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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 21, 1902, Image 1

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VOL. XXV.—NO. 52.
AMERICA, TOO,
WARNS RUSSIA
SECRETARY HAY SENDS NOTICE
THAT OPEN DOOR IX CHINA
MIST BE KEPT AJAR
AIDS ENGLAND AND JAPAN
Protests Against Proposed Monopoly
in Manchuria in Strong
and Unmistakable
Terms,
GERMANY ALSO JOINS IN
PEKIN, Feb. 19.—A sensation was
caused in diplomatic circles here today
when it became known that the United
States, through Secretary of State John
Hay, had sent a note to the Russian and
Chinese governments, following closely
along the lines of the Anglo-Japanese
treaty of Jan. 30.
The note is a distinct warning to both
China and Russia that the United States
■will not permit the integrity of the em
pire to be molested in favor of one na
tion, to the detriment of another.
The note, which practically indorses the
English treaty with Japan, says:
"Washington, D. C, Feb. I.—An agree
ment whereby China gives any corpora
tion or company the exclusive right or
privilege of opening mines, establishing
railroads, or in any other way industrial
ly developing Manchuiia, can but be
viewed with the gravest concern by the
government of the United Stages.
"It constitutes a monopoly which is a
distinct breach of the stipulations of the
treaty concluded between China and for
eign powers, thereby seriously affecting
the rights of American citizens.
"It restricts their rightful trade, ex
posing it to being discriminated against,
interfered with, or otherwise jeopardized,
and strongly tends to permanently im
pairing China's sovereign rights in this
part of the empire, while it seriously in
terferes with her ability to meet her in
ternational obligations.
Insists on the "Open Door."'
"Furthermore, such a concession on
China's port would undoubtedly be fol
lowed by demands from other powers for
similar equally extensive advantages else
where in the Chinese empire, and the in
evitable result must be the complete
tvreck dJ the policy of Sosolute equality
of treatment to all nations respecting
trade, navigation and commerce within
the empire's confines.
"On the other hand, the attainment by
one 'power of such exclusive privileges
for the commercial organizations of its
nationality conflicts with the assurances
repeatedly conveyed to this government
by the Imperial Russian ministry of for
eign affairs of the imperial govern
ment's intention to follow the policy of
the 'open door,' as advocated by the
government of the United States and ac
cepted by all the powers having commer
cial interests in China.
"It is for these reasons that the
United States now, as formerly, animated
by the sincerest desire of insuring to the
world the benefits of full and fair inter
course between China and the nations
on a footing of equal rights and advan
tages to all, submits the above to the
earnest consideration of the imperial
BOA-ernments of China and Russia, con
fident that they will give due weight to
its importance, and that they will adopt
such measures as will relieve the just
and l.atural anxiety of the United
States."
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.-It is under
stood here that the terms of the British-
Japanese agreement to preserve the in
tegrity of China was submitted in ad
vance to President.Roosevelt and Secre
tary Hay and approved by them.
Strong: Warning in Terms.
'J Following out the traditional policy
however of avoiding entangling alliances!'
the United States positively declined to
become a party to any actual agreement
concerning China. . - bent
'When Lord Cranborne, in the British
parliament last week, declared there was
■«-■' f doubt Mthe British-Japanese agree
ment would command the full approval
of the United States, he spoke by author-
The agreement between Great Britain
and Japan was dated Jan. 30. There i?
therefore deep significance that Feb l
two days after the treaty was signed, this
country sent to Russia a note, practically
adopting the principle of the treaty as
the policy of the United States "The
agreement between Great Britain and Ja
pan is largely a military one, and pro
vLdls f°r a joint use of forces in case
of hostilities.
Secretary Hay's letter, of course, could
not go to that extent, but the substance
of it as telegraphed, leaves no doubt
that Russia has been notified in strong
diplomatic language, that the moral sup
port of the United States is with Great I
Britain and Japan, and that this coun
try ..will necessarily resent any failure
on the part of Russia to redeem the
pledge it. made to President McKinley
that the open door policy should be ap
plied to Manchuria.
Germany Takes Same Position.
Apparently, Secretary Hay waited until I
after the British-Japanese treaty was i
made public, so that the note of the '
United States might have nil the weight !
: of an indorsement of that treaty
It is believed here also that Germany
wrote a similar note to Russia, and,
■while the emperor was unwilling to par- |
ticipate in an alliance with England and !
