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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 22, 1902, Image 10

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M. D. FLOWEJR, Pros. ■ ■H. B. CARROLL, Gen. Suj»t.
ST. PAUL UNION STOCK YARDS,
South St. Paul, Minn.
Best Equipped and Most AdvantasPnus Market for the Shippers In «he
Northwest—Connected With All the Railroads.
1,000 BEEVES AND 5,000 HOGS WANTED DAILY.
CHAS. L, HAAS COMMISSION COMPANY
live STOOK GOiSISSJOa iERQHISn,
Rccm (9 Exchange Bldg., Union Stock Yards. So- St. Paul, Minn
and Ur.ion Stock Yards, Chicago, 111.
All correspondence will receive prompt attention. Liberal advances made on con* •
slgnments. References—Union Stock Yards or any Commercial Agency.
WILL. THI'ET. " FRANK THIET.
THISFT RRIIC live stock
■ ■■•*& I Dllu9ip Commission Merchants,
Located In Chicago 111., So. Omaha, Xeb.,Sfoux City, la., So. St. Paul Minn
SO. ST. PAUL—Cattle Salesmen—Frank Thuet, ■C. L. Kaye B. B. Mosher.
Hop: Salesman—P. J. Gibbons. Sheep Salesman, Fred Foxley '
StnX EYT£?^ CEiH? atl2?» Live o Stock Bank- Union stock Yards. Chicago;
TirtUi V\h S ,a'L S°-o- aulJ St Paul National Bank, St. Paul; U. S.
Lards National Bank, So. Omaha; Live Stock National Bank, Sioux City.
Kenneth Clark, Pres. J. J. Flanagan, Vice Pres, W. E. Brig 2 s, Secy, and Trsis-
St. Paul Cattle Loan GO.
Exchange Hid-?., fouth St. Paul, Minn.
WILL FURNISH MOXEY OX LIBERAL TERMS to feeders of cattle and to
those in Minnesota and adjoining states wanting to get a start in raising cattle
or add to their present holdings. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
•South\ St Paul <£ii?e Stock
jTnd Outside Cattte Markets.
SOUTH ST. PAUL, Feb. 21.—Receipts
at the Union stock yards today (.estimat
ed) were: Cattle, 175; calves, 25; hogs,
sheep. 3,500; cars, 39.
Otiicial receipts yesterday: Cattle, 591;
calves. S3; hogs, 1,713; sheep, 138; horses,
4; cars, 43.
Receipts thus far in February, com
pared with the same period in 1901, are
as follows:
Feb.,1902. Feb.,1901. Gain.
Cattle a.r^i 5,741 *13
Calves ..- l.lsS - 1,844 »6Sb
Hogs 41.122 34,516 6.608
Sheep 30,153 8,936 21,217
Horses 57 99 *42
Cars .. 955 523 162
Receipts thus far in 1902, compared with
the same penod in l»01, are as follows:
_ , 1902. 1901. Gain.
Cattle 20,504 20,376 128
Calves .. 2,774 3,504 *7SO
Ho 115.151 33,986 21,168
Sheep .. 92,5^5 54,788 37.730
Horses ".. 89 333 *244
Car's 2,655 2,192 483
*Loss.
Hogs.
Comparative receipts:
Total lor today (estimated) 1,500
A week ago . 2,910
A year ago 1,375
Quotations: Underweight and light,
$5.25!§6;. mixed and butchers. $5.7506.25•
heavy, $5.75#6.50; boars, $2.50*53: stags,
$4.i0@5.25; pigs, $4.50@5.10.
•Market opened a big 5c higher, and
closed firm and active at the advance.
Receipts moderate. Quality was general
ly only fair, about the same as Thursday,
but the best hogs on sale were quite a
little batter. Prices ranged from $5.60@
$<5.20; bulk. $3.80@5.95; pigs and under
weights, $4.5C(g>5.50. Representative sales:
_ Lights— _
No. Wt.DkgTPrice.iNo. Wt.Dkg.Price. ;
40 188 •■ $5.55|11 173 .. $5.70
75 ...,....-198 .. 5.55J64 190 .. 5.N0
16 160 .. 5.60J54 ..........184 .. 5.80
22 ISS •■ 5.70,80 195 SO 5.65
86 ...._;_.... 180 40 5.551
Mixed and Butchers— ~~
E6 200 .. $5.55|33 ." 239 160 $6.C0
•0 237 .. 6.05|72 220 .. 6.95
M ........ 200 40 5.90121 200 .. 0.80
IS 212 SO 5.90123 226 .. 5 l!(i
17 219 .. 5.80| 8 242 .. 5.50
92 209 80 5.95179 210 SO 3.80
hJ- ........ .. 5.95|81 202 120 5.95
_ Heavy— ' ~~
€5 .. .7.~m"W%171Q\23 198 .. 16.13
If 260 .. 5.90J27 265 .. 5.90
£9 ........ 202_.._5.95;67 259 .. 6.20
Pigs and Underweights— ~~
*6 ........ 123~'.r55.03] S ........ 142 .. 15.35
4 140 40 5.00 :. 130 .. s*o
7 153 .. 5.40 ! 4 132 .. STO
" 110 .. 5.40 2 ;.. 150 .. 5.50
Cattle.
Comparative receipts:
Total for Today (estimated) 200
A week ago 3g5
A year ago ...* .....205
Quotations: Fiincy butcher steer®, $5 50
6T6.10; prime, $5@5.40; good to choice,
$4.-JO(S\.M; common to fair, $3@4 75;
fancy butcher cows and heifers, $4*.60@5
--prime, $4-9.4.50; good to choice, $3.25@3.90;
common to fair, . 52.90^3.2-3; canners and
cutters, Sl.seg-2.55; .. good to choice
butcher bulls.. $2.7%:;. 75; common and
bologna bulls. $2572.70: good to choice
veals, $s.2T>{/t:.25; common to fair, $4@5;
god to choice feeding steers, $3.50@4.25;
common to fair. ?2.50jr.U0; good to choice
stock steers, $3@3.60; corrffnon to fair,
$2.50^2.30; steer calves, $2.50@3.35; good
to choice stock cows and heifers, $2.75@
3; common to fair, . $2.25i§2.65; heifer!
calves, $2.20@3; stock and "feeding bulls,
52.25@2.75; good to choice milch cows and
springers, ?32@40; common to fair. $25@30.
Receipts of all kinds light. Butcher j
cattle in good demand, with cow stuff
generally strong to 10c higher and steers |
strong. Veals steady and active. Stock- '
ere and feeders move readily at stcadv
prices. All the better quality stuff well
cleared out Representative sales:
Common to Fair Batcher Steers-
No. Wt. Price.
2 .... - : L . .1170 $|.7>
Common to Fair Butcher Steers—i ~
No. Wt Price?! No". Wt. Price.
