OCR Interpretation


The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, August 30, 1902, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1902-08-30/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

VOL. XXV.—NO. 242.
JOINS THE
DEMOCRACY
Wm. N. Whitely, the Ohio
Keaper King, Deserts
Eepublican Party
PROTEST AGAINST TARIFF
"•"his It Is, He Declares, That Fosters
Trusts and Saps the Vitals
of the People
HIS CHANGE OF FRONT
CREATES A SENSATION
*The Democrats Must Stick to the
Tariff if They Expect to Win," Says
Mr. Whitely—Thousands of Repub
licans Going Over to the Ranks ot
the Democrats.
Special to The Globe.
SPRINGFIELD, Ohio, Aug. 29.—Wil
liam N. Whitely, the well known man
ufacturer of reapers In this city and
always a stanch Republican in the
past, has just announced that he has
deserted the Republican party and will
hereafter vote the Democratic ticket.
This remarkable change of political
faith Mr. Whitely attributes to the
conviction that it is the tariff that has
fostered trusts in the past and that
It will continue to sap the vitals of the
people so long as it is retained in
force.
"The Democrats must stick to the
tariff issue if they expect to win,"
Baid Mr. Whitely today. "They can
win if they will not be so very diffuse
In their issues as they have been in
the past. The people are getting tired
of being dominated by trusts, and
thousands of Republicans are going
over to the ranks of the Democrats."
Mr. Whitely's conversion to the
Democratic party, or rather his deser
tion of the Republican party, Whs pro
duced a genuine sensation here, where
he employs about 3,000 men in his
great works.
BRITISH OPPOSE
MIXED MARRIAGES
to Prevent Alliances Between
Boers and Britons in couth
Africa.
Special Cable to The Globe.
THE HAGUE, Aug. 29.—Considera
ble indignation is expressed here over
the report that the British, being de
termined to crush Dutch influence in
every possible way in South Africa,
are discouraging matrimony between
Boers and Britons. The story goes
that fifty English women, who desired
to avail themselves of Mr. Chamber
lain's emigration scheme, have been
rejected because they admitted that
they were Boer sympathizers and stat
ed that if they married in South Af
rica they would wed Dutchmen.
It is also stated that Sir John Ar
dagh, one of the royal commissioners
just sent oui to South Africa, advised
the government to oppose mixed mar
riage", wherever they could be done,
as the children of such unions would
be trained in Boer ideas.
Gens. Botha, Delarey and Dewet will
continue their efforts in Great Britain
to inducing the government to make
compensation for the homes, farms,
cattle and other property belonging to
the Boers destroyed during the war,
but will make no appeal for public do
nations In aid of their people.
CERTIFICATES OF ORIGIN
ON GRAIN FROM AMERICA
German Customs Authorities Will Re
quire Them Hereafter.
HAMBURG, Aug. 29.—The Ham
burg customs authorities will here
after require certificates of origin in
the case of grain dispatched from New
York, Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore,
Buffalo. Newport News, Cleveland,
Chicago, Milwaukee, Duluth, Montreal,
Quebec, Portland, Toronto and Mani
toba. Cargoes already afloat are ex
empt.
St. Paul on Seven Hills
ENTERTAINING story in the Sunday Globe of
how the Capital of Minnesota was founded and
how it narrowly escaped being called Rome. To
morrow's paper will also contain a feature story of the
State Fair, another on the Department of Dakota and
a dozen others on timely topics, including the letters of
George Ade and Mr. Dooley
And every item of news of interest from Nome to
Van Dieman's Land * * * w *
W¥ £t frttl §kbt
DAY'S NEWS SUMMARIZED
Weather for St. Paul and vicinity:
Rains today and Sunday.
POLITICAL—
Leonard A. Rosing sounds keynote of
campaign at great Democratic mass meet
ing in Minneapolis.
President of the civil service commis
sion tells what part employes of the gov
ernment may take in politics legally.
William N. Whitely, the Ohio reaper
king, deserts the Republican party and
joins the Democrats because of trusts.
DOMESTIC—
Chicago messenger girl, with fist and
hatpin, bests a gang of striking messenger
boys who attack her.
President Roosevelt goes hunting in
New Hampshire and bags a bear.
Half brother of Bartholin, the alleged
murderer in Chicago, says the family be
longed to the Danish nobility and the
father was a suicide.
