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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 23, 1902, Image 1

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VOL. XXV.—NO. 54.
EIGHTEEN DIE
IN HOTEL FIRE
BIG XEW YORK BLAZE ATTENDED
BY SCENES OF PITIFUL
HORROR
BLAME IS NOT YET FIXED
Large Armory Destroyed and \one
Knows Whether Late Conflagra
tion Across Street Was Doe to
Sparks or Other Cause
GUESTS LEAP FROM WINDOWS
~- NEW TORK, Feb. 22.—For the third
lime since New Years day Park avenue,
this city, was the scene of loss of human
Kfe. First was the collision in the New
York Central tunnel at Fifty-sixth street
and Park avenue; second came the dyna
mite explosion in the rapid transit sub
way at Forty-first street, and the third
today was a fire which started in the
Seventy-first regiment armory at Thirty
third street, and then spread to the Park
Avenue, hotel, where eighteen persons
were killed, and many injured.
This was the worst hotel fire since the
Windsor was destroyed.
The fire was first seen at about 1:30 in
the morning in the armory, and in re
markably short time that building was
aflame from end to end. After the fire
men had been at work nearly an hour
the discovery was made that the hotel
was on fire. The^ hotel was crowded
with guests who had come to attend the
festivities in honor of Prince Henry.
More than 500 persons were in the house.
The fire was confined principally to the
fifth and sixth floors near the elevator
air shaft. About tly? time the hotel was
found to be on fire' the lights went out
and the corridors were filled with smoke.
The guests, unable to find their way
through the darkened hallway, jumped
from windows, or ran directly into the
flame-swept portions of the building. It
Is this fact that accounts for the large
loss of life, although the hotel was not
destroyed.
Explosion Adds to Terror.
The fire in the armory started on the
third floor, on the Thirty-third street
side, where there was a tier of rooms oc
cupied by different companies of the reg
iment. Within five minutes the whole
structure was beyond saving, and ten
minutes later the roof fell in with a ter
rific crash. There was no one in the
armory at the time except a janitor and
his family. They escaped by going
through a scuttle hole in the roof, and
thence along the battlements on the Thir
ty-fourth street side to safety on the
roofs of houses to the east.
Several hundred pounds of ammunition
■tored in the tower of the armory detona
ted in a series of minor explosions, par
tially wrecking the portion of the walls
near which it was stored. This added
terror and caused fear of greater ex
plosions to those who were fighting the
flames
It was not until 3 o'clock that the
flames were discovered in the Park ave
nue hotel, directly across from the ar
mory.
Various opinions were given as to the
origin of the fire in the hotel. The man
ager claims that it was of incendiary
origin. Others hold that the fire orig
inated from sparks from the burning
armory building, swept by wind in the
direction of the hotel, descending the alr
dhaft, which was directly alongside the
elevator. The idea of incendiary origin
is scouted by guests of the hotel, and by
Fire Chief Croker.
Scores of guests were taken from the
windows of the third, fourth and fifth
Continued on Fourteenth Page.
DISCRACE TO THE STATE
SOUTH CAROLINIANS DEPLORE
FIGHT BETWEEN SENATORS.
Special to The Glohe.
COLUMBIA, S. C, Feb. 22.—The fight
In the senate between the South Carolina
Eenators is regarded by both factions here
as both shocking and disgraceful.
Only the bitterest personal feeling
against McLaurin could have made Sen
ator Til!man lose control of himself and
resent being called a liar in such a man
ner. It Is the first time in his political
career of fourteen years that he has no
ticed such a charge.
It has been charged by »me that JVlc-
L<aurin was afraid of Tillman. The af
fair today will, therefore, do McLaurin*
more good than harm, although many
people here would have preferred eff&og
a different kind of fight, and one to a
finish. The disgrace of the proceedings
will be keenly felt in the rural districts,
where Tillman has good friends, and will
do him no good. A great many persons
are opposed to both men, and while re
gretting the place selected for the fight,
rejoice that they came to blows.
Gov. McQueeny, when shown a story
of the fight tonight, expressed himself
as being shocked. He would take no
»ides, but said the people of the state
•would have a reckoning. When both
men resigned at Gaffney last year, he
Haid, it was a childish proceeding and
unworthy of their offices, and he said
now they have brought additional dis
grace upon South Carolina.