6 1112 $4,50 1 1060 4.00
1. 920 3.00 1 1410 4.00
1 •• 1027 4.35 2 1060 3.75
Butcher Cows and Heifers—
1 ..... .......1180 $3,751 1 ..112013.85
1 H9O 4.50! 1035 3.65
1 090 3.00 1 940 3.00 !
f. 1025 2.9014 1077 3.60
1 ....'.1150 i.m 3 1005 3.10
1 ............1180 3.50 5 1102 4.25
4 1062 3.1512 1200 3.50
1 ..1440 4.15) -
Cutters— _ - ~ _
"2 7725 $2.50! 1 1030 $2.35
2 880 2.COJ 1 940 2.60
Canncrs — ~~
"2 ... .TT.. 900 $2.00! 1 .7.777...... 710 $2.00
< ... 1022 2.00] 1 > 359 2.25
Fat and Bologna Bulls— ~
1 ..... ."777:1330 $2.90 "l ............ 710 $1725
1 ..;.1370 3.25! 1 800 2.50
1 1070 3.00 1 1340 3.25 1
1 1430 3.75: 2 1215 3.00 I
Veals— -■>■■-,-".■ ': - - £ I
2".....: 100 &M 1 1 130*5.00 !
y . „_. - l: - ■•.-. I*o 0.00 l 1 „... 180 4.25
Stackers aud Feeders— '
"2 .... ."7T77777 eaol37oo!io C7B $3.50
A •-:-. v l: •fl4^ %9 a < 6 633 3.45
Stcer^ Calves— "~
\ —li imi^igJMi^L^ ••• • • '350 $3:25
Common and Tailings—Steers—
10 355 $2.00] 7 ............ 432 $2.25
W.H. CAMPBELL
COMMISSION COMPANY
live StGuk Commission Merchants
Union Stock Yards,
SOUTH ST. PAUL,
t^jnslgamerits cr.d corrospcnd.mc» a».
I.ciiea tl&rkel reports furnished en ap
plication.
We do a strictly commission business.
r»o live dtoc< bought or sold on our own
Kererpnces - Stock Yards bank. South
V m£U'; "^t.v bank. Zurnbrota; Hoc.
IT««: *^qcrn«r, slate treasurer, Capitol
bulMmj? .at ■•PfuS: A. G. Andersen, cash-
Ur. St £dul National osiAz. Ht. Paul.
SUMMER & THOMAS
LIVE STOCK BROKERS.
Orders taken for all kinds of live stock
and time given to responsible parties.
Correspondence solicited.
SOLTH ST. PALL, SIOUX CITY,
Minnesota. lowa.
Suck Cows and Heifers— '■
2 515 $3.00 7 616 $2.65
3 677 _2 80. 2 ....265 2.70
Heifer Calves— ' ■
6 412 12.601 3 ........... 443 $2.75'
Common and Tailings—Heifers—
3 7~503~52.40; iTTT7.7T77rrr~296~5~2~00~
Stock and Feeding Bulls—
1 •• •• ....i. 940 $2.75
Milch Cows and Springers—
1 cow and 1 calf $35.00
1 cow and 1 calf 28.00
Sheep. • .-:; . *-
Comparative receipts:
Total for today (estimated) 3 500
A week ago 3,587
A year ago ........... 1 .. 2
Quotations: Fancy lambs, $5.75@6.25;
gcod to choice fat lambs, $5@5.60j fair
to good fat lambs, $4.75@5;' feeqing lambs
S-i^o; thin buck lambs, $3(54; good to
choice yearling wethers, $4.50@5.25; good
to choice heavy wethers, $4.25@4.75; fair
to good wethers $4@4.25; good to choice
far ewes, medium weight, $3.75@4.50; thin
heavy weights, $3.25#3.60; fair to" good
fat ewes, $3@3.25; common killers, $2.75@
3; good to choice stock and feeding ewes",
$2.2t-@2.75; fair to good, $2@2.25; common
to old "skates," $I@2. .
Western feeders: Lambs. $4@5; ewes
$2.25@2.75; wethers, $2.50-@4.50.
Receipts liberal, but entirely feeding
stuff, and not placed on sale. Prices on
all kinds quoted fully steady. Repre
sentative sales: •
Killing Sheep and Lambs-
No. Kind. wt. Price.
1 yearling wether ..............140 $5 50
So lambs ; 77 | oq
Among the shippers on the market
were. C. V. Vassau, Forest River; R.
Spatz, New Germany; J. Hegerle. Ft
Bonifacius; W. Rolf. Bongards; C S.
Richards, ..Stewart; H. Shen. Lakevile
C Black, 2\\elch; F. Gibbons, Mantor
ville; J. F. Powers, Renova; Canton
Bros. Watson; J. H. Person, Montevideo
-11. W. Nelson, North wood; Nelson &
Co., Hanska; , Dunham & Carpenter,
JanesviHe; OS. Thurston. Judson; Col
burn & Co.. Garvin; H. A. Anderson S
A- Berg, New Richland; S. H. Pertis St
Peter; C O. Martin. Lewisville; A.' A
Buiidy, Madelia; T. H. Damman, 'Plato.
Midway Horse Market.
MINNESOTA TRANSFER St Paul
Minn -Barrett & Zimmerman report that
the revival m trade from Manitoba has
a most active tone and constitutes a
mirtJt rC I- ta =e, Of *>usiiK« a done on this
marKet. 1 arm horses were -plentiful and
buying resumed actively. Values-
Drafters, extra ' tu&ft^nn
Drafters, choice .. 125^1«
Drafters, common to good '.'.'.'.'..'. lOOttill
I: arm mares, extra ......V....WJ." "v'-^f ,
Farm ares choice y.'.'.'.':.:'.: 100&125
Farm mares, common to g00d.... 75@1C0
Chicago Live Stock. -
- ICA?0' Feb. • 21.--Cattle-Receipts,
0.500; active- and steady; good fo prime
steers, $6.50@7.20; poor to medium, $4@6.40:
peckers and feeders, $2,5085; cows. $1.25®
5.46; heifers. $2.50@5.50; canners, $I.2s<ffi2
bulls, $2.50®4.f10; calves, $2.50@6 75; TeVas
te<\ steers, $4.75@5.75. HoCT-Reoeiots
today. 28,000; tomorrow. 21.0* v l^ft over
4..XX); active and strong to 5c higher; mix!
rcavv UB%« ?- t5 -%- 6°: BS>oS to choice
reavj, $0.z0a6.4a; rough heaw $,<\tai\ -.-
Ught, $5.80©6; bulk sales, 'fS.S "I'
Sheep-Receipts, 7,000; shaep steady
lambs weak to 10c lower; good to choice
sLS/^ ?4lD(&0-2a; fair to thoifo mixed,
ki^t-fj f. tern, sheep and yearlings
5*.50@5.60j native lambs, $3.7:®:-65- west
ern lambs, $5.25@6.50 •'-«**■• ■». west-
Official yesterday: Receipts-Cattle
10, ao; hogs, 27,056; sheep, 10,136 Shin'
"972. t&~Cattie> 4 232 hOSS' 6 1 55; *££>'
OTHER LIVE STOCK 3HABKETS.
Kansas City, Mo.—Cattle—Receipts, 3.C00
; head active and strong; beef steers, $6®
l^i 7- exans' H.25@5.75; cows and heifers,
*S&*.la; strikers and .feeders, $3.50<54.90.
Receipts, 7,500; market strong-" and
dc higher; heavy, $5.2<)@6.35; Packers,
$a.50@6.20; medium. $5.80@6.20; yorkers
$5.35©6; pigs, $4.50@5.30. Sheep-Receipts'
fa°mbs m$ a6S:t ady: SheeP $4- @5-60!
* St. Louis. Mo.—Cattle—Receipts, " 1,000
--market steady for natives: beef steers
$3.60@6.35; Texans, $3.25@5.65; stockers and
feeders, |2.65@4.50; cows and heifers $2 "5
@5.25. Hogs-Receipts, 5.000; market 5c
higher; pigs, $0.55@6; packers, $5.95@6.15;
butchers, $6.15@6.45. Sheep—Receipts 500:
ROGERS &ROGERS,
LIVE STOCK COIYIMISSIOiN MERCHANTS.
Room 21 Exchange Building, South St. Paul, Minnesota.
Highest market prices obtained for stock. Prompt attention given to all corre
spondence and orders. References: Any commercial agency.