Nearly 2,000 iron and steel workers
strike at Lebanon, Pa., because of refusal
to discharge colored non-union workmen.
Monroe (Mich.) citizens kill a Toledo
man who had planned to elope with a
married woman of the former city.
List of speakers for the National Farm
ers' congress is announced.
One man is killed and another fatally
injured by a cave-in at Whitehall, Wis.
Gen, Gobin orders the soldiers in the
coal region to shoot persons throwing
missiles and use their n mobs
resisting their authority.
FOREIGN—
Jamaicans clamor for annexation to
the United States.
British try to prevent marriages of
Boers and Britons in South Africa.
LOCAL—
Mrs. C. B. Marsh, of Holland, Vt.,
throws herself out of a third-story win
dow.
Insurance commissioner will investigate
the affairs of the Foresters.
Joseph W. Jacques, a machinist, dies
of injuries received in a fight. P. J.
O'Keefe, a watchman, is charged with
the crime.
Wires will be torn out in the metropol
itan district by the authorities.
Returns from seventy-five counties in
dicate that the assessed valuation of the
state for this year will be $630,000,000.
Lightning interferes with business by
putting electric plants out during a storm.
Restaurant men will ask for an injunc
tion against union pickets.
Insurance commissioner declares that
the Order of the North Star is insolvent.
Many policy holders will lose heavily.
Mayor Smith believes that a bureau of
information should be established during
fair week.
Good roads train and equipment arrives
at the state fair grounds.
St. Paul woman claims that Bartholin,
wanted in Chicago on a charge of murder,
made a purchase in her store.
Indictments may be returned against
local railroad officials for alleged violation
of interstate commerce laws.
State fair management has realized $18,
--000 from sale of privileges to sell re
freshments.
Sports committee for Labor day picnic
announces an excellent programme.
MINNEAPOLIS—
Six-year-old girl is kidnaped on Nic
ollet avenue.
Lightning strikes steeple of First Con
gregational church.
SPORTING—
American Association —St. Paul 8 Min
neapolis 2; Louisville 5; Columbus 1; In
dianapolis 5, Toledo 1.
National League—Chicago, 9, Pittsburg
3; Cincinnati 10, St. Louis 1; Boston 4,
Brooklyn 0; Philadelphia 6, New York 2.
American League—St. Louis 7, Balti
more 1; St. Louis 4; Baltimore 2; Cleve
land 4, Washington 2; Boston 6, Detroit 1;
Philadelphia 10, Chicago 6.
Dan Patch, at Providence, paces a
mile in 1:69^, only a quarter of a second
under the world's record.
Jim Crack, of White Bear, becomes the
champion yacht of the B class. The A
class champion is Aderyn.
BUSINESS—
Pears of frost send wheat, oats and
corn up and other bull factors appear in
the market.
Stock market is broader, stronger and
more active.
Trade conditions are reported excellent
everywhere except in the anthracite coun
try.
MOVEMENTS OF STEAMSHIPS.
port. Arrived. Sailed.
Queenstown.. .Merion Belgenland
Rotterdam Potsdam.
Moville Furnessia.
Hamburg Moltke.
Southampton Auguste Vic
toria.
Queenstown Common-
Plymouth Fuerst Bis
marck.
Hongkong Empress of
, , - India.
Auckland Ventura.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT JR.
TO HUNT IN THE BLACKHILLS
President's Son Seems Following in the
Footsteps of His Sire.
CHICAGO, Aug. 29 .— Theodore
Roosevelt Jr. arrived in this city today
in company with H. R. McCullough,
third vice president of the Chicago &
Northwestern Railway company. The
party went at once to Mr. McCullough'a
home at Lake Forest, where they will
spend tomorrow. Sunday they expect
to leave for a hunting trip in South
Dakota and the Black Hills.
SATURDAY MORNING*, AUGUST 30, 1902.—TEN PAGES.
GIRL USES HER FIST
KNOCKS DOWN AND DRUBS ONE
OF A GANG OF STRIKERS
THAT ATTACKS HER
HOLDS THE OTHERS AT
BAY WITH A HAT PIN
Young Woman, of Chicago, Acting as
a Telegraph Messenger, Proves to
Be "Like a Porcupine, Not Rashly
to Be Touched"—Only Seventeen
Years Old, but Progressive.
Special to The Globe.
