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VOL. XXV.—NO. 96.
SENATE SLOW
TO AID CUBA
RECIPROCITY PROPOSITION IS
PLACED LAST ON CALENDAR AND
ITS PROSPECTS DIMINISH
OPPONENTS ARE IN GLEE
Senators Burrows, Nelson and Other
Republicans Will Have Demo
cratic Aid in Fighting Pas
sage of the Measure
LONG DEBATES ARE EXPECTED
FROM THE GLOBE BUREAU,
Wash in felon, D. C.
WASHINGTON, April s.—The steering
committee of the senate today gave Cu
ban reciprocity what may prove to be a
decisive bl«iw. At its meeting this morn
ing it was determined that after the Chi
nese exclusion bill shall have been dis
posed of the Philippine government bill
Is to be taken up. Consideration of this
till is to be followed by the Nicaraguan
canal bill.
Republican leaders in the senate are
more interested in the Philippine bill than
in reciprocity or any other proposed leg
islation that is now before them. They
want the Lodge bill passed and passed
quickly. Democrats generally want to see
the canal bill become a law. Their anxiety
for canal legislation is well known to the
Republican leaders, and so it was decided
to put the Philippine bill ahead of it in
hope of cutting off debate ton it.
It is possible that this hope will r.ot be
realized. Democratic members generally
declare that the Philippine bill cannot
pass without a full and free discussion.
Many Republican senators also want to
make speeches on the bill. It is probable
tlat altogether a month will be consumed
in this debate.
Consideration of the canal bill will also
extend over a considerable time so that
there is little likelihood of the Cuban rec
iprocity bill being reached before the lat
ter part of May. At that time considera
tion of the appropriation bills will be on,
and this will still further delay its consid
eration. \\ jien it is' taken up it will be
bitterly opposed by Senator Burrows, Sen
ator nelson and other Republicans from
beet sugar states, and several Democrats
Btate that they have speeches ready that
•Will take them a week each to get over.
The opponents of the measure claim
that they can, under the rules which
allow unlimited debate, prevent a vote
at this session, and that they will be abte
to choke it off in the t>hort session next
winter.
This is the present state of affairs, but
it is possible that senators who now op
pose the bill may decide to withdraw
from the fight and allow the bill to pass
before adjournment.
Three Reports From Minority.
Three separate minority reports on tho
Cuban reciprocity bill were tiled today by
Representatives •Robertson, of Louisiana;
Newlands, of Nevada, and Cooper, or
i, all Democrats. Mr. Robertson Baya
In part:
"The bill, if enacted into law, would nf
forcl relief to tho Cuban treasury. J be
lieve that the benefits would go Into the
pockets of a few sugar planters owningl
thousands of acres of land. The 20 per
cent reduction would not go to the relief
of the Cuban i«?ople, but would go im
mediately and entirely to fill the already
overflowing coffers of the sugar refineries
of the United States, known by the name
of the sugar trust."
Mr. Robertson expresses astonishment
that cne of his Democratic associates (Mr.
lfcdellan), in his report, refers to the
fcill as an enunciation of the "Democratic
doctrine of reciprocity." Mr. Robertson
adds:
"It seems to me that that kind of reci
procity ia absolutely impossible under a
Democratic tariff. Should the tariff ever
be revised on the line and plane of the
principles of the Democratic party, reci
procity would be entirely unnecessary and
impossible, as the rati'S would not be
prohibitive and the extension of our trade
would a.s a natural consequence (iow from j
the imposition of such tariff rates without
the necessity of reciprocity.
Think* Law Helps Trust.
"The bill is highly i n the interest of t.ie
trust, grants no relief to Cuba nor to the
people of the United States, violates tli*
fundamental principles of our policy, In
terferes grievously with the international
relations of a weak and dependent re
public which is attempting to follow out
the dictates of this country, and must or
necessity become involved in international
entanglements with many important na
tions and might involve us, in order to
protect Cuba, in serious international
complications."