Japan, he was not averse to letting the \
czar know that Germany's commercial i
interests in the Orient would be jealous
ly guarded.
o Jt, il expected, in fact, that Germany
and the I nited States will be found to
ot.- 1 0C« c, upyins almost the same position,
an,] thus the result wfl be that Rus
-1 and France will l>e arrayed on onV
sidfi and Great Britain, Germany Japan
and the United States on thYother l
DRANK CARBOLIC ACID
L.A t ROSSE BABY SWALLOWS OIAUE
OF THE FLIID.
Speeinl to The Globe.
T-A CROSSE. Wis., Feb. 20.-as a re
eult of Mrs. Bertha Weslergaard care
lessly leaving a bottle of carbolic acid rm
a dressing table, her two-year-old daugh
ter Bernice lies probably dying. The
mother left the room for a moment, and
when she returned the child was drain
ing the bottle of the deadly drug, it
had swallowed an ounce of the acid be
fore she could interfere.
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
OLEO SCANDAL GROWS
MICHIGAN INVESTIGATION SHOWS
ALLEGED BRIBERY IN OHIO.
KALAMAZOO, Mich., Feb. 20.—1n the
bribery examination today Stats X>afry
and Food Commissioner Snow testified
that he questioned Thompson at the
Niles conference, and the latter replied
that the Hammond Packing company
had fixed up a deal with State Commis
sioner Blackburn, of Ohio, and that col
ored oleomargarine was being sold at
Cleveland and Toledo. He said he be
came suspicious that his former deputy,
George Bussey, had a deal on with the
packing company, and went to 'Ham
mond to see about it.
He alleges that W. M. Tunnecliff, the
"go-between" there, told him that the
Ha. -^ond company "had some money to
spend in Michigan."
Before the taking of testimony began,
the defense moved to quash, on the
ground of the non-jurisdiction of the
court, and because the oleomargarine law
was unconstitutional, and that no crime
had been committed. This was overrul
ed. The examination was adjourned to
next Tuesday.
SGHLEY'S CASE CLOSED
PRESIDENT DIRECTS DEPARTMENT
THAT HIS DECISION IS FINAL
Friends Talk of Taking Controversy
Into Congress, but Fail to
Arrive at a De
cision.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Feb. 20.—Secre
tary Long has received the following
personal note from the White house an
nouncing the president's action in the
case of Admiral Schley:
"White House., Washington, Feb. 15,
1902.—My Dear Sir: The president re
quests me to state that after a full and
most careful consideration of the appeal
of Admiral Schley and of the answer
submitted thereto by the navy depart
ment, through you, he has made the en
closed memorandum on the case, which
he directs shall be filed therewith and
the case treated as closed. Very truly
yours, —"George B. Cortelyou,
"Secretary to the President."
Members of the Maryland delegation
in congress were in consultation today
regarding the latest phase of the Schley
case, but reached no conclusion as to
whether any move will be or can be
made.
MARCONI IS GRATIFIED
WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY PROVED
OP COMMERCIAL TTSE
Inventor to Return to Canada to
Perfect System, and Says Only
Opposition >"ow Lies in
England.
LONDON, Feb. 20.—At a general meet
ing of the Marconi Wireless Telegraph
company today Mr. Marconi, referring to
the trans-Atlantic experiments, announc
ed that the next series of tests would in
clude the transmission of words and mes
sages. He added that there was nothing
to prevent the company from undertak
ing commercial" messages with ships at
sea.
The service at present is in permanent
use on ships, and there were twenty-five
land stations. His transmission of twen
ty-two words in a minute, he said, did
not compare badly with the work of the
cables. The defects 'with regard to se
crecy had been removed.
After perfecting arrangements in Can- i
ada, he would challenge Sir William
Preece and Prof. Lodge to intercept mes
sages. The monopoly claimed by the
British postal telegraph had heretofore
impeded the establishment of a wireless
telegraph station in England or Ireland.
Mr. Marconi complains that obstruc
tions are thrown in his way on this side
of the Atlantic, in marked contrast v.'ith
the generous encouragement which he
had received from the governments and
press of the United States and Canada.
With regard to the commercial value
of the service, Marconi said that upon
the recent arrival of an Atlantic liner,
upwards of 8,000 words had been receiv
ed within sixteen hours. The transmis
sion of this number of words daily across
the Atlantic would represent an annual
income of £73,000 for each pair of sta
tions.