U/EEKLY MAKRET LETTER.
South St. Paul, Feb. 21.
CATTLE--There has been an excellent
demand for c.l kinds of killing cattle at ail
times this week. Prices 0:1 steer stuff,
especially the better gir-des, have been
strong, while ail kinds of 00w stuff have
sold strong to a shade higher. A part at
the decline on canners, which came the
latter part of last week, has been re
gained. Veals steady and active. There
has been considerable more activity in the
etocker and feeder trade than last week.
Receipts have beer, rather light and it
has been necessary to import cattle from
other points to fill orders. Prices are
really no higlier than the latter p*rt of
last week, but have ruled strong and
firm. Buyers have been more liberal In
sorting and the yards ore well cleared
iflE ST. PAUL GUIBS, SATDKUAY, FJSI3KUAKY 22, 19Q3.
market strong; sheep, $3.90@5.35; lambs,
$5.30@fi.85.
South Omaha—Cattle—Receipts, 1.900;
active and stronger; beef steers, $4@6.50;
Texans, $3.60(a4.60; cows and heifers, $3@
5; canners, $i.50@2.75; stockers and feed
ers, $2.50@4.60. Hogs—Receipts, 8,200; mar
ket 5c lower; heavy, $6(??6.20; mixed, $5.55@
5.95; pigs. $4155.50. Sheep—Receipts, 7CO;
Steady; sheep, $3@5.90; lambs, $5ft6.40.
STOCKS, BONDS
* AND MONEY.
NEW YORK, Feb. 21.—The action of
tlie stock marKet this morning demon
strated pretty conclusively that specula
tive sentiment had overcome the shock
caused by yesterday's unexpected an
nouncement of the contemplated proceed
ings against the Northern Securities com
pany. Stocks held on margin and by
timid headers had apparently been sold
out yesterday, and the forced liquidation
completed, there was very little need for
supported orders in the market this
morning:. It was generally supposed that
stocks bought yesterday for support had
been unloaded on the rally, as insiders
game.i confidence that no serious break
in prices was pending. At the opening
the market was heavy, but by the second
hour the selling had fallen to such small
proportions that the market was practi
cally stagnant. At the same time there
were points of resistance, and a few
stocks gained additional strength as the
day progressed, and led to a substantial
rally, which placed prices quite generally
above last night's close. The issuance of
the bank seemed to be the turning point.
The cash item was practically unchanged
instead of the expected decrease of over
$1,000,000, and the restriction of the loan
expansion to less than $5,000,000 reassur
ed the uneasy sentiment that credit re
sources were being taken up at too head
long a pace. The call money rate eased
off to 2 per cent under the showing of
the bank statement, and the reduced re
quirements for speculative purposes.
The cessation of forced liquidation and
the development of strength in a number
of stocks drove the shorts to cover. A
report that J. P. Morgan had gone to
Washington to confer with President
Roosevelt, gave traders comfort. The
Colorado & Southwestern stock became
very strong at the last on a volume of
trading unpredecedented for those stocks.
Their gains reached three points or bet
ter. Good dividend prospects was alleged
as the reason for the advance. Chicago,
Indianapolis & Louisville also rose 3Mn
and the preferred 1% on reported dividend
prospects. Amalgamated copper was
erratic, rising at one time over a point,
but closing practically unchanged. Man
hattan also failed to hold its full gain of
V/ - American snuff rose 5 and the pre
ferred 2. North-Western recovered 4%,
of yesterday's loss. United States Rub
ber stocks were strong. Outside of these
the striking gains were in less prominent
stocks. Renewed strength in the ex
change market corroborated the expecta
tion that more gold will be exported next
week.
Bonds were rather dull and irregular.
Total sales, par value, $2,385,000.
The routine news of the week has given
no cause for anxiety, but rather for en
couragement in the activity of the iron
trade, a rather larger movement of grain
and prosperous general trade conditions.
The bond market has been relatively
rrcre active than stocks, and values were
enly slightly affected by the late weak
ness in stocks, outside of some of the
highly speculative issues.
United States refunding 2s advanced %.
the 3s coupon %, 3s registered %, the 5s
y., and the old 4s y 8 per cent over the
closing call of last week.
The announced determination of the
authorities at Washington to take legal
steps against the Northern Securities
co<jany on the ground that it was form
ed in violation of the Sherman anti-trust
law of 1890 upset the stock market on
Thursday, and superseded every other
consideration. Previous to that time'
there had been a dull and spotty market,
with individual stocks advancing sharp
ly and the general undertone firm. This
was due to the disinclination of holders
to sell as much as to lack of marked de
mand for stocks. Mow far the new
turn of affairs in Jlbrthern Securities
may ultimately affect the market is dif
ficult to foresee. Those whose substan
tial interests were most at stake were
large buyers of stocks in the flurry of
Thursday, while the sellers were almost
whoiiy the speculators on margin, Some
of them of important character. It is in
variably the iule, however, that substan
tial interests come to the support of
values of properties in which they are
interested in time of crisis, without any
purpose of obtaining stocks for perma
nent holding. The same thing was seen
a. the time of President McKinley's as
sassination and in last May's panic. The
assumption among speculators in Wall
street, that the establishment of the
status of the Northern Securities com
pany would remove all the repressive in
f.uences upon speculation and restore
conditions to the state that interrupted
by the Northern Pacific quarrel, takes
no account of the fact that values were
inflated by over-speculation last May,
and that the events that that speculation
was intended to discaunt have since
come to pass, or have been demonstrat
ed to be idle rumors and canards. Not
much thought has been given as to ho w
far the actual condition of property val
ues would be affected by the overthrow
of the Northern Securities company. It
is not clear that the actual changes and
divisions of control which effected by the
Northern Pacific contest would be al
tered by dissolving the company.
The flotation of the Northern Securi
ties company might supposably be de
feated, without threatening the renewal
of the transcontinental railroad conflict.
The cause for depression wnleh some dis
cern in the proceeding against the
Northern Securities company lies in the
supposition that it is intended to test
the efficacy of the existing law in the
case and then lend the power of the ad
ministration to amending it, if neces
sary, to make it effective against the
formation ol great financial combina
tions. The programme thus foreshadow
ed would not be regarded with equanim
ity by any large financial interest, and a
reflection of misgiving would be respect
ed in the securities market for an in
definite period.
Stocks.
lS'l'sjHi'h|Low|L.B.
Atchison .. ..110400 75%J 75%} 7E%
do pfd .. .! 3?00| 97 | S6%| 96%
Baltimore & Ohio ....:.Jll4OO 103%!l02 14 j 103
do pfd... .......I ,100 £3%! 93%) 93%
Can. Pacific .: | 4001 114% j 114 |114%
Can. Southern ......... | SCO S6 186 85%
Ches. & Ohio I 1000 15*41 45 | 4514
Chicago & Alton | 8200 1 37%) 37 I 37%
do pfd .. I 200 76% 7614 76%
Chi., Ind. & L0ui5...... 14460 64V" 60% 64
Chi. &. East. 11l ] 600 140% 139%|140%
Chi. Great Western.. 1400] 23%; 23Vii 23%
do A pfd 1.....J 1..... 84%
do B pfd 200 45 i 45 45%
Chi. & North-Western | 1500 218%1215 215
Chi., R. I. & Pac ...... j SCO 161 1159%! 161
Chi. Term. & Trans ..| 600 16 | 15% 15%
do pfd j 200 31 ! 30% 31
C. C, C. & St. Louis..i 20501100%: 99%!100%
Col. Southern ........... 79100] 20% | 17% j £OL40 L 4
do Ist pfd I 6200 69% 66 | 68%
do 2d pfd 106001 36% | 33% 36%
Dela. & Hudson 400172 171% 171%
I>ela. Lack. & W. . 6001283 1280 282
Den. & R. Grande .... 200 43% 43% 43%
do pfd I 500 91%1 91% 91%
I Erie ..: 18400 38% 37% I 35%
do Ist pfd J 15001 65% 67% 1 65^
do 2d pfd | 5001 £6 | 55% 55%
of everything. Milch cows steady and
active.