Mr. Newlands makes an elaborate pre-
Ecntation reviewing the political and com
mercial phases. In conclusion, he says:
"The American people are becoming tir
ed of sentimental legislation. We have
spent $300,000,000 in a war to frte Cuba.
We have spent over $500,000,000 In attempt
ing to carry civilization to the Philip
pines. It is now proposed by the senti
mentalists that we should inaugurate leg
islation changing our finance system, not
for the benefit o£.the American consumers,
nor for the benelit of our agricultural
classes, which thus far have received lit
tle of the benefit of our financial legisla
tion, but for the purpose of diverting to
the Cuban planters, in order to relievo
their threatened economic distress, a very
large amount of money.
\ <•« I:i nils Desires Annexation.
"I am willing to extend this sentimental
legislation to Cuba for a reasonable period,
provided It Is accompanied by an invita
tion to Cuba to become a part oTthe Unit
ed States. I wish to give Cuba full op
portunity of deliberation, and I am will
ing to relieve her necessities so that this
deliberation shall not be disturbed by
acute economic distress, but [j-am oppos
ed to the legislation unless we give Cuba
clearly and unequivocally to understand
that if sl^fevishes commercial union witn
this counfW, and conditions of commerce
not enjoyed by other independent nations,
ehe must seek political union with us in
the form of annexation as a part of ilie
republic."
Mr. Cooper's report Is brief an<l ex
presses general opposition to the bill
The beet sugar opposition to -ie tariff
reduction of 20 per cent in the house has
outline,! its campaign. Representative
- aa soon as the bill is before the
is to offer the Babcock bill as an
amendment to it. He will be ruled out of
on the ground that tne Babcock bill
Is not germane. Morris will appeal from
the decision of the <2halr, supported by
-uitatives William Allen Smith, of
Michigan, and Tawney, of Minnesota,
It is said the Democrats will vote quite
Solidly to sustain the appeal from the
cha!r, and there are grave fears that
th« re are enough insurgents added to the
Democrats to overturn the ways and
means committee plan and adopt the
Continued on Sixth rase.
. ■' - . - : ' ■ - - ."■ .-._;"-..-" ■'■ i • ■
DAY'S NEWS SUMMARIZED
For St. Paul and Vicinity—Fair Sunday
and Monday; northwest winds.
FOREIGN—
Five persons are killed, twenty are fa
tally injured and in all 125 are hurt at a
football game in Glasgow.
Funeral train bearing Cecil Rhodes'
body passes through Kim'beriy and
whole population shows dead magnate
honor.
LOCAL—
Assemblyman Whitcomb Teiterates
statement that good asphalt paving is
worth $2.50 per square yard.
City about to start suit against City
Railway company for damage done by
electrolysis.
School inspectors refute imputation of
carelessness in keeping accounts.
Pint of whisky bought in St. Paul by
state dairy inspector contains thirty drops
of fusel oil.
Prohibition party files list of candidates
with the city clerk.
Real estate business in St. Paul is
unusually brisk this year.
State dairy and food department se
cures twenty-six convictions in three
months.
Coliseum movement is gaining ground
every day.
Twenty-five helpers and chipp^rs at
Hoist and Derrick works go on st
Board of control appoints steward at St.
Peter hospital to succeed J. M. Rogers,
dismissed.
Report of dairy department shows that
Minnesota manufacturers comply with
food laws.
DOMESTIC—
President Roosevelt may come West
and speak at Sunday school convention
at Denver.
Both police and saloonkeepers declare
that New York will suffer a dry Sun
day.
Many Indians are suffering in famine
in Arizona.
Grand jury unearths systematic scheme
of bribery in St. Louis and is scathing
in denunciation of house of delegates.
President Roosevelt orders investiga
ticii of camps said to be maintained by
British soldiers lv Louisiana, while
Boers force the fighting in South Africa.
Senator Hanna lauds union labor in a
speech on arbitration.
POLITICAL—
Noted Democratic Cluib of Chicago
pledges support to Mayor Rose, ot Mil
waukee, i?s a candidate for the presi
dential nomination.
WASHINGTON—
Capt. Joseph B. Coghlan is restored to
full rank arid is in line for admiral. .