CHICAGO, Aug. 29.—1n a struggle
with a crowd of striking messenger
boys who had surrounded and attack
ed her, seventeen-year-old Janette
Bonneau, a messenger girl employed
by the Western Union Telegraph com
pany* knocked one of her tormenters
down with her fist. Then, after giv
ing him a severe drubbing, she' held
him and with a hat pin as her sole
wepon kept his companions at bay un
til the police arrived.
The scene of the struggle was in
front of the Monadnock building, Jack
son boulevard and Dearborn street. A
crowd which gathered cheered the
girl, when, resenting an insult, she
struck out, knocking one of her tor-
Continued on Fourth Page.
LEONARD A. ROSING.
Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Drives Home a Strong Argumentative Point.
DEFEAT FOR REBELS
IN VENEZUELA
They Stubbornly Attack a Town and
Are Driven Off—German
Cruiser Busy.
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Aug. 29.—The
German steamer Poloria, which arrived
here today from Venezuelan ports, re
ports that Friday last, while at Caru
pano, Venezuela, 700 rebels attacked
that place stubbornly, and got inside
the town, where they were met by a
thousand government troops under
Gen. Velutini. Severe fighting, lasting
the whoie day, followed, and ended in
the disorderly retreat of the rebels,
several of tte latter being killed or
wounded.
Bullets repeatedly struck the steam
er, and, the lives of her crew being in
danger, Capt. Hoff, her commander,
communicated with Gen. Velutini and
asked for protection. The general re
plied that the Polaria must clear out,
as she had no right to be there. Her
captain refused to leave the port, and
telegraphed to the German cruiser Ga
zelle, Capt. CrafioroJ, at La Guayara,
asking £or immediate priJtection. The
Gazelle arrived at Carupano Sunday
morning and protected the Polaria,
while the latter proceeded to take in
a cargo. This work was completed on
Monday night, and the Polaria sailed
under the protection of the German
cruiser, which also left Carupano.
The Venezuelan government officials
there were in fear of another and more
serious attack upon the place. Trade
was completely crippled and many
atrocities were reported.
North Dakota Asphalt.
BISMARCK, N. D., Aug. 29.—What
is asserted to be a superior quality of
asphalt has been discovered on lands
of the Cannon Ball River Land com
pany, south of Dickinson. The deposit
resembles coal and is in the vicinity of
a coal vein.
LEONARD A. ROSING SOONDS
KEYNOTE OF STATE CAMPAIGN
Democracy Ratifies Its Nominations and Takes Up Is
sues at Great Mass Meeting in Minneapolis.
ARDOR IS UNDAMPED
STORM FAILS TO AFFECT ENTHU
SIASM OF MINNEAPOLIS
DEMOCRATS
RATIFICATION MEETING
AN UNQUALIFIED SUCCESS
Big Audience Cheers to the Echo Stir
ring Speeches of Mr. Rosing and His
Associates on the State Ticket—War
Taken Into Enemy's Camp by Frank
Larrabee.
Rumbling thunder, threatening skies
and intermittent but vigorous showers
PHICE TWO CENTS—{ Sm^cm™.
last night, held no terrors for Minne
apolis Democrats. Over 2,000 of them,
wet, but enthusiastic, assembled at
Normanna hall, Third street and
Twelfth avenue, to ratify the Demo
cratic state ticket and hear the key
note of the campaign sounded by the
party leader and gubernatorial candi
date, Leonard A. Rosing, of Cannon
Falls.
The showers which began at 5
o'clock and continued at intervals dur
ing half the night would have de
terred any but men enthusiastic in
their support of principles involving the
preservation of the rights of all men,
expounded by a leader, enjoying in the
fullest degree the trust and confidence
of the rank and file of the Democratic
party.
Shower followed shower and just be
fore 8 o'clock the rain came down in
sheets. Between the showers and plod
ding along in the later heavy rain the
citizens of Minneapolis turned out in
surprising numbers to greet their can
didate for governor and his associates
on the Democratic ticket.
Long before 8 o'clock the hall was
fairly filled and when the platform
party arrived the main floor and large
balcony were quickly filled to a com
fortable limit.
RAIN AFFECTED NUMBERS,
BUT NOT THE ENTHUSIASM.