HOGS—The market ruled a good 5
cents higher today with light receipts
averaging fair in quality and including'
some g-ood hogs, although nothing choice,
Good heavy hogs, the best on sale,
brought $6.20. Fancy heavy hogs would
easily have sold at |6.20@6.30. The mar
ket has been a decidedly satisfactory one
all we^k and our prices have averaged 10
cents above any other Western point.
SHEEP—Receipts have been light,'not
enough to meet the demands of the pack
ers. The demand for good quality stuff of
all kinds was never better and prices are,
right down the line, strong *at last week's
close. Common stock and feeding stuff 13
salable but does not move readily.
Very truly,
ROGERS & ROGERS.
We give special attention to out-of-town investment and
speculativß accounts. Our private wires and our connections
with all of the principal exchanges enable us to give prompt
and accurate service. Correspondence invited.
JAMES OMAN & GO. ™F St, Paul, Minn.
Gt. Northern pfd v.» f.v;pEoo 184 1183 V. 184%
Hocking Valley ........ I 900 67% 66% 6/'
do ptd -- ......... J~..;j 400| 84 | S3*. ■ b3%
Illinois Central ... >*.: | >20W> ( 139^1138% ' 139%
lowa Central .......^;,:#4001 84 I 83% i 83%
,do pfd ..V..r'-SoO 79 | 76 "j 79
L.Erie & Western _-...j_ 400] 67 | 66 j 67 ;
do pfd .. -.....:....-5i.;;»...)..... .....1131
Louis. &■ Nash ........| 2600|104% 103% 104%
Manhattan L ...'..) 91001134 1132% 133 &
Metropolitan St. Ry~.-;|;SsCO|i6S%fl67%
Mexican Central ' ...... | kl4oo| 28% l 28 j 2i%
Mexican-National .."..,..( - 3QOJ 16%| 16%1 16y 8
Minn. & St. Louis ....[. 8001109% 108 -109%
Missouri Pacific ....'.... |{7200|102%|101%j102%
Mo., Kansas & T ..*?i:; |' 500 21%' 24% 24%
do pfd ...... ........ I'llOOj 54% -53% 54
New Jersey Central....| : 200j192 192 193
New York Central ....j 3001i63 162- 1162%:
Norfolk & Western .... 1700; 56% 56 I 56%
do pfd ..:.............. | 300! 90 - 190 9u
Ontario & Western ..j sisoo 33% i 33% 30%
Pennsylvania ... ........ !11000|149%|148% 149%
Reading .. ...........134400! 56% £5% £6%
*do'l st pfd..... I 1000 81% 81 W| 81%
*tt 2d / f« •.•.-128S00 68% 66% 68?
St. L. & S. Francisco..! 1000|6<% 59y 2 60%.
do Ist pfd ......|.....|..... .;... i i 3%
do 2d pfd .. .... I 14001 73 71% 73%
St. Louis Southwestern! ,100| 26 • | 16 i 25%
do pfd .. 1 40Oj 59%| 58% 1 s'<%-
St: P3-"1 ••. - • •■• •• • •■120100j163%|162% 163%
-5 d° + iP £d '™*• ••• I lOOUSS%IIBS% iSk%
Southern Pacilic .......|45000[ 61%| 63% 64%
Southern Railway ...... \ 3.00 32% 32% 3i%
T do ptd ... ..r............j 1300! £5% 85 95%
Texas & Pacihc I 5300| 40% 40 40yt
T°ledo- St. L. & W | 3.0 3i%! 21 21%
do pfd | iooj 41 | W,
U^ lOn f F™ itiC 135800 101% 100H MU
WaV/g .■:::;;:.•• 2.00|23% :3%U3%
intfflrTXSta-as; S3 42% ! ,42-,. 42%
Wheelmgr & Lake Erie 20C0 £0 18« t^k\
do pfd .. 1500 32%) 31 i 32%
Wisconsin Central .... 300 20% 19% 20ii
Ad am p s M..v:.v.v::::::::: m HHIP
American .. " ''| *" \™-
United^States 266 iii" Hi" 114
TVells-Farg-o .. ..... . I*}
Amalgamated Copper .21100 70% '68% 69%
Amer.^Car & Foundry. 100 28% 25% 25%-
American Linseed Oil.| SI? 21% W<
do pfd 100 49 49 43
Amer. Smelt. : & Rsfln. 300 46% 45% 46
do pfd -....; ij;;x 200 97% 9714 97%
Anaconda Mining Co,' 3fßoj 33 3i% 32yt
Brooklyn Rap. Trans, | SO;JOj 62 61% 61%
.Colorado Fuel & Iron: 800 85% .84% 86%
1 Consolidated Gas '.... | :2,00 22C% 213 220%"
Cont. Tobacco pfd^,.. 116% 116% lie 7?
General Electric . .. *.., , % 2(K» 2b9 288 289%
Glucose Sugar ............ . 43 v*
Hocking Coal .... r ,-.,. -400 17"-' }"lY j 16%
International Paper ..|.\.. 20
Tdo pfd l. ;.:. 0 166 '75% *75%' 75%
International Power . ;v «c
Laclede Gas ...JU... xl" V"' "'" 051/
National Biscuit v.-i I 400 47% 47* 47
NatSs^lf ••-- -CO 17^ 17^ 17 "
do pfd '.'.'...*.'.'. :;: "•■ •! <%
North American .;.;.': ICO '91% :9i% 92
Pacific Coast «... t . '■ 791/
Pacific Mail +.. 500 *4s"' ] 45% 46%
People's Ga5...... £... r 800 £9-/ 93% 993?
Pressed Steel 1 Car .V... 10, 39 /8 39 % 39%
do pfd .......v.....^... ;....[.. . 82
Pullman Palace Car...; -3001220 2*6" 218
Republic Steel .......V. | 1000! 16% 16 16%
do pfd ! 1800 70% 63% 69%
Sugar ;.... 16803 129% 128% 129%
Tennessee Coal & Iron 9900 68% ! 66% 67%
Union Bag & Paper Co 200 16% 16% 16%
T ,do pfd • I 200 80 80. 75
United States Leather. &<)j 11% 11% 11%
do pfd ••••• 501) 81% 81% 81%
United States Leather 55C01 16% 15% 16%
--do pfd .. I ]30;i| 58 155% 57
United States Steel... 14900 44 1 43% i 43% '
„d ° 7 fd, ••••••• £623S 94%j 93% 91%
Western Union ........ | 400 £0%l 9J%| 90%
American Locomotive .I 600 31%! 31 3 L
-i - Pfd.... 1 1001 92% j 92% j 92%
xEx-dividend. : ~T r ~~~ -
Total sales tor the day, 573,200 shares.