House committee reports favorably
upon Fowler's finance bill.
Senate blocks aid for Cuba by tariff
provisions, putting the reciprocity meas
ure last on the calendar.
SOUTHWEST—
Gov. La Follette takes a hand in the
municipal tangle at Hayward, "Wis.
George W. Rood, Republican candidate
for mayor of Grand Rapids, Mich.,
dies.
RAIiLROADS—
Gould interests secure a Pacific coast
terminus at Los Angeles.
Howard Elliott is made vice president
of the Burlington system.
Tourist sleeping cars between here and
Chicago are not a success.
Wabash said to be after the Western
Maryland railroad.
Railroad accidents of the week.
SPORTING—
St. Paul beats St. Louis by 3-0 in exhi
bition baseball game.
H. C Hirschy. of Minneapolis, wins
great American handicap shoot and be
oomes champion wing shot of America.
SCHEDULED TO OCCUR TODAY.
Metropolitan—"The Pride of Jennico,"
8:15.
Grand—"Fiddle Dee Dee," 8:15.
Star—"Victorian Burlesquers," 2:30 and
8:15.
German-American veterans meet at 8.
Mass meeting, helpers and ehippers,
Federation hall, 3.
MOVEMENTS OF STEAMSHIPS.
Port. Arrived. Sailed.
New York—St. Louis Rotterdam.
Now York Q. Waluersee.
New York—Minnehaha ..Mongolian.
New York Mesaba.
New York Umbria.
New York.... Hamburg.
New York— La Bratagne.
Yokohama ... Gleno.a;le.
Yokohama ... Tartar.
Yokohama ... Coptic.
Antwerp Kensington.
Havre Champagne.
Boston Sylvania.
Boston Sardinia.
Cherbourg ... Philadelphia.
Liverpool Saxonia.
Liverpool Patricia.
Liverpool Lahn,
Gt-noa Hohenzollern.
AFFECTS NEBRASKA LAW
OLEO BILL. PASSED BY CONGRESS
CONFLICTS WITH STATUTE.
LINCOLN, Neb., April s.—The Nebraska
oleomargarine law has been found to be
in conflict with the bill recently passed
by congress. The Nebraska law, instead
of placing a tax on the colored product,
prohibits its sale entirely.
Food Commissioner Bassett recently be
gan a crusade against the sal 3of colored
oleomargarine, securing one conviction
and bringing prosecutions in Sixteen other
cases. It is believed that the national law,
when it becomes effective, will make
prosecutions under the Nebraska law in
effective.
TEST ON WAR-TAX ACT
SUIT BROUGHT TO RECOVER REV
EXI'ES PAID UNDER THE LAW.
NEW YORK, April s.—Dr. Herman C.
If. Herold, collector of internal revenue
for the Fifth district of New Jersey, has
been served with a summons in a suit for
$1,900,0C0 in the New Jersey supreme court.
The action is brought by the American
Sugar Refining company, which sues to
recover the amounts paid to Collector
Herold for taxes under the w Tar tax act.
It is understood the suit is to test the
constitutionality cf the law.
DiES_AS HE PREDICTED
DROPS DEAD AFTER TELLING EM-
BALMERS TO CALL.
Special to The Globe.
LA CROSSE, Wis., April 3.—On his way
home John Dimler, aged sixty-rive, a
prominent citizen of La Crosse, stopped at
an undertaking establishment anil noti
fied the embalmers that they could call
for his remains before morning.
With a laugh which led to believe he
was joking, he continued^home and ate a
| hearty supper. He appeared in the best
I of health.
A moment later he stepped upon the
front porch of his residence anl dropped
<!• ad. One hour later Miller Uro-s, the
undertakers to whom he made his strange
statement, were preparing him for cue
grave
SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 6, 1902.—TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES.
