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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, April 04, 1902, Image 1

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VOL. XXV.—NO. 94.
PROBE DEEP
INTO SCANDAL
CONGRESSMEN CALL ABXER M'KIX
LKY AXD OTHER XOTABLE WIT
MOSSES IX WEST INDIES CASE
SENATORS ARE ABSOLVED
Attorney Hansen Declares That All
the Money Spent Was for Legiti
mate Purposes, and That
Ko One Was Bribed.
GRON ADDS TO KIS STATEMENT
WASHINGTON, April 3.—The investiga
tion of charges in connection with the
Danish West Indies negotiations was re
sumed today by the house special com
mittee. Among those present when tne
hearing began were Aimer McKinley, Col.
W. C. Brown, Carl Fisher Hansen and
Representative Gardner, of New Jersey.
Mr. McKinley was; the first witness.
He pave his residence as New York, his
business that of a lawyer, and in response
to Chairman Dalzell's inquiry he said he
was a brother of the late president.
Asked aa to whether he knew Cape.
Christmas, he said he had met him once
in the most casual way in the lobby of
the Manhattan hotel, New York. He
never held any conference with him of
any kind or character.
"Was there any talk of the Danish West
Indies?' asked Mi". Dalzel).
"None whatever, either remotely or
otherwise," answered the witness.
Mr. McKinley went on to say that he
bad never mentioned the matter to the
president. lie had no meeting with
Christmas beyond this casual one, when
there was nothing except an exchange of
the courtesies of the day.
Representative Richardson asked the
witness if he knew Mr. Hansen.
BlcKinlcy Declines Proffer.
Mr. McKinley said he had known Han
sen for some time, and prior to the casual
meeting with Christmas, Hansen had Cc.
sired ti> retain him in this matter. -
In reply, the witness said he told Mr.
Hansen lie could have nothing to do with
it. Subsequently, whin he met Christmas
he "passed the time of day" and that was
tin- end of it.
Mr. Richardson asked if Mr. McKinley
ever had any talks with the Seligmans on
the subject. Mr. McKinley said he had
never bad any conversation with them on
this transaction or with anyone except
Hansen, as lie stated.
Representative Gardner followed with
a statement disclaiming all knowledge of
Christmas except of the most casual char
acter. Someone, he said, had asked per
mission to present a lady and gentUjf.an
at his (Gardner's) rcom. There was a
brief meeting, and the. card left bore the
name of Christmas. That was the extent
of his acquaintance with Christmas.
Mr. Gardner said he had taken some
interest In the acquisition of the Danish
West Jn.lio.-, and had introduced a bill
on the subject. But this was before
Christmas had made the casual call.
Gardner .llaki'H Disclaimer.
Mr. Gardner also disclaimed going over
the subject with a Mr. Evans, who had
been mentioned in the matter, except in
a sidewalk conversation, when inquiries
were made as to the prospects of a sale
of the Danish islands.
Mr. Richardson asked if Mr. Gardner
kin w of the Inter national Press associa
tion.
Mr. Gardner said he did-; ho had been a
stockholder in the concern, which at one
time represented several New Jersey
newspapers.
Col. W. C. Brown testified that he met
Christinas once at the Manhattan hotel,
in New York. He had no conversation
with him at that one meeting, except the
Continued on Seventh Page.
MURDERED EACH OTHER
GEN*. FI.XSTOX SCORES FIMPIXOS AT
BANQUET IX SAN FRAHCISCO
Says That They Killed More Than
4,000 of Their Own Soldiers
Daring; the Past Tivo
Years.
SAN FRANCISCO, April 3.-Gen. Fred
erick Funston was the guest of honor
at a banquet given by the Ohio society.
In n^ponse to a toast he said in part:
"Aftei the first three or four months
oi ffchting the Filipinos forsook all clvi-
Ued methods of fighting, and began a
guerrilla warfare of a sort unparalleled in
history. They tilled directly or by tor
ture r. early 4,000 of their own countrymen
durfag the years cf ISOO and 1901 because
they would not contribute money to sup
port the insurgent cause.
'•I Prow of nearly 400 cases la my own
district in. which natives were buried
alive i do many of these were women anl
children.
'"1 1 ey committed inconceivable atroci
ties on American soldiers who fell into
their hands. I had the pleasure of cap
turing and hanging some liends guilty of
tr,is.