Mr. Marconi will sail for Canada next
Saturday.
ROSEBERY OUT AGAIN
REPLY TO BAXXERMAX PUTS HIM
APART FROM LIBERALS
Former Premier Is Particular to De
clare That While He Must Aban-
don His Party, He Will Not
Be in Solitude.
LONDON, Feb. 21.—As an outcome of
tho controversy concerning the relations
between Sir Henry Campbell-Banner
man, Lord Rosebery and the Liberal
party, Lord Rosebery has written to the
Times declaring, frankly, that he "re
mains outside of Sir Henry's tabernacle,
but .iot in solitude."
"Let me add," continues Lord Rose
bery, "one word: At this moment of
definite separation nObody appreciates
more heartily than I do the well-inten
tioned devotion of Sir Henry Campbell-
Bannerman to the Liberal party and
what he conceives to be its interests. I
only wish* I could have shared his la
bors and supported his policy."
The foregoing letter was called out by
Sir Henry in a l'ecent speech, asking
whether Lord Rosebery speaks "from
the interior of our political tabernacle,
or from some vantage ground outside."
Lord Rosebery s reply, therefore, marks
a definite separation from the Liberal
party.
CHIEF WAS PRACTICING
POLICEMEiN SEARCH CITY WHILE
O'NEILL PLAYS BAGPIFES.
Special to 'The <3lotoe.
CHICAGO, 111., Feb. 20.-Chief of Po
lice O'Neill was missing for five hours
tonight, during which time telephones and
messengers were kept busy in all parts
of the city, and almost the entire police
force was-engaged-4n a search for its
head. His disappearance gave rise to
many rumots, one of which was that he
had been assassinated. Finally O'Neill
sauntered home "from a suburb where,
with some Irish musicians, he had been
engaged in a bagpipe rehearsal for a
benefit in wliicj% he is to take part
FRIDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 21, 1902.—TEN PAGES.
MARTIAL LAW
FOR ALL SPAIN
BARCELONA STRIKE TROUBLES
FORCE PREMIER TO STRIN
GENT ACTION
CEISIS IN LIFE OF NATION
Rioting; Spreads, More Troops Are
Ordered Out, and Fight
ins Still Con
tinues.
SHIPPING HAS WARSHIP'S AID
MADRID, Feb. 20.—Premier Sagasta is
declaring a decree establishing martial
law throughout Spain. The signature of
the decree, it is believed, will be followed
by a national crisis.
It was persistently said when the cham
ber of deputies closed this evening that
the minister of war, Gen. Weyler, had a
long conference with the queen regent
yesterday, followed by a conference with
the military authorities today. After
ward, it is asserted, arms and ball car
tridges were served out to the troops in
Madrid.
The battleship Pelayo has been ordered
to Barcelona.
According to telegrams received here
late tonight from Barcelona the street
fighting there continues. A heavy rain
helped to disperse the rioters, and the
authorities are taking severe measures.
The strikers today killed three work
men who wished to resume work. The
proprietor of a bakery who raised the
price of bread was also killed.
It is hourly becoming more apparent
, that anarchists are the prime movers In
the revolution. The markets are without
provisions and the strikers are prevent
ing the slaughter of animals.
A mob stormed the arsenal at Sabadell,
not far from Barcelona, and secured
forty rifles, but these were subsequently
recovered by the troops.
Fresh fighting between the troops and
rioters has occurred at Tarrasa and Sab
adell.
Most of the ships in Barcelona harbor
have been forced to leave without dis
charging their cargoes.
Shoot at Troops From Amhnsh.
The Barcelona mob does not offer any
serious resistance when confronted by the
troops, but rioters are continually sniping
at the police and soldiers from behind
doors and windows and from the roofs
of houses, dispersing when the troops
charge.
Incendiary posters have appeared wnich
threaten the orderly classes with terrible
reprisals, saying that dynamite will be
used to offset the Mausers of the troops.
The strikers are looting numerous shops
and private houses.
The railroad officials have announced
the suspension of service en the lines
owing to the resolute attacks which the
rioters have made on the trains.
Trade unions throughout Spain have
declared adhession to the cause of the
Barcelona strikers.
