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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 22, 1902, Image 1

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VOL. XXV.—NO. 53.
CUBA BUTCHER
ASKS CONTROL
WEYLER'S REQUEST TO BE GIVFN
CHARGE OVER STRIKE RIOTS
OPPOSED BY PREMIER
SPAINS TROUBLES SPREAD
Attack on Retreat of Priests Re
pulsed by Lively Fire by the
Fathers Forced Into
Defense.
ANARCHISTS' MISSION FAILS
LONDON, Feb. 21.—1t is announced In
J. special dispatch from Madrid that Gen.
weylef, the war minister, is urging the
aueen regent to give him a free hand
m dealing with the "rebels in Cata
lonia," and that Premier Sagasta threat
»ns to resign if Gen. Weylers request is
granted. The queen regent is said to
favor Gen. Weyler's plan.
A number of rioters attacked the Jesuit
college at Sargossa last night. The
fathers fired on the mob, believing their
assailants to be thieves.
Forty persons have bee nkilled in Bar
celona since the disturbances began. The
strikers today attacked the jail in an
attempt to rescue their imprisoned com
rades, but they were repulsed by the
troops, after a number of rioters had
been killed or wounded.
The ordinary necessaries of life are
failing; and distress is accentuated. The
strikers are said to be receiving large
Eums of money from London.
In neighboring towns the disturbances
are spreading and increasing in gravity.
Anarchists Fail in Mission.
A number of anarchists have arrived
at Bilbao, with the object of inciting a
strike. The socialists have refused to co
operate in the movement.
The rioters at Barcelona are devoting
their energies to preventing food sup
plies from entering the town. In one
such case the troops escorting a convoy
were obliged to fire on the rioters, sev
eral of whom were killed or wounded.
A serious conflict also occurred today
in the center of the town.
The efforts of the captain general to
persuade the dock laborers to resume
work have failed and the entire trade
cf Barcelona is at a standstill.
Revolutionary proclamations are still
being circulated.
The exciting debate in the chamber of
deputies in Madrid on the interpellation
yesterday of Senor Robert, deputy from
the province of Catalonia, in regard to
the occurences at Barcelona was re
nowed today.' Senor Romero Robledo
asked for information regarding the
meeting of the foreign consuls at Bar
celona, and when the minister of the
interior, Benor Gonzales, professed his
ignorance of this meeting and declared
the interpellation to be inopportune, the
deputies of the opposition displayed the
greatest impcctier.ee.
Gen. Weyltr, the minister o^f war, an
nounced in tha chamber that he had de
cided upon ei'ti^etic steps to suppres3
the disorders.
The search of suspected houses con
tinues, resulting in the arrest of large
numbers ot anarchists and revolutionists
of all kinds, who are considered the
prime movers in the troubles.
Mmlrid Workers Favor Rioter*.
The cosmopolitan character of Barce
lona makes it a resort for representa
tives of all the revolutionary elements In
Europe, and the ranks of the malcontent
workmen have been swelled by French
am' other foreign political agitators. The
Republicans are busy among the troops,
urging them not to use their guns against
their own class in defense cf plutocrats.
The working people of Madrid favor the
strikers.
Martial law has been proclaimed at
Tarragona. The strike is spreading in the
Llofcregat and Gardona valleys. There
is a general cessation of work at Castel
lon de la Plana and Garve, and much
excitement prevails at Batea. Force.s of
gendarmie have been dispatched to those
places.
in a conflict in Valencia yesterday be
tween the police and the rioters three
persons were wounded. Fourteen arrests
were made.
WILD BATTLE STORY FALSE.
Total \imiber of Killed in Barce
lona, However. Is Forty.
LONDON, Feb. ZL-*. Dispatches received
here from Madrid and Barcelona and
from various frontier towns in close
tcuch with the scenes of the disturbances
in Spain quite discredit the sensational
dispatch to the Exchange Telegraph com
pany, saying that a fierce battle had been
fought between troops and rioters in a
suburb of Barcelona, that the artillery
raked street after street and that per
sons were reported to have been killed
©r wounded on both sides.
As a matter of fact up to last evening
the total number of persons killed
throughout the disturbances was enlv
forty.
