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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, April 08, 1902, Image 1

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VOL. XXV.-NO. 98.
CUBAN BILL IN
THE BALANCE
DEMOCRATS INTRODUCE A SEW
ELEMENT OF DOUBT' BY CALL
IXC* A CAUCUS
HItTT OF A BIG COMBINATION
Many Unite With the Republicans
Who Oppose Reciprocity and
Bring: Defeat to Proposed
-2O Per Cent Tariff.
FRIENDS OF MEASURE HOPE
WASHINGTON, April 7. — Representa
tive Hay (Va.), chairman of the Demo
cratic caucus, today issued a call for a
conference of Democratic members on the
subject of Cuban reciprocity at 8 o'clock
tomorrow night. The call followed a pe
tition signed by more than twenty-five
Democratic member?, requesting the con
■ . The move caused some agitation
on both sides of the chamber in connec
tion with the opening of the debate on
i:u Cuban bill tomorrow, as it was
thought to introduce a new element of
doubt as to the iinal vote on that meas
ure.
To Concentrate Minority.
The movement for a conference was
understood to have been initiated by
those opposed to the bill with a view to
concentrating the minority opposition. It
w..s conceded by the supporters of the
Payne bill that a combination between
the minority and the Republicans who
oppose reciprocity would make the final
ijsno doubtful. Representative Watson
find.), v. ho is acting as the Republican
"whip" on the Cuban bill, expressed con
fldence that the bill will pass.
Among the "trills passed was one to
amend an act for the relief and the
civilization of the Chippewa Indians in
Minnesota.
HAD MILLIONS; IS BROKE
HENRY V. Ll< AS TAKES BASIC
HUT LAW MS CHICAGO
Waa Left $2,000,000 by His Father
Twenty Years A«o —His" Parent
St. Louis Money King at
Time of Ilia Death*
CHICAGO, April 7.—Henry V. Luras
was one of the 164 bankrupts tor whom
th(- United States district court wiped out
of f40,000 in debts. The schedule filed by
the ii< titioner contained no assets and
showed that In ISB3 Mr. Lucas fel! heir to
$2,000,000 as his portion of a $9,000,000 es
tate I< fl !»*■ his J'ather. Twenty years ago
Judge Lucas, .the petitioner's father, was
reckoned the wealthiest man west of the
Allcghenies. He was a money king in
St. Louis, where a street is named in his
he, nor.
Among other ventures, the son is soid to
have lost $300,090 by the failure of a barge
line which he started between St. Louis
and New Orleans. Later he came to
Chicago to work for a living.
DRiSGOLL AN INSOLVENT
FORMES ST. PAUL MAN FAILS FOR
NEARLY .SIOO,OOO.
Special to The (.I.>!.♦-.
CHICAGO, April 7.—Confession of in-
BOlvency was made in the United States
coll, a we!l known newspaper man, for
merly holding stock in the Pioneer Press
ol St. Paul, Minn. His debts are placed
at (96,100,
The National German-American flank
of St. Paul holds a claim for f3i,360, and
other banks of the same city are smaller
creditors.
RIOTING IN JAMAICA
MANY ARE INJURED IN FIERCE
FIGHT WITH POLICE.
KINGSTON, Jamaica, April 7.—There
has been rioting at Montego bay since
last Saturday owing to arrests made by
the police. On Sunday night there was
a severe light between police and rioters,
and many on both sides were severely
wounded. Troops have been disoatched
from Kingston to the scene of the dis
turbance.
Advices received here this afternoon
show that tna rioting is still proceeding-
Acting Oov. Oliver and the general com
manding the troops have arrived at the
scene, and the cruiser Tribune sailed
this morning to land men at Montego
During the fighting of yesterday one
man was killed and a police officer was
disemboweled.
The increased taxation and an unwistf
arrest were the cause of the trouble The
situation is critical, but the authorities
hope to quell the rising at an early date
BLANCHEWALSK DUCKED
FALLS TWELVE FEET INTO THE
WATER AT NSW WHATCOM.