BRIBERS RULE
GREAT GITY
GRAND JURY IX ST. LOUIS IN
EARTHS FACTS OF WIDE-
SPREAD CORRUPTION
SCATHING IN ITS REPORT
Investigation Covers Ten Year* and
Shown That Members of House of
Delegates Have Systematic-
all)' Sold I'ntncliiscH
CONDEMNS PROMINENT MEN
ST. LOUIS, April s.—Startling charges
are made by the February granu jury,
which has been investigating bribery and
official corruption in the municipal assem
bly, in it 3 final report to Judge O Neil
Ryan in the crimnal court.
The report declares that the people of
St. Louis have but a vague conception
of the extent to wb\ch corruption and
venality have for the past ten years ex
isted among the sworn officers and pub
lic servants. It finds the true condition
of affairs "almost too appalling for be
lief." A tribute is paid to Joseph W. Folk,
the circuit attorney under whose leader
ship the investigation is being made.
In part, the report reads as follows:
A far-reaching and systematic scheme
of corruption has been carried on for
years by nvembers of the municipal as
sembly. The members form what are
callcu 'combines' for the special purpose
of holding up prospective legslation until
their demanus In the way of money con-
Ssl^-=~*- ;>fl^~J^* <**Sfc ■'■ :!"*i«»' Vi'iii'tii' ■" •-" "■' ':' bBwSM '--..■■"' ■,"*~'-"" 1 »"-•■••• f"*'.->? f,''.'; t ' . /;
c Bs t^.^^" ■—■- ~~- ■'■- -«, *'..***' ..*.! 3T v9ssß •**^^t"'* »•-**'' r» •• ' • *V" t i„^ ."* !f * •
~$ . Ruins of Bui/ding at Tenth and Minnesota' Streets, the v'Y.;T -''/\- *" ; -;'." . 5
[l'& completion of which was prevented by the panic of 1893. /••::.-'V::-'.-%\'v'vvi-^V;V ' • ••'• :'•"• -:: ■ -
p;V ■.- ; ■ -.■;.;■- . ...: v";' ■■■;-" . i l,/ ■ ■■'..- ":V .-*V'- •
■t| /?( f/73 r/g/?i is an outline of the structure the or- „■;■ ■■':■'-■ .\*^.: ■•*■'*/' ; '!■
p ganization hopes' to erect in the mar future. '' p ■".*', .>:": 1 ;• ,/'* Vv''~:*V',.- : '?si£& ; *i!
Ruins of Building at Tenth and Minnesota Streets, the
completion of which was prevented by the panic of 1893.
At the right is an outline of the structure which the or
ganization hopes to erect in the mar future.
sideration are complied with. Instead of
discharging the .duties of the office for
the public good and in accordance with
their oath they become organized gangs
for plunder, using their office to enrich
themselves at the pejple's expense.
"Our investigation, covering a period of
ten years, shows that with few excep
tions no ordinance has Letn passed where
in valuable privileges or franchises are
granted until those interested in the pas
sage thereof have paid the legislators the
money demanded for action in the par
ticular case. No municipal corporation
has ever had its most valuable franchises
so recklessly and scandalously disposed
of for a consideration which found its
way not to the city treasury, but to the
itching palms of the public pilferers.
"The persons against whom indictments
for bribe-giving and bribe-taking have
been returned are but a small percentage
of those whom inquiry convinces us de
serve to wear the garb of convicts."
Condemns City Legislators.
These indictments were returned by the
grand jury today:
Bribery—Robert N. Snyder.
Attempted bribery — Edward Butler,
John Becker.
Perjury—George J. Kobush.
In concluding the report the jury says:
"We have had before us many of those
who have been and most of those who are
now members of the house of delegates.
We regret to report that "we found a num
ber of those utterly illiterate and lacking
in ordinary intelligence, unable to give a
better reason for favoring or opposing a
measure than a desire to act wiih the
majority. In some no trace of mentality
or morality could be found; in others a
low order of training appeared, united
with base cunning, groveling instincts
and sordid desires. Unqualified to re
s-pond to the ordinary requirements ol
life, they are utterly incapable of com
prehending the significance of an ordi
nance, and are incapacitated both by na
ture and by training to be the makers
of laws. The choosing of such to be leg
islators makes a travesty of justice, sets
a premium on incampetency. and delib
erately poisons the very source of law.