Forty workmen's associations have been
dissolved, and the members of their com
mittees arrested. The homes of the
strike leaders and of anarchists are be
ing registered and put under guard.
The military engineers have assumed
control of the street car service, and a
few cars, half filled with soldiers, are
running. Even the funeral coaches have
to be protected by the police. No letters
have been delivered in Barcelona in three
days, and In some distant parts of the
town business is completely paralyzed.
Strike Agitation Is Spreading.
A pitched battle occurred in the out
skirts of the city between the strikers
and the military escort attached to sev
eral wagons that were bringing in pro
visions. The contents of the wagons were
dragged out, and barricades were built
across the road. The rails have been
torn up to prevent trains from enter
ing the city.
The strike agitation is spreading. At
Castellon de la Plana, taking advantage
of the night and of the absence of the
police, the strikers set fire to two fac
tories with the aid of petroleum. The
factories were destroyed. At a work
men's meeting held at Castellon de la
Plana a general strike was voted. At
Saragossa most of the factories have al
ready closed on the demands of the
workmen. The captain general of Sara
gossa has wired for reinforcements.
A strike at Valencia, owing to the re
fusal of the dock laborers fo participate
in it, did not become general. The po
lice at Valencia, assisted by the troops,
have, up to the present, been able to
maintain order.
Martial law has been proclaimed at
Manresa, thirty miles northwest of Bar
celona, and at Saragossa.
Owing to the censorship over news
from Barcelona, it is difficult to ascer
tain the real state of affairs. It is quite
certain, however, that all the efforts of
the authorities toward conciliatory moves
have so far failed, and the extension of
the strike movement is more likely than
its restriction.
Government Suppresses Xew«.
In addition to the labor movement, the
ever-present Catalan home lule agrita
tion is likely to prov ea serious factor in
the- situation. Almost alone among the
ministers and the government authori
ties, Gen. Weyler is in sympathy with
the Catalonian demands, and is inclined
to sludy their grievances. He has held
military commands in Catalonia, speaks
the Catalan language and understands
the situation.
The government declines to publish fig
ures of the casualties in the riots of
Tuesday and Wednesday. It is inferred
from private information received here
that forty persons were killed and 200
wounded during the encounters of those
days. Five hundred arrests have been
raade. persons who were only slight
ly wounded were concealed by their
fr.'ends in order to avoid prosecution.
Women took a prominent -part in the
riots, and were more violent than the
men. Among the incidents related of the
disorders at Barcelona is the case of a
policeman who fell a victim to his re
semblance to an inspector named Tiesols,
who is much hated by the anarchists.
The policeman, mistaken for the inspect
or, was assassinated,.
The telegraph lines have been cut be
tween Sabadell and Tarrasa. It is feared
the strike will next extend to Seville and
Verona, and a ministerial crisis is not
an unlikely outcome of the trouble.
It transpires that last Sunday several
workmen's meetings were held in Barce
lona. The principal meeting was held at
the Circo Espanol, and was attended by
6,000 persons. Teresa Claramunt, the no
torious agitator Bonfulla and other an
archists made violent speeches at this
Coutinned on Seventh Page,
BAN ON PECTQF RATS
GERMAN HEALTH \ AUTHORITIES
SEEK TO ABOLISH RODENT.
BERLIN, Feb^ $!—The destruction •of
rats throughout the empire, so far as
this is practicable, is under considera
tion by the imperial health department,
of which Dr> Koehler is president, and
to which some of the most distinguished
scientists of Germany are attached as
The object of the health department Is
to mitigate the danger of contagious dis
eases. Dr. Robert Koch, the eminent
bacteriologist,"has been commissioned to
devise the taetie¥ of the.campaign to
seaports.
VALET TELLS
OF MURDER
JONES DESCRIBES IX DETAIL THE
M.tXXER IX WHICH HE KJLLKI)
MILLIONAIRE
URGED TO HASTE BY PATRICK
Lawyer, He Saj-s, Talked of Com
mitting- the Deed Him.
self in Case of
Delay.
USED CHLOROFORM AND POISON
NEW YORK, Feb. 20.—A very dra
matic point in the tFial of Lawyer Albert
T. Patrick for the murder of the Texas
millionaire. William M. Rice, was readied"
this afternoon. Charles F. Jones, the
valet, had been relating the circum
stances leading up to the sudden death
of Mr. Rice in September. Then, plung
ing at once into the details, he held the
attention of his audience to the end of
his recital. Freed of minor paints, his
story fellows:
In August, Patrick grew impatient. Mr.