Special to The Globe.
NEW WHATCOM, Wash., April 7.—
Miss Blanche Walsh, the actress, met
vith a mishap here last night that will
t;mse her much discomfort for several
days. She, with a party of friends, was
walking to her hotel from the theater
In passing along the water front Miss
Walsh made a misstep and fell a dis
lance of twelve feet into the water, be
fore her companions were able to assist
lur. A boat nappened to be nearby, and
with this she was quickly rescued" after
bavtng sustained no more serious injury
than paiaful bruises and a thorough
di enchinjj.
BUTTON WAS EXPENSIVE
COSTS A TRAVELING MAN $75 TO
HAVE O.\E SEWED OX HIS COAT.
Special to The Globe.
LOUISVILLE, April 7.—A button off his
coat cost F. E. Briggs, a traveling man,
just $75 and much of his trust in human
nature. fie was found by the police
today wandering along Greene street in
a dazed condition.
He said he was passing a house when
a woman called attention to the defect
in his dross and offered to sew on a but
ton. H e accepted the offer, entered the
place, and that is the last he can re
member. -When he regained conscious
ness tie found that J75 had been tak«n
from his pockets.
fbe St faul % lobe
* V—^
DAY'S NEWS SUMMARIZED
~ 1
Weather Forecast for St. Paul and Vi
cinity—Fair and warmer on Tuesday;
Wednesday showers and cooler; fresh
south winds.
WASHINGTON—
House passes a drastic Chinese exclu
sion bill.
President Roosevelt leaves Washington
for the Charleston exposition.
Senate committee on Philippine affairs
resumes the archipelago investigation.
Senator Depew indignant because his
name was mentioned in the Christmas
scandal. \
Senators Nelson and Clapp thought to
have agreed on C. C. Haupt, of Fergus
Falls, for United States district attorney.
Attorney General Stratton, of Washing
ton, files papers in case against Northern
Securities company in supreme court.
Doubt thrown over the Cuban /.0 per cent
tariff measure by the calling of a caucus
by Democrats.
POLITICAL—
Congressman Heatwole will probably
manage the anti-Van Sant campaign.
Mayor Johnson is defeated at Fargo by
W. D. Sweet by 58 majority.
Cincinnati goes Republican and Cleve
land Democratic.
Democratic landslide at Yanitton, S. D.
Democrats carry Butte and Anaconda,
while Republicans carry Helena.
LOCAL—
Bids for electric lighting 1 plant for con
tagious ward of city hospital rejcc^tii.
State dairy and food department fight
ing to prevent importation of borax meat.
Arrangements have been completed to
extend Concord street car line to South
St. Paul this year.
Over 7,000 wage earners are participat
ing in the coliseum movement.
Rev. Dennis Sullivan, of Jesseland, Sib
ley county, ordered to come before court
in bankruptcy proceedings.
Secretary Randall addresses Chamber
of Commerce on subject of state fair.
Congregation of Central Presbyterian
church accepts Dr. A. B. Meldrums res
ignation.
Differences of opinion in faculty of
state agricultural school may cause Prin
cipal Tucker to resign.
Central high school debaters may pro
test decision of Le Sueur judges.
Citizens of St. Peter will not permit
hospital controversy to be dropped.
Board of public works praecicj.ll>' de
cides to abandon widening of Sibley
street.
Omaha road will build two-story freight
house at cost of $60,000.
Park board revives project for chain of
driveways connecting Twin Cities.
Elevator companies receive encouraging:
reports on Northwestern crop conditions.
llennepin county bar will work for non
partisan judiciary.
Minneapolis presbytery holds its annual
session.
Tonawandg, man finds brother's remains
in university dissecting rooms.
DOMESTIC—
Felix Adler regards Booker T. Washing
ton as a greater man than the late Cecil
Rhodes.
Henry V. Lucas, a few years ago worth
$2,000,000, takes the bankrupt law in Chi
cago.
Three men reported killed in a wreck
on the Chicago Great Western at Rein
beck, lowa.