FUSION QUESTION IS UP
POPtLISTS 1\ KWSAS I\ABLE TO
AGREE OX PROPOSITION.
TOPEKA, Kan.. Feb. 2!.-The commit
tee on resolutions in the Populist confer
ence, after several hours' d scjsslon,
brought in two reports. The majority re
port recommended that the Populist par
ty in the state be kept intact, and that
"no ;tttention be paid Democrats.' The
minority repoit called for affiliation w.th
the Democrats.
This division precipitated a worse
Etorm in the convention. After much ar
gument the resolution was referred ba-k
to the committee, with order« to l>rin°-
In another iepurt at the night s?ss.on
FIREMEN ARE CONDEMNED.
Severe Censure Follow* >liseomliiv>t
in I-a (rogse.
Special to The Glebe.
LA OROSSE, Wis., Feb. 2L—The fire
and police commission lute tonight ren
dered its decision in the matter of the
alleged scandalous conduct of the fire
departmeat Feb. 8, when several of the
I wholesale houses in the city were
destroyed. The report exonerated Capt.
any blame for misconduct of
iremen, but censured the entire depart
ment and particularly Blair Thompson.
In regard to charges made against Capt.
•Desmond, of stealing department proper
ty, the report declared that the evidence
showed the articles had been borrowed
md not stolen. No dismissals followed.
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
WON'T CHEER PRINCE
POLES RESENT GERMANY'S TREAT
MENT OF THEIR RACE.
Special to The Globe.
CHICAGO, 111., Feb. 21.~Tw0. hundred
thousand residents of this city of Polish
birth and parentage will show their in
dignation at the treatment of their rela
tives at home by the German govern
ment by making the visit of Prince Hen
ry to this city an occasion of mourning.
Elaborate religious services have been
arranged, and meetings will be held to
Five expression to the sentiments of the
Polish-Americans.
BIG FIRE IN
NEW YORK
FLAMES DESTROYING THE PARK
HOTEL-FOl'R PEOPLE
KILLED
FLAMES ARE STILL SPREADING
NEW YORK. Feb. 21. — The fire
broke out after midnight, de
stroying the Seventy-first regiment arm
ory, between Thirty-third and Thirty
fourth streets, on Fourth avenue. The
building occupied the entire block and
was the headquarters for the Seventy
first regiment, N. Y. N. G.; headquarters
of the Fifth brigade, Second battery and
the First Signal corps.
The fire started on the main floor and
burned upward very rapidly Before 2
o'clock the entire building was in ruins.
Before an alarm had been turned in
flames completely enveloped the building
and when the firemen reached the scene
the blaze had burst through the roof.
Shortly after 2 o'clock the walls of the
armory fell with a tremendous crash.
Occupants of the five-story house from
137 to 141 Bast Thirty-third street were
driven from their homes by the police.
The Park avenue hotel was fired imme
diately after. A large quantity of pow
der stored in the armory exploded.
Guests Leap From Windows.
Hundreds of persons occupying a row
of flat buildings in Thirty-first street
were taken out by the police and were
cared for in m'ghboring houses.
The hotel caugt fire on the third floor.
The guests were all leaving and some
are being taken out by the firemen.
The car barns of the Metropolitan
street railway caught lire at the same
hour.
At 3:10 o'clock a woman guest jumped
from the fifth 1 story of the hotel. She
was fatally injured.
Ambulance calls were turned in to all
the hospitals in the lower section of Man
hattan.
All available police reserves were call
ed to the scene.
Up to 3:20 six people had been taken
out by the firemen. The flames had then
spread to the sixth floor and were leap
ing from the windows. It was thought
impossible to save the hotel.
The estimated loss ly? to 3:15 was $1,
--000,000.
Two dead bodies had then been tafcen
from the hotel.
One of the dead is said to be a Col.
Pepper, of Louisville, Ky. The other
body has not yet been identified.
Two more unidentified dead bodies
were taken from the hotel at 3:30.
Fire Chief Croker at 4 a. m. said fifty
persons were d.cad in the ruins of the
j Park hotel alone.