Rice, though an invalid, was living too
long to suit the lawyer's purpose. Pat
rick said he would come to the house
and kill him himself i£ necessary. H©
suggested chloroform and Jones said he
would get some.
The idea of chloroform as a means of
murder was suggested by a magazine av
ticle. it was determined on after Jones
talked with a physician who said a per
son whose heart was affected, as was
Mr. Rice's, could be most easily killed
with it, and that little trace of the drug
■would be left. Jones got a two-ounce
vial of it by writing to his brother in
Texas.
First Gave Victim Mercury.
Jones then branched off into the al
leged plan adopted-to weaken the al
ready sick old man.. This was by giving
him mercury and iron pills. The pills
brought on debilitating illness. Then un
wittingly a friend brought Mr. Rice a
present of bananas. Of these the old
man ate nine. The Iruit made kirn ex
ceedingly ill, and yet the weakening
doses of mercury were kept up. By &tt
urday, being about the eighth day of the
last illness, Mr. Rice became dtlirious.
This testimony, brought the events up to
Sunday, the day of death, and the wit
ness had said that during these ten days
of illness he had kept Patrick informed
of the details personally and by tele
phone.
William Rice's quick death, declared
the witness, was decided upon at a con
ference between Patrick and Jones, held
Saturday night. Jones had told the law
yer of the arrival of a draft for $25,00*
Patrick told him it was time to apply file
chloroform now that the draft had come
and Capt. Baker was coming, or trhey
would lose all. Jones agreed.
Signaled SucCesji m( Murder.
Jones here told his story of the actual
killing. He made a cone of a towel, in
the small end of which was a chloroform
soaked sponge. Creeping into the room
where Mr. Rice lay sleeping, he quickly
covered the sleeper's face with the large
end of the cone. In half an hour he
came back. He removed the cone. Mr.
Rice was dead. Jones swore he tele
phoned to Patrick the words, "Mr. liice
is very ill," the agreed signal between
the two of death. Jones' story of the
murder was concluded by the statement
that Patrick came to the house and re
moved all of Mr. Rice's papers.
B OJS "^y^i-itsoM " ';
FAMHIAB FACES AT THE CAPITOL.
TINKERING
THE TAX CODE
HOUSE ADOPTS WALLACE AMEND
MENTS ELIMINATING PROVISIONS
MOST OBJECTED TO
JACOBSON WALKS INTO A TRAP
In Making Play to Agricultural Ele
ment, He Arouses Opposition
Which. May Seal Fate
of the Bill.
ROBERTS STARS IN NEW ROLE
The house yesterday adopted the Wal
lace amendments eliminating the dras
tic and inquisitorial features from the
personal tax clauses of the tax code;
repealed the vessel tax clause, which
has agitated the Duluth delegation; spe
cified that threshing machines and corn
shredders shall be assessed, and wran
gled through two tedious sessions, de
voted to "fixing" the bill.
Jacobson and the "friends" of the bill
fell into a trap yesterday morning, which
places them between two fires, and may
result in the ultimate defeat of the code.
Wednesday night Mr. Jacobson agreed
to support the Wallace amendments. Yes
terday morning he pretended to awaken
to the alleged fact that the amendments
were too sweeping in their scope, and
calculated to aid the tax dodger, to the
injury of the farmer and small taxpay
er. In an impassioned speech he pro
posed a supplement to the . Wallace
amendments, to which Wallace and the
opposition very readily agreed, as it re
ally made no difference, and Jacobson
voted for the Wallace proposition. Mr.
Jacobson's supplementary amendment,
which was generally believed to be a
play to the farmers' gallery in the lnst
extremity, provides that county auditors
may add 50 per cent in penalty to the
assessor's return of personal property
which the owner has refused to list.
The factions which have most strenu
ously opposed the drastic features of the
bill could see nothing objectionable in
Mr. Jacobson's desire to get at the tax
dodger, and while the representatives of
the agricultural districts declined to be
convinced, and were joined by the Dem
ocrats, styled the amendments "a shame
ful compromise," they mustered only for
ty-six votes, as against sixty-two.The dis
cussion of the amendments occupied the
whole morning, and it was not until aft
ernoon that Jacobson got a vote on his
supplement, which was made a part of
the omnibus amendment. The attitude of
the opposition was plainly shown in the
vote for the supplement. It voted al
most solidly for the Jacobson proviso,
which received eighty-one out of a total
of ninety-one votes.