United Mineworkers, at Dubois, Pa., re
ject the agreement reached at Indian
apolis and the strike continues.
Commander EU Torrance, of the G. A.
R. at Hot Springs, S. D., inspecting site
for a branch national soldiers' home.
Frederick Driscoll, formerly of St. Paul,
and well known here, is an insolvent la
Chicago.
Blanche Walsh falls twelve feet into
the water at New Whatcom, Wash.
FOREIGN—
Representatives of Russia and China
will sign Manchurian convention papers
today.
Premier Kuyper. of Netherlands, thinks
United States and Great Britain had
entered into an agreement as to the
Spanish and South African wars.
Shah of Persia will visit the emperor
of Germany in May.
John Wanamaker surprises Emperor
AViiliam by his .frank, familiar taiK.
Bl SINESS—
Condition of winter wheat crop is a
puzzle to the pit, but despite the con
flicting theories May closes with a %
cent advance.
Rise in stocks on Wall street is check
ed by heavy demands on the money mar
ket and banks' surplus reserve is wiped
out.
SPORTING—
James Whitfield, president of the West
ern league, commits suicide.
The St. Paul team returns to training
quarters at Richmond, Ind.
Outfielder Warner after promising to
return to St. Paul again jumps contract.
Governor of South Carolina will not
allow Jeffries-Fitzsimmons light at
Charleston.
SCHEDULED TO OCCUR TODAY.
Metropolitan—"The Pride of Jennico,"
0.15.
Grand—"Fiddle Dee Dee," 8:15.
Star—Victoria Burlesquers, 2;30 and 8:15.
St. Paul presbytery meets at East Pres
byterian church, 10 a. m.
Special meeting board of aldermen 3
p. m.
Y. M. C. A. athletic entertainment at
the Auditorium, 8 p. m.
NEWS INDEX.
I—Cuban Tariff in Danger.
House Passes Drastic Chinese Bill.
Hint of Anglo-American Pact.
Mayor Johnson Defeated at Fargo.
Roosevelt Goes to Charleston Exposi
tion.
2—Cars to South St. Paul This Year
Sibley Street May Not Be Widened
Probable Protest of Le Suour Debate.
Omaha Road Building Freight Shed
Meldrum's Resignation Accepted.
3—Proposed Branch of Soldier's Home.
4r-Editorial Comment.
At the Theaters.
New York Letter.
s—President Whitfield Kills Himself.
Sporting News of the Day.
6—A Tax on Ingenuity.
Social Gossip.
Day's Short Story.
7—Minneapolis News.
S—Great Northern Railway Appeals.
Popular Wants.
9—ln the Market World.
10—Coliseum Project Booms.
Park Board's Boulevard Scheme.
State Fights Borax Meat
Priest Summoned to Court
Randall Talks on State Fair.
3ttOVEME>TS OJr STEAMSHIPS.
Port. Arrived. Sailed.
Gibraltar ....M. The e<sia.. Aller
New York Cevic.
New York....Vaderland.
Algiers Co^ack.
Portland Dominion.
Plymouth .... Pennsylvania.
Halifax Oorinthi^i.
Cherbourg ... Moltke.
Hongkong ... Olympia.
Antwerp Haverford.
Hiogo Tang Tsze.'
Bremerhavea Caesel.
TUESDAY MORNING. APrii, g, 1902. — TEN PAGES.
PASS DRASTIC
CHINESE BILL
REPRESENTATIVES ADOPT MEAS
URE WHICH EXCLUDES EVEN
MIXED BLOOD ORIENTALS
INCLUDES THE PHILIPPINES
Flovrery Kingdom Laborers in the
Colonial Possessions Are For
bidden by Its Terms to
Come Into This Country.
SNAP JUDGMENT AS TO BANKS
WASHINGTON, April 7.—The house to
day pass-d the Chinese exclusion bill af
ter incorporating in it several amend
mciiiii -.viiich increased tiie drastic char
acter of the measure. The princ.T>al one
not only excludes Chinese by birth and
descent, but all Chinese of mixsd blood.