Bonds. ;:
U S. ref.2s.reg.lo9 H. Valley-4%5;. ;109%"
. d°, coup 103 L. &N. uni. 4s. 101%
do 3s, reg 10S»i Mex. Cent. 4s .. 8"v«
do coup 108% do Ist inc. .... 3oi£
do new 4s,reg.l3:n 8 M. & S. L 45..105
do coup 1391* M., K. & T. 45.. 99%
do old 4s, reg.l^V,, do 2ds ......:.. &£
do coup. ......mi* N. Y. C. lsts...lO3ia
do ss, reg ....106V2 do gen. 31ae...108
coup 106V s N. J. C. g. 55....136%
Atch. gen. is ..104^ N. P. 4s ........105^
do adj. 4s .... 93Vj do 3s r.... 74^
B- & O. 4s ...... 104% (N. & W. c. 45..10314
do 3^s ........ %\ 2 Reading gen. 4s. 99^
do cony. 4s ..106' /2 S. L. & 1:M.c.55.117%
Can. South. 2ds.llO^ ;i. L. & S. F.4s. 98
C. of G. 5s :..... 11l $. L. S.W. . 2ds.. 98%
■^do Ist inc. .... 79iil do 2ds ........ 79*,
C. & 0.-4%g-,...110 p. -A. & A.P.4S. 02
C. & A. 3^s .. 8414 South. Pac. 45.. 94%
£•',?• &£- n-4s - 96 {south. Ry. 5s ..120V
C..M & S P g.45.113^ T. & P. 15t5....120%
£' -p^r N.-W.c.78.139% r., S.L. & W.4s. 85
C..R.1. &P. 45..111 U. P. 4s ... 1057-
CCC. & 5.L.g.45.103^ do cony. 4s ....10614
Chi. Term. 45... 86 Wabash lsts ..118%
Col. & South. 9414 do 2ds .........111^
Cons. Tob. 4s .. 45^ do deb. B. ..." 72K
D. & R. G. 45...102? i West Shore 4s ..112%
Erie prior 1. 45.. 99 . i\V. & L. E. 45.. 93^1
do gen. 4s .... SS fWis. Cent 4s - 89%
F.W. & D.C.15t.112% 1
London Closing Stocks.
Anaconda 6?] - do pfd 92
Atchison ........ 77 I!Ontario & \V.... 33%
do Pd 99: | Pennsylvania .. 76%
Baltimore & O.IO514: Reading .. 28%
Can. Pac ....... 117* do Ist pfd ....." 42$
Chesapeake &O. 46 do 2d pfd 34%
C. G. W 257 So. Ry ...... ... 33U
C., M. & St. P. .167%) J do Pfd ... 97
D- &R. G 44*dSo\ Pacific .... 65
do pfd ......... 94 , Union Pacific ..103^
Erie .............. 38% do pfd ......... 91
do Ist pfd..... 69fe<r.. S. Steel ...... 44%
do 2d pfd ..... 56 do pfd 95^
Illinois Cent..l 43 £ Wabash ...... ; 24
Louis. & Nash..lo6*3' do pfd ....."....' 44
M., K. & T...... 24%! Spanish 4s ...... 76
da pfd 57 ! Rand Mines 11%
N. Y. Central. .166^ De Beer s ....... 45%
Norfolk & West 57%:;- : ' ;
Bar silver dull, 25% d per ounce. Money
per cent. Th« rate of discount in
th; open market for short bills is 2\@
1% per cent; for three months!" bills,
2 11-16@2% per cent. Consols for money
94%; for account, 94 7-16.
New York Mining Shares.
Adams Con $3720 Little Chief ....S(FI2
Alice 45 Ontario 7.00
Breece • .60 Ophir '.:.:........ 1.07
Brunswick Con. .OS Phoenix .......... 04
Comstock Tun.. .05 Potosi ........... IX
|"on. Cal. & Va. 1.25 Frvage .07,
iJeadwood Ter.. .CO rra Nev ; 12
Horn Silver .. . 1.40 Small Hopes ... .38
Iron Silver ..... .64 Standard 3.20
Leadville Con... .05
New York Money.
NEW YORK, Feb. Close: Money on
call steady, at 2@2>4 per cent, closed bid,
and asked,.2@2% per cant; prime mercan
tile paper, 4@4^ per cent; sterling ex
change very strong, with actual business
in bankers' bills at $4.87%@4.87% for de
mand and at $4.87%@54.85 for. sixty days;
posted rates, $4.86@4.88y->; commercial bills
$4.84&@1.85%; bar silver, 55c; Mexican dol
lars, 43% c; government bonds strong;
state bonds in active; railroad bonds ir
regular.
New York Bank Statement.
NEW YORK, Feb. 21.—The statement of
the associated banks for five days this
week shows:
Leans, $930,757,600; increase, $4,752,900.
Deposits, $1,010,474,20<); increase, $4,195,
--200.
Circulation, $31,174,300; decrease, $59,800.
Legal tender, $72,426,300; decrease, $388,
--900.
Specie,' $194,898,900; increase, $243,500.
Reserves, $'267,325,200 ; decrease, 555,400.
Reserve required, $254,868,550; increase,
$1,048,800. *
Surplus, $12,476,650; decrease, $1,124,200.
METALS.
NEW YORK, Feb. 2L—All of the metal
markets were quiet today, but in two or
three cases prices- w»re lifted slightly.
Tin here was quoted up to $25 to $25.30
for spot and London -prices were ad
vanced 10 shilings to £117 for spot and
£109 17s Sd for futures: The New York
and London copper markets were steady,
but quiet and unchanged. Lead was
firm here at 4%c, whHe London was Is
3d higher at £11 13s 9d. Spelter was
higher, closing at $4.20<ff14.25, but London
was 2s 6d lower at £17 15s. Tfie local
iron markets were quiet and unchanged,
and fhe English markets were consider
ably lower. Glasgow 1 closed at 53s 3d.
and Middlesboro at 47» 7 1 / £ d. .
lc a Ride an street Cora.
Call at Twin City Coupon Co.. 220 Oer
mania Life building. 3t PauL
Edwards, Wood & Co.
STOCKS
BONDS
Members
Fcerd cf Trade, Chica^j.
Chsmber Commerce, Minneapolis
Eoard of Trade, Duluth.
Minneapolis and'PuluthtfJS^,
MINNEAPOLIS.
Closing.
Fri. Thurs.
May wheat, Minneapolis ....74%, 74%
July whaat, Minneapolis 75%-% 76%
May wheat, Chicago 77V»-^8 7sy 8 -%
July wheat, Chicago 78 7bMs
May whecU, i\ew xork 83% 83'/s
July wheat, New York 83% 83%
May wneat, Duluth 76 78%
July wheat, Duluth 77 77%
May wheat, St. Louis 83% 84 1-16
July wheat, St. .Louis 77%-% 77%
y MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 21.—A holiday
tone ruled in all tne grain markets today.
Tne prospects of heavy receipts on Mon
day, following the two-day interVui. was
deterrent to activity on tne buying vside
Today's report showed 100 cars or more
than last year for tnis market, and as
weather conditions favor a fairly liberal
movement it is generally expected that
Monday will show ireer offerings of
wheat and coarse grains. Further there
was the expectation that a continuation
of favorable reports from the winter
wheat area might have depressing effect,
ihe seaboard sent a number of items
regarding export possibilities. The 50
loads reported taken yesterday could be
firmed only in part, and one dispatch
said the bulk of the trades for export
lately are found upon investigation to be
Manitoba wheat to be moved out after
the opening of navigation. • In conse
quence of this there was little buying.
A good many in the pit were short in a
small way and to noon they hesitated
whether to cover today and lay low. or
to remain short over the holiday.