Mr. Deming, of Hennepin, secured the
adoption of an amendment to the delin
quent tax clause, calculated to protect
the innocent purchaser of property on
which tax may be delinquent throjgh
failure of the proper officiate to assess
it. The code provided that from and aft
er the date that the taxes became de
linquent the auditor should charge
against the property interest at the rate
of 7 per cent until the back tax was
paid. Mr. Demicg argued that the error
, of an assessor might run along unnoticed
for several years and then turn up, a
lien on property purchased by an entire
ly innocent party. His proposition elici
ted considerable discussion, but was final
ly adopted by a practically unanimous
I viva voce vote.
Tonnage Tax Knocked Ont.
Mr. Laybourn easily secured the adop
tion of an amendment replacing the pres
ent tonnage tax on vessels registered in
Duluth. The amendment provides for a
tax of three cents on each ton of the
vessels' net registered tonnage. The tax
is to be collected by the state and one
half paid to St. Louis county. The Wal
lace amendments disposed of the grain!
in elevators tax and the St. .Louis delega
tion was about ready to sit comfortably
down and wait for- the fight en their pet
aversion—the proposed tax on »..e iron
mines. The whole thing worked so ■easily
that the real danger to the bill was loom
ing up squarely before Jacobson, before
he realized the trap he had walked into.
The Wallace amendments which were
regarded by Jacobson and his immediate
followers as a compromise that would
result in shoving the bill through at
lightning speed, without seriously crip
pling the prime cbjects of «-«e measure,
proved a two-edged weapon. It won over
some of the enemies of the bill who came
Continued on Third Page.
PRICE TWO CENTS-) SM'^t,.
SEEK ELEVATOR RELIEF
INDEPENDENT GRAIX BUYERS
FORM LARGE ORGANIZATION.
Special to The Globe.
FARGO, N. D., Feb. 20.—The North
western Elevator company was establish
ed here today as a permanent organiza
tion by independent grain buyers from
lowa, Minnesota and the two D^kotas.
The officers are; President, W. H. Mc-
Pherson, Valley City, N. D.; first vice
president, A. L. Ballou, Larabee, Iowa;
second vice president, B. W. Perr, Bath,
S. T>. ; secretary, J. C. Hanney, St. Paul,
Minn.; treasurer, J. M. Finney, Clinton,
Minn.
The organization* seeks to end warfare
between buyers and old line elevator
companies. It will act as kind of arbitra
tor and adjust differences at local points
so that satisfactory prices may be perma
nently established.
A co-operative commission company will
be established with board of trade connec
tions in Chicago, Duluth and Minneapolis
which will handle all grain shipped by
independent buyers as well as that by
farmers themselves. In this way the or
ganization expects- to secure the same
privileges new granted the old line ele
vators in freight rebates and premiums
on grades.
Twenty-nine independent and farmers'
co-operative elevators of North Dakota
were represented today and each joined
the association. At meetings to be held
at Sioux Falls, S. D., Feb. 25, Austin,
Minn., Feb. 27, St.-Paul, March 5 and 6, it
is expected that the independent elevators
of other states will join.
McPherson wrill look after North Da
kota. Ballou in lowa, Hanney and Perry
those of South Dakota and M. P. Moran
and Finney in Minnesota. A close alli
ance will be formed with the> National
Grain Growers association and t^e Coun
try Elevator association.
BOERS AGAIN VICTORS
BURGHERS CIT OFF AXD CAPT I It 11
CRACK REGIMENT OF BRIT
ISH DRAGOONS
REPULSE HAMILTON'S ATTACK
Forty-Six Prisoners Taken From tlu»
Scots Grays, Kitchener's Re-
l>ort Says, Were Later
Released.
LONDON, Feb. 20.—A detachment of the
Scots Grays, one oLGreat Britain's crack
dragoon regiments, has been cut up by
the Boers at Klipdam. Maj. C. W. M.
Feilden and Capt. E. Usfcher were se
verely wounded, two men were killed,
six were wounded and forty-six were cap
tured.