"These men, through their corrupt
agents, aproach the legislative represent
ative of powerful combinations or cor
porations competing for valuable fran
chises, demand and receive of them sums
of money ranging from $100 to $100,000 tor
their individual votes and influence.
"From the evidence before us it ap
pears that an official of the city govern
ment boasted of the fact that he had
made $25,000 a year out of his official po
sition, which paid a legitimate salary of
but $300 a year. Another official, accord
ing to evidence before us, agreed with
one interest to do an official act for «7j,000,
and afterward from the opposing inter
ests accepted the sum of $100,000, for do
ing the very opposite of that which he
agreed to do for $75,00*.
One Vote Brings $50,000.
One legislator received in cash at his
own residence the sum of $50,000 for his
vote on a pending measure. This was
Continued on Sixth Page.
IRELAND SEES NO FICHT
ARCHBISHOP SHORT IX DISCUSSING
REPORTED OPPOSITION.
Special to The Globe.
NEW YORK, April s.—Archbishop Ire
land, when seen at the Fifth Avenue ho
tel today in regard to the cablegram
from Rome stating that his success in
obtaining the appointment of an Ameri
can commission to negotiate with the
pope on the Philippine question had
aroused against him all the reactionary
elements in the church, said:
"I know absolutely nothing about it,"
When pressed further the archbishop
again declare! that he was "absolutely
ignorant Ton the subject."
The cablegram states that the move
ment against the archbishop was led Dy
the Jesuits, who fear to see him ap
pointed a cardinal and who are very ac
tive at the Vatican to prevent such an
appointment. The opponents of Ireland
are said to declare that if another
American cardinal is to be appointed it
must be Archbishop Corrigan.
"I know very little about the commis
sion itself," said the archbishop, "and
about the antagonism in the church I
know nothing."
BAN ON PASSION PLAY
CLERGY ORDERED TO ISSUE WASH.
ING AGAINST ITS PRODUCTION.
MONTREAL, April s.—La Semaine. a
religious weekly paper, the olllcial organ
of Mgr. Bruchesi, will in its issue of next
Monday inform the Catholic clergy of Hie
diocese of Montreal that it is their duty
to warn members of their congi*.gatio/j
that it is forbidden to attend the presenta
tion of the passion play which has been
presented at the Monument National the
at< r in this city for the last two woks.
In discussing his action Mgr. Bmchesi
said that he hesitated taking a step which
would cause financial loss to anyone. The
decree had been issued only after a care
ful investigation.
DREAM OF THE ST. PAUL Y. M. C. A.
POLICE TO ENFORCE LAW
new Yonic 1.1 Kirn Mili pkomise
TO CLOSE SALOO.VS SLADAY
Members Pledge Themselves to Ar
rest All Offenders Asr?»iHst the
Excise Statute All Over
the; City.
NEW YORK, April s.—At a meeting of
the Patrolmen's Association of Greater
New York today it was decided that the
policemen would do all in their power to
keep closed every liquor saloon in the
city tomorrow.
Each of the eighty-one precincts of llie
city was represented at the meeting. A
number of the men present pledged them
selves to make arrests for excise violation,
even though they might not be on duty
when such cases were called to their at
tention.
NEW YORK, April 5. — Twenty-eight
local bodies, representing 1 S.OOO saloon
keepers, forming the Liquor Dealers' As
sociation of Now York city and vicinity,
at special meetings just held, are stated
to have decided to Compel the police to
enforce every blue law on the statute
book next Sunday.
They propose that not only shall sa
loons be closid on that day, but that
every store and place of business open
contrary to law shajl be shut up as well.
This move is in retaliation to the sudden
action of the polte*? in enforcing the law
against the? saloonmen.
LEE NOT A CANDIDATE
HE DOES NOT WANT TO BE MIN
ISTER OR CONSUL TO CUBA.
CARLOTTESVILLE, Va., April 5.—
Gen. Fitzhugh Lee authorized tne Asso
ciated Press to say that he is not a can
didate for the position of minister or
consul general to Cuba. He seeks no dip
lomatic position whatsoever.