IV. ear the close the market broke on
realizing caused In part by the report of
th* Modern Miller. The Miller says- The
™£ P m. - central section of the winter
wheat belt is doing well and generally is
amply protected oy snow. - Moisture is
Plentiful everywhere. Claims of actual
damage are notable for their scarcity"
The weather ■ since 1902 entered has been
highly favorable, materially improving
crup conditions. Large deliveries of wheat
by farmers are noted, owing to better
sawssyts&s —--^ -*<*
May broke to 74% c and closed weak at
that figure.. July closed at 75*&75«4c
Chicago closed May at 77%@77%c.
Bradstreet's figures the weft wheat
and flour clearances at 3,609,000 bu
May price ruled on No 1 northern but
g » s&s: s.v £53Sa
dragging on No. 2 in the Great NorS
*"£*« and rejected from 63? ToM °
Millers say the week up to tX ha«
been the dullest known in the trade*in?2
RS Sir incre^ tT sw\ h,! Ve^oSi
as the wheat market dra^gs In 'its orif
"swans tejsrss?i3ti£i
First patents are quoted $3.55@3 95- set
was obtainable. Some No 1 sold at $171
but on this there was a heavy doK
firW^°% De^and on the V^hole wll
w \♦ c dra^in& being on less desist
! S."r 6tei°af&» n<l there was a sold at
ftSed^fffflg* thGre Was a trade r
. Minneapolis received 36 cars against 8
had 2 f ca rrs and ' Were **"•*>'■> Sth
toClarHv r e P"si CfiQ: $1.69;
$ l 7l arme- fl-69 ' February, $1.69; May
saSrjs -setJ2 at
1 r/rket hofriin 31,"^ 0 cnan &es are made,
market holding steady. Coarse pornmpa
mrofiirpfr 011 sacks ' af ?L
| ou^ted 11101106, 8 are «a little as
X noii v. m lower fi S«res are occa
penally heard on the outside, but millers
are I quoting unchanged, Bran in bulk
quoted at $15 per ton: bulk shorts $15
--fl°!»' middlings. $16.25^16.75; rid dog $17
17,.50; feed in m- sacks $1 per ton
ad"^iona , in 100-lb sacks, $1.50 per tor!
additional. Shipments, 1,383 tons
tvt yr~i , much business was reported.
No 2 closed at 56c. Receipts, 5 cars; shi
rotnts, none. • ' •■ . .
<\^]?l~T^ eT% was a fairly satisfactory
; ™and • Feed grades are quotable at
, siJ(&a6c, and malting grades, 57@63c. Re
ceipts, 13 cars; shipments, l car '
' Hay—Upland C Afancy $7.50®7.75: upland
tfi^'l?-' 5®7-^ N0..1,.56.78@7; midland,
Is 6 20@6.50; medium, $5.50@6; timothy
I choice, »l@11.50; rye straw, choice, $4@
4.50. Receipts, 193 tons; shipments, 20
j tons.
The following was the range of prices:
wKeat— Open. High. Low. Closing 1.
T\heat— Open. High. Low. Fri. Thurs
February ..... ■„-.. . 73% 74%
May..'...'.... 74% 74% 74% 74*4 74%
Ju1y.;...... -76 76 1-16 75% 75% 76%
Track—Official closing quotations—No.
1 hard, /5%c; No. 1 northern, 73%@74c- No
2 northern. 72%@73c; No. 3 wheat,' 70@
<l%c; oats, 41%@42%c; corn, 53@56c; rye
56c; barley, 53<&63c; flax. $1.69; flax futures
February,«sl.69; May, $1.71. '
■ . . ; 7-' State Grain/Inspection.
—Northern—
N0.1hd.,N0.1,N0.2.N0.3.Re.1.N.G.
Gt. Northern .... 4 39 8 2 11
C, M. & St. P. .. 4 17 19 5 5
M. & St. L 8 10 1 .. 1
Soo Line ..;.....- 3 12 1 1
Nor. Pacific .... 5 12 28 2 3
C.,5t.P.,M.& O .. 1 7 8 2
Totals .. 25 97 CD 12;» 20
Other Grains—No. 3 corn, 3; No. 4 corn
14; no grade corn, 6; No. 3 oats, 10; No'
4 northern oats, 3; no grade oats, 2; No
4 barley, 1; No. 1 flax, 10; rejected flax -9.
Cars Inspected Out — Wheat — No 2
northern, 34; No. 2 northern, 75; No 3, 97
--rejected, 4; no grade, 8; No.- 3 corn. 4;
No. 4 corn, 2; No. 3 oats, 5; No. 2 rye,
1; No. 4 barley, 2: | No. 1 5 barley, 1; No.
1 flax, I; rejected flax, 4.
Milwaukee Curb.
Curb on May wheat 74Vg@741 / 4
Puts on May wheat 7.3%^71
Calls on May wheat 74^@71%
Minneapolis Curb.
Curb on May wheat 77% to 77%@7714
Puts on May wheat 77'
Calls on May wheat 74%@% to 77^
Curb on May corn Goix
Puts on May corn !59%
Calls on May corn 61<56iy 8
DULUTH GRAIN.
DULUTH, Minn., Feb. 21.—Wheat open
ed %c off *for May, at 76^c, and finally
declined to 76 1,4 c, after a session of un
excelled dullness. In the meantime July
held lc above. The close was very weak.
O'CONNOR & VAN BERGEN
BROKERS
Stocks, Bonds, Grain, Provisions
202-203 GERMA.MA LIFE BI.DC, Fourth and Minnesota SU., St. Paul.
Members Chicago Board of Trade. Direct Private Wires.
C Chamber of Com.
' merce, -• -
Minnaapoifs,
310 Board of Trad;,
DuEuth, Minn.
Room A Manhattan
Building, ;,
Stm Paul, Minn,
GRAIN
PROVISIONS
Private Wires>
Telephone 559 m
at 76c for May. Flax declined to $1.72 for
May, with trifling business. Cash wh-eat
was fairly active. Receipts—Wheat, 115
cars; oats, 1; barley, 1; flax, 24; total 201
Shipments—None.
Close—Wheat—No. 1 hard cash, 77c; No.
1 northern, cash and to arrive, 74c; May,
76c; July, 77c; No. 2 northern, 71% c; No. 3
61'MiC; Manitoba cash, 72*4 c; May 7414 c•
No. 2, 69% c. Flax—Cash, $1.69; to arrive'
$1.70; May, $1.72. Corn, 60c; rye, 55c; bar
ley, 49®49%c.
CHICAGO 'CHANGE.
: CHICAGO, Feb. 21.—Grains had an
other slow, monotonous day. Most oj!
the light trading was evening up in prep
aration for the holiday on "EKange to
morrow, but bearish sentiment, especial
ly in corn, eventually turned the pits
weak, • and May wheat closed %c lower;
May corn, %<&% c lower, and May oats
%c off. Provisions closed unchanged to 5c
higher.
Wheat conditions were*"little changed
Foreign news was slightly bullish and
domestic the reverse. Closing-up deals
started the market a trifle lower, but so
tame was speculation that fluctuations
the first part of the session were hardly
noticeable. There was little interest in
the market, and the pit was almost with
out features. Cables were about steady.
Argentine shipments were much re
duced from last year. Northwestern re
ceipts are larger, and are expected to be
larger for some time, owing to line ele
vators shipping to their terminals. The
prevailing sentiment was to sell for a
moderate break. Eventually the South
western markets begin turning weak, the
corn market was alfected bearishly, and
wheat turned downward. May, which
opened a shade higher to lxAc lower
at~7B*4cto 78c, haggled for a long time,
then declined to ?<%c and closed weak.
%c lower, at 77%@77%c. One of the early
bearish influences was advice that yester
day's, export sales were for Manitoba.
