlyj:Moorhead; ■* Jpm -'-"P™
Pareo. Jatnest'n. Fergus Falls,
Wahpeton. Crookston. Grand
Forks, Graftou. Winnipeg. ... B :00 ptu 7 : 10 am
Fargo Local fdly. ex. Sun.) : St.
Cloud, Bralnerd and Fargo 9:TO am K«?6 pm
jfßteffi Ticket OfflcJ^
(sw|j£P[ 386 Robert St., Cor, 3th,
€^BB ('Phone 480), and Union Depot
""Leave. I tEx. SnTidayl »Daily~ | Arrive
iIiCHICAUOIi
MO :10am '.Dnluth. Superior, Ashland. fR-Sttm
*.U : '£ Dlv i- Duiutli mid Superior ... •<i:.v/am
•10:05 am Sn City. Oinaha & Kan. Citr «&5-,pm
tlOrffiam Etmore, Su Palls. Pipestone t6:sr, D m
+ tn'^ pm -Ji antaW - New Ulm - Tr « c y tia:oiam
tlO :05am 'Watertown. Huron. Pierre. to :55pm
«S:lonm "C wUfnrniii In Three r><, v ;-' «; - :
&?£# -y TIC^ET OFFICE,
n%» 19 » r ph — •
H*^ EAST THtHD _BtJ 1142.
Lkavt. «Dailt. ißscept Sunday Arkivk:",
tH:3|am Breck. Division ft Branches ti::Hn m '
Jf : 2^ m £ S u " P " Ht Dlv - & Br«uche« tti: fi^
ts:di^«H J WlllniarTia St. Clond tio»>arn
♦7:45pm Breck.. Farsro.Od.rs. Woe? *7:s:am
•3:oopm Montana & Pacific Coast *6-*onm
•B:lspm St. Clond. Cr kst'n. G* F'is *l'^Sm
t4;lf.pm ExcelilorA Hutthlnson ... t9 :4sam
EASTERN WIMMESOTA-a. *. RY.
•11 -ISpin* \ P«*«th. Went Snperlor j t^-toa'S
Chicago. Milwaukee & St. PajQaiiriiii"
Lv. U P. Ar. St. P.
££I^**° «? a , y " Sxpresa.. 16:15 am tio:iopm
Chicago "Atlantic" Ex... ♦s-.sr.pm •1135 am
Chlcag, "Fast Mail" *6:55pm J^Opm
Chicago "Vestibule" Lira. •8:10pm AfZm
Chicago via Dubuque t4:y>pm HI :00am
Peoriayla Mason City «4 :3opm *11 :00 km
St Louis and Kansas City. •B:3skm »6 :35pm
Milbnn ic and Way « :2 oam +6 :3f ,{,™
Aberdeen and Dakota Ex. «7 :0.1pm «B:lsam
t Dai } y n , +E , X - Sun iEx Sat Ex - Mo «i.
for f nil information, call at Ticket Office.
"The Maple Leaf Route."
Ticket Office: Robert St., cor. sth St. Phone 15ft
Trains leave from St. Paul Union Depot.
ky ' J Except Sunday. Leave. Arrive.
Dubuque Chicago, Waterloo, I +7.30 am fr.2B pm
Marshalltown, l)es Moines,-! *8.10 pm *7.45 am
Eg %g£s
ST. PAUL & DULUTH R. R,
Leave T Arrive '
St.PanL 'Dally. tEx. Sunday. St. Paul.
!|*S* m - DumfiT" "" ™Z~mT
'"a:W. SUPERIOR . %§££
From Union Depot. CITY TICKET OFFICE.'
386 Robert Street.
M., ST. P. & S. S. IN. ft. R.
Union Station.
Leave. | EAST. | Arrive."
6:43 p m Atlantic Limited Daily. J:3> a m
0:05 a m Kninelander Local, ex. Sun. tf:39 p m
WEST.
fi:os a m Pacific Limited, Daily. .. a-3o p m
From Minneapolis, Glen
-6:05 p ra wood Local, except Sunday. jn.4> am
iirlington~Route.
Leaves Union Depot for Chicago, St
Louis and down river points 8:15 a. m.
Arrives from Chicago 2:15 p. m. except
Sunday. Leave* Union Depot for Chicago and
St. Louis ß:3s p. m. Arrives from same points
7:40 a. au-daiiy.
WISCONSIN CENTRAL
City Office. i.Tj Ro crt street. 'Phone No. 9t.
AiiTn(n<n>ii. Leave Arrive
All Trains Daily. st Panl. St. Paul.
Eau Claire. Chippewa]
Falls. Ashland, Hur- T^a-m. S:lsa.m.
ley, Oshkosh.Mllwau- > and and
kee, Waukesha. Chi- 'I^Cp.m. •£:3sp.m.
cbko. East and South J
•Arrive 7 :Z) p. m. on Sunday*.
M. & ST. Li. DEPOT— Broadway A 4th.
MINNEAPOLIS & ST. LOUIS R. R
"ALBKKT LRA KOirTK,"
Leave | »Dally. tEx Snnday. | Arrive
j Alb'tLen, Dcs Moines, I
+9:15 a.m. i Ced. RpMs, Kan. City f t 7 40p.m
t6:35 a.m. J Watertown, New Ulm I t4;55p.m
+5:00 p.m. | New Ulm Local. f +10-^0 a.m.
•7:00 p.m. Dcs Moines & Omaha Lim *6 :5.5 a a
•7:00 p.m. Chicago <Jt St. Lonls Lia *B:sSa.m
•4:45 p.m. Albert Lea .fc Mankftto Loo tl":Hsa.m
J m That the best line from Chicago
TV*,,. to Cripple Creek, Colo., and oil
I£VT( points shown in the
*^ m 7r7P m ' * „.«„. CHTC*QO
«°""""- to " EEK Alias l^li^, (f
accompanying map is the l-fl
Chicago & Alton R. R. t#X
Write or call to-day, for lowest rates and
fall particulars. R. Somerville, General Agent
Passenger Department, 101 Adams Street, Mar
quette Building, Ohicago, Illinois.
The Globe.
Frte Want Page Blank
For ;h» I rxmployfd
O» ST. PACL AKl> XWHBAPOUS.
Free Sltuottan or Help Wanted Ad
vertisement* must be written on this
blank and sent to THE GLOBE Ad
vertising Department, 8k Paul.
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