The meeting in April was the beginning
of the bad blood and the bitterness be
tween the senators.
X- ***** *&&% - - :li^^
COL. GEORGE H. KIMBALL.
THE ST.PAUL GLOBE
ALL WOULD WED HIM
"ADONIS"' MEETS HIGH FAVOR OX
ODD TRAPPING TRIP.
Special to The Globe.
NILES, Mich., Feb. 22.—Harry Adonis,
who left Dowagiac, Jan. 26. on a trip
across the country to San Francisco on
foot, has been heard from at Ypsilanti,
Mich. He states that he had had to
date forty-eight proposals to marry,
from maids, young and old, at Kalama
zoo. He said he refused, twenty-nine
offers, among them being a bachelor
woman with $80,000 reserve fund. The
capital was very tempting, but she had
auburn hair, and he declined. Among
other exploits Adonis states that he kiss
ed nineteen Battle Creek girls in eighty
two minutes. According to his contract
he must be married before July 16, 1902.
Since his start he has earned $750 dis
tributing advertisements. Adonis must
push a wheelbarrow the entire distance,
must earn ■$1,500, and must not beg, bor
row or steal.
ISOLATED BY STORM
PHILADELPHIA HAS NO COMMTNI
CATION BY WIRE WITH OUT
SIDE WORLD
NEW YORK STILL SUFFERS
Great Havoc Worked by Sleet, the
Streets Full of Dead Horses and
All Traffic to the Suburbs
Suspended.
NEW YORK, Feb. 22.—Mail advices
from Philadelphia say that that city is
completely shut off from electrical com
munication with the outside world, as
though such a thing as a telegraph wire
or telephone wire never existed.
The storm is the most disastrous sleet
storm as far as wires are concerned, that
has ever visited that section.
Four persons were killed in Philadel
phia during yesterday and last night by
coming in contact with heavily charged
wires. Late last night the street railway
company operating all the lines was com
pelled to abandon its service. Hundreds
of linemen are at work clearing the wires
and until they are convincedi that all
danger from contact with electric light
wires is past, the officials of the various
telegraph cempannies will not attempt to
operate thpir wires.
The sleet storm that struck New York
proved to be the most severe that has
been experienced here for several years.
Telegraphic communication was almost
completely suspended until this evening,
when it was generally restored.
Throughout the day the streets were
rendered nearly impassable by slush,
many of them presenting the appearance
of rivers, the sewers being incapable of
carrying off the overflow.
The greatest damage was sustained in
Brooklyn, where scores of horses were
killed by contact with live wires, which
were everywhere prostrated.
More than 100 dead horses lay in the
streets throughout the city. Many of
them dropped from exhaustion and others
fell and broke their legs, and had to be
shot.
The great storm did more damage in
the suburbs than in the city. The wind
had full sweep and in the towns and vil
lages of Eastern New Jersey, Long Isl
and and Westchester country, trolley and
telegraph service was abandoned, and
the ground is strewn with broken wires
and trees.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 22.-Most of the]
trains arriving in Washington are from
two to tnree hours late, on account of the
storm. The breaking down of telegraph
wires has delayed railroad traffic
throughout the storm area. This involves j
serious interruption to the mail service.
The Atlantic coast storm appears to be
Slowly parsing off to sea. Snow continues
in New York city and rain southward
to the Carolinas. The weather has clear
ed in the interior of New York state and
Northeastern Pennsylvania.
An area of low pressure, which now
covers tne -ouuiwest, promises to move
eastward, giving rain in Texas, the lower
Mississippi valley and the Central Gulf
states Sunday and in the Ohio valley,
lower Lake regions and South Atlantic
states Monday. The temperature will
rise in the Ohio valley and Lake region
Sunday and somewhat higher tempera
ture will prevail Monday in the Atlantic
coast districts.
NEW YORK, Feb. 22.—Mail advices
from Trenton, N. J., says: The city of
Trenton has suffered greatly from yes
terday's storms. The streets are liter
ally strewn with fallen wires and
branches of trees that were carried down
with the weight of the ice. The local
trolley service was compelled to suspend
early* last evening. Outside communi
cation both by telegraph and telephone
closed about 6 o'clock last evening, and
has not yet been re-established.