The voters did not have it all to
themselves, either. On the platform
were a dozen ladies and scattered here
and there through the audience were
numbrs of enthusiastic members of
the fair sex. Had the weather been
fair the big hall would not have ac
commodated half the crowd. As it was,
what was lacked in numbers was more
than made up in enthusiasm.
The party of fifty on the platform
included besides Albert G. Leeck, of
Owatumwa, candidate for state audi
tor, Frank Larrabee, Minneapolis, can
didate for attorney general, George P.
Jones, Rock county, candidate for clerk
of the supreme court; Maj. James
Madison Bowler, Minneapolis, can
didate for railroad and warehouse
commissioner, numerous prominent
Minneapolis Democrats. Among them
were Frank N. Stacy and H. A. Saver,
candidates for the house in the Thirty
ninth district; Albert T. Heinrich and
James C. Hayes, candidates for mayor;
Edward Conroy, candidate for sheriff;
Harry A. Lund, Olaf Gylstrom and
Adam Hanna, candidate for city
treasurer.
Among \.he state Democrats were
Chairman H. L. Buck, of the state cen
tral committee, Winona; Secretary H.
T. Tolmie, Spring Valley, and John
Stone Pardee, Red Wing, editor of the
Argxis.
Chairman Elijah Barton, of the
Hennepin county committee, opened
the meeting and introduced F. G. Win
ston as the permanent chairman.
ROSING RECEIVES A
TUMULTUOUS OVATION
The arrival of Mr. Rosing and his
party was signalled to the crowd in the
hall by the strains of martial music'
from a band stationed near the en
trance. The appearance of Mr. Ros
ing at the entrance of the hall was the
signal for the ovation. The party in
cluded Mr. Rosing, on the arm of
Chairman Barton; Mrs. Rosing, es
corted by F. G. Winstrom, and Miss
Anna Ketensky, confidential secretary
to the state committee, with Chairman
H. L. Buck. As the party merged from
under the balcony the cheers became
deafening and were continued until
after the party had taken seats on the
stage.
Maj. J. M. Bowler was the recipient
of another ovation and the various lo
cal candidates were severally given
enthusiastic receptions by their re
spective followers in which all of the
crowd good naturedly joined. Enthusi
asm was in the air. It was contagious
and every man and woman in the big
hall was hopelessly infected.
The arrival of former Gov. John Lind
at 8:40 was the signal for a demon
stration seldom accorded a candidate
for public office. The former governor
entered the rear of the hall just as Mr.
Rosing made some reference to his
administration. Some one called "Here
he is now." The chee>rs which greeted
the popular idol fairly shook the big
building.
APPEARANCE OF GOV. LIND
AGAIN LOOSES ENTHUSIASM.
The deafening din was continued
until after Mr., Lind, escorted by John
Hagman, reached the stage and re
peatedly bowed his acknowledgments.
Again it was taken up and carried
along until the audience seemed fair
ly exhausted by Its paroxysm of en
thusiasm.
Mr. Rosing was the first speaker.
His introduction by F. G. Winston
was characteristic of that sterling
Democrat. Mr. Winston said he had
been called upon not to make a speech,
but to preside at a meeting which
should open the state campaign in
Minneapolis. He said Democratic vic
tory was in the air. The campaign
would be fought out on lines that
could be approved by every man who
believes in the rights of. men as
against the oppressions of organized
capital.
The conclusion of Mr. Rosing's ad
dress marked another scene of en
thusiastic disorder. As he delivered
the stirring: words of his pledge in a
manner that left no room for doubt
of his sincerity, the crowd cheered
again and again. He had made no at
tempt at oratorial flight. It was the
talk of an honest man to men. It rang
true in every sentence. It left not
the slightest chance for doubt or
equivocation on any one of the issues
before the people.
REPUBLICAN CHARGES OF
COWARDICE DISPROVED.
The Republican insinuations that
Mr. Rosing and his associates would
dodge the alleged issues presented by
the opposition were successfully and
forever' silenced. Mr. Rosing presented
issues. He defined his position and the
position of the Democracy on all the
important questions before the peo,
ple. His exposition was concise, but
definite, conclusive. No one who heard
him entertained any doubts touching
Mr. Rosing's position when he had
finished.