The news was received this morning
from Lord Kitchener, in a dispatch dated
Pretoria, Wednesday, Feb. 19. The Scots
Grays formed a part of Gen. Gilbert tiam
iltoiVs column. The latter, while moving
on Nigel, Feb. 18, engaged a. force of
Boers at Klipuam.
The Sects Greys became detached, were
surrounded and cut off. Gen. Hamilton
was unable to dislodge the Boers from
their position, so he continued his march
towards N,\gel. The Boers released the
Scots Grays who had been made pris
oners.
DEATH LIST IS 5,000
XEW VOLCAXO ERUPTS AXD SHA
MAKA EARTHQUAKES REXEWED.
LONDON, Feb. 21.—Cabling from St.
Petersburg, the correspondent of the
Daily Mail says the seismic disturbances
at Shamaka have been recommenced, and
that a new volcano began eruption last
Wednesday. The number of killed in the
Shamaka district is now estimated at
5,000.
GRAND FORKS IS FAVORED.
Hardware .Men of \ortli Dakota
Xame Place of Xext Convention.
Special to The Globe.
FARGO, N. D., Feb. 20.—Grand Forks
today seevred the next annual meeting
of the North JJakota Retail Hardware
Dealers' association. H. N. Joy, of Ham
ilton, was elected president; H. F. Em
ery, of Fargo, vice president; W. H.
Pinkerton, of T.akoka, treasurer, and C.
N. Barnes, of Grand Forks, secretary.
The retiring president, Helgesen, aril
President Joy end Secretary Barnes were
elected to represent the association at a
national meeting In Chicago in March.
Applications of retail grocers and im
plement dealers to be granted mutual
insurance extension now enjoyed by the
hardware men, were filed, as no definite
action could be taken because of the plan
to make the insurance a national mat
ter, in which case other organizations
would probably not be recognized, but
would be compelled to establish similar
insurance of their own.
This afternoon's executive meeting ar-.
ranged for a closer combination of hard
wire riieh of tfce state and placed the as-
BCCif.tion on a more business-like basis.
The forencon was given up to traveling
mtn and jobbers, and the interesting
conference resulting will probably elimi
nate friction in the future.
INJUNCTION PROTECTS NAME.
Secretary of Treasury Shaw Goe* to
Conrt to Stop Slander.
Special to The Globe.
DES MOINES, lowa, Feb. 20.—Ex-Gov.
Shaw, now secretary of the treasury,
has secured a permanent injunction to
prevent Jno. MacGregor from sending out
circulars and uttering statements to the
effect that he is a forger and perjurer.
MacGregor. is one of Shaw's former
reighbors, who claims the ex-governor
beat Him in a lawsuit by trickery.
He prepared circulars attacking Shaw
to send out broadcast during political
campaigns, and recently announced his
intention of going to Wall street and
Washington to denouncl Shaw. A tem
porary restraining order was issued by
Judge Eelwood and was today made
permanent, despite MacGregor's contest.
ORE ALMOST SOLID SILVER.
Assays on Ww Find Show Valne «f
fS.OOO it Ton.
HELENA, Mont.. Fe.b. 20.— The United
Smelting and Refining company's smelter
at East Helena has received a shipment
of silver ore which is believed to be the
richest ever made in the state. The ore
assays $S,OOO a ton, and is approximately
one-fourth silver. The shipment is made
fram a ifline from Neihart. Great quan*
titles of the ore found is so malleable a?
to be almost cut with a knife.
NOT HOSTILE
TO MERGER
ABMINISTRATION'S ACTION TOWARD.
NORTHERN SECURITIES COM
PANY MISUNDERSTOOD
PAINS ARE TAKEN TO EXPLAIN
Attorney General's Proposed Action
Is to Be a Mere Test of the
Power of Existing
Laws.
VESTED INTERESTS ARE SAFE
FROM THE GLOBE BUREAU,
Washington, D. C.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Feb. 20.—Th#
attitude of the administration toward the
merger of the Great Northern and North
ern Pacific through the Northern Securi
ties company, has been misunderstood.
Such is the statement which the presi
dent took pains to give out today through
official and semi-official channels.
It is announced that the proceedings
to be commenced by the attorney general
are not to be taken as an indication of
hostility, either towards the company
egainst which they are directed or the
railroads in general.
Attorney General Knox says it is mere
ly a step to try the effect of laws now nn
the statute books on railroad conditions
which have recently developed.