Fear is entertained of a rise in the Del
aware and an overflow in South Trenton
that might inundate the homes.
GORGE CONDITION'S CRITICAL.
Weather Bureau Serves Warning to
Cities on Choked Streams.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 22.—The weather
bureau has issued the following special
bulletin:
Conditions in rivers and mountain
streams of Pennsylvania, western Mary
land and West "Virginia considered crit
ical, dangerous. Cooler weather is not in
dicated and ice gorges may cause flood
ing of low lying lands.
FACES THAT Aim FAMILIAR TO ST. PAUL PEOPLE.
■■ ■■ ■■■■'v'jßi:^ 1 ■ '■. ■ ' * ?& Jfl
iff -• : -'S
GEORGE S. WISE3tIAX,
SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 23, 1902.—TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES.
FISTICUFFS ON
SENATE FLOOR
TILLMAN AND M7LAURIN PROMPTLY
POLISHED FOR. SCANDALOUS
FIGHT ■«' .
BOTH FOUND IN CONTEMPT
Senior Accnses Colleague of Selling
Vote on Paris Treaty, Is Given
the Lie Direct and Both
Resort to Blows
GRAVE BODY IS SHOCKED
WASHINGTON, Feb. 22.—Washington's
birthday was signalized in the United
States senate by a fist fight between
Senators iillman and McLaurin, of South
Carolina.
The blows each fell on the face of the
other. They were separated by force
and after long debate declared in oon-
SENATOR TILLMAN.
tempt. Despite apology by each, neither
will be allowed to again speak in the
senate until further action shall have
been taken In committee.
Senator Tillman said Senator McLaurin
had traded his vote on the Paris peace
tTeaty in return for control of federal
patronage in Carolina.
Mr. Tillman at first declined to men
tion names, but, Mr. Spooner, of Wiscon
sin, reminded him that he owed it to hdm
self, to the senate and to the country
to "name the man.' Mr. Tillman indi
cated that lie referred to his colleague
from South Carolina.
Mr. McLaurin was not in the chamber
at the time, being engaged in committee
work, but he was sent for and appeared
just as Mr. Tillman concluded his speech.
In the course of his speech Mr. Tillman
said:
Arouses Spooner to Protest.
"Yet," said he, "God save the mark,
we pretend to be honest."
Mr. Tillman maintained that, instead of
trying to civilize and elevate the Filipinos
the government might better have spent
some of the $400,000,000 expended in the
Philippines in colonizing the negroes in
the Southern statee of this country.
' When he later directed a question at
"his friends on the other side of the
chamber," Mr. Spooner inquired to whom
he referred.
"I have many friends on the Republi
j can side," said Mr. Tillman. "Person-
SEINATOR M'LALKIN.
ally, you are a nice, clean man, but polit
ically you are one of the most infamous
oowards and hypocrites that ever hap
pened." (Laughter.)
Mr. Tillman became involved in a
lively colloquy with Mr. Spooner regard
ing the ratification of the Paris treaty.
The South Carolina senator referred to
Mr. Spooner's comments in his speech
yesterday upon the part taken by
William J. Bryan in securing the ratifi
cation of the Paris treaty. He replied
to the Wisconsin senator that the influ
ence of Mr. Bryan was potent, but in-
Continaed on Twelfth I'age.
wait «
B. L. FREIiI>Y.
FIND PROFIT IN BEGGING
ODD INDUSTRY DISC VBRED BY
THE POLICE OF CHICAGO.
Special to The Globe.
CHICAGO, Feb. 22.—Supt. E. P. Bick
nell, of the Chicago bureau of charities,
has discovered that a large number of
professional beggars make a regular
business of soliciting cast-off clothing and
selling it to certain lodging house keep
ers. They have a regular schedule of
rates. The price paid for hats and
caps is 5 cents, while an ordinary pair of
second-hand shoes bring: 35 cents; over
coats are worth 30 cents to $1.50. The
lodging house keepers, it is said, have
the articles repaired, and sell them to
their patrons at a fair profit.
EXTRA GUARD FOR POPE
GARRISON" AT ROME DOUBLED BE
FORE XEARIXG JUBILEE.