MANAGLEDATTHEGRAVE
JAMES ROWE, BOUND TO JAIL
GUARDS, ATTEKDS FIXKUAL. ,
NEW YORK, April s.—Manacled to tv.-o
officers, James Rowe, formerly a book'
keeper for a well known concern, has
been permitted to attend the funeral of
his wife, at New Haven, Conn.
A yisar ago Rowe was arrested for em
bezzlement, and sentenced to serve a
year In .iall. His wif£ was heartbroken
and died in the hospital.
DEATH MET AT
FOOTBALL GAME
FIVE KILLED, TWENTY FATALLY
INJURED AND 125 INJURED BY
FALL OF GRAND STAND
CROWDS BREAK THE SUPPORTS
Spectators Tbrown to Ground Are
"Piled Five Deep, but Despite the
Horror of the Accident the
Contest Is Continued
THRONGS WEIGHT IS BLAMED
GLASGOW, April 5. — The struggle of
the crowds which gathered at Ibrox
Park today to witness the last interna
tional association football content be
tween teams from England and Scotland
causi fl the collapse of a portion of one
of the spectators' terraces, resulting in
the death of five persons and the injury
of 123 others, twenty of whom wi'.l die.
' 'When the game began 70.C00 spectators
were on the ground, and an imm?nse
crowd had gathered outside. Being un
able to obtain admittance, this crowd
broke down some of the barriers and
swarmed upon the field, whereupon the
police charged and drove the intruders
back upon the terraces and peats, with
the result that the railings dividing the
crowds were broken and the people were
thrown over each other.
In the frantic struggle toward the ex
its the pressure toward the upper por-
tion of the westerly tfrrn.ee was so great
that 100 feet of the highest part of the
structure collapsed under the weight of
the crowd driven upon it, precipitating
the mass of people to the ground, sixty
feet below. The injured were piled in
heaps, wedged in with broken wood.
Many Suffer Internal Injuries.
The onlookers hesitated to approach
the danglinff structure at first, but final
ly began to Utilise portions of the broken
barriers as stretchers. A hundred of the
mora seriously injured were carried to
the pavilion and to spaces in the rear of
the stand?. A majority of the victims
are suffering from broken ribs and frac
tured limbs, while some sustained In
ternal injuries.
Those most severely hurt were later re
moved in ambulances to infirmaries and
ether sufferers were sent in cabs to sur
geries. Six of the injured are not likely
to recover.
Up to midnight five deaths had been
reported as the result of the accident,
while in the cases of twenty of the other
victims all hope of recovery has been
abandoned.
An investigation into the causes of the
disaster shows that the breakdown of the
terrace had begun before the structure
was subjected to its severest strain, and
it is now believed that the imal collapse
was caused more directly by tne efforts
of those nearest the first break thun by
the additional weight of those who rushed
upon the stand from below. The terrace,
although supported by iron girders,
swayed and cracke-a ominously under the
movements of its frantic occupants.
Game Continue* After I!sh:is(<':-.
The Ftfansrest feature of the affair is the
feet wide and contained 12 tiers of seats.
The injured In many cases were lying
five or six deep and It is considered mar
velous that there were not more fatali
ties. One man hung by his boot, which
caught in a splintered beam, head down
ward, lifteey ieet above the ground.
Finally his boot was cut and the man
dropped into a. sheet held below.
The strangest feature of the affair is
fact that the crowd in the other parts
of the grounds failed entirely to realize
the extent of the disaster and tho game
was played to a finish, resulting in a
draw. Kven the management appeared
to be unaware of the seriousness of the
accident until it was announced after the
wvnclusion of the game.
WANT ROSE PRESIDENT
CHICAGO DEMOCRATS IXDORSE
MILWAUKEE MAYOR.
MILWAUKEE, Wls., April 5.— a
largely attended-meeting of the Demo
crats of this city at th« Exposition
building tonight to ratify the election
of Hon. D. S. Rose for mayor of Milwau
kee, the Cook County (111.) Democratic
club pledged support to Mr. Rose as the
Democratic nominee for . president in
1104.