TAWNEY USES PROBE
HE SEEICS INFORMATION ON I*-
DISTRIAL CONDITIONS IN
Cl'BA
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.-When the
house met today it was agreed that when
it adjourned today it be to meet Mon
day next.
Mr. Tawney, of Minnesota, asked unan
imous consent for consideration of the
following:
"Resolved. That the secretary of war
be requested to furnish the house nuch
information concerning the number of
acres of land in Cuba purchased by non
residents of the island since the date of
the American occupation, as is shown by
the reports to and the records of the war
department and by the records of the
military government of Cuba, giving the
consideration, the names and places of
residences of purchasers, the number of
acres contained on each trust conveyed,
the total acreage of cultivated sugar land
owned by citizens of the United States
and by citizens of other countries foreign
to Cuba."
Mr. Payne, the. majority leader, spid
he did not think the precedent should be
established of considering such resolu
tions before they had been considered by
the committee. Mr. Tawney denied that
it was rnusual to adopt resolutions of
inquiry in this fashion, but Mr. Payne
continued to object.
CALL STARS TO FLAG
COXGI-ESS-MEX FAVOR AD.MISMO.V
OF THREE TERRITORIES
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.—The house
committee on territories today unani
mously voted to report bills for admis
sion of the territories of New Mexico,
Arizona and Oklahoma to statehood. The
vote was taken upon a motion made by
Mr. Moon, of Tennessee, declaring it to
be the sense of the committee that the
three territories were entitled to state
hood and that subcommittees be appoint
ed to prepare the bills. The subcom
mittees were appointed.
LARGE ELEVATOR BURNS.
Capacity of Rained Grand I orlis
Structure Whk OG.OOO Busliils.
Special to The Globe.
GRAND FORKS, N. D., Feb. 21.—The
National elevator at Crystal burned to
the ground. The capacity of the build
ing was 66,000 • bushels. Other buildings
were saved with difficulty.
SATURDAY MORNINS, FEBRUARY 22, 19O2.—TEN PAGES.
PRINGE'S SHIP
IS DELAYED
NEW YORK MAY HAVE TO POST
PONE ELABORATE RECEP
; TION PLANNED
J. P. MORGAN TO GREET HIM
Great Financier Leads in Prepars.
tions for Dinner That Is to
Have Oddly Costumed
Waiters.
SPECIAL POLICE ON GUARD
NEW YORK, Feb. 21.—Admiral Prince
Henry of- Prussia is due in New York
tomorrow. That he will arrive on sched
ule time is, however, exceedingly doubt
ful. The Kronprinz Wilhelm, to equal her
westward record, should reach Bandy
Hook lightship by / 45 o'clock tomorrow
morning. Owing to the conditions now
prevalent on the Atlantic, her arrival at
any hour during tomorrow will be sur
prising.
Of all the entertainments organised in
honor of Prince Henry, there will be
none more elaborate than the luncheon
to be given for him at Sherry's Wednes
day next by the representatives of
American finance, trade and industry, the
moving spirit of which is J. Pieipont
Morgan. In the way of giving
the royal visitor an idea of
American gastronomy, it is projected to
surpass anything of the kind that has
over taken place here before. The cost
of the luncheon wWI be great, and among
the items of expense will be the highly
ornate liveries now being made for the
entire staff of waiters employed In con
nection with the entertainment.
Odd Uniform for SerTltor*.
The prince and his entertainers will 1 c
surrounded by servitors who will look as
if they had stepped out. of a canvas
painted in the days of the Georges of
England. Each of these servitors, smooth
shaven and of impassive countenance,
will wear, instead of the conventional
swallow tail, a black cloth coat, with
seven cloth-covered black buttons on
either side, beginning at the neck and
extending to the waist. A fine pieco of
black braid runs from the button to the
edge of the coat, which is without lapels
and has a clerical collar. A white stock
encircles the neck and at the front of
the throat is a white satin bow.
Under the coat_-is a white buttoiiless
waistcoat, the bottom coming well down
over the waistband of the black plush
breeches of full cut, gathered in at the
knees with a band which tops a pair
of white stockings. Patent leather pumps,
with buckles, complete the costume. The
whole outfit is a complete reproduction
of the livery used in England a cei;t'iry
ago, but of much finer texture.