Special to The Globe. ,
ROME. Feb. 22.—1n order to prevent
disturbances during the celebration of
the pope's silver jubilee, tho Italian go
ernment is taking ' the precaution to
double the garrison at Etomjgg; The Vati
can authorities appreciate very much this
prudent measure. ; ' All . the |' Catholic
countries will be represented at the jubi
lee March 3 by special envoy. N. Nisard,
the French ambassador, has informed
Cardinal Secretary of State Rampolla
that he has received special credentials
to represent France at the' ceremony.
■llWllinni IHBiliiailnili, ,„.,„', .J,- iin—.T—TMirnniiMiiiM ■■ i.i iiiMiiai ■■■..■■■iimihiih^i nm
W/Vl^ Br^ "|H|. ...... - ■. ■
HIS EOYAL ta&HNESS PRINCE HENRY OF PRUSSIA.
SPAIN A BIT QUIETER
STRIKE SITUATION, HOWEVER, IS
STILL, OF GRAVE CHARACTER.
MADRID, Feb. 22.—The nearest ap
proach to truth that it is possible to
gleam from the mass of conflicting offi
cial and private dispatches from Bar
celona indicates that the situation is still
of the gravest character, but without any
important outbreak of fresh hostility be
tween the troops and the strikers.
Private dispatchesl received here from
Barcelona deny that there is any prob
ability of a settlement, and say the
strikers are leaving the city in largo
numbers
According to messages received here
from Barcelona the police of that city
have captured important documents
showing that Ixmdor anarchists furnish
ed a considerable amount of funds to the
strikers, and aided in organizing the out
break there.
The captain gpoeral at.Barcelona has
allowed the rietera three'.4ays in which
to deliver up all "their arms. After the
expiration of that time any person found
in possession of arms will be tried by
drum-head court martial.
mi SI
AJLDEIRMAX HUNT,
PRINCE HENRY
IN NEW YORK
STEAMER KRO\PRIXZ SIGHTED
OFF SANDY HOOK EARLY
THIS MORNING
SHIP WAS LATE IN ARRIVING
Programme Planned for His Recep
tion Last Ms lit Had to Be
( Carried Otot With
ont Him
CANNOT LAND UNTIL TODAY
NEW YORK, Feb. 22.—The Kron
prinz Wilhelm, with Prince Henry
of Germany on board, was sighte-1
at 1 o'clock this morning off Nan.
tucket lightship. She will arrive off
Sandy Hook at 1() «' clock this
morning.
NEW YORK, Feb. 22—At the Irving
Place theater the programme as arranged
for the entertainment of Prince Henry
tonight was carried out as if he had been
present. A crowded house liberally ap
plauded the play, "A Blank Page."
The German ambassador, Count yon
Holleben, Admiral yon Baudissin, and
fifteen members of his staff, and Consul
General Buenz occupied boxes. The the
ater was crowded with a representative
and fashionable audience, the entire or
chestra and balcony being occupied by
men and women in full dress. The house
was beautifully decorated with ever
greens interspersed with American Beau,
ty roses and smilax combined with the
German and American colors. During
the intermission between the second and
third acts the orchestra rendered the
German and American national anthems,
the entire audience rising.
NEW YORK, Feb. 22.—Germany and
America unite in the regret that adverse
Atlantic gales have prevented the great
ocean greyhound, the Kronprinz Wiihelm,
from bearing Prince Henry to port in
time to receive the splendid welcome ar
ranged for him today. It was regarded
as certain that the vessel would have bsen
heard of today.
The North German Lloyd managers de
cided this evening that even if the Kron
prinz Wilhelm should get into quaran-
Continued on Sixth Page.
fit. ■ "*■
AMBROSE TIGHB, ;
SAY HOBSON WILL WED
REPORTS BXGAGE HIM TO ADL.iI
STEVENSON'S DAUGHTER.
Special to The Globe. *
CHICAGO, Feb. 22.—Dame rumor has
picked another young woman to share
the joys and sorrows of "Merrlmac"
Hobson. This time the naval hero's
name is*linked matrimonially with that
of Miss I-etitia Stevenson, the charming
daughter of former "Vice President Ad
lai Stevenson. Interest in the reported
engagement Is heightened by the fact
that Capt. Hobson is visiting at the
home of the Stevensons, in Blooming
ton, having arrived there today.