'■'- he officers of the insurgent army
ordered the assassination of each other
in order to hold their places. Personally
I owe a good deal to Aguinaldo, but he
toll me he had C-€n. Luna killed for To
oth«*r reason than he was coming to the
frcnt too fast.
"The Filipi.v s are absolutely ii.capa'/o
o? rt today, and Z do noi
think the nsvt generation of the raoo
Mill Ob."
PLANS OF ROCK ISLAND
WILL BIILD A LINE FROM FORT
WORTH TO GALVESTON.
CHICAGO, April 3.—Two projects ar*.
now credited to the Rock Island manage
nient which will change materially th->
railway map of the West and Southwest
and bring in new and possibly disturbing
conditions. One is the building of a line
fiom Fort Worth to Galveston, and the
other is the purchase of the Colorado
Southern with a view to extenenhg tho
Clear Creek branch of the line across the
range through Middle Park and Routt
counties. Colorado, thereby establishing
an air line from Denver to Salt Lake
Cflty.
Officials of the company today admitted
that purveys for such v Galveston line
v. ( ]o being made. It is stated that if
built the new line wil pass through Dal.
las, Tex., and thence will be an ah- Una
to Oalveston.
Ifytf St. $aul §iobt
PAY'S NEWS SUMMARIZED
Weather Forecast for St. Paul and Vi
cinity: Fair Friday and probably Satur
day; light variable winds.
POLITICAL—
St. Paul still feels baneful effects of
former Mayor Doran's administration.
Dar Reese calls Mayor Smith's sup
porters traitors.
Republican executive committee wres
tles with enthusiasm problem.
LOCAL—
State board of forestry accepts land
offered by late John S. Pillsbury.
State treasurers discover apparent dis
crepancies in reports of Twin City Tele
phone company's gross earnings.
University regents plan to secure larger
field for athletic purposes.
Twin City Telephone company's main
offices moved to new building, Cedar and.
Eighth. •
Supt. Olsen preparing Arbor bulletin for
distribution in. schools.
Assembly passes ordinance providing for
$99,500 bond issue for new armory.
ColLseum project is finding favor with
the people.
Secretary of State Hanson to investigate
status of steel trust in Minnesota.
Assembly takes preliminary action on
vacation of Third street for cold storage
plant.
Bar of St. Paul pays an impressive
tribute to memory of Henry .T. Horn.
National Buttermaker's association re
quests two Minnesota men to act as
judges.
Testing of dairy breeds of cows proposed
for St. Louise exposition.
Charles H. Worthen, formerly of St.
Paul, kills himself and wife in New York
bearding house.
DOMESTIC—
Justice Gaynor, Brooklyn, refuses to
enjoin strikers from, placing pickets.
.faderewski plays at a musicaic given
by the president "and Mrs. Roosevelt at
the White house.
Atlantic City is visited by $175,0J0 fire
that destroys the famous beard walk
and twelve hotels.
Sensational death of a juror in Tanke
case will be investigated.
Officers at Fort Sheridan fear a con
spiracy among the prisoners confined
tli ere.
Allied People's Party of the United
States adopts a platform at Lincoln.
An American company buys American
rights and patents of the Marconi Wire
less Telegraph company.
Rock Island system has a number of
improvements in view that will increase
the company's mileage.
Congressmen probe deep into Danish
West Indie§ scandal, calling Abner Me-
Kinley aa a witness.
WASHIXGTOX—
Senate passes the bill to tax oleomar
garine.
Representative Stevens asserts Minne
sota delegation was misrepreaenttd as
to Cuba by former Senator Washburn.
SI'ORTIXG—
Twin City shooters still have chance
in Grand American Handicap.
National league affairs to be man
aged by Soden, Hart and Brush.
Tommy White, prize fighter, knocked
unconscious, died at hospital.
The St. Paul players have first chance
to practice.
Tommy Ryan gets the decision over
Billy Stift, of Chicago, at Kansas City.
RAILROADS— ""
It is reported that a triple alliance
may be formed between the Colorado &
Southern, the Rock Island and ihe
Colorado Fuel and Iron Company of Den
ver.
Changes are made in the operating de
partment of the Northern Pacific.
Supt. Kimberly, of the Northern Paci
fic, returns from McKenzie.
FOREIGN—
Gen. Dewet keeps President Steyn from
meeting Schalkberg and hope of peace
in South Africa grows dim.