Will Pay Honor to Grant.
Sunday, when Aiince Henry visits the
tomb of Gen. Grant he will place two
wreaths on the tomb, one from the kaiser
and the other the prince's own tribute.
Both wreaths will be composed of Amer
ican Beauty roses, lilies and orchids, and
will have in the center a crown. On the
emperor's wreath will be worked in
flowers the initials "W. I. R." (.William
Imperator Rex).
The pier at the foot of West Thirty
fourth street, where the prince will land,
has made a special subpolice precinct
with two captains, eight sergeants, ten
roundsmen, fifty mounted policemen and
lCO~i>atrolmen, all picked men. It is
known as the Hohenzollern precinct.
A Postal telegraph office with a direct
wire connection with the German cable
has been established on the dock at the
foot of Thirty-fourth street for the ac
commodation of Prince Henry of Prus
sia and his suite, who will thereby be in
instant communication with Gem.any at
all times.
Admiral Evans, Gen. Corbin and As
sistant Secretary Hill, the president's
delegates, will board the Kronprinz "Wil
helm, probably at the quarantine station,
and will greet Prince Henry in the name
of the United States government.
The Irving Place theater, where a gaia
performance is to be given tomorrow
evening, has been beautifuLy decorated,
and orders j.ave t.en given for the fes
tooning of the prince's box with Amer
ican Beauty roses, more than 400 of the
roses to be used for this purpose. Hein
rich Conried, manager of the theater, has
had a special entrance broken through the
wall on the Fifteenth street si<ie of the
theater, in order to permit the prince to
enter the royal box injmediately on step
ping from his carriage.
The play selected for this performance
is Blumenthal & Kadelburg's three-act
comedy, ''Im Weissen Roessl." This se
lection was made by request, a» the
prince has thus far had no opportunity of
seeing the play, owing to the fact that
during the time when it was given in
various cities of Germany he was in
China.
Other Cities Plan Honor.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Feb. 21.—Arches
which will make an electrically lighted
colonnade of Wisconsin street and Grand
avenue, from the Pfister hotel to the
court of honor at Eleventh street, In hon
or of Prince Henry, are being put in
place. In addition, other arches will be
erected on Third street, down which the
prince will pass to the exposition.
ST. LOUIS. Mo., Feb. 21.—The solid geld
and silver casket which will be present
eel as a souvenir to Prince Henry of Prus
sia by Mayor Wells will be eighteen
inches long, four and a half inches high
and four and a half inches from front to
back. The material is of solid silver and
gold, with decorations in full relief, rich
ly cut by hand in solid metal and enam
eled.
-. The most ornate embellishment will be
the device: on the cover. This consists
of the common seal of. St. Louis on each
side of which are the American and the
German eagle,' the' key to the city - pro
truding at the top. and bottom. ' :~.
- LONDON, Feb. 21.—The Weekly Review
makes the impending arrival of Admiral
Prince Henry :. of Prussia at New York
the occasion of another chapter in the
Spanish-American war controversy," de
claring that "both Englishmen and "Amer
icans see through Germany's game," and
refuse to be misled -I by the ; inspired at
tempts to. undermine their mutual friend
ship und understanding. : , — r. ;
I ;': "A fact which - will ■be written down by
the historian," says the T spectator, "i^ as
well recognized today as it will ever be
That is, , that England used fear influence
&nd the, Americans know she used it on
the ; side of r the United , States, i as' against :
those who wished ..to- take the side of :
Spain." ■■•.:;•... ..... - -...•---...-. „-..--•■;.■ . ;;
- BERLIN, Feb. 21.-The Figaro dispatch
from - London - representing Emperor
\\illiam as being displeased with the ■
bearing .of r the , American naval officers
and that, therefore, .he has given orders
to make the visit |as German-American
as possible, officials here say is absurdly
false. .' ..-.-'■-. ■-—-■-
EPIDEMIC OF MUMPS
SEVEN THOUSAND CASES IN CHI
CAGO AT PRESENT.
Special to The Globe.