The chief struggle was over an amend
ment to prohibit the employment of Chi
nese sailors on American ships. An
amendment covering this proposition was
at first ruled cut on a point of order, but
subsequently was modified to evade the
ruling and was adopted—loo to 74.
Extended to Philippines.
As passed the bill practically re-enacts
all the exclusion laws and incorporates
with them the existing treaty regulations.
It extends these exclusion laws to Uie
Philippines and the otner possessions of
the United States, and forbids Chinese
laborers in our colonial possessions com
ing into this country. The Philippine
commission, by the terms of the bill, is
directed to adopt proper measures for
the enforcement of the provisions of the
bill in the Philippines.
The conference report on the war rev
enue tax repeal was adopted and the bill
sent to the White house.
Bank Charters Extended.
Late in the afternoon Mr. Fowler (N. J.)
moved to pass, under suspension of the y
rules, the senate bill to extend the char- i
UNCLE SAM-'l THINK I'VE DESIGNED A BUNCH OF TIIOUBLE FOR MYSELF/
ters of national banks for twenty years.
The Democrats were taken completely by
surprise. As it was after the usual hour
for adjournment the attendance was slim.
The Democrats attempted to filibuster,
but a call of the house finally secured a
quorum and the bill was passed.
Bnctetshon Tax Remains.
Considerable time was 'consumed by
the senate in a discussion of the confer
ence report on the bill to reduce war
revenue taxes. As passed by tire senate
the tax en transactions in so-called
bucketshops was retained. The con
ferees struck out that provision, it be
ing explained that the house would not
consent to its retention. Mr. Berry, of
Arkansas; Mr. Bacon, of Georgia, and
Mr. Pettus, of Alabama, insisted that
the senate suould demand the retention
of the tax. Mr. Alclrich, of Rhode
Island; Mr. Allison, of lowa, and Mr.
Spooner, of Wisconsin, while they were
in favor of the tax, explained that it
could not be retained without endanger
ing the entire measure. The conference
report finally was adopted, 36 to 20.
BIG STEAMER AGROUND
STRIKES ROCKY REEF DIKING
S\OW STORM ON SUPERIOR.
CHEBOYGAN,: Mich., April The
steel trust steamer Charles P. Van Hlse,
from Duluth. to South Chicago, ore-laden,
ran hard aground during a snowstorm on
the northeast end of Bois Blanc, about
two miles from the life-saving station."
She is on a rocky bottom, and is "leaking.
The captain was -brought here by the
crew of the life-saving station, and will
take the Favorite and men arid go to the
assistance of the Van Hise, .
FLOUR GOES AT $3 A FOOTD.
Extreme Prices for Provisions in
the Thunder Mountain Country. ~
SPOKANE. Wash., April 7.—Flour, su
gar ■ and: salt are selling at $3 a pound in
the newly .discovered Idaho i. gold fields
of Thunder mountain. There are now be
t-ween 800 and : 1,000 men ■in the camp, - and'
others" are coming in at the rate of fifty
per day. : ---:■■/■■;■.: -;_: „,. ;-* : ::. -.;.'-,.., ': *"---. ■.", :. ■:..■'•;;
Sixty mites of the journey niust be
made on snowshoes. though snow'isrrrjm
three to fourteen feet.de .p. -
SHIP IS BURNED AT SEA
SCHOONER CARRYING CHEW OF
SHIP FRANKISTAN AT 'FRISCO.
- SAN FRANCISCO, April 7.—The schoon
er H. C. Wright, from Hawaii for this
port, is just outside the harbor. She has
on board the crew of the British ship
Frankistan, from Newcastle, N. S. W.,
for this port, with coal. The Frankistan
was burned at sea. Particulars crnnot
be * obtained until the Wright comes to
anchor within the harbor.