Public funeral services held over re
mains of Cecil Rhodes at Capetown.
SCHEDULED TO OCCUR TODAY.
Metropolitan—Viola (Allen in "In the
Palace of the King," 8:15.
Grand—Vaudeville, 8:15. •
Star—Topsey Turvey Burlesquers, 2:30
and 8:15.
Robert A. Smith Business Men's club,
Raudenbush hall, 8. •
Rev. G. Morgan Campbell at House of
Hope church, 2:30 and 8.
Anti-Vaccination society, Central
hall, 8.
Woman's Civic league meeting, Room
1004, N. Y. Life building.
MOVEMENTS OF STEAMSHIPS.
Port. Arrived. Sailed.
New York ... La Lovie.
New York ... Crefeld. ~
New York ...• American.
Singapore ....Hyson.
Liverpool ....Georgian.
Liverpool .... lonian.
Liverpool .... Teutonic .
Madeira Deubigshire
Havre La Touraine.
Naples Hohenzollexn
Port Said .... Moyune.
Hamburg .... — Numantla
Queenstown . Westernland
Queonstown . Germanic.
Manila „ Indromeda.
Rotterdam .. :statendam.
NEWS INDEX.
I—Oleomargarine's Fate Sealed.
Probe Danish West Indies Scandal. ,
New National Party Formed. •
Dewet Opposed to Peace. .
Great Fire in Atlantic City. ""
Courts Differ in Labor Decisions.
2—St. Paul Lawyers Honor Horn.
Trust Status to Be Probed.
Work for Cold Storage Plant.
Assembly Passes Armory Law.
Butler Judges in Demand.
3—News of the Northwest.
4—Editorial.
New York Letter.
News of the Theaters.
s—Tommy Ryan Defeats Stift.
National League Lacks President. i
Sporting News of the Day.
6—News for the Women.
7—News From Minneapolis.
B—News of the Railroads.
Want Advertisements.
&—Bears Rule Grain Market.
Railroad Shares Go Up.
News of the Markets.
10—Force Fight on Steel Trust.
College Will Aid Sports.
Arbor Day to Be Celebrated. . „■,_;■
CIRL JUMPS OVER FALLS
DELIA TANSEY, OF BUFFALO, LEAPS
INTO THE NIAGARA FLOOD.
NIAGARA FALLS, N. T., April 3.—
Delia Tansey, of Buffalo, went over the
American falls at 6 o'clock this evening.
It was the most sensational cataract sui
cide in years. The girl jumped over the
railing of Goat island bridge, about ten
feet from shore.
William Connors, of Liverpool, Eng.,
who was on the bridge at the time, ran
down the shore and waded into the river.
A rake was passed to him, which he suc
ceeded in fastening in her clothes. Miss
Tansey begged piteously to be saved.
He tried to draw the woman toward the
shore, but her clothing tore and she was
carried over the brink of the falls. Two
hundred people saw the woman go to her
FRIDAY MORNING. APRIL 4, 1902.—TEN PAGES.
KILLS WIFE
AND HIMSELF
CHARLES H. WORTHEX, FORMERLY
OF ST. PAUL. DEAD IN
NEW YORK
FINANCIAL JWORRY THE CAUSE
He Was for Years Connected Witli
Powers Dry Goods Company
—Went Ea«t In
1593.
IS SAID HE PASSED BAD CHECK
Charles H. "Worthen, for many years a
prominent business man of this city, yes
terday killed his wife and committed sui
cide in a boarding house at 49 West
Ninety-fom-th street. New York. They
were found dead in their room
terday afternoon. The wife's throat wa3
cut and there was a bullet hole in her
head. The husband's throat" was cut and
the main artery in his left leg was sev
ered. A revolver clutched tightly in the
hsnd of the dead man lay with its muzzle
close to his head, but only one chamber
was empty. Worthen passed as a pro
moter, with an office at 10 Barclay street.
Worthen was for years connected with
the Powers Dry Goods company, of this
city, as secretary and treasurer, and lived
first at 206 Nelson avenue, and later at
407 Holly avenue. In 1893 he removed to
New York.
Met Aeeident in 1875.
He was born in Lebanon, N. H., snme
thing over fifty years ago. He was a son
S^^s^^^Z^Z^y^-^ ■ gi saw"**" ' ._' c "
of George W. Worthen, one of the most
prominent merchants of his day in North
ern New Hampshire. In 1875 Charles
Worthen started for Chicago, where he
waa to be admitted into partnership in
the firm of Field Leiter & Co. On the
way he was one of the victims of a great
railway disaster on the Grand Trunk.