CHICAGO, 111.. Feb. 2t—"lf anything
like the present epidemics of mumps has
ever before struck the city, it is not
within my memory," said Health Officer
Kiefer today. "A little while ago I esti
mated that there were 5,000 cases of
mumps in the city. I believe there are
more than 7,000 now, and there are more
measles than mumps, but of a compara
tively harmless sort." Tne rich as well
as the poor are sufferers. . Not long ago
one of the belles of the most exclusive
society set was invfled to a ball at Fort
Wayne. The mornfi% of the function she
felt ill, but she was; nevertheless, In at
tendance. She danced with eijery officer
at the fort. The next day she knew she
had mumps. She had plenty of company
at the fort.
DENIES BANKER BAIL
COURT HOLDS FINANCIER AN-
DREWS OX THIRD WARRANT
Charge* Against Officers of Defunct
- *, • Detroit' Institution Made Spe
" ' * - cific After ■. Examination
of Books.
DETROIT, Mich., Feb. 21.—A third war
rant was issued today for Frank C. An
drews, vice president of the City Sav
ings bank, which is in the hands of a
receiver, on a complaint charging him,
together with another officer of the bank,
for whom a warrant was also Issued,
with making a false report on the bank's
condition to the 3tate banking commis
sioner, Feb. 20, 1901.
Mr. Andrews was arraigned in the po
lice court late this afternoon. His coun
sel asked that he be released on this
charge on his personal recognizance, in
view of the fact that the bail ou the
two former complaints against him totals
$25,000 and is ample. Judge Whelan de
clined to grant the req.est, and fixed
the bail at $50,000, This was not furnished.
Mr. Andrews' examination was set for
Feb. 28, the date of his examination-on
the other complaints.
The complaint made to#ay specifics the
result of examination of the books ot
the bank, and shows that in every de
tail the resources of the bank were
shown above actual conditions.
The report last made before the failure
indicated that F. C. Andrews was i.ot
liable in any amount to the bank as
payer, when, the complaint declares, he
really was liable at that time for *92,500.
The report also shows that another di
rector of the bank was liable to the
bank as payer for $23,000, whereas the
complaint says the true amount should
have been $45,412. F. C. Andrews, as in
dorser, was reported to be liable for 537,-
COO, when, the complaint says, he should
have been liable in this capacity for
$142,208. The report mdi/ ated that An
drews was not liable in any amount for
over draft, whereas, the complaint says,
his account was overdrawn $149,133. The
complaint charges that these discrepan
cies were made with the intent of de
ceving the bank examiner.
HASTE TO MOVE BOY
DOCTORS DISAGREE OVER RE
. MOVAL OF PRESIDENT'S SOTS
Lad Is Taken to White Honse Home
on Mother's Reqnest Despite
Opposition of One At
tending' Doctor.
GROTON, Mace, Feb. 21.—1- eodore
Roosevelt Jr., who has been ill wii-i pneu
monia for two weeks in the Grotrm school
infirmary, is bound for Washington to
night. Bundled to his eyes with blankets,
he was taken in a covered sleigh from
the infirmary to the special train which
had been in readiness at the Groton sta
tion for several days. The young patient
was accompanied by Mrs. Roosevelt and
Dr. P. M. Rixey, while in another con
veyance was Miss Koosevelt. A light
snow was falling at the time.
Dr. Warren, the school physician, was
opposed to a change of the patient, but
Dr. Rixey gave his opinion that .he boy
would stand the journey all right.
It was Mrs. Roosevelt's wish to have
her son in Washington as soon as he
could be moved with safety. Dr. Peabody
was not informed until nearly time for
the good-byes to be said.
LONG WILL GET OUT
SECRETARY CONFIRMS Rt'MOR
THAT HE WILL LEAVE CABINET, j
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.—After the 1
cabinet meeting today Secretary Long
stated that the report that he intended
retiring was true. He said he had lixed
upon- no specific date for leaving, had
not yet formally sent his resignation to
the president and might not do so for !
some time. The president, he said, was j
fully aware of his purpose many months
ago.