The enthusiasm was not exhausted
Continued on Fourth Page. I
GREAT BATTLE IS OM
DEMOCRATIC LEADER OUTLINES
POLICIES PARTY STANDS
FOR
OPPOSITION RECEIVES
SCATHING ARRAIGNMENT
Mr. Rosing Fires Opening Gun in
Struggle for Governmental Control—
Republicans' False Issues Are
Handled Without Gloves—Platform
Pledges Are Fully Reaffirmed.
Mr. Rosing received a tremendous
t>vation. When he stepped forward to
deliver in ringing sentences his ar
raignment of the Republican adminis
trations and to outline the policies for
which the Democracy of Minnesota and
its candidates stand, he was again
greeted with cheer upon cheer.
Mr. Rosing's speech, which consumed
a little more than an hour in its deliv
ery, was a concise exposition of the
conditions which confront the people of
Minnesota and the claim of the Demo
cratic party on their suffrage. He
threw down the gauntlet of challenge
to the Republican party and merciless
ly exposed its administrative and leg
islative attempts to make political cap
ital at the expense of the people. The
railroad merger question he handled
without gloves and called upon the
people not to allow themselves to be
blinded by a false issue raised to cover
a multitude of Republican sins. He
said:
"Under a system of government
where the people choose their own ser
vants and executives of the law which
they themselves have enacted, it has
become customary for the"" candidate
for the chief executive office to for
mally express his viewsfiipon the ques
tions which confront the electorate and
demand settlement in the campaign in
which such candidate comes before the
people to have his views ratified or re
jected.
"On the 25th day of June, the Demo
cratic party of Minnesota, assembled in .
convention, applied Democratic princi
ples to pending questions and took
their stand accordingly. The platform
so adopted I indorsed without reserva
tion and in accepting the nomination I
said that at some future time 1 would
take occasion formally to express my
views more fully upon the various
questions touched upon by that plat
form.
"This is essentially a state campaign.
The questions of immediate interest
and importance are those touching us
as citizens of Minnesota. Nevertheless,
there are questions of national import
which press upon us for consideration
and which will demand our attention in
the congressional campaigns and which •
cannot be separated entirely from the
state contest, because, after all, the
same general principles apply in na
tional and state affairs. While ques
tions may differ in scope and extent,
the principle of equal rights for all and
special privileges to none applies in
state as well as nation and in the ap
plication of this principle electors must
decide upon which side they will take
their stand.
NATION'S LIBERTY MUST
FOLLOW NATION'S FLAG.
"One of the questions of national im
portance which the people must con
sider and decide upon in this campaign
relates to the very foundation princi
ples of our government.
"Shall we continue true to the prin
ciple of self-government? Shall we
continue in the old faith that all just
governments are founded on the con
sent of the governed? Shall we, as
Americans, maintain that wherever the
American flag floats as the emblem of
sovereignty, there it must mean the
same constitutional liberty and the ap
plication of the same governmental
principles which has made this nation
the greatest world power today?
"Greatest, not because of its arma
ments, not because of its magnificent
navy and its heroic army, but greatest
because of its fealty to justice, truth
and liberty; greatest in having devel
oped the highest type of the individual
through assuring liberty in religious
faith, freedom in political action, and
in enforcing personal responsibility
while protecting personal rights.
AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS DE-
VELOP INDIVIDUAL MANHOOf.
"Our institutions have eneourag^
men to think and to apply thuW
thoughts without fear. Americanism
has brought into play brain action, and
American thought today influences the
world. The magnificent success of our
navy and the initiative displayed by
its personnel, from admiral to cabin
boy; the heroism of our army and the
individual capacity shown in meeting
all emergencies, are abundant proof
that under our form of government
there is developed the truest patriot
ism and the highest individual man
hood.
"No American disputes the truth of
these propositions and when separated
from questions involving the details o*f
a particular policy, our Republican
brethren assert them with gusto. Only
a few weeks ago the senior senator
from this state, in illustrating his posi
tion upon a public question, used this
language: 'None of you would like to
be the subject of an absolute mon
arch, no matter how kind and benev
olent.' If such sentiments are cred
itable to us, are they not equally cred
itable to ten millions of people who de
sire the privilege of forming their own
government, suitable to their own con
ditions in life, and the environment
which God has created?
"The Democratic people of this coun
try, they who are thoroughly saturated
with love for the declaration of inde
pendence and our institutions, believe
that people everywhere are entitled to
the same rights and privileges that we
enjoy, and therefore we hold that our
Continued on Third Page.

xml | txt