Both his legs were amputated as a re
sult of his injuries'. He sued the Grand
Trunk for damages and the case was
most stubobrnly fought. Gen. Benjamin
F. Butler was Wdrthen's lawyer and he
secured $47,000 damages.
Financial Trouble the Canae.
Financial trouble is the only reason for
the tragedy that can be assigned by those
who knew the couple. The man, it is
said, had given a check on a bank in
which he had no funds. He leaves two
brothers and a sister. One of tne
brothers, William D. Mann, was long as
sociated with the Powers Dry Goods
company, first as salesman and later as
superintendent. He left the city last year.
The other brother lives in Lebanon, N. H.
Feared Another Operation.
Special dispatches to The Globe
from New York state that Worthen had
been despondent for some time, suffering
considerably from the effects of the am
putations performed nearly twenty years
ago. He had been heard to say that he
dreaded the prospect of having to un
dergo- another operation in the near fu
ture. The dispatches also state that he
had a sister in St. Paul, Mrs. Clara
Maun, but the only Clara Mann .in ihe
directory lives at 237 Thomas street, but
she is not a relative of Worthen, her
maiden name being Effers.
DEBATERS AT CHICAGO
IIXXESOTA MEETS MICHIGAN TO.
NIGHT FOR THE CHAMPIONSHIP.
Special to The Globe.
CHICAGO, 3.—Debating team*
representing Cue Universities of Minne
sota and Michigan will battle for th-»
championship in the Western University
Hall Fine Arts building tomorrow Mich
igan will be represented by Hugo Son
nenschein, a Chicago boy; L O Meies
and Andrew J. O'Connor. Hugh T ' Ms-
Clear, Willis I. Norton and Benjamin
Drake Jr. will speak for Minnesota.
This will be the final contest in the
tournament, held under the auspices of
the central Debating league. Minnesota
has already defeated Chicago in a pre
liminary contest, and Michigan has beat
en IsorUiwesteru.
ITALY STOPS AUTO RACE
PREMIER'S PROHIBITORY DECREL
CAUSES IXDIGXATIOX.
NEW YORK, Aprii 3.—Great indignation
has been caused among French auto
mobilists of the news just received, says
the Paris correspondent of the Tribune.
Orders have been issued prohibiting the
Abassia to Nice automobile race en Ital
ian territory.
Yesterday the prefect of Coni, the stage
on the way to Turin, issued a decree for
bidding the race on. territory under his
jurisdiction.
French automobilists held an indigna
tion meeting in Turin and sent a telegram
to the premier, requesting him to annual
the prefect's decree.
Instead of doing so, Signor Zanardegi
went further than the prefect and forbade
the race on the whole Italian territory.
A3 the French authorities had sup
pressed it on French soil nothing is now
left but Austria.
The race is thus definitely killed.
MRS. HAINES ACQUITTED
"WAS CHARGED WITH MfI'RDERIXG
HER TWO-YKAR-OLD DAIGUTER.
MOUNT HOLLY, N. J., April 3.—Mrs.
Mabel Fentcn Haines was today acquitted
of the charge of murdering her two-year
old step-daughter, Gwendoline, at De
lanco, a year ngo. It was alleged that
the child's death was due to inhuman
treatment by Mrs. Haines. The cas« has
been on trial for two weeks.
PRAISE ALTGELD'S WORK
lIEXRY GEORGE AXD OTHERS El.
LOGIZE DEAD LEADER.
NEW YORK, April 3.-A workingmen's
memorial service in honor of the late
John P. Altgeld, former governor of II-
A REAL SI&N OF SPRING.
linois, was held tonight at Cooper Union.
A. J. Boulton called the meeting to
order, and Henry George Jr. was intro
duced as the chairman for the evening.
Mr. George said there never was a great
er hero than Altgeld.
John N. Parsons said it was to be re
gretted that the tribute to Altgeld could
not have been paid him before his death.
"Although dead," he said, "his works
live after him."
"What I say here tonight." said Clar
ence S. Dajrs»w, of Chicago, "will not
make those who hated Altgeld feel any
more kindly toward the dead hero. He
never cringed nor fawned to friend or
foe. He believed in equal rights for all
men."