UP TO THE PRESIDENT
ATTORNEY GEXBRAi KNOX SUB
MITS REPORT ON JUDGE
NOTES' CASE
Decision Is Carefully Guarded, bnt
It Is Regarded as Certain He
Will Xot Return to,
FROM THE GLOBE BUREAU,
Washington, D. C.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 22.—Attorney
General Knox has submitted his report
on the case of Arthur H. Noyes to the
president and the cabinet at today's ses
sion. It was announced that the recom
mendations and the findings would be
made public Monday.
Unless the president sees fit to overrule
the findings of the attorney general, it is
said that Judge Noyes will sever his con
nection with the federal judiciary. Cer
tain it is that he will not return to Nome.
Mr. Knox holds that if he was the victim
of a conspiracy, the conspiracy was so
well laid that it has succeeded. Popular
feeling at Nome is such that the interests
of justice would not be subserved t>y
taking Judge Wickersham from the bench
and returning Judge Noyes to that dis
trict.
The administration has been placed in
a predicament by the findings of the San
Francisco.court of appeals. If Noyes is
not removed the reflection on the court
of appeals will be so grave as to require
the removal of one or more of its judges,
even at the expense of impeachment pro
ceedings. Naturally the department of
justice hesitates to precipitate such a re
sult. The understanding among those
who claim to have information is that
reasons of public policy will be urged
for Noyes' removal by the president.
The attorney general has been in grave
doubt as to what to recommend. He
has felt that he should not go against
the findings of the California court with
out ample proof that Noyes is the vic
tim of conspiracy. The evidence before
the attorney general is conflicting, and
whatever determination he has reached
is based on the broad ground of public
policy. Great efforts have been made
to keep the findings from becoming public
as the^e is constant possibility that
Roosevelt may follow his own judgment
and brush aside the decision of Knox.
PLAN A GREAT DEPOT
UISION STATION IS CHICAGO IS TO
COST $15,000,000.
CHICAGO, Feb. 22.—A new union sta
tion which, with .adequate terminal fa
cilities, will cost $10,000,000 to $15,0tv,000, is
proposed for Chicago by the Pennsylvania
management. The plans contemplate a
magnificent ornamental building and ter
minals which will rival, if not excel, any
in the United States.
It is propose! to erect on the river
bank mammoth lake inter-change ter
minals to extend the entire length of the
property. Such a terminal, it is esti
mated, would result in making the reads
using the terminals the greatest medium
of exchange between rail and ifresh water
in the world.
It is further contemplated to erect a
great mail transfer station which it is
estimated would give the lines running
into the stattion an advantage on through
mails of at least five hours.
FORGED TO EAT POISON
GIRL FOUND UNCONSCIOUS—TEL.I.S
STRANGE STORY. I
BRODHEAD, Wis., Feb. 22.—Luella
Francis, who makes her home with the
Rev. Mr. Murray, the Methodist min
ister here, is in a critical condition from
poison., which she 'asserts was forced
down her throat by a man whom she de
tected robbing —r. Murray's house Tues
day night. Miss Francis claims she saw
the man running down the stairs of the
house after the burglary*.
Thursday night, when passing a corner
of the street away from the general trav
el the same man, she says, seized her and
after kicking her and pounding her forced
her to swallow poison. Late in tne even
ing the girl was found by a passerby un
conscious.
Deur Outrides McEachern.
BUFFALO, N. V., Feb. 22.—Ray Deuir,
of Buffalo, defeated Archie McEachern,
of Toronto, Ont., in a special pursuit
race at the Severity-fourth regiment
games tonight. Deur passed McEachern
when they had ric"den 3 miles, 7 laps and
110 yards. The time was 9:53 4-5.
■^R ■:■: ■ " ■; ..... . .%5He
v ""r "
£U X». BEARDSLEY,
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
HALL SPRINGS
SENSATION
VETERAN EDITOR SPEAKS HIS
MIND AT COMMERCIAL CLUB
BANQUET
WHAT PATRIOTISM REALLY IS
Party Ties So Strong That Honesty
of Speech Is Stifled—Political In
dependence Is Political
Ostracism
DUTY OF AMERICAN CITIZENS
In a speech scarce half an hour in length,
H. P. Hall furnished a sensation at the
annual dinner of the Minnesota society,
Sons of the American Revolution, held at
the Commercial club last night, that waa
only equaled by the surprise which it
created.