1 _
FARGO HITS JOHNSON
MAN WHO HAS BEEN FOUR. TIMES
MAYOR IS DEFEATED BY
W. D. SWEET
DEN.KIE WINS AT GRAND FORKS
Cleveland Democrats Prove Victors,
While Renblicans Are Ahead at
Cincinnati—Workingmen
Win at Hartford.
Special to The Globe.
FARGO, N. D., April 7.—The unexpect
ed happened in the municipal election
here today, and Mayor Johnson v.as W
feated by W. D. Sweet, a wholesale har
ness manufacturer. Sweet won by 75
njajority. The fight was a throj-cor
nered one, and Dr. Thams, Socialist can
didate, polled a light vote, largely from
Johnson's stronghold, sufficient to cause
the mayor's defeat.
Mayor Johnson has served rour terms,
three of them consecutively. Sweet has
been a member Of the council a number
of years, and is thoroughly familiar with
municipal affairs. He has tight of the
twelve councilmen, and probably two
more will vote with the administration.
Viewed politically election was more
of a surprise than is apparent on the lace
of it. as Sweet's candi'ddfcey was backed
by the John Haggart faction in local
politics. For the last two elections the
Kennedy crowd has predominated and
Haggart has been compelled to suffer de-
feat. He Is apparently in the saddle
again and his supporters say lie is stt'orig
er than ever. The Kennedy crowd iis
serts this election was not on party lines,
and they will be able to control the Re
publican county and state conventions.
Fight on fur Assessor.
There has been conpi U-rable discussion
about the appointees of the Sweot ad
ministration. The chiei light on the John
son administration was made for tne
city assessorship, but it is not announced
who will be named for that place. It is
generally understood that ' Frank Regan,
a veteran of the Philippine service, will
be chief of police, and J. E. Hyde, re
cently cashier of the lied River bank,
city auditor, with A. M. Carter as city
engineer, vice S. F. Crabtia, . There will
be a general shake-up of the police force,
and many of the old patrolmen will be
thrown out. The closest race was for
police magistrate between Col. Cleary and
Attorney Martin Ryan. The official count
showed Gearey won by a majority of
three. This is his fourth term.
CHOSEX MAYOR FOtRTH Tmt:.
John Dinnie Again \nmed as Chief
at Grand Ferka.
Special to The Globe.
GRAND FORKS, N. D., April 7.—ln
the city election here today John Dinnie,
Republican, was elected to a fourth term
as mayor by a plurality of K'7 over Dr.
H. M. Wheeler. Brynjtfson, the Demo
cratic candidate, received 257 VDtes. The
enly change in the board of aldermen was
the election of "Willis A. Joy to succeed
George B. Clifford, and M. H. Redich to
succeed Henry Gotzian.
Thera were 1,400 votes cast, which is
the largest in the history of the city.
The Dinnie people are jubilant, as the
campaign was a close one.
Special to The Globe.
BISMARCK, $. D., April 7.—Today's
city election involved only the choice of
four aldermen, oae from each ward of
the city. The city administration was, in
dorsed 6y the election of its candidates
ir. the First, Second and Third wards, M.
P. Slattery, 11. L. Read and J. P. Jackson
being named. In the fourth warl G. W.
Beaver was put up as candidate against
former Mayor Patterson as candidate for
Continued on Third Pave,
HINTS AT PAGT
WITH BRITAIN
DR. KUYPER THINKS UNITED
STATES HAD AN UNDERSTANDING
WITH CHAMBERLAIN
SEES SIGNS OF A BARTER
Thinks Price of Non-intervention in
South Africa Was an Assurance
of English Aid During
«-, . " the Spanish War.
EOERS TO RESIST TEN YEARS
Special Cable to The Globe.
BERLIN, April 7.—Dr. Kuyper, pre
mier of the Netherlands, before leaving
this city today, frankly suggested that
assurances of British support during the
Spanish war were the price, of America's
ron-intervention in South Africa. The
Dutch minister associates the visit paid
to the United States by Mr. Chamberlain,
British colonial secretary, before the out
break of hostilities with Spain, with the
official attitude of the Washington gov
ernment toward the Boer cause.