Resolutions were passed expressing re
spect far the membery of Gov. Altgeld
as "one who.fought valiantly and died
gloriously in fhe greatest of all causes—
that of humanity.''
IRISH HONOR REDMOND
DUBLIX GIVES HIM FREEDOM OP
CITY, AXD ALSO M'HIGH.
DUE LIN, April 3.—The" freedom of the
city of Dublin was conferred today on
John Redmond, chairman of tne United
Irish league and of the Irish parlia
mentary party, and Patrick A. McHugh,
the Nationalist member of parliament for
the north division of Leitrim, who, with
\ nomas O'Donnell, recently made a tour
of the United States in the interest of the
Irish league.
The lord mayor, Sir Thomas D. Pile, in
a speech, said the freedom was conferred
as a recognition of their services to the
Nationalist cause. The corporation of
Dublin desired to mark the enormous suc
cess of the party under Mr. Redmond's
leadership and their admiration of the
courage with which Mr. McHugh had
fought for National interests and against
the infamous system of jury-packing.
Mr. Redmond, in replying, said he re
garded Dublin's action as an earnest evi
dence of her fidelity to the principle of
self-government. The local government
act had created the first free representa
tive bodies in Ireland; had ended the pos
sibility of a long continuance of the rule
of Ireland by force and coercion and had
brought nearer the day when a truly
National government would »c restored.
DEWET FIGHTS
PEACE PLANS
BOER GEXERAL KEEPS PRESIDENT
STEYX FROM JOIXIXG SCHALK-
Bt'RGER'S PLAXS
LITTLE HOPE OF ENDING WAR
Inloss English Troops Are Able to
Crash Oat Antagonists, It
Seems, Diplomacy Will
Be a Failure.
MILNER APPEALS FOR FTI.NJDS
KROONSTAD, Orange River Colony,
April 3.—Acting President Schalkburger
has opened negotiations with President
Steyn, who has been located with De
larey and Kemp, but the whereabouts of
the party has not been ascertained. Da
wet has been located near Boshof.
It is believed that Gen. Dewet is in
fluencing President Steyn not to meet
Acting President Schalkburger.
DUNBAR. Natal, April 3.—General traf
fic is closed throughout the whole coun
try north of the Tugela river. The region
is stoutly protected by lines of block
houses extending from Ladysmith. Per
mits are required to enable people to pro
ceed beyond Colenso. The town guards
at Ladysmith, Dundee and New Castle
are under arms and have been recruited
to their full strengin.
PRETORT\, April 2.—Communications
have passed between President Steyn and
the Transvaal mission at Kroonstad, but
nothing is yet known of the result. The
majority of the military men and civil
ians here expect more from the continual
pressure of the troops than from the
present negotiations.
It is pointed out that once before, when
hard pressed, the Transvaalers showed a
desire for peace, but this was promptly
over-ridden by President Steyn. Noth
ing in the present situation, so far as
known, indicates that President Steyn is
less irreconcilable than previously. In
deed, the known facts seem to point to
a greater determination to continue the
struggle.
LONDON, April 4.—The Daily Chronic's
this morning says that Lord Miiner, the
British high commissioner in South Af
rica, has requested a credit of £3,000,000
for new railways and railway extensions
and connections in South Africa.
The government has decided to grant
£885,000 for this purpose, pending the dis
cussicn of the larg-er sum.
Lieut. Wittcn, one of the Australians
sentenced to penal servitude for life at
the same time the Australian officers were
sentenced to death for shooting and rob
bing Boers, who were traveling to Pieters
burg with the object of surrendering, has
arrived in England to serve his sentence.
He gives an account of the affair as fol
lows:
"One of their (the Australian) officers
had been murdered by Boers. Shortly
afterward the Australians captured a
number of Boers, including one wearing
the uniform of the murdered officer. They
immediately held a drum head court
martial, found the man guilty and order
ed him to be shot. For this the '/[us
tralians were arrested in October and
tried by court-martial. Their sentences,
after revision by the imperial government,
were communicated to them in February.
Two of the Australians were shot."
NEW YORK. April 3.—C01. Ricchiardi,
formerly an officer in the foreign corps
of the Boer army, and former Field Cor
net Baumann have just returned from
the southern part of Argentina, says a.
Buenos Ayrea dispatch to the Herald.
They say they have found splendid land
for stock breeding purposes in the. in
chudut territory. They will petition the
government for the privilege of establish
ing Boer colonies.