Cash business today was only a trifle
better. Local receipts were 12 cars, 1 of
contract grade. Minneapolis and Duluth
reported tOS cars, making a total for the
three points of 517 cars, against 268 last
week. This day last year was a holi
day. Primary receipts were 526,000 bu
Seaboard clearances in wheat and flour
equaled 391,000 bu. Argentine shipments
were (384,000 bu. compared to 476,000 bu last
week and 1,032.000 b:i last year The
seaboard reported 12 loads taken for ex
port.
There was more interest taken today in
corn than in wheat. Bearish news was
in the majority, and sentiment was
nearly • all on the selling side. Corn
fought declines hard, however, in a way
to puzzle the crowds. Cables were a lit
tle 'higher than yesterday, and London
reported a light yield promised for Ar
gentina. Sou en western markets had light
receipts, but persistently sent in bearisn
reports. There were reports of accept
ances . from several, quarters, mostly tat
small lots, but conservative houses re
peatedly denied that the country was of
tering more freely. . St. Louis, however
brc*.e . sharply and sold under Chicago!
the first time in a long while. The" bright
weather had added influence. May, which
r ad™lv'nff steadily around 61*4 c, 'declined
I°. ™$ ° a2> d closed weak, %@%c lower,
at 60% c. Receipts were 103 cars.
Oats were dull and uninteresting
Tr*de was exceedingly light, and the de
pression was due largely to lack of sun- '
port. As for some time past, this market
.followed corn like a faithful servant
May closed weak at its lowest figure %*
down, at 43% c. Receipts were 121 cars
Provisions had a good tone in contrast
with the grain weakness. The hog mar
ket was strong, and a fair demand from -
commission houses, together with some
scaling, short covering in pork, held
prices for a small advance. Options fluc
tuated narrowly. May pork closed 5c
l s£f?A at $1072%; May lard unchanged,
at $9.40, and May ribs 2V 2 c up, at $5.45@
S.4|%.■'. ' ■ - ■ - ■ *
The estimated receipts for tomorrow
are: W heat, 15 cars; corn, 130 cars; oats,
103 cars, and 23,000 head of hogs ■
The leading futures ranged as follows:
. ' ■ '■' |Open.|High.j **"*•! Close.
Wheat— I ' ~ 1 j : T"
May ./•.... $&.75U150.78V4 $0.77* $0.77%
- ]y ■•■ • I .78% .78% .78 .78'
Corn-" "'" ■ 77% | ■"' ' -771 4 • 771/*
May ........... ' .61% *L%] .60%!| - C O%
July ..r..;...... .61% .61% .W%\ .60%
September 60 .60 .59*1 ■ 59&
Oats— I -j -" "
May, ...:........ .43% .43% .43% .43%
i^y ••• •••• -36% .36% .35% :ss%
ifISTSftL «fl -311-*, H •**
a >' • -115.67% i 15.75 15.67% 15.72% ;
July 115.82% 15.90~ 15.52%15.87%
Lard— j J
May .....*....... 9.40 9.45 | 9.40 9.40
c£uly^--T-"' 950 19.55 19.50 9-52*
Short Ribs— j II 7"
May 8.45 | 5.50 1 8.45 18.47*
July I 8.55 8.60 I 8.55 8157*
September. .... 8.65 J 8.70 I 8.65 I 8.67%
Cash quotations were as follows: Flour
—Dull; winter patents, $3.50@4; straights
$3.40<&3.70; clears, S3@3.#>; spring- specials
$4.20; patents, $3.20@3.50; straights, $2.90
1i2.30. Wheat—No. 3 spring, 75@75%c; No
2 red, 82@34%c Oats—No. 2.
No. 2 white. 44%@44%c; No. 3 white 4414
<£M4%c. Rye—No. 2, 60r361c. Barley—Fair
to choice malting, SOS63c. Fiaxseed—No
1, $1.66; No. 1 Northwestern, $1.71@4.7iy;
Timothy seed—Prime, $6.40. Pork—Mess
per bbl, $15.50@15.55. Lard—Per 100 lbs,
$3.20^9.22%. Sides—Short ribs (loose),
I $8.?0fr5.4-5. £?houlders—Dry .salted (boxed)
7%(ft7i4e. Sides—Short clear (boxed)
$8.70@8.8f1. Whisky—Basis of high wines,'
$1.28. Clover—Contract grade, $3.25. Re
ceipts—Flour, 27,000 bbls: wheat, SS,O<W bu;
corn, 75,000 bu: oats, 138.000 bu; rye, 2,000
feu; barley, 39,000 bu. Shipments—Flour,
34,000 bbls; wheat, 65,000 bu: corn, 43.000
bu; oats, 83.000 bu; rye, 6,000 bu; barley,
20.000 bu. On the produce exchange today
the butter market was easy; creamer
ies, 181^(62Sr-: dairies, 18%6?24c. Cheese-
Firm, 10@12y 4 s. Eggs—Weaker, fresh,
20031 c.
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS.
TOLEDO, Feb. 21.—Wheat lower; cash,
86% c; May, Ss%c; July, 81% c. Corn—
lower; May. 1 61% c: July, 61% c. Oats—Dull:
February. 44% c; May, 440; July,"37%c.Clov-'
erseed—Fairly active; higher;. cash prime
and March, $5.67* A; No. 2 Aisykt?, $8.50@
8.60. .. -•■ -■■>-• ... - -. „• ■ i
.KANSAS CITY, Feb. Close: Wheat !
—May, 75@75%c; July. 74% c: cash No. 2 j
hard,:7s@7s^c; No. 2 red. 84'g'8~c: No. 2
spring, 73%@74'^c. Corn—May. 60?ic; Sep
tember, 58% c; cash No. 2 mixed, 59%@
60% c; No. 2 white, -61%@64?ic. Oats—
2 white, 45@46^e.'
MILWAUKEE. Feb. Flour steady. -
Wheat steady. . Close: No. 1 northern,
76%@77c; No.- 2 northern, 45u,@76c^ May.
77%@77%c; puts, 77Vgc; " calls, ■" 77% c. S Rye
quiet; No. 1,'60%@61c. Barley weak: No.
2, 62% c; samp>rssiS:6lc. Oats lower; No. !
2 white, 44%@15c. Corn—May, 60 3ic; puts,
60% c;. calls. 61V4c. . :
ST. LOUIS', Feb. Close:; Wheat
lower; No. 2 red cash, elevator, S4Ve;
May. 83% c: Ju1y,.:77%@71%c;/ No. 2 hard.
77@79%c. Corn lower; No. 2 cash, 69»^c;
May. 60^c; July. 61%@€ii4c. Oats lower
No. 2 cash, 4414 c; May; 44% c; July, 3G^c;
■No. 2 white, 46 I*>(aH7c. . -" '"
: LIVERPOOL.' Feb. 21.—Receipts of
wheat during the. past three days, 209,000
centals, including 117.000 American.
rßeceipts of American " corn during the
past three days, 25,000" centals. ' Wheat-
Spot steady; No. 1 northern ;spring, (Js2d; !
No. 2, red western winter, Ss iy>d; No. 11
California, 6s PA&: futures quiet; March/ 1
6s 17/8 d;l 7/8 d; ; May,: Ss l%d. Corn—Spot Ameri
can mixed, -new, steady, 5s Id; mixed, old,
quiet. 5s 26; ; futures steady; ■- February j
nominal,- March* 5s l%d; May, 2%d. <j
. FINANCIAL .
a. j. eummiEVGS
DEALER IN
Wheat, Corn,. Oats, Provision Fu
tures and New York Stocks.
Rcctns 331, 334 and 336 Endicott Arc3jj.
fiIiARANTFFR execution of all ordsrs at ■»*.