"America's position is anomalous," sail
Dr. Kuyper. "The hearts of your people
unquestionably beat in full sympathy
whh the Loers and yet the government
at Washington is immovable. Notwith
standing ministerial assurances that
England foresaw war in South Africa
long before President Kruger ispu. ,; hla
ultimatum, she would never have pro
voked that ultimatum unless fairly cer
tain of international neutrality.
Thinks America Was Assured.
"When the trouble over Cuba came 1
cannot believe that America would have
faced the war that ensued if she had do*
been assured that the navies of Europe
would be kept at bay while she proceed
ed to riddle the decrepit fleets of Spain.
Mr. Chamberlain's family ties may have
taken him to the United States at a time
when both nations- contemplated war,
but perhaps they were not so urgent as
to prevent the transaction of official busi
ness at the same time.
"I do not mean to say that Mr. Cham
berlain gave or received assurances on
that occasion, but the question as to
whether he did or did not is both grave
and suggestive in fhe light of recent his
tory. Perhaps the Russian occupation of
Port. Arthur passed without protest on
the part of Queen Victoria's ministers as
the result of a similar species of barter. '
Denies Peace Proposal*.
While the Dutch premier admits having
on the occasion of hi 3 present visit to
Germany discussed the war in South Af
rica with the kaiser and Baron yon
Richtbofen, he denie3 that his visit ha.s
been connected with peace proposals.
"All sides," he says, "now agree that
intervention would provoke a war too
dreadful to contemplate. The Boers can
continue their present form of resistance
ten years. They will be able to meet on
even terms all the offensive troops Lord
Kitchener can spare as long as they man
age to supply themselves with ammuni
tion, weapons and provisions from the
British convoy.l:."
HETTY GREEN A LARGE LOSER.
Bnildings in Which She Is Part
Owner Burned in Chicago.
CHICAGO, April 7.-Thirty person*
were driven into the street today by a
fire which destroyed the block of frame
buildings on Cottage Orove avenue be
tween Thirty-ninth street and Oakwood
boulevard. Nine buildings were destroy
ed. Hetty Green Is one of the owners
of these buildings. The total loss is put
at $20,C00.
Six members of the Wrlischke family
and two brothers by the name of Len
nard were cut off on the second floor
of one of the structures by the burn-
Ing of the stairway. They wera prepar
ing to jump when the firemen arrived and
brought them down safely.
MOVEMENT OF GOLD HEAVY.
Kronprinz Wilhelm Will Carry $2,-
500,000 to Paris.
NEW YORK, April 7.—Lazard Freres
will export $1,500,000 gold to Paris on the
steamer Kronprinz Wilhelm sailing to
morrow.
Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co. hay«
engaged $1,000,000 for shipment.
PRICK TWO CBXT9—{ V T E '«'- TS
SHARPEN AX
FOR VAN SANT
COLLINS OR HEATWOLB MAY BE
GUBERNATORIAL CHOICE OP
INSURGENTS
CONFERENCE IN ST. PAUL
Third District Statesman Spends
Busy.. Day in Secret Sessions
With Prominent Anti-Ad
■ ■•■;, ministration Men.
MAY GET TOGETHER TODAY
As the result of a conference which
lasted all day and most of the night yes
terday. Judge Collins or Congressman Joel
Heatwole may enter the lists two wrest
the Republican nomination for governor
from Van Sant.
If Justice Collins will resign his p.laco
m the supreme bench at once and an
!n iiiirt his candidacy the antl-Y&ri r?ant
forces say he can land the nomination in
a v.aik. and with the assistance of Heat
vrole as the head of the state campaign
machine and hold the state safely in the
Republican columns. It" Collins lia.i not
the courage of his ambitions then Heat
woie may carry his anti-Van"Sant senti
ments to the point of abandoning the con
gressional field for a try in the state At
large as a preliminary step to a seat In
the United States senate.