The administration has observed, with
some concern, that Wall street interprets
this news as threatening the value oC
railroad properties. The drop in stock
prices is interpreted to mean that some
investors and traders have concluded
that the president is dangerously rascal,
and that the great power of the federal
government is to be used in a way which
will prove injurious to vested interests.
What the administration is trying to do
now is to dispel this notion.
The president, it is said, is merely
clearing the way for legislation in con
gress affecting the railroad situation.
His beliefs on this topic are set forth
in his message to congress and do not
need to be repeated. He advises super
vision and regulation by the federal gov
ernment of natural monopolies, into
which class he puts the great transporta
tion companies of the country. He holds
that the interest of the individual must
be protected by the strong hand of the
nation, but before he can take any steps
for further legislation by congress he
feels that he should make a trial of
whatever laws are on the statute books'.
If thoy are adequate that is all that la
asked. If nut, it will be congress" duty
to remedy the defects. The attorney gen
eral has rendered "his opinion that the
Sherman law has been violated by the
Northern Securities company, but this is
merely his individual opinion and may Da
far from the opinion of the federal
i courts. What the latter is will not be
I known for many months, and, therefore,
the immediate effect of the president's
mo\e will be to postpone all congres
sioral consideration of the railroad prob
lem to a rather distant date.
KXOX WILL XOT RETIRE.
Authorizcd#Stateinent Made That At
torney General "Will Remain.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.—Reports hav
ing been rather widely circulated th'«t
Attorney General Kncx had decided to
resign from the cabinet, it can be stated
on authority that there is absolutely no
basis of fact for these reports.
DEMOCRATS PUT OFF CAUCUS.
Early Meeting- of Senate Cansert De-
lay of Party Plan.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 20.—The caucus
of Democratic members "called for to
morrow has been postponed because of
the early meeting of the senate. No
date is fixed for the caucus.
BIG FIRE IN VIRGINIA
DESTRUCTIOX OF DRY GOODS HOUSE
CAUSES A LO*S OF $120,000.
RICHMOND, ya., Feb. 20.-The large
dry goods stone of Cordes & Mosby, on
Broad street, with the entire stock, waa
destroyed by fire tonight.
The loss is $120,000, fully covered by in
surance.
FIGHTS THE GEANITE TRUST.
Formation of Xew Company in Win-
cousin Will Lower-Prices.
Special to The Globe.
LA CROSSE, Feb.-20.—1t was discov
ered late tonight that H. P. Hixon, of
this city, heads a company which has
purchased a large granite quarry near
Merrill, Wis., and therefrom will furnish
granite goods in competition with the re
cently formed granite trust. Mr. Jlixcm
declares that the Merrill 'Lighting and
Electric Railway company, of which he
is a principal stockholder, is behind the
scheme to fight the granite trust. The
company has aiready invested $20,000- in
land and equipment, and the quarrying
will be started at once. The organiza:
ticn oi the independent company will,
in all probability, mean a big drop in
prices of granite goods.
MORE FIGHTING IN PANAMA.
Details of the Engagement With
Revolutionists Mender.
PANAMA, Colombia. Feb. 20.-It is
positively kn?w here that the forces un
der the government leader. Gen. Castro,
and the revolutionary general, Ilerrera,
are fighting. Varied and numerous re
ports have reached here of this engage
ment, but they all lack details.
The forces are in the vicinity of Aqua
Dulce, Yeguala and San Carlos, between
thirty and forty miles southwest of Pan
ama.
The Colombian government had per
fected arrangements with a British
steamship company to transport rein
forcements to Gen. Castro when, at the
last moment, the agent »f the company,
acting upon the advice of the eaotain of
the British cruiser Amphion. refused to
permit the company's steamer to move
the troops.
Gen. Salazar, the' recently appointed
governor of Panama, has cabled his ac
ceptance, and is due here next wt ek.
NO FAVORS FOR CHINAMEN.
California Congressmen Will Make
Xo Move to Aid. Merchant*.
WASHINGTON, F*b. 20.—The mem
bers of the CalifarnA delegation in Con
gress, after conferences held today, unan
imously decided to disregard the resolu
tions recently adopted by the Chamber
of Commerce of San Francisco, favoring
admission of Chinese merchants, sales,
men, bookkeepers, and others of the mer
chant class.

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