■ li'-V ;;"iv'.; BI~Z.L£TIX OF ';:. ■'■- •;
IMPORTANT KIWS OF THE DAY
■:-;. Weather Forecast for St. Paul: V*;:
. -. , Partly Cloudy. >" ■'-"..
■7; I—House in an JUgrly .Mood.
- "East Storm-Swept Again.
Prince Henry Will Be Late.
Weylcr Asks Control of Mob:
: 2-Snvglars Make Good Hani..V
City Contracts Let.
Stay by Levee Plan. '
:; Girls Prefer store Work.
After Cheap Candy. -
3—Black Hi! ln Folk Mad.
Xews of the Sorthwest. ..
4—Editorial • Comment.
Latest Political Gossip.
Stew York-Letter,; - - -•
s—Little Men Are Itcady. '
General Sporting News. ;;
6—The -Woman's Page.? -' ; ' : • '
< . ..-; Daily Short - Stary.V^-T^r^'-.rf .-■■-■^ "
- 7 —Day's Doings in Minneapolis. ."
- •*-— Xerrs of the Hail road*. '.
9—Grain and Provision Markets. T :,=.
lO—Supreme Court Decisions. -" -. -;
Police -Commission Will :Stay. :.
;■ City Charter Held Valid. I
KILLING DAY
IN THE HOUSE
MEMBERS IN FIGHTING MOOD, ANO
AMENDMENTS WERE
SLAUGHTERED)
AMENDMENTS TO CONSTITUTION I
House Judiciary at Last Agrees ou
a Bill Conforming- to Pro.
visions of the Original
Dunn Bill.
SENATE PASSES SEVERAL BILLS
The house woke up yesterday morn.
ing in an ugly humor. The result was
a continual wrangle throughout the Bt-a
■ion. and every propo.i.-d amendment
which appeared to affect the code in any
material manner was voted down with
an energy which made the opposition
anxious to get away.
The trouble started immediately after
the special order was resumed, and the
war continued even down to the motion
for adjournment, which was secured only
after an aye and nay vote by roll call
lhe radical friends of the code felt that
they had been trapped in the adoption ot
the "Wallace amendments, and the middle
of the road elen.ent was in a frame of
mind calculated to make war on any
proposed change in the bill which would
prolong the struggle.
The idea that the corporations and pro
fessional tax dodgers had gained a point
by the adoption of thu Wallace amend
ments redoubled the natural antagonism
to corporate Interests, and a big major
ity seemed to be committed to the idea
that safety lay in sticking to the text
of the bill. Mr. Roberts, Hennepin, had
a small series of amendments to the pub
lic service franchise clauses. Mr. Lay.
bourn bobbed up with his amendments to
protect the elevator men beyond the pos
sibility of taxation. Mr. Sander arrived a
little late, but armed with a proposition
to reduce the salary of members of the
permanent tax commission from $3100
per annum to $2,400. Mr. Johnson, Hen
nepin, wanted th«i bend of county super
visors of assessments raised from $5 000
to $10,000, and incidentally took a o.>ost
for his bridge building- industry by ask
ing that the county bridge tax be'raised
from 5 mills to 10 mills on the dollar.
Death Blows Were Dcnlt.
There was a considerable display of
oratorical pyrotechnics, but the result in
every case was the same—the an<ei-d
--ments were summarily killed. The only
amendments adopted were the series of
grammatical corrections offered by Mr.
Roberts, Johnson's proposition to com
pel county supervisors of assessment to
furnish two sureties Instead of one, as
proposed by the code, and Mr. Jacob
son's amendment providing for the dis
tribution of penalties and interest on de
lrnquent tax settlements.
The trouble was precipitated by Mr
Roberts who bobbed up with an Amend
ment to keep the water power companies
out of the classification as public service
franchise corporations. He insistei that
-,^"^"r-r L _. „... ,_. -J- ' •"'" Z^Kfk
IN THE GALLERY OF THE HOUSE.
there is no franchise in the water pow
er which goes with the riparian rights,
and that the code, if adopted, would
work a great injury to cone.ins which
would be arbitrarily declared to be en
joying franchises which do not exist.
Mr. Roberts' arguments brought out Mr.
Dobbin, who jumped on Roberts, by in
ference, as a corporation lawyer. Mr.