Three Boer families are already here.
Others from Portugal are expected to
come if grants of land can be obtained
from the Argentine government*
PRICE TWO CEXT3-J SRSjSSfi
ANTI-TRUST LAWS HIT
TEXAS COITIT MAKES IMPORTANT
RULING AGAINST THEM.
HOUSTON, Tex., April 3.—The decision
entered by the Austin court of appeals
in the case of the Shipper's Compress
company, is an important one. Aside
from the fact that the Texas anti-trust
laws are declared unconstitutional, the
court also declares tlj?t:
"One may, if financially able, acquire
much or all of the property of a given
class, provided the purchase was not
made for the purpose of injuring or ac
complishing- harmful results to the pub
lic; and from a bare exercise of this priv
ilege it cannot be inferred that the pur
pose and intention was to create a mo
nopoly or that a monopoly necessarily re
sults from such extensive acquisition."
SOLDIERS IN A PLOT
FORT SHERIDAX OFFICERS FEAR
A CONSPIRACY AMONG MILI
TARY PRISONERS
FOUR ESCAPE IN TWO DAYS
Private W. P. King,, the Last to Uain
His Liberty While Awaiting Trial
for Denertlon, and Extra
Precaution to Follow.
CHICAGO, April 3.-Fort Sheridan of
ficers, it is said, fear there Is a con
spiracy araung the military prisoners at
the post to escape, and extra precautions
are to be taken to guard the rest of the
prisoners.
W. P. King, a prisoner held for deser
tion, is the last one to escape from his
guard, making the fourth occupant of
the guardhouse to find his way to free
dom during the last two days.
King was a member of Company X,
first cavalry, and after desertion was
captured March 14, and was awaiting
trial. He disappeared while his compan
ions were watching the arrival of Gen.
Me Arthur, the new commandant. No
trace of him. has been found.
WYOMING MINE ON FIRE
ISLAZE SMOILDKRS TWENTY VIMIIs
-BREAKS OUT IXTEHMITIIOMLV.
CARBOX, Wya, April 3.-Tlie fire that
has been smouldering in the old No. ~
coal mine of the Union PaeirJc here, has
broken out afresh, and a force of men is
now engaged in walling up the mouth of
the fan shaft through which the smoke
and flames are issuing.
About twenty years ago a fire was
started in the mine, and being- unable to
control it, the company walled up the
shaft. At intervals or two or three years
tho fire has broken out in new pkiccs,
and for five consecutive years it burned
steadily.
The tire has undermined the country
for a radius of half a mile, and miners
say it will probably burn for an indefin
ite seriod.
HUBBARD'S BILL PASSED
IOWA SENATE ADOPTS IMPORTANT
ItAILHOAD MEASURE.
Special to The Globe.
DES MOINES, April B—The senato
late tonight took up what has been
known as the "Hubbard merger bill" and
passed it with but five dissenting votes.
It authorizes lowa railroads to extend
their iines into all o£her states, to own,
construct and buy railroads and to buy,
own and control stock and securities of
other roads in all other states.
The bill is said to have been drafted a*
the result of an agreement between the
railroads, particularly the Burlington and
Rock Island.
it was amended so as to forbid the con
solidation of competing lines in stales
adjacent to lowa. This is permitted in
states not adjacent to Jowa.
AUTHOR KILLS HIMSELF
DIBIT DE LA FOREST JUMPS FROM
FOURTH STORY WINDOW.
NEW YORK. April 3.-Dubut de la
Forest, forty-nine years old, a well known
writer of sensational serial stories after
the style of wavier de Montepin, has
committed suicide by throwing himself
out of a fourth story window, says a
Herald dispatch from Paris, xie had been
nervous and irritable for some days 1 past.
He breakfasted with his family and then
retired to his study, which overlooks the
corner of the avenue Trudaine and the
Rue Gerando.
After working a short time LaForest
opened a window and threw himself out.
He was picked up a corpse.
A note was found, saying that he was
tired of life.
MARCONI PATENTS SOLD
AMKRUAX COMPANY PIRCIIASES
RIGHTS FOR THIS COIVTRV.
IXJXDOX, April 3.-The Mar.-oni Wire
less Telegraph company has sold Its
American rights and patents to an Amer
ican company with a capital of $6,150,000.