"Washington and His Memory" was
the theme, and Mr. Hall was among
those called upon to pay tribute to the
immortal commander. His address waa
short, yet so pregnant with surprises,
that it found the little band of patriots
so convulsed with undisguised astonish
ment that the witty remarks of a speak
er who followed were unequal to the
task of relieving the painful tension that
existed.
In plain words Mr. Hall told his hear
ers that patriotism lay not in recounting
the deeds of those that had gone before,
but in their application to the material
things of today. His address, which waa
the sensation of the evening, was a3 iol
lo'ws:
Mr. Hall's Address.
I shall say very little about George
Washington. His name and fame are so
indelibly written upon the pages of tha
'history of our country that every Ameri
can school child knows it before it has
reached sufficient years to distinctly pro
nounce his name, 1 prefer to leave that
to others and to speak to the living,
rather than of the dead.
The history of this country has been
one of progress. To my mind it has no
better illustration than the lives of George
Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Slav,
cry in Washington's day was not, at
least popularly regarded a moral crime,
and George Washington, great as he was,
was a slaveholder. He wrested our free
dom from a foreign tyrant and we honor
him. Lincoln preserved, and emancipated
the slaves as well.
I do not know that there can be a bet
ter illustration of the fact of the progress
of events than the lives of these two men.
Such men as Wendell Phillips and Wil
liam Lloyd Garrison raised the standard
of political independence when it was a.
disgrace and social ostracism to stand.
up and denounce the crime of slavery,,
The work grew until it finally won; but
a little handful of men, so small that
they were less in numbers than thosa
seated around this board, were the real
men who abolished slavery in the United
States. Other circumstances led up, and,
as has already been stated, the man for
me.time appeared in the person of Abra
ham Lincoln.
But we are not through with progress^
The Democratic party live 3 largely upoa
the traditions of the past, and mistake*,
real or hoped for by the Republican
party. They have had a better opportu-.
nity than the Republicans of following
the teachings of Washington's farewell
letter, when he announced at the early
age of sixty-four that he never would
hold office again, and I wish there wera
more in the Republican party who did
not feel that they must, of necessity,
be so imbued with patriotism that they
should overlook that portion of Washing
ton's letter.
The Race Question.
There is one tremendous question in
the South at this very moment. The
negroes are in a worse condition in the
South today than they were before they
were emancipated. The white population
has been elevated and advanced by the
obliterating of the political crime at
slavery. But to all practical intents and
purposes the negro in the South is still
a slave.. He is disfranchised in many;
states, and allowed no opportunity to
rise, and there is a problem that it will
take some man, wiser than myself, to
attempt to elucidate.
The difficulty about political independ
ence is the binding character of party
ties, atld the feeling that if a man dares
to speak what he thinks and differs with
h)p liarty he is at once politcally ostra
cised.
One of the speakers at this table to
night dared to differ, a short time ago.
with his party, and he is today lashed,
scourged and politically ostracised and
held up as a shining light and warning
to others in his party as a sample of
their fate if they dare assert political
independence. We want to cultivate such
a sentiment that men will dare to be In
dependent of the political party to which
they belong, and I say this not as a poll*
tician, but m the spirit of patriotism.
As I said, the Republican party is more
progressive than the Democratic party.
This is, perhaps, because so many of the
progressive- Democrats left their party
and joined the Republican ranks Hurfng
the Civil war and have dominated thafc
party ever since. ■
The McKinley bill of IS9O was a coura
geous thing, and very few political par.
ties would have taken the chance of en
acting it at that time, but it was passed
by the Republican party, and it caused
ita defeat, Cleveland being elected la
1892.
• Now look at McKinley's last speech In
Buffalo. That speech would hav<; an
swered for the Democratic platform ln»
1892 upon which Cleveland was elected
president But it has been accepted by
his party, and all Republicans now say
Amen. If four or five y-?ars ago any ofhr
er prominent Republican had raised the
standard of political independence whlchl
McKinley raised^ at Buffalo he would ha.v«
been ostracised and turnod out of his
party.
Take the case of the Spanish war. Wftjf
Continued on Sixth Page.
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f. • ajSjjSKi ... j
HUwhIbHI S WWffffliffiiiK^mBSn^wirilll,
HE\Ri I>. LANG*

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