AMERICA MAY OUST BRITONS,
BOERS ARE FORGING WARFARE
President Roosevelt Orders Investi
gation of Military Camps Said to
be Maintained in Louisiana.
HEAVY LOSS IN BATTLE IN THE TRANSVAAL
While Battle is Waged in South Africa Friends
of Republics' Fighters Bring About Official
Action Aimed to Put English Off
United States Soil.
WASHINGTON. April 5.-In response
to Gov. Heard' a raquesi for a statement
of the law bearing upon the operations
ot the British officers at ChaJmette, Li.,
Becretary Hay has responded, by direc
tion of the president, thai be baa on
a thorough Investigation to be made into
the operations at the camp.
The secretary has recelvi ■■! an opinion
from the attornsy general upon the puic
ly lcg-al aspects of the case, winch ia
on exact lines with tru- policy heretofore
pursued by the department In this mat
ter.
The state department today made public
correspondence that has so far taken
place between the United Stairs govern
ment and the governor of Louisiana, rep
iesenting- the latter*! statement touching
the shipment of live stock and supplies
for the British army in Suuth Africa
from Ohalmette, La.
There are three principal letter*
and a number of appendices. Tue
principal letter Is from the gov
ernor of Louisiana, dated March 29,
touching the conditions at Chalmeti ; a
reply from Secretary Hay, dated April I.
announcing that he had ordered an in
vestigation (which will be made by an
army ofllctr); and a long 1 opinion from
the attorney general on the legal points
involved In the Chulmette shipments.
Gov. Heard's letter has already been
outlined in the press dispatches. He be
gins with a statement that he had re
ceived from the mayor of New Orleans
a copy of a letter from Secretary Hay
calling his attention to a threat of Sam
uel Pearson "to commit a breach, of the
peace in New Orleans," and referring
that letter to the mayor for considera
tion. Mr. Pearson's letter Is one hereto
fore published, dated New Orleans, Feb.
1, and addressed to the president, calling
attention to the condition of affairs at
New Orleans and'Chalmette.
SIutIJV Kntcrs a Denial.
The mayor transmitted this COrreS]
ence to the govt/nor on the ground that
the acts complained o! were permitted In
tin parish of St. Bernard, out of the
Jurisdiction of the. city authorities.
governor imine Jia tely wroti t I B
Nunez, of that parish, Is regand to ih.
matter. The sheriff's reply part of th
governor's letter-is dated St. Bernard,
La., Feb. 28.
The sheriff reported concisely that
mules and horses were being Loaded at
Chuimette for the British govemnn nt,
either directly or Indirectly, but the load-
Ing was done by longshoremen of New
Orleans, Supervised by Kngllshmen, who
might or migi't Dot be officers 'if the
British aimy Certainly there was no
one there In uniform. In conclusion the
sheriff says:
"There is no such thing as a British
prst, with men and soldiers established at
Port Chalmette. So far as the recruiting
of men is concerned, I am sure I can
certify that it is not being done In tha
pari.sh of St. Bernard. As I understand,
the only men taken on the Bhipts •''
muleteers, who are employed in tl:
of New Orleans.
"I have always endeavored to • i
observance to the laws of thl
well as to the laws of the United S
and, tlr-rt-fore, should you Inform me that
said shipments are contrary to the
will certainly prevent any further viola
tion of the law."
Governor "Wants Statin* !-"i\<-il.
Gov. Heard says it Is conceded by the
Britibh officers themselves that the ani
mals were for the British army in South.
Africa. He continues:
"The burghers of B :a are mak
ing a fight for their homes and their iu>
eity, which cannot but app< aJ at least to
the sense of fair play of the American
people. As the executive of the common
wealth of Louisiana, whoso people have
always been ardent lovers of these b
I cannot but feel that th
and maintenance of a ba_«e of war sup
plies for the British army upon her
place upon me a grave responsl
These mule 3 and horses shipped from
Port Chalmette, as claimed, are. mdi
sable to the operations of the British
army. Hence they must be coj
contraband of war, ■ value man
arms or soldiers that England ci
easily furnish fr<m within her own bor.
ders."