May 29th
Coliseum Day,
It's & cold day when any
body gets left. There'll be
no cold weather between
now and V *****} **
Wage: -Earners' Day
M^y 29th.
DORAN FIRST
HEAD HUNTER
TURNED GOOD REPUBLICANS OIT
OF OFFICE TO MAKE \V W
FOR HIS FRIKMh
FOE OF GOOD GOVERNMENT
Candidates' Personal Relations With
Former Mayor and Their Political
Activity Sole Qualification.* to
Important Appointments.
TAXPAYERS FOOT THE BILLS
"Ultra partisanship in the distrii
of municipal patronage began w r ■
advent of Doran as mayor," said a :
inent Republican yesterday. I ■
man, who has for many years '■>■-■ n prom
inent In the working ranks of th<
publican party and as a -
dldate will support Mayor Sn
common with many other thinking Re
publicans ho takes decided
the statement made by Chaim
■ter, of the Republican comml
he characterized Mr. Doran ■■■■
partisan, capable and lair
Continuing he said:
"Mr. Webster la as far fn m
in his statement of Mr. DOl
partisan character
B
Chester K. Smith. Ultra
the distribution of n
b. gan with the advent 0* I
or. He was notoriously
and the question of fitnesa
into Hs calculations in d
appointment of an employe oi mi ml
an executive board. The appi
lations to Doran-3 wing of the part.
the amount of pull he enjoyed wer<
solo qualifications in his
tive ethics. Everyone branded D
orat bad to go, no matter how ca]
he might be or how insignificant th<
tion he occupied. Jlis bead hunt:. |
nut stop on party lines, either.
Dismissed Good Republican*.
"His favorites had to be taken care of,
and they were to the exclusion of go<«l
Republicans as well as good Democrats.
The icsult was an administration from
the effects of which the city has not yet
entirely recovered. Just as an instance
of Mr. Doran's non-partisan character
the voters will do well to recall the ap
pointment of Harry Franklin to the
school board to succeed Anthony Ycerg.
They boast of Mr. Doran's record in thts
council. Well, as a member of the coun
cil Mr. Doran was a member of the com
mittee which tried and convicted Frank
lin. Then when Doran became mayor ho
appointed Franklin to the school board.
An action, according.. to the Doran cod*
probably both honest, non-partisan ami
entirely consistent. But there are a lot
cf Republicans who will not vote for a
return of that kind of consistency. On.j
of the purely non-partisan acts of Mayor
Doran will forever prevent him from
again securing the opportunity to re
peat it. Mr. Upham, a life-long Repub
lican, was removed from the l'brary
board to make room for Edward Feld
hauscr, who at the-time was a Doran
enthusiast, or supposed to be. Mr Up
ham had been retained by Mayor Smith
as a gentleman whose services were,
frcm his long connection with the br>.ir<i
and his business ability and connections,
invaluable to an institution on an inse
cure footing.
Expensive Xon-I'nrflwnii \|i point
■seats.
"Mr. Upham did not appeal to Doran
as a politician and had to step down ami
out for Feldhauser. That non-partisan
appointment cost the city about $80,000.
Mr. Doran's management of th appoint
ments to the fire board to get rid of Chief
Jackson was another instance of his non
partisan character. His partisanship was
of an order so rank that the Republican
newspapers, now obliged to support him,
rated him and his administration roundly;
and repeatedly. I am a Republican and
I believe in good government by the Re
publicans, but Mr. Doran demonstrated
that he !s not the man for the office.
The contrast between the police depart
ment of Doran's administration, when it
was unsafe for out.'., wife or sister to be
out of doors after night, and the present
administration of police affairs, should be
sufficient indication of the difference to
Intelligent voters to insure Mayor Smfth'a
re-election by the largest majority ever;
given him."
MEETS ANOTHER FROST
REESE SAYS SMITH'S COHMKIK I \ X .,
SII'POHT IS DISHOSKST.
Darius F. Reese, the principal S]
at a Republican meeting in th<
ward last night charged the Joi
wholesalers of St. Paul with
Mayor Smith with the intent t> p
la return a reduction of their t.
prived of any decent argument In
of the candidacy of the I:
oralty aspirants, the Republfc
entered upon a campaign of vile .
tions» and Reese led the van with .-..
tack upon the. business ti
Paul In an attempt as ridicule
tile to stir up race hatreds.
The meeting of the P*
publican league club at Seventh
Continued on Seventh I'uk«-.

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