Dobbin said the commissioners who in
serted the clause Mr. Roberts would have
stricken knew their business, and if
there were any injury worked by it con
trary to the constitution the supreme
court would protect the sufferers. He
-~- ,:l- ■-''■'*'"-.--" SENATO?? l^f Arthur - ; :: . - ,
■■'■■:■- V.1- ." ..:. • —- ; --:j"; •■■•--■ i .. -„ _ •-.:•, ; . --.■ - -
AMONG THE SENATOBS.
PRICE TWO CENT3~-{: g? v |" c 'g^
insisted that the clause was a safe
guard to protect the individual against
the corporations.
Mr. Roberts came back at Dobbin by
charging him with" a disposition to make
the bill as bad as possible, so that its
ultimate defeat would be assured. He
summed up by declaring, as he shook his
fist at Dobbin in-particular and the house
in general, "You fellows want to raise
the devil and defeat the bill." Mr. Dob
bin returned the retort courteous by
admitting that he did not know as much
about protecting public service franchises
as Mr. Roberts, because he was not a
corporation lawyer. Continuing, Mr. Dob
bin said: "I have repeatedly said that
I am in favor of the enactment of a
just and equitable bill. I intend to vote
for the bill and probably shall, and I
do not want the gentleman to impute
bad faith on my part because I insist
that these taxdodgers should be made
to pay their just share of the taxes. I
want the bill properly amended and pass
ed, but I do not propose to vote to aid
the professional taxdodger."
Couldn't Hear Sweet.
J. Sweet, representative, broke in with
a rambling discourse by which he in
timated that he would show that Mr.
Roberts was being shamefully mistreat
ed. He got just about that far along,
when the speaker broke in upon his elo
quence with the statement that the de
bate should be confined to the subject un
der consideration. Mr. Sweet attempted
to tell the speaker what his rights In the
"^"^ t****^4. Gyrf- -*/
REPRE/SEXTATIVK SAM D. lIIUKIt.
premises were, when Dowling cut him
short with the uncomforting information
that "The chair will rule that the dtbate
be confined to the subject under con
sideration." It was one of the very few
instances in which Dowling has attempt
ed to exercise the peremptory peroga
tives of his position, but he went at it
in a business-like manner, and his de
termination was announced in a man
ner that caused Sweet to lapse into in
nocuous desuetude. There were twenty
minutes of general wrangling before the
house got a chance to vote on the prop
osition, and then it was beaten with a
vote so decisive that the walls of the
hall rung to the echo. Mr. Roberts had
two or three similar amendments, which
were disposed of in the same manner so
rapidly that he confined himself entirely
for the next few minutes to fixing gram
matical and typographical errors of the
bill. He secured two amendments, which
were requested by the county auditors.
On provides that the triplicate tax state-
• : ■
ments or receipts be made at one opera
tion by the use of carbons or other copy
ing device, and the other that taxpayers
may not receive the proposed pay state
ments until they are ready to pay their
taxes.
Layboarn Breaks In.
Then came Mr. Laybourn with his
grain in elevator amendments. His
amendments he claimed were calculated
to protect from assessment only grain in
transit which might be stored in the ele
vators at the date of listing, but the
Continued on Seventh Page.
COAST STATES
SNOWBOUND
STORMS STOP BISIXESS FROM \K\v
. YORK CITY CLEAR TO
GEORGIA
NATIONAL CAPITAL ISOLATED
Telegraphic Communication Secured
by Way of Atlanta, and All Train*
Entering: City Are Many
Hours Late.
PHILADELPHIA IS CUT OFF
NEW YORK, Feb. 21.-Snow, followed
by rain and sleet today created in thfa
city and vicinity ■ the most disagreeabi*
conditions known in many years.
South and west of New York the tele
graph and telephone wires were proa
trated early in the afternoon, and al
though conditions improved somewhat be
tween New York and Chicago late in the
evening, communication, by wire with
Philadelphia and Baltimore was cut ofl
absolutely. Slow communication was re
stored with Washington, D. C by wav
of Atlanta.
During the early hours of the day
heavy, wet snow fell for several hours.