Mr. lleatwole returned yesterday morn
ing from a flying trip to Northfiekl. His
arrival was the signal for the appearance
of a half dozen prominent Third <i
Republicans. In an hour five coi
sicnal districts and the Republican state
executive committee were repres
among the anti-Van Sant men who w re
in evidence. Among them were ''». H.
Pierce. Nortbfield; J. H. Reims, i,e rtueur;
Senator A. Stockton, Faribault; Senator
B. i: Smith. Minneapolis; Senator J. J.
Ryder, East Grand Forks and St. Paul;
Senator Ole Myran, Ada. senior member
of the state executive committee and in
surgent-in-chief in the Van Sant camp;
Albert Berg, Roseau county; J. A. Law
rence, Senator Dickey. C. A. Rasmusson,
Red Wing; Kditor Jaub'ert, Litchtield; '".
Robinson, Mankato; J. Kelly, North.ield,
brother of Repn sentative A. D. Kelly.
Came Prepared for Boainess.
There was a lunch and then a confer
ence behind closed doors. Then there
were more conferences. The supplement
ary talks were between Mr. lleatwole and
the insurgents from points outside of his
congressional district. . In the evening th.
Third district men got together again and
from several sources came the mysterious
whisper., "Something doing tomorrow."
Mr. Heatwolo did not go to the length of
entering a denial to the proposition that
the meeting was hostile to Van Sant. Nor
that lie may become a candidate for gov
ernor. He contented-ihimself with saying
that he came to St. Paul to confer, as
is his custom, with the people from his
district upon the needs of his congres
sional charge and other business. ]!■ was
also entirely candid in stating that his
opposition to Van Sant is in no degree
abated.
There was no attempt on the part of
any of the Republicans to conceal their
anti-Van Sant .bitterness, but there is
evidently a division of opinion as to the
most desirable method of making their
opposition ..'j the gerttfewan fr*«i V*nona
bear fruit. The Third district men are
for Heatwole for governor in the same
enthusiastic manner, if better concealed,
that they have suported aim for con
gress. - They want to see him in the
United States senate and with him as
a gubernatorial candidate they believe he
can, pay off their score against tne gov
ernor and take the first and deciding step
in his advance on the Clapp entrench
ments.
A second anti-Van Sant faction and
perhaps the most bitter, wants to beat
Van Sar.t with Judge Collins, groomed
by Ileatwole as the head of the cam
paign organization. A third faction is
out to beat Van Sant with cither Col
lins or Ileatwole or anybody. Heatwole
to manage in either case. All are agreed
on the question of placing the manage
ment of the campaign in the hands of
Heatwole. He has demonstrated with the
Third district his ability as an organ
izer and for several years has been out
of joint with the management of the
state tickets.
4 gllliin Him Ihrcp Districts.
State Auditor Dunn, who was th* first
choice of the new Ninth district, I
to have been dropped from the calcula
tions of the slate makers. The up state
men claim Collins can come into i--> con
vention with the solid delegations of the
Sixth. Eighth and Ninth districts and on
the first ballot make a decisive split in
the First district vote. The Instil
in the Fourth and Fifth districts: are not
particular. They will go with the ban !
wagon crowd so it does not get started
toward Van Sant. The men from., me
northern part of the state agree wth tht;
Third and Second district p liticians in
their predictions that Van Sant, if nomi
i. wii 1"- beaten by a plUi
variously estimated at from 20,000 to
The ostensible (.bjeetton of the nun
from the northern half of the state to
Van Sant is based primarily on a f<ar for
the legislative ticket. The fear is not
confined to the upper half of the
though by any means and several prom
inent legislators have announced that
they will not sacrifice themselves as can
didates if Van Sant is nominated. a.
poll of the Republican executive com
mittee shows that four out at seven
m-~-ml>^rs are openly opposed to Van Sant
and their treatment of his early conven
tion scheme is an-indication of almost
Me,y 29th
Coliseum Day
Saturday was a Good Day.
450 Wage Earners were add
ed to the list of those who
have pledged ** * *» *
One D^y's Earnings
anything but confidence or loyalty oc
the part of the committee as a whole.