UUMIIHII I LLO act markat pricss. Instan
taneous service. Bank refersncas. City Dspari
mont Room 336.
Out of Town Department, Room 334.
Our daily market letter and book of infor
mation free upon application; tells you how
and why our business continues to incrsass.
Come in and see us. Branch Office, Ryan
Hotel. No interest charged.
H. HOLBERT & SON,
• - . ' . - ' - -.
Bankers and Brokers
341 Robert St. St. Paul.
JAMESON & HEVENZR,
WHOLESALE FL9O3, FEED AND SEEJJ.
State Agents for _<r D4IH
Griswold Bro3. Bals Tijj. ■'* rj+**l-
CHAS. H. F. SMITH & CO.
lumbers of ths New York Stock Exchangs. S?a
cial attention given £rain orders. Member.! C&i
-cij.o Eoird of Trade. PRIVATE WIRES.
k-ioneer Press Bldj., St. Paul, .vUjj.
INVESTfIENr SECUSIIidS.
J. C. GERAGHTY & CO.
COMMISSION BROKERS.
Room D, Endicctt Building. St Paul.
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and Provisionl
DIRECT PRIVATE WIRES.
Produce and 7 tint
... Markets ...
Commission Row, Feb. 21.—Trade in the
open market at today's meeting of the.
Produce exchange establisned the follow
ing prices "in lots:
—Creameries—
Extras 25%@ .21
Firsts .23
Dairies—
Extra .22
Firsts :.... .20
Packing stock 1 .18 -
Cheese—/ /?.■;:;■;<
1 Twins, fancy .11 @ .11%
Good' to choice 10 @ .10%
Full cream, Young America. -11%<&> .12 "
Brick, No. 1 11%@ .12
Brick. No. 2 .10%® .11
Limburger .11*
Swiss . . .11%
Eggs-
Fresh stock, cases included. .25 @ .26
Dressed Meats—
Veal, fancy ;. .07%@ .C 8
Veal, common .06 & .07
Country-dressed hogs .06 @ .06%
Dressed Poultry-
Fancy dry-picked turkeys,
small, per lb 14 @ .14%
Same, large young toms . — .12
Turkeys, No. 2 and old toms. .10
Spring chickens, fancy : 12*@ .13
pring, mixed lots 10 (a 1 .11
Ducks 12 @ .13
Geese .11
i Fish—
} Sunfish and perch, lb .02 <g> .03
Crappies, per lb ; 0G @ .07*
I Pike .03*
Pickerel .02 "
Whitefish _ .OS
The following prices are those at'whic'V
the commodities mentioned are selling to
the retail trade. In large lots tnese
prices may be shaded: >
Beans-
Fancy navy, per bu 2.00 0 2.10
Medium, hand-picked 1.80 @ 2.00
Brown, fair to fancy ........ 1.90 @ 2.10 —
Peas—
Yellow peas 1.25 # 1.50
Green peas .. 1.35" @ 1.50
Potatoes-
Small lots, per bu 75 <fi .80
Car lots ......' 70 0 .75
New potatoes, bu 3.50 @ 3.75
Sweets
Cobden, per bbl 5.C0 @ 5.50
Vegetables-
Artichokes, dozen I.EO
Beits, new, : doz. bunches.... .75 '
Beets, old, bu .. .61
Brussels sprouts, quart .'..... " .25
Cabbage, bbl .. 1.50-@ 1.75
Cucumbers, dozen .. 2.00
Carrots, bu .. . . .50
Celery, doz. bunches ......... .25 @ .40
Egg plant, dozen : ' 2.C0
Lettuce, head, Southern, par
dozen ;.... .23
I Gkra, bu .. .......... -......„.. . 2.00
Onions,' green,' doz. bunches. ' .£5 '
Onions, dry, bu .. .......... 1.50
Onions, Spanish, crate ...... 1.75"
Peppers, basket ... ' . 1.00
Parsnips, bu >........:......... .40 (ftj .50
; Parsley, dozen .. .25 @ ."0
Pie plant, lb ..." .03
Radishes, ?;ozcn bunches .... • .60
Spinach, bu .. :........... . : '", > 1.00
Strawberries,' per quart .£0
.Turnips, old. bu i.. .2-1 .
Tomatoes, old, bu .35
Wax and string beans, bu.. S.CO
Cranberries—
Jerseys, per lb G.">o ® 7.00 '
! Wisconsin, B. 8., fancy 7.C0 @ 7.50
i Boxes 2.50
Grapes-
Malaga, bbl ............ * C. 50 @ 7.50
Apples—
Jonathans, fancy, bbl ...... 00 @ 6.50
Ben Davis .. 5.00 (0 5.50
Western stock, per. box .. 1.25 @ 1.50
Lemons—
California, per box 2.00 @ 3.25
Oranges-
California navels ............ 3.00 @ 3.50
Tangerines, per box 4.00
Miscellaneous
Bananas .".".' 2.00 0 2.50
! Honey, per. lb 11 @ .14
i Popcorn, per lb ;....... "<■ .03
j Persimmon?, per crate .: 1.00
I Grape fruit, Florida, box 9.00 «D 9.50.
Grape fruit, Cal., per box... 5.00 (ft 5.50
Pineapples, dozen 350 @ioO
■ Nuts— • '
California walnut;;, lb .12
Peanuts, raw - .05
Peanuts, roasted ... 07
Brazils- .16
Pecans, medium .101/,
English walnuts .fv'- ]i2K
SK^::::::::::::— -15 .@ ,: 16 ~
Filberts 12
Chestnuts "10
Chestnuts, Italian .08
Hickory, small, bu . 2 25
Hickory, large, bu 1.75
1 Butternuts, bu .......:..: 1.00
; Cocoanuts. per 100 3 OC
i Walnuts,.black, per bu....... 1.50 (ft- 1 75
j Figs ana Dates— - -■■'■-," :
j California figs. 10-lb box.. 75
Turkish figs, lb .11 <Q "14
Arabian, lb 15
Fard dates, 2b .07 fl *08 •
Hallowee dates, lb 04 (3 06
. Apple Cider— • .-;.■ ■-/.- •'
Sweet, per bbl COO
Sv/eet. half bbl 3*50
Hard, common, per Db1...... 4.30 & SCK>
Hard, fancy, per lib!' ..;..... $.00 #10.00
OTHER PEODITCE MARKETS.
j CHICAGO, Feb. 21.-Butt-r steadvr
creameries,l\giß',i-c; dal los, 18@34c. Chees--^
steady; Cheddars. 10©10V4c: twins, 10*^>
Wgc; dairies. 10-y,@U'4c; Young America?,
11%|i,12c. Eggs easier; at mark; cases In
cluded, 32@32%c.: Dressed poultry steady;
turkeys, l0@14c: chickens SiglOc.
NEW YORK, Feb. 21.-Butter—
ceipts.; 3,713 pkgs; firm: .state dairy, "><■■
28c; state creamery, 22@30c; Juno .cream
j cry. . 17@25c ;■. renovated. 15'4@23%c: fac
j torjY 15@21c. Cheese—Receipts, 2,6^0 pkgs •
j firm; state full cream, small early-made
fancy colored. . 12@12i4c;; state ■ full cream '
{ small early-made, fancy white. - 12@12^<
I ; largo, early-made colored," lie: large,. ear
ly-made >white, lie. Receipts, 2,T«>: -
pkgs: lower, closing strong; state an,;
I Pennsylvania,; a%c; Western at mark,
,S6%c: Southern; at mark, 85c: Coffee easy: S
No. 7 R!o, 6%c. ',-. —'
a

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