Shortly after noon the snow turned into
a steady drizzle of rain.
During the evening the temperature
dropped enough to turn the downpour of
rain into a eoa..ng of ice over buildings
and trees. In the parks the branches of
the trees were ruined by breaking under
weight cf the ice. Traffic on the Brook
lyn bridge was almost at a standstill.
Fifth avenue was a sheet of ice. Jt was
early descried by carriages and by mid
night nothing save an occasional auto
mobile was to be seen on the thorough
fare.
In Broadway, after theaters, the sc< W
was one of great confusion. Cabs ami
carriages drawn up in front of the the
aters were handled with great difficulty.
Jersey City by 10 o'clock at night was
practically in darkness. Electric wires
were down in every part of the city. .
At Newark the streets were ankle deep
in slush.
WASHIXGTOX 13 CUT OFF.
Telegraphic Communication With
Capital Stopped for Many Houi-h.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.—A severe sleet
storm struck Washington today and to
night the national capital is absolutely
cut off from all telegraphic or telephonic
communication north of Baltimore aiui
is compelled to depend on uncertain
wires to Richmond,VVa t and Atlanta, Ga.,
for reaching the country at large. Aside
from damage to wires, however, the
storm did no in-jury. The storm came
from the South and in traveling North
thi rain turned into sleet and snow as
it struck the colder latitudes. It is said
at the weather bureau that the storm will
reach the New England coast Saturday
morning and will make it necessary for
shipping to lie by. Clearing weather is
expected in Washington and vicinity to
morrow.
Trains on all railroads entering Wash
ington are from two to three hours late.
HIS'PHONE WIRELESS
IJfVEXTOR HOPES TO TALK FROM
MLXCIE, IXD., TO CHICAGO
STATION
SUCCEEDS IN LOCAL TESTS
Service Inaugurated Over a Space of
One-Half Mile Lead* to a More
Elaborate and Remarka
ble Experiment,
MUNCIE, Ind., Feb. 21.—Arthur J.
Bolen, of Muncie, who claims to have
invented a wireless telephone system, is
taking out incorporation papers for the
International Wireless Telephone com
pany. Bolen is an electrician, and hia
invention is the result of many years of
experiments.
He will make his first test of long
service between a smokestack of a
Muncie factory and the Stevenson build
ing at Indianapolis and the Masonic tem
ple, Chicago, and it will be made as soon
as the equipment can arrive. Similar ap
paratus has been used successfully in
Muncie over a half-mile of space.
WU IN AN ANGRY MOOD
QUARRELS WITH ADVOCATE OK
EXCLUSION LAW.
NEW YORK, Feb. 21.—Wu Ting Yang,
f Chinese minister to the United States.
■ and James D. Phelan, former mayor of
I San Francisco, had an exciting colloquy
i on the subject of Chinese exclusion in
the corridor of an up-town hotel today.
Mr. Phelan was one of a delegation that
visited Washington to urge re-f naetion of
! the exclusion act and holds pronounced
1 views on the subject.
He and the minister met by ehan c,
and after renewing recollections of a
: former meeting at the Bohemian club in
1 San Francisco, expressed their views in
j tones that attracted a crowd. They qui
j eted down before they parted, and the
I minister in conclusion said:
"You ki:ow about the subject, now that
I ha\»e talked to you."
WOMEN HONOR MARTYRS
WANT DAY OF PRAYER SET AS IDF,
IX THEIR HONOR.
WASHINGTON, Feb. a.—The' convention
at the Daughters of the American Rev
t lulion today, upon the motion of Mrs.
Stratton. of Minnesota, unanimously
; adopted the following resolution:
"Resolved, That we recommend to eon-
I Kress that the Sunday following the
: birthday of our late beloved President
i AlcKlnley be set apart as a day of
prayer in memory of our martyred pres
idents—Lincoln, as the master mind, the
great-hearted emancipator whom we all
revere; Garfield, and, particularly, Mc-
Kinley, the man beloved by the people
as possessing all the virtues of heart and
mind that combine to make one good and
great. We suggest Sunday, so that the
memory of these men may year by year
be associated with thoughts of our duty
as citizens to live nobler and purer
lives."

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