Last night the situation pending an
agreement upon a candidate and con
certed action depende-d largely upon the
decision of Justice Collins. Th<
ogniiK the patent fact that V
cannot be beaten for the nomination with
a straw man. Someonw must
the field at once. If Justice Colliii
the nerve to quit the bench the mass
of insurgents is ready to give him
choice of its support. If he wil]
into the open, Heatwole can receive Urn
support of practically the same men.
A loans Man's Candidate.
"William Louis Kelly Jr.. Deo
candidate for Judge of
court, is essentially a young m
didate. He is the sort of 3
who will reflect credit on . .
citizens and professional n •
to the municipal bench. Mr. Kelly wafl
r
H-*^al I
"*VIM.I\M LOUIS Xl I iv Jit.
born in St. Paul thil
and has practi ■« d [am li
thirteen years.
He is the Bon of J
Kelly, and mem!
lie is especial]; qua Ifted for the b<
He began the practice
father's Office. Later lie went With
O'Brien, Eller & O'Brien, a
quently opened an Independent
where he has attracted an Important ami
conserative clientele
Indorsements in Bad I'orni.
The Roosevelt Rough Riders clul
night organized forces for the stern busi
ness of the campaign. It is now r<
to march, shout and vete •'<•! lit. !:■
lican ticket to the very limit <<■ .i
--tty.
The Rooscvcltar.s first dash
arena of grown up politics BinM its ill
starred sortie in the primary campaign
was made last night at the Mercl
hotel. The policy of Indorsing candid
a la Van Sant was decried, oftlci
ed and the marching services ol
ganization placed at the dlsposi I
c< iitral commits c
The following offlcen ■
President, Ij. Corning; vl
C. 1> Bentlcy; secretary and •■■
C. Cat heart Muxficld. The
committee includes Frank Haskell, VVH
liam Klein, K. Kemkamp, C. 8 I 1
George W. Lio.Ms, fVUUani I
G. Holyoke, J. «'. !■ • \
of the marchitiK cl ib, Oeorg< I
stayer. Capt. Booh its ■
his men to repprt at the artnorj I
night for drill.
The famous indorsement of <•
Rant came up with a protest. '
thirty-four young men pre» i lio
believed it bad policy on the paj
club. Phe by-lawa could nut i •
ed without formal notice, and :
ing ultimately decided that th<
mtnt of the candidati
at the indorsing \s
To show beyond question ti
robust institution, the club h
that its cv. -rr lll l it T - c -
upon the executive < omnll ti i
city and cotmty organization t"
upon the club's part in lhe cam
programme. That poll
tire satisfaction, it v,,; gj
to which all the. candidates Will
vited.
WRECK ON GREAT WESTERN.
Three Men Reported Killed in
SmiiKli-i i» nt Iteinbeclf, limiji.
DE3 MOINEB, lowa, April 7.—Three
men are reported killed and others in
jured in a wreck on the Chicago Great
Western at Reinbeck, lowa.
The Great West< m train
St. aPul said at 2:16 this •
had been no wreck on the road during tba
niglit.
SHAH WILL VISIT KAISER.
AVill ray His Respects <«» German
Banperox in May.
BERLIN, April 7 Offld I
rt thai th<
will : :
i peror WHUa n
is going t,i Contrexville, K>
B< rlta whi
c< ptable to hia maj* I
T. V. POWDERLY QUITS OFFICE.
F. I*. Sar««-"t Siii-iMMtl.s Him r.« out-
miKMiuiM-r of limiiiu ru(ifi<>.
WASHINGTON, D. C. A-, ril 7.—Tho
resignation of Tenence V r. Pdwderly a.-*
commissioner general of immigration has
been placed in the hands of the president.
Mr. Powderlj is to be succeeded in of
fice by Frank P. Sargent, but as tha
latter does not expect to take bold fir
more than a month, the present commis
sioner's resignation probably will not bo
accepted until that date.

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