Th 2 governor says it la hia optaJon ti'.at
it is the function of the- national govern-
merit, and not of the state, to enforce
obedience to the neutrality laws; ■
such <!ut\- belongH to the state where the
violation occurs, he would not hesitate to
act as the law may warrant, and ho call.-*
runlliiurd on Seventh l'aife.
Oh Promise Ma
&&& & & &
May Z9th
Coliseum
Pay
j& & & & & M
£et Someone Slse B& Behind Zim*
FIRST 11 ,p fo Qf 3 s
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
PRETORIA, April 4.-The British los=C3
in the engagement in the neighborhood
of i tarts river, in the southwestern ex
tremity of the Transvaal, March 31. we're
three officers and twenty-four men killed
and sixteen officers and 131 men wounded.
The Boers admit that they lost 137 men
killer or wounded. The action occurred
at Doornbalt farm, a few miles soutn
of the scene of Gen. Delarey's defeat of
Gen. Methuen.
The Boers, who were commanded i'y
Gens. Kemp and Potgller, attacked with
great determination, out the Canadian
contingent, which was the last to arrive
In Soutu Africa, from Canada, and two
squadrons of Yeomanry, under Col. Cook
son, and the artillery and mounted rifles,
under Col. Keir, presented such a stout
front that the burghers were finally
forced to retreat. The casualty list shown
that of the Second Canadian mounted
rifles four officers were wounded, nine
men killed and forty men wounded.
Praise for the Canadians.
LONDON, April The gallantry or the
Canadian troops at the engagement with
the Boers near Harts river, Southwestern
Transvaal, . arch 31, attracts unstinted
praise from the British press. 'i..c com
ments form a striking contrast to the re
cently printed notification that the atten
tion of Lord Roberts, the commander la
chief, had been drawn to various oases
whero colonials who had been awarded
commissions were treated as interiors by
the regular otlioer.s and otherwl.se nu'Ja
to feel that they were only members of
tho mess by sufferance.
Lord Roberta, It vvas'semi-onkinlly an
nounced, was making an Investigation,
; ami, intended to inflict the most serious
penalties on any British officers found
guilty of such conduct. Privately, and la
letters to the press many colonial oitl»
| cers have frequently complained that
"they are good enough at the front, but
arc not wanted at a Capo Town hotel o?
in a London drawing room."
The South African casualty »jst thla
evening shows losses sustain'd by th»
Second dragoon gjards. In their .sharp
rear-guard action with the Boers, near
Boschman's Kop, during the evening of
March 31, were sever*-. Two ofllci rs w<tb
killed and live wore wounded, atrl eigh
teen men were killed and fifty-eight were
wounded.
INDIANS ARE STARVING
'rn<)isA\nsi of ri«\s AND >i\hi_
copas without I'uon oh \\ \ii:it
S*j:::iiiic Spreads Over Entire *i:i:-a-
ton Kent r»aii«.n, mill L'iilcm Re
lief Cornea Mortality Will
lie <ir«j!l.
vation are suffering From faml
it allowed to continue, is
suit 1]
and llarlcopa tril
Agent Hadley is I tem
pi i ary relief fox Ihe Indiana and to
that petitions be Bent to co i -i^ing
the Washington authorities to p
. to ay rt th
Ranchers above the reservation aro
abandoning their ranches and their cat
tle are dying by scores for lack of food.
Relief haa been sent from here and the
desired petitloi are goingl forward to
"Washington.
ASK TO HEAR ROOSEVELT
I'HF.SiDKVr INVITED TO M»ii
simi'.v SCHOOL < o\\ i;\ i i!»\.
DBNVEB CoL. April
E
to be hi Id
At a banqu< t oi
city a ■ m VV. N. I
oston, chairman of I
saying th
forth t-. cm
the invitation and the o
&&&&&&
3I you have not,
is)hy not?
Be among the first
to give
One Pays
Earnings
£}